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PURCHASING POWER East Carolina University 41% Male 59% Female

Represents more than 1/3 of the Greenville community $2.8 billion economic impact on eastern North Carolina

29,000 students Approximately 5,000 new students every year Approximately 4,300 graduates every year

84% in-state residents

6,000 faculty and staff members Average salary $77,898

Approximately 80% living off campus

National College Student Profile

Food: $50 billion Automotive: $31.6 billion Clothing/Shoes: $18.6 billion

Students spend an average of 10.7 hours per day on campus during the week.

Other: $62.8 billion INCOME SOURCE www.reuters.com/article/ idUSnGNX8YFczg+1d8+GNW20140625

ECONOMIC IMPACT SOURCE www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/ ipar/customcf/DL/FB/FactBook14-15.pdf

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East Carolinian The

YOUR CAMPUS NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1925

VOLUME 93, ISSUE 28

Thursday, 4.20.17

BAREFOOT ON THE MALL ECU’s SAB annual event headlined by artist Daya

Lauren Sura TEC STAFF

T

oday East Carolina University’s Student Activities Board will host its annual Barefoot on the Mall. Barefoot is a popular event for students during the spring semester as it brings a fun and relaxing atmosphere to campus before two weeks of final exams. “Barefoot on the Mall brings together the entire campus community for a day of music, games and fun to signify the closing of the academic year,” Alec Fortune, the special events chair on Student Activities Board, said. “It gives ECU a sense of tradition, too, as this is the 38th annual Barefoot.” T h i s y e a r ’s t h e m e i s “Cirque du Barefoot” and will feature entertainment by music artist Daya. “We incorporate different aspects of the events and food to correlate with the theme, and we make sure to bring all kinds of different music and entertainers to help the Barefoot the best event all year long,” Fortune said. Daya is a celebrity pop singer from Pittsburg, Pennsylvania.

ALANA awards set to recognize minority students Blessing Aghimien TEC STAFF

Her f irst single, “Hide Away,” was released in April of 2015 and she has since released EP’s and her debut album “Sit Still, Look Pretty” in 2016, collaborated with a variety of acts such as with The Chainsmokers’ song “Don’t Let Me Down” and played a variety of exclusive events such as the 2016 White House Easter Egg Roll. Daya won a Grammy for Best Dance Recording and a WDM Radio Award for Best Trending Track for “Don’t Let Me Down.” “We bring artists to campus by means of a committee of students that help pick out artists based on criteria like cost, availability and any kind of content restriction,” Fortune said. “That is what most of them enjoy most about SAB, is being able to have a say in the types of music and events that are brought to campus.” The event will take place from 2 to 8 p.m. with Daya’s performance at 7 p.m. There will also be some student organization booths and an outdoor showing of the film Madagascar 3. To contact this writer, email arts@theeastcarolinian.com.

COURTESY OF IHEART.COM

The works and achievements of students of color are being honored by East Carolina University’s Ledonia Wright Cultural Center in the form of an annual awards event, ALANA Recognition Ceremony, taking place today at Hendrix Theater. The LWCC’s annual event takes place every spring and aims to recognize students of color who have attained a minimum GPA of 3.0 or above during their fall semester. The program will also include remarks from Virginia Hardy, ECU’s vice chancellor for Student Affairs. Several nominated students have been looking forward to this awards ceremony, one of those several being freshman fashion merchandising and business administration double major Jessica Harper. As the first member of her immediate family to go to a four-year university, Harper valued her education “more than anything” and said she is “honored” that ECU is a school that offers recognition to students of color for their achievements. “Both of my parents raised my siblings and I to know that the one thing that no one can take away from you is your education and all I want is to make my parents proud once I get my undergraduate degree,” said Harper. “I’m so humbled to receive such recognition, especially being that I attend a predominately white institution. This recognition shows that ECU is a school that doesn’t ignore or bypass the achievements of minority students.” In addition to being an honor roll student, Harper said she is looking > ALANA page A2

Pop singer Daya performs onstage . East Carolina University’s annual event, Barefoot on the Mall, begins at 2 p.m. and Daya will perform at 7 p.m.

The Burgeoning to perform at Barefoot on the Mall Danielle Schmid

FOR THE EAST CAROLINIAN

Philadelphia’s finest, The Burgeoning will perform at this year’s Barefoot on the Mall. It will take center stage Thursday at 3:30 p.m. This band has a unique indie pop sound and is looking forward to performing at East Carolina for the first time. Loud Dreams, its latest EP, was released in October. The upbeat EP contains feel-good songs and has been a success so far, according to lead singer and rhythm guitarist Logan Thierjung. The Burgeoning formed in 2011 and has gained a following since then. The band started with the Thierjung brothers, Logan and Alex. Members Brandon Bradley and Mark Menkevich joined later on. Since starting, the band has matured and developed its own sound. The band’s inspi-

COURTESTY OF THE BURGEONING

The Burgeoning band members perform onstage at a concert. The band will appear on stage at Barefoot on the Mall at 3:30 p.m.

rations are people like Sade and bands like Tame Impala. Where most independent bands lack social media presence, The Burgeoning is the opposite. Its well-managed Tumblr and Twitter sites stay up to date and

have high quality photos, along with entertaining and professional posts. Bradley, the lead drummer, is the main one who runs the band’s Instagram account. The men try to stay in contact with supporters

and keep them up to date through these accounts. “We have a d e c e nt amount of followers; we are very hands on and try to talk to our closest fans just about every day,” said Logan Thierjung.

