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E ig lite e n W e s t N e w Y o r k C ity

E ig lity - n in tli S t r e e t


resen ted

T h e S e n io r Class »/

FRANKLIN

SCHOOL


C o n t e n t s Page

D

kdication

S en io rs

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5

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E x e r c i s e s ...................................................................... 2 5

r ad u atio n

Salutatory

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28

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30

C

lass

H

C

lass

P rophecy

V

a ledictory

isto ry

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35

V o x P op ...................................................................................... 36 L ost

F ield

L

Page 4

•

Found

and

D

ay

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36

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37

etters

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C lasses

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A

c tivities

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A

dvertisem ents

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70


Jedicalion 111 loving nicniory of C'.ai’IAIN HkrMA\ Jacobu's, Franklin,

Cai’tain

RoBF.Rr Jacobson, Franklin,

and

P r i\’a t e F r e o e r i c r M. IkiscmioFF, Franklin, Franklinite cated.

'42. this edition of the is

affectionately

dedi­

Franklin School is proud of

the record of these heroes ^v'ho ga\e their lives to make this a better world ^v'ith freedom for all mankind.

P r iv a t e F r ederick M . B

uschhoff

C a pt a in R

C a pt a in

obert

H

Ja c o b s o n

erman

Ja c o b i u s

®

I’ a g e

5


A p r il 12, 1945, was a sad day tor oiir n a t i o n an d tor the world. ^Vord was rele ased o t the s u d d e n death of oiir I’ resident, F r a n k lin D e l a n o R o o s e \ e I t .

The

“O n e W o r l d ” to torm w h ic h h e g a v e hin is e lt w it h o u t stint, will be lorever gratetiil tor his \ i s i o n a n d tor his statesm anship .

Page

6


F

A

C

U

L

T

Y

• . Top: Mr. Stevens, Mr. Ross, Mr. King, Miss Russack, Mr. Gunderman, Mr. Soffietti, Dr. Standerwick, Mr. Kern Bottom Row:

Miss Spindler,

Mrs. Lynn, Miss Limbach, Mr. Hall, Mr. Berenberg, Miss Fidlag an .

M iss

Necker,

Mrs.

Coufall

P age


J.

L