SPORTS

A8

CLARK continued from A1

PIRATES BREAK HOME RUN RECORD IN DOUBLEHEADER A7

Thierjung picked the name of the band when he heard the word “Burgeoning” in his English class one day. “ The word literally means ‘grow’ and sounds really cool,” he said. This name stuck out

and meant something to him considering the band wants to grow together with its supporters. The Burgeoning wants people to know its music is not your basic boy band, there is a message behind the music. The band currently holds practices in an abandoned house with no heat or bathroom. “Our biggest struggle right now is practice space,” Logan Thierjung said. This is where the band usually writes its songs, jams out and has musical conversations. The members take parts of music it likes and build lyrics around the mood of the song. The band is currently touring the U.S and performing at colleges like Arcadia University and University of Washington. Wh i l e tou r i ng , t he group loves to meet new

acceptance and find his place in life. That void was filled by discovering diving when he joined high school after struggling for a majority of his life trying many different things in order to feel a sense of belonging. In high school, having to constantly lie to his parents about his sexuality caused Clark to struggle in school and diving. He had relationships with other divers throughout high school and sometimes away meets were the only places he could see his boyfriend; he didn’t want those relationships to have to stop, because he couldn’t tell his family he was gay. He decided it was time to tell his brother Brandon. His brother told him that he had suspected, because he knew Clark didn’t express a lot of interest in girls. Eventually, one of his closest friends convinced him to tell his parents the truth. Clark said he simply texted his mom “Uh ... ya ... I’m gay.” Many tense discussions later, his parents sent him to a therapist, who was also Mormon and simply tried to convince Clark that the way he felt about his sexuality was incorrect. Clark said he knew there was no way he could suppress who he was any longer and stopped following the Mormon faith, a decision he said left him without a sense of religion coming into college.

Looking at it from an LGBT perspective there are so many individuals who feel like they have no place in religion... I wanted to express how that’s such a fallacy. Just because someone tells you no, doesn’t mean „ everyone will say no to you... -Alex Clark

Finding a new home Before coming to ECU, he dove in high school but had not really started competing until his junior year because of complications his freshman and sophomore year. Even so, Clark was strongly recruited to ECU where he has had a successful four-year career. He has made honor roll every semester in college, while scoring fourteen points in the USA Invitational as a freshman, competed in the final of all three C-USA championship events as a sophomore, was a NCAA Regional Zone qualifier his junior year, and was a part of the AAC championship teams his junior and senior year. Along with those accomplishments, Clark usually scored a sum of points in almost every dual meet he ever competed in for the Pirates. There is roughly six-to-ten per season, so Clark was a constant deliverer of much appreciated points. Diving allowed Clark to discover who he was and be more confident in expressing himself. The fact that he could gain confidence every day doing something he loved pushed him to open up about his sexuality and accept himself. “It was a really rocky road for a long time, but over time it has gotten better,” Clark said.

Rediscovering faith Clark is the first openly gay male athlete for the Pirates, and is perhaps one of the most interesting men at East Carolina. Being Mormon, made it difficult for him to reconcile his sexuality with his faith, and not being able to talk about it made it worse. Clark eventually opened up to his close friends at ECU, and instead of receiving harsh judgements and cold shoulders, he received supportive gestures from people who cared about him. Not only did Clark find acceptance, he also rediscovered religion, something he lost growing up. “Since I was raised in such a religious household, when I first came to college I was completely put off by religion,” Clark said. “Growing up I was only allowed to go to the Mormon Church, and never in my life been to another church. I had no concept of what religion was really like. Since the aspect I saw it from was so unaccepting of me and really pushed me away, I thought everything would be like that.” One day one of his teammates asked Clark

TOP: COURTESY OF ECU MEDIA RELATIONS BOTTOM:MICHAEL SEEGARS I THE EAST CAROLINIAN

Top: Clark dives in an event. Bottom: Clark looks at two different jackets while going through clothes.

if he wanted to attend a Baptist church with her, and even though he wanted nothing to do with religion he didn’t want to turn her down. That day changed his life. “From the minute I had walked into the church with her I was overcome with this feeling that I had never had before,” Clark said. “The sermon that day was all about love and acceptance and how Christ loves everyone and accepts everyone. It was so empowering because I had never heard that before.” Clark began attending the Baptist church more often and eventually led to him being the co-president of the Baptist Ministry group on campus. Diving not only opened up a way for Clark to express who he was but led him down a path that helped him understand how he fit in the eyes of God; one of the biggest factors in him being able to be so open about who he is today. “Looking at it from an LGBT perspective there are so many individuals who feel like they have no place in religion,” Clark said. “I wanted to express how that’s such a fallacy. Just because someone tells you no, doesn’t mean everyone will say no to you.”

and has always been handy and crafty like that; it was the first time my dad and I had really bonded over something.” Clark said. “He would always take us to housing sites that the contractors were using that his company had made. I always loved walking through houses when I was younger and that’s why when I first came to ECU I was a contracting major but then quickly realized I did not want to major in that.” Clark said the self-freedom he gained from attending church allowed him to find a new major that better fit with his passions. He originally picked contracting because it would allow him to find a closer relationship with his father, but after all the changes he had made for himself throughout his life he decided to branch out again. After three more failed major attempts in architecture, hospitality, and business he found a love for fashion merchandising. “In the very first class I ever took, Principles of Merchandising 1135, very first day just talking about the syllabus I was just like ‘this is for me.’” Now, as he finishes up his major after interning at Serendipity where he designed a successful Christmas window display, Clark will be taking an internship this summer in New York City at the largest Macy’s in the nation. Clark applied for a scholarship opportunity that would take him to a retail show in the big apple, provided to him by a professor,

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A passion for fashion Clark initially came to ECU as a contracting major, but it didn’t last long. “I know my dad’s true passion was building and carpentry, He loves to build anything

which allowed him to upload resumes and obtain interviews from four different stores: Belk, Home Shopping Network, Walgreens, and Macy’s. Clark ended up getting a job offer from all of them; something unheard of in this type of recruiting process. “I ended up choosing Macy’s because it was the only one in New York City,” Clark said. “I really felt it would be the best opportunity for me. The networking opportunities alone, the people I could meet, the connections I could make, plus when would I have this opportunity in my life to just pick up to move to New York?” With hopes for coming back to ECU next fall for graduate school, the eight-week position fell right into place for Clark. “I actually graduated high school with a girl who interned there last summer and she had gone to Indiana University and at the end of the internship they offered her a full-time job. So I thought that would be a really good option for me to explore,” Clark said.

Tackling advocacy Being the first openly gay male athlete, Clark wants to be an advocate for people who are afraid to come out and for those who feel like they don’t belong in anything that they do. “It doesn’t matter who you are or what you’ve done, there’s always a place for you,” Clark said. He said he also wants to change people’s preconceived ideas about being gay, and to create an inclusive atmosphere. “Even my freshman year, I had several teammates come up to me and say ‘You know before I met you I didn’t think that being gay was right’ or would say things like ‘I didn’t accept gay people until I met you but you’ve totally changed my outlook on it and I really respect you’,” Clark said. “I feel like if I made that change with those people, it’ll say so much to other athletes as well.” Over the time he has been an athlete here he said he knows he’s been able to open many eyes of other athletes who have not come out and expressed their sexuality to the Pirate community yet. Clark strongly believes that coming out is an opportunity that shouldn’t be taken lightly and said he hopes it will inspire other people and athletes as well, even though it is certainly not easy. “If I take this opportunity to be a successful athlete and also be proud of who I am then it’ll help other people to be able to do the same,” Clark said. For Clark, the bottom line is all people should be proud of who they are. “My advice to everybody who might be struggling with the same thing is to give people an opportunity. I think you would be surprised with how accepting a lot of people around them would actually be,” Clark said. “One of the biggest fears is how many people would turn their backs on me but when I actually did I was astonished at how few turned their back on me. So my advice would be, be true to yourself and who you are. You put forth the love that you will most likely receive.” Even though Clark came out before diving in his first meet at ECU, he feels he could’ve fit in anywhere. But Clark said he doesn’t think he would have had the opportunity to make such a big impact on his teammates or his community at a bigger university. “At a lot of other universities I felt that I would have been just a number on a team or a name on a roster,” Clark said. “But when I came here I really felt like the immediate effects of me being here would be seen. I wouldn’t just be a number on a list or a name on a roster; I really felt like I would be Alex Clark, diver for East Carolina.”

NEWS

A2

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Board of Trustees to hold April meeting

T E C S TA F F

COURTESTY OF THE BURGEONING

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS If you feel there are any factual errors in this newspaper, please contact Seth Gulledge at editor@theeastcarolinian.com.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Emily Harvey

ECU Interfaith Alliance to host discussion East Carolina University’s Interfaith Alliance will hold its last event of the year on Monday. Lorem Ipsum. The event will be held from 7 p.m to 8:30 p.m at Al-Masjid Islamic Center & Mosque. Lorem Ipsum. Prayers for Peace & Justice will begin with a prayer and followed by an awareness discussion with a question and answer session. Refreshments and snacks will be provided. In respect, women are asked to bring and wear a headscarf. All participants will be asked to remove their shoes upon entering the mosque. Lorem Ipsum. All participants will be asked to remove their shoes upon entering the mosque. Lorem Ipsum.

NEWS

A3

New student health clinic to launch

BRIEFS

The East Carolina University Board of Trustees and its standing committees are meeting April 27 and 28. The session will be held at Murphy Center on ECU’s Athletic Complex. The committees of the Board of Trustees will begin meeting at 8:15 a.m on April 27 and the full board meeting is at 9 a.m on April 28. A detailed schedule and meeting materials are available online at ww.ecu.edu/bot.

Construction on the new student center behind Joyner Library. The state-of-the-art student center is expected to be completed on time with original plans.

New student center to finish on time

Matthew Prensky

FOR THE EAST CAROLINIAN

The new student center at East Carolina University will become the signature building and front door to a school looking to prove they’re a top notch institution. During the planning phase, students were consulted about the different items or services they would like to have in the new building. “O n t h i s c a m p u s (student) needs were a little less about what they wanted to see in the building as much as what they wanted the building to look like,” said Erik Kneubuehl, associate vice chancellor of Student Involvement and Leadership. “ They wanted something that was going to showcase Pirate Pride

and also show that ECU is a serious institution.” A major theme throughout the building will be about the culture and history of eastern North Carolina and ECU. For example, in the ballroom, the entire floor will be a map showing the coast of North Carolina. It will show where all the major lighthouses are and include a large “X” to mark where Greenville is located. Along with the map, a giant “Argh” will be painted on the wall and the ECU creed will be displayed on one of the main staircases inside the building. Another major university themed aspect to the building will be three 18 foot lighted letters spelling ECU. The giant letters will be on the corner of the student

center near 10th Street and Charles Street. “It’s going to be the new front door of the institution,” Kneubuehl said. The construction of the 210,000 square foot structure has begun and is quickly reaching the second and third floor. With some delays due to weather, the university is hoping now that the structure is off the ground less stoppages will occur, according to William Bagnell, associate vice chancellor for Campus Operations. As of May, the second floor reinforcement columns were being poured ahead of the third level, according to the university’s construction newsletter from this month. “We’ve had a very wet academic year with the storms and hurricanes so

that slowed down construction,” said Kneubuehl. “But we’ve had a fairly dry spring and summer going into it and that has allowed us to make up some days.” As of this month, construction is set to be completed in September of 2018. Once it is finished, Student Affairs will move into the building and soon after, it will be opened to the public. Depending on delays in construction the new student center could be opened to the public between August to October of 2018, according to Kneubuehl. According to Kneubuehl, the building will bring a number of new services and architectural features to ECU. Some of the architectural features include a new ballroom,

jumbo outdoor screen and 200 seat black box theatre equipped with retractable seating. “We are going to have a true ballroom,” Kneubuehl said. “It’s going to be a 14,000 square foot ballroom with 30 foot ceilings that break up into three rooms that hold up to 800 people.” Kneubuehl described the size of the ballroom as being similar to the Greenville Convention Center. He estimated in total the room could hold up to 2,000 individuals. Since the ceilings will be higher it will allow for different acts to be held in that space along with commencement or Greek life events. When Mendenhall Student Center was built in

> CONTRUCT page

A2

Students at East Carolina University’s health sciences campus will soon have easier access to Student Health Services with a recently announced plan to open a second location. The second location is scheduled to open July 5 on the second floor of the new student center at the health sciences campus. “I think it will give them very good access to a service that they obviously pay fees for just like other students,” Associate Director for Clinical Operations at ECU Student Health Ellen Goldberg said. “They’ll have a clinic that’s kind of right in their backyard, versus having to make time to come over here and use our clinic on this side, so I think they’ll be much happier having something so close to them.” Goldberg said students at the health sciences COURTESTY OF THE BURGEONING campus have had limited Construction on the new student center behind Joyner Library. The state-of-the-art student center is expected to be completed on time with original plans. access to the student health building on main campus certainly if they need to use convenient, (and) obviously health sciences location as ing to Laliberte. She said there iberte said. “And I know for a few reasons. that on a day that they’re more affordable if people are the main campus location are different club meeting that we’re one of the few “One is parking, it’s very not normally there. I think on the East Carolina health with just a few exceptions, locations, allowing students health sciences campuses daunting to come from that parking is a little bit more insurance, to get our care,” according to Goldberg. in different medical majors that have a student center, side of campus, from health generous on that side for Laliberte said. “Certainly primary med- to be more interprofessional. not necessarily just for us sciences, and have to come those students as well.” Goldberg said a few ical care, things like illnesses “It’s hard with all of the but that was meant to be here because the parking is Senior nursing major things, such as radiol- and injuries and then physi- different buildings, nursing, something for the health so limited. The second thing Mariah Laliberte, vice chair og y and a pharmacy, cals, Pap smears, those types dental medical, being sep- department.” is time,” Goldberg said. “They of Interprofessional Health will not be offered at of things, all of those things arate, so it really brings us Goldberg said more just don’t have huge breaks in Sciences Student Leadership the new SHS location. you’ll see over at the other together by having it all in one i n f o r m a t i o n o n t h e their schedule where they can Council (IHSSLC), said many “We can’t have an X-ray side as well,” Goldberg said. location and the slide’s pretty hours at the second SHS leave their side of campus to health science disciplines machine over there because “We’ll have lab services over cool,” Laliberte said. location, how to make come over here to have an require various vaccinations of size limitations and cost there so we’ll be able to do Goldberg said more appointments, the phone appointment, find a parking and screenings in order for and that kind of thing, so a things like draw titers for the information on the hours number and more details spot, be seen and then get students to be approved for couple of our big services students that are in clinical at the second SHS location, will be available at the back to classes.” the clinical setting. like that, if students need to rotations, (and) we’ll give how to make appointments, beginning of June. the phone number and more “So having that student have those services, they’re vaccines over there.” Goldberg added, “I “I think it’s wonderECU has taken into con- details will be available at the ful that East Carolina’s think this will give them an health office within walking still going to have to come to obviously physically closer distance to the nursing, the main campus,” Goldberg said. sideration what students need, beginning of June. providing us with this,” location, that they can in dental, the medical, the other For the most part, not only with the second SHS “I think it’s wonderful Laliberte said. most cases just walk to from health sciences programs, SHS will be able to offer location, but with the new that East Carolina’s proThis writer can be contacted at news@theeastcarolinian.com. their academic building, or makes it more timely, more the same services at the student center as well, accord- viding us with this,” Lal-

CONTRUCT continued from A2

1974, it was oriented for the smaller student body at the time. Kneubuehl said since then, the university has grown to almost 30,000 students, and a larger building was needed. Because of the lack of space in Mendenhall, many student groups had to go off-campus to host large events, according to Kneubuehl.

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For questions or comments, contact sports@theeastcarolinian.com.

Another major facility feature to the new student center is Pirate Vision, a screen which will be roughly half the size of the jumbo screen located at Dowdy-Ficklen stadium, according to Kneubuehl. “(Pirate Vision) is a 24 by 48 foot outdoor jumbo screen that will face Joyner Library,” Kneubuehl said. “We want it to face the library and it will have a huge grass area out there so we can watch live sporting events, telecasts of

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HOROSCOPES Aries

Leo

(March 21-April 19) -- Today is a 7 -- Get adventurous and explore today and tomorrow. Investigate your opportunities. Another gets through where you can’t. Call ahead to avoid running all over town.

((July 23-Aug. 22) -- Today is a 7 -- Have fun with someone sweet today and tomorrow. Avoid controversy, risk or expense. Relax and spend easy time together. Listen more than you speak.

Virgo

Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Today is an 8 -- Figure out your money today and tomorrow. Review resources, and store provisions for the future. Public obligations interfere with private time. New possibilities stretch old boundaries.

Gemini

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Today is a 7 -Home draws you in magnetically today and tomorrow. Enjoy domestic arts, crafts and beautification projects. Handle chores and routines. Share the fruits of your labors.

Libra

(May 21-June 20) -- Today is a 7 -- Have patience with your partner through tomorrow. Misunderstandings delay the action; don’t make wild promises, and do what you said you would. Negotiate and compromise.

Cancer

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- Today is a 7 -Monitor communications through tomorrow. There’s a difference of opinion. Beware contradictions and trite solutions. Avoid gossip and rumors. An answer is elusive. Listen quietly.

Scorpio

(June 21-July 22) -- Today is a 7 -- Expand your physical boundaries and limitations with practice over the next few days. Focus more on actions than talk; words can get tangled.

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Today is a 9 -Bring in the money today and tomorrow. Slow down to untangle misunderstandings before they grow. Update schedules and keep everyone in the loop. Have patience with delays.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -Today is a 7 -- You’re ready to spread your wings and fly today and tomorrow. Listen before you advance, or risk breakdowns. Note emotion as well as logic. Distractions cause mistakes.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -Today is a 6 -- Find a quiet, private thinking place. Rest and recuperate today and tomorrow. Slow down and avoid irritation at delays and misunderstandings. Let it all blow over.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Today is an 8 -Teamwork scores through tomorrow. All for one and one for all. Stick to the rules or risk a foul. Avoid controversy or jealousies. Diplomacy pays off.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -Today is an 8 -- Crazy professional dreams seem possible over the next few days. Maintain grace despite awkward communications or misunderstandings. Clarify scheduling and watch for delays.

ACROSS 1 “__ Trek: Voyager” 5 Polly Holliday’s role on “Alice” 8 Portrayer of the Skipper on “Gilligan’s Island” 9 Name for a Beatle 12 Zachery Ty __ of “Home Improvement” 13 “Candid __” 14 Snakelike fishes 15 “The Twilight __” 16 __ out a living; get by 18 Fight result, for short 19 Chess piece 20 Recolors 21 Womanizer 23 “The Man Who __ There”; Billy Bob Thornton movie 24 Mixon of “American Housewife” 25 Diana Maria __ of “Man with a Plan” 26 Mrs. Archie Bunker 28 “__ Range”; movie for Kevin Costner and Robert Duvall 29 TV rooms, often 30 “Cold __” Solution to Last Week’s Puzzle

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32 King Kong, for one 35 “The Streets of __ Francisco” 36 “Name That __” 37 And others: abbr. 38 Almost 40 Flip-__; rubber sandals 41 Pancake topper 42 Actress Samms 43 “__, Dear” 44 “Me and the __”; Steve Harvey sitcom DOWN 1 Green cartoon ogre 2 Actor on “Chicago Fire” 3 Word of woe 4 “The __ & Stimpy Show” 5 Role on “Everybody Loves Raymond” 6 Citrus fruit 7 “__ Life to Live” 10 Medical drama series 11 Made of hard, sturdy wood 12 “You __ Your Life”; Groucho’s show 13 Pigeon’s cry 15 Yara Shahidi’s role on “Black-ish” 17 Suffix for strong and long 19 Buzzi of “Laugh-In” 20 Actor Annable 22 Cheerios ingredients 23 Use a towel 25 Role on “The Golden Girls” 26 Begley and Bradley 27 Martin and Cain 30 Actor Robert and his family 31 “__ Given Sunday”; Al Pacino film 33 The Mamas & the __ 34 Golfer Ernie __ 36 “__ Grit”; Matt Damon movie 37 Red Muppet 39 Suffix for bound or comment 40 Winter month: abbr.

COMICS COMICS

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www. sudoku.org.uk

BREWSTER ROCKET

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Local Non-Profit Campus

10.125 x 2 in

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$750 $390 $205

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*The front page advertisement price includes full color.

Deadlines

Fall/Spring Editions Thursday: 4 p.m. Mon.

Summer Editions Wednesday: 12 p.m. Thurs.

Page Specifications

The East Carolinian is a broadsheet newspaper 10.125 inches wide and 21 inches deep

Color

6/5/17

© 2017 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved.

7

Fall

4,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday

Spring

4,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday

Summer

3,000 copies every Wednesday

One color: $75 red, yellow, blue Full color: $150 Any combination of CMYK Non-discountable

Distribution

Newspapers at more than 90 locations across campus and in the Greenville community

(Prices are per insertion. Deadlines may be altered as needed to account for holidays, weather, etc.)

5 • The East Carolinian

HELP WANTED Retired educator looking for an experienced Graduate student with skills in computer entry data and proficiency in Microsoft Word. Please contact Ealin Bartlett at J_E_Bartlett@yahoo.com

Solution from last week

Dimensions

Tuesday: 4 p.m. Thurs.

A5

theeastcarolinian.com

SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S PUZZLE

> BAND page A2

Half Page Quarter

This writer can be contacted at news@theeastcarolinian.com.

6

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the Oscars, but you can do a number of things out there.” The new student center will also have a commons area located near the front entrance of the building. The commons area will be called the “GUC Commons” because it is being sponsored by the Greenville Utility Commission. It will have a three story glass-enclosed atrium that looks out onto

Classifieds & Puzzles


ECU s official newspaper Additional Advertising Classifieds

Local Rate $7 Student Rate $5 • Rates include up to 25 words or fewer and include 7 days online. • Each word over 25 is $0.10 • Extras such as bold or all caps are an additional $1 per word.

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12 p.m. the day prior to publication.

Pre-Printed Inserts Single: $100 per 1,000 pieces Multiple: $150 per 1,000 Increments of 1,000 only Non-commissionable.

• Single sheet inserts must be 8.5 in x 11 in or smaller. • Max size of a folded insert in a broadsheet edition is 10 in x 13 in. • Max size of an insert in a tabloid is 9 in x 12 in.

Tabloids

Pirate Preview Stitched & Trimmed Tabloid Full page: 9.37 in x 9.53 in Half vertical: 4.60 in x 9.53 in Half horizontal: 9.37 in x 4.69 in Quarter vertical: 4.60 in x 4.69 in Quarter horizontal: 9.37 in x 2.25 in Eighth: 4.60 in x 2.25 in Housing Guide/Other Tabloids Full 9.37 in x 9.65 in Half vertical: 4.60 in x 9.65 in Half horizontal: 9.37 in x 4.74 in Quarter vertical: 4.60 in x 4.74 in Quarter horizontal: 9.37 in x 2.28 in Eighth: 4.60 in x 2.28 in Other publications vary in size. Please contact us for additional information. (All sizing is width by height)

Deadline

• Insertion orders must be received at least 10 days prior to the scheduled insertion date, and inserts must be received at the following address at least 5 days prior to the run date. The East Carolinian c/o Cooke Communications 1150 Sugg Parkway Greenville, NC 27834

The East Carolinian • 6


.com 6

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1

Videos appear in conjunction with as well as independently of online articles and cover topics including news, arts, entertainment and athletics

10 second pre-roll or post-roll spot $25 per week

@TEC_newspaper TOP: COURTESY OF ECU MEDIA RELATIONS BOTTOM:MICHAEL SEEGARS I THE EAST CAROLINIAN

and has always been handy and crafty like that; it was the first time my dad and I had really bonded over something.” Clark said. “He would always take us to housing sites that the contractors were using that his company had made. I always loved walking through houses when I was younger and that’s why when I first came to ECU I was a contracting major but then quickly realized I did not want to major in that.” Clark said the self-freedom he gained from attending church allowed him to find a new major that better fit with his passions. He originally picked contracting because it would allow him to find a closer relationship with his father, but after all the changes he had made for himself throughout his life he decided to branch out again. After three more failed major attempts in architecture, hospitality, and business he found a love for fashion merchandising. “In the very first class I ever took, Principles of Merchandising 1135, very first day just talking about the syllabus I was just like ‘this is for me.’” Now, as he finishes up his major after interning at Serendipity where he designed a successful Christmas window display, Clark will be taking an internship this summer in New York City at the largest Macy’s in the nation. Clark applied for a scholarship opportunity that would take him to a retail show in the big apple, provided to him by a professor,

Top: Clark dives in an event. Bottom: Clark looks at two different jackets while going through clothes.

/theeastcarolinian/ A passion for fashion

1

Clark initially came to ECU as a contracting major, but it didn’t last long. “I know my dad’s true passion was building and carpentry, He loves to build anything

youtube.com/c/TECvideo

if he wanted to attend a Baptist church with her, and even though he wanted nothing to do with religion he didn’t want to turn her down. That day changed his life. “From the minute I had walked into the church with her I was overcome with this feeling that I had never had before,” Clark said. “The sermon that day was all about love and acceptance and how Christ loves everyone and accepts everyone. It was so empowering because I had never heard that before.” Clark began attending the Baptist church more often and eventually led to him being the co-president of the Baptist Ministry group on campus. Diving not only opened up a way for Clark to express who he was but led him down a path that helped him understand how he fit in the eyes of God; one of the biggest factors in him being able to be so open about who he is today. “Looking at it from an LGBT perspective there are so many individuals who feel like they have no place in religion,” Clark said. “I wanted to express how that’s such a fallacy. Just because someone tells you no, doesn’t mean everyone will say no to you.”

Video

For questions or comments, contact sports@theeastcarolinian.com.

B

Rediscovering faith

Client client’s tweet

Clark is the first openly gay male athlete for the Pirates, and is perhaps one of the most interesting men at East Carolina. Being Mormon, made it difficult for him to reconcile his sexuality with his faith, and not being able to talk about it made it worse. Clark eventually opened up to his close friends at ECU, and instead of receiving harsh judgements and cold shoulders, he received supportive gestures from people who cared about him. Not only did Clark find acceptance, he also rediscovered religion, something he lost growing up. “Since I was raised in such a religious household, when I first came to college I was completely put off by religion,” Clark said. “Growing up I was only allowed to go to the Mormon Church, and never in my life been to another church. I had no concept of what religion was really like. Since the aspect I saw it from was so unaccepting of me and really pushed me away, I thought everything would be like that.” One day one of his teammates asked Clark

Tackling advocacy

Before coming to ECU, he dove in high school but had not really started competing until his junior year because of complications his freshman and sophomore year. Even so, Clark was strongly recruited to ECU where he has had a successful four-year career. He has made honor roll every semester in college, while scoring fourteen points in the USA Invitational as a freshman, competed in the final of all three C-USA championship events as a sophomore, was a NCAA Regional Zone qualifier his junior year, and was a part of the AAC championship teams his junior and senior year. Along with those accomplishments, Clark usually scored a sum of points in almost every dual meet he ever competed in for the Pirates. There is roughly six-to-ten per season, so Clark was a constant deliverer of much appreciated points. Diving allowed Clark to discover who he was and be more confident in expressing himself. The fact that he could gain confidence every day doing something he loved pushed him to open up about his sexuality and accept himself. “It was a really rocky road for a long time, but over time it has gotten better,” Clark said.

Being the first openly gay male athlete, Clark wants to be an advocate for people who are afraid to come out and for those who feel like they don’t belong in anything that they do. “It doesn’t matter who you are or what you’ve done, there’s always a place for you,” Clark said.

Tackling advocacy

-Alex Clark

Being the first openly gay male athlete, Clark wants to be an advocate for people who are afraid to come out and for those who feel like they don’t belong in anything that they do. “It doesn’t matter who you are or what you’ve done, there’s always a place for you,” Clark said. He said he also wants to change people’s preconceived ideas about being gay, and to create an inclusive atmosphere. “Even my freshman year, I had several teammates come up to me and say ‘You know before I met you I didn’t think that being gay was right’ or would say things like ‘I didn’t accept gay people until I met you but you’ve totally changed my outlook on it and I really respect you’,” Clark said. “I feel like if I made that change with those people, it’ll say so much to other athletes as well.” Over the time he has been an athlete here he said he knows he’s been able to open many eyes of other athletes who have not come out and expressed their sexuality to the Pirate community yet. Clark strongly believes that coming out is an opportunity that shouldn’t be taken lightly and said he hopes it will inspire other people and athletes as well, even though it is certainly not easy. “If I take this opportunity to be a successful athlete and also be proud of who I am then it’ll help other people to be able to do the same,” Clark said. For Clark, the bottom line is all people should be proud of who they are. “My advice to everybody who might be struggling with the same thing is to give people an opportunity. I think you would be surprised with how accepting a lot of people around them would actually be,” Clark said. “One of the biggest fears is how many people would turn their backs on me but when I actually did I was astonished at how few turned their back on me. So my advice would be, be true to yourself and who you are. You put forth the love that you will most likely receive.” Even though Clark came out before diving in his first meet at ECU, he feels he could’ve fit in anywhere. But Clark said he doesn’t think he would have had the opportunity to make such a big impact on his teammates or his community at a bigger university. “At a lot of other universities I felt that I would have been just a number on a team or a name on a roster,” Clark said. “But when I came here I really felt like the immediate effects of me being here would be seen. I wouldn’t just be a number on a list or a name on a roster; I really felt like I would be Alex Clark, diver for East Carolina.”

A

-Alex Clark

B Looking at it from an LGBT perspective there are so many individuals who feel like they have no place in religion... I wanted to express how that’s such a fallacy. Just because someone tells you no, doesn’t mean „ everyone will say no to you...

Finding a new home

Finding a new home

“ which allowed him to upload resumes and obtain interviews from four different stores: Belk, Home Shopping Network, Walgreens, and Macy’s. Clark ended up getting a job offer from all of them; something unheard of in this type of recruiting process. “I ended up choosing Macy’s because it was the only one in New York City,” Clark said. “I really felt it would be the best opportunity for me. The networking opportunities alone, the people I could meet, the connections I could make, plus when would I have this opportunity in my life to just pick up to move to New York?” With hopes for coming back to ECU next fall for graduate school, the eight-week position fell right into place for Clark. “I actually graduated high school with a girl who interned there last summer and she had gone to Indiana University and at the end of the internship they offered her a full-time job. So I thought that would be a really good option for me to explore,” Clark said.

Looking at it from an LGBT perspective there are so many individuals who feel like they have no place in religion... I wanted to express how that’s such a fallacy. Just because someone tells you no, doesn’t mean „ everyone will say no to you...

CLARK continued from A1

acceptance and find his place in life. That void was filled by discovering diving when he joined high school after struggling for a majority of his life trying many different things in order to feel a sense of belonging. In high school, having to constantly lie to his parents about his sexuality caused Clark to struggle in school and diving. He had relationships with other divers throughout high school and sometimes away meets were the only places he could see his boyfriend; he didn’t want those relationships to have to stop, because he couldn’t tell his family he was gay. He decided it was time to tell his brother Brandon. His brother told him that he had suspected, because he knew Clark didn’t express a lot of interest in girls. Eventually, one of his closest friends convinced him to tell his parents the truth. Clark said he simply texted his mom “Uh ... ya ... I’m gay.” Many tense discussions later, his parents sent him to a therapist, who was also Mormon and simply tried to convince Clark that the way he felt about his sexuality was incorrect. Clark said he knew there was no way he could suppress who he was any longer and stopped following the Mormon faith, a decision he said left him without a sense of religion coming into college.

and Macy’s. Clark ended up getting a job offer from all of them; something unheard of in this type of recruiting process. “I ended up choosing Macy’s because it was the only one in New York City,” Clark said. “I really felt it would be the best opportunity for me. The networking opportunities alone, the people I could meet, the connections I could make, plus when would I have this opportunity in my life to just pick up to move to New York?” With hopes for coming back to ECU next fall for graduate school, the eight-week position fell right into place for Clark. “I actually graduated high school with a girl who interned there last summer and she had gone to Indiana University and at the end of the internship they offered her a full-time job. So I thought that would be a really good option for me to explore,” Clark said.

Your Message here

That void was filled by discovering diving when he joined high school after struggling for a majority of his life trying many different things in order to feel a sense of belonging. In high school, having to constantly lie to his parents about his sexuality caused Clark to struggle in school and diving. He had relationships with other divers throughout high school and sometimes away meets were the only places he could see his boyfriend; he didn’t want those relationships to have to stop, because he couldn’t tell his family he was gay. He decided it was time to tell his brother Brandon. His brother told him that he had suspected, because he knew Clark didn’t express a lot of interest in girls. Eventually, one of his closest friends convinced him to tell his parents the truth. Clark said he simply texted his mom “Uh ... ya ... I’m gay.” Many tense discussions later, his parents sent him to a therapist, who was also Mormon and simply tried to convince Clark that the way he felt about his sexuality was incorrect. Clark said he knew there was no way he could suppress who he was any longer and stopped following the Mormon faith, a decision he said left him without a sense of religion coming into college.

Multi Media

Social Media

Reach our followers instantly with sponsored content. Advertise on our social media accounts $20 per tweet* 9,000+ followers 4 tweets for $75 A Sponsored client message Retweet

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The East Carolinian • 8


About WZMB 91.3FM

Coverage Map

On air since the 1950s, WZMB 91.3FM is the non-commercial radio station at ECU. The station is operated by students dedicated to “music and local programming not readily available elsewhere in the listening area.” WZMB 91.3FM studio is located in the Mendenhall Student Center. WZMB 91.3FM offers an incredible selection of alternative music, including rock, hip hop, soul and indie. In addition to music, listeners can expect to hear news, interviews with local artists, coverage of sporting events and more.

Featured Programming Home of ECU Women’s Basketball •

WZMB 91.3FM has exclusive broadcasting rights at all games, including throughout postseason play.

The Heather Macy Show •

Featuring ECU Women’s Basketball Head Coach Heather Macy, this show airs exclusively on WZMB 91.3FM each week throughout the season. Seasonal sponsorships are $895, which

include mentions pre-show and post-show. Live Streaming •

WZMB 91.3FM provides listeners the flexibility to listen from anywhere via live stream of its broadcasts at:

www.ecu.edu/wzmb 9 • WZMB 91.3FM

On Site Live Entertainment

WZMB 91.3FM is excited to offer DJ services. The station is able to provide live entertainment at any event on campus and in the Greenville community. $91.30/hour. Minimum 2 hours/Maximum 4 hours. Contact us for more information. @wzmb913

WZMB.ATECU


ECU s radio station Sponsorship Sponsorship is available for various broadcasts throughout the day, as well as for special events. Account executives will analyze each sponsor’s needs, budget and target audience to partner them with the broadcast slot that best suits your needs.

Daily Packages As show themes and times change throughout the year, sponsors may choose to purchase a time slot (listed below) or sponsor a specific show (as schedules become available). Time Slots • Morning: 8 a.m. — 11 a.m. • Mid-Day: 11 a.m. — 2 p.m. • Afternoon: 2 p.m. — 5 p.m. • Evening: 5 p.m. — 8 p.m.

BASIC: $50/WEEK OR $200/MONTH • 2 spots during selected show/time slot PLUS: $100/WEEK OR $400/MONTH • 2 spots during selected show/time slot • 2 weekend spots • 1 Tweet per week from @WZMB913 PREMIUM: $150/WEEK OR $600/MONTH • 2 spots during selected show/time slot • 2 weekend spots • 2 Tweets per week from @WZMB913 All spots are 30 seconds. Featured sponsorships are billed monthly. Please contact us for additional information.

WZMB 91.3FM • 10


The Hook

This full color lifestyle magazine spotlights professors, students and community members through interviews and fun Q&A sessions. The Hook also provides an in-depth look at topics, interests and activities of today’s ECU students. 2,500 copies are distributed in September and March. All rates include full color

Dimension

Rates

1

Back Page*

8.5 in x 11 in

$800

2

Premium*

8.5 in x 11 in

$700

3

Full Page

8.5 in x 11 in

$600

4

Half Page

8.5 in x 5.5 in

$325

5

Quarter Page

4.25 in x 5.5 in

$175

Expressions ECU’s official minority voice magazine highlights diversity on campus and strives to broaden readers’ understanding of minorities in our community. There are 2,000 copies distributed across campus each fall.

1

Full Page $400/includes color

2

Half Page $225/includes color

*Limited availability for cover, priority and all magazine advertising.

11 • Magazines


Rebel This annual award-winning magazine recognizes the art and literary works of students selected each fall through a juried show. There are 2,000 copies distributed across campus each spring. $300 per sponsored mention.

Buccaneer The Buccaneer Yearbook has been instrumental in capturing the moments and memories ECU students, faculty and staff have created since 1923.

ยง

ECU Stars

Students are encouraged to participate in the various Buccaneer portrait sessions offered throughout the year. Students are able to purchase the photos from their portrait sessions, while senior portraits are offered for free.

Dimensions

Rates

Full Page

8.17 in x 10.08 in

$400

Half Page

8.17 in x 5.04 in

$200

@TheHookECU @ExpressionsMag @Rebel_ECU

13

Advertising space is available for purchase. Ads appear on glossy, full color pages. Rates are as follows:

The first 1,000 copies of the Buccaneer yearbook are free!

/thehookmag/ /ECUExpressionsMagazine/ /rebelatecu/

@expressionsmag

Magazines โ€ข 12


SP EC IAL PUBL ICATIO NS Spirit Posters

Pirate Preview

These modified broadsheet posters are inserted into The East Carolinian to promote the spirit of East Carolina every Thursday preceding each of the 7 home games during the 2017 football season.

This tabloid is included in each first-year student’s orientation packet. Students receive their packets during summer orientation sessions throughout June and July on East Carolina’s campus.

Advertise all season long with this spirit poster series

6,000 issues published

Spirit posters feature your 5 in x 3 in full color ad on the flipside of our gameday poster insert. This package requires use of consistent ad copy for all 7 posters. This $1,600 value ad series, limited to 12 advertisers, is specially priced at $850.

Back Page*

$900

Premium

Discover Series

This broadsheet product offers advertisers the opportunity to target specific events and locations related to the greater Greenville community. Discover Uptown Greenville- Sept. 7 Christmas at Arlington Village- Nov. 16 Valentine’s Day- Feb. 13

Size Premium*

Price $125

$650

Standard*

$85

Full

$550

*Pricing includes full color

Half Vertical

$325

Housing Guide

Size

Price

Half Horizontal $325

10.125 in x 2.5 in 3.25 in x 4.5 in

Temple: Oct. 7

This tabloid is released during the Fall and Spring ECU housing fairs, typically scheduled for November and March, and targets the growing number of students searching for off-campus housing. Price Size Back Page* $800

BYU/ Homecoming: Oct. 21

Premium

$600

Tulane: Nov. 11

Full

$500

Cincinnati: Nov. 18

Half Vertical

$300

James Madison: Sept. 2 Virginia Tech/Family Weekend Sept. 16 South Florida: Sept. 30

Quarter

$225

Half Horizontal $300 Quarter

$200

*Pricing includes full color

13 • Special Publications


NOTES Artist’s Note: • Preferred delivery method for all advertising is a PDF. • We do not accept Pagemaker or Publisher files. • Acceptable files include Illustrator CC, Photoshop CC, InDesign CC, JPEG, TIFF, PNG and EPS. • Color is printed using the four-color CMYK process. • Ads that are sent print-ready must be set to CMYK. Graphics in RGB will not print.

• We cannot adjust colors in PDF or EPS files. • Resolution minimum is 300 dpi. • We reserve the right to float, shrink or expand electronic files to fit the space reserved. • Print-ready ads must be packaged and include all fonts, graphics, photos, etc. We reserve the right to substitute similar fonts if a font is corrupt or not supplied.

Business Note:

• Student Media reserves the right to revise or reject any ad if the content is deemed objectionable or misleading. Advertisers are discouraged from making claims or using art or words that impugn or degrade sex, sexual orientation, religion, race, age, national origin and veteran status. • Ads having the appearance of editorial material will be identified as a “Paid Advertisement.” • We do our best to accommodate special positioning inquiries. However, requests are not guaranteed. • No advertisement is accompanied by news stories or free notices. • An advertiser must complete a credit application and credit check by the Media Accountant to be eligible for credit purchases. Credit will not be granted to any business in operation for less than six months. • Advanced payment is required for all advertising by out-of-state or transient advertisers and for all advertisers untill credit can be established. New accounts desiring credit must fill out a credit application and allow five business days for processing. • Credit terms are Net 30. Invoices must be paid within 30 days of date of publication. Past due accounts will be turned over to the university collections office and subject to interest and penalties (10%) on all state past due receivables. • Advertisements and payments are accepted in person or via mail only. No insertion orders will be accepted over the telephone. • All contracts for advertising become effective only upon the approval of the Media Accountant. ECU Student Media reserves the right to terminate a contract with 30 days’ prior written notice. • Student organizations must prepay or supply a requisition with account number. or purchase order to place an advertisment. • Returned checks are subject to a $30 fee. Collection of the face value of the unbounced check, along with the returned check fee will need to be collected in cash, money order, or certified check before advertising can resume. • Price adjustments or make-goods will only be considered where the error is solely the fault of Student Media. Any liability will not exceed the cost of the ad. Minor or typographical errors that do not change the intent of the ad will not qualify for an adjustment. Student Media must be notified of an error within five business days if an advertiser is to receive consideration for compensation. • Accounts unpaid for 30 days of invoice date are subject to approval for further advertising. • Display advertising canceled after the regular deadline will be subject to 100% of the ad’s cost. • Terms and conditions apply to all student media products and services. • Original ads, photographs or artwork produced by ECU Student Media are the property of Student Media and may not be used without prior written consent by Student Media for any purposes. • Returned checks are subject to a $30 fee. • Any billing questions should be directed to the Media Accountant at 252–328–9235.

Helpful Hints • 14


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Regular Newspaper Publications Hook Publications

Fall 17

First Day of Class: Aug. 21 Labor Day: Sept. 4 Fall Break: Oct. 7 - 10 Thanksgiving: Nov. 22 - 26 Last Day of Class: Dec. 4 Commencement: Dec. 15

Spring 17

Themed Publications Expressions Rebel

First Day of Class: Jan. 8 MLK Jr. Day: Jan. 15 Spring Break: March 4 - 11 State Holiday: March 30 - 31 Last Day of Class: April 24 Commencement: May 4

Summer 18

Home Football Games Buccaneer

Summer Session I: May 14 Memorial Day: May 28 Last Day of Class: June 18 Summer Session II: June 21 Independence Day: July 4 Last Day of Class: July 26

Home Football 17

James Madison: Sept. 2 Virginia Tech: Sept. 16 South Florida: Sept. 30 Temple: Oct. 7 BYU: Oct. 21 Tulane: Nov. 11 Cincinnati: Nov. 18

2017-18 Media Kit  
2017-18 Media Kit  
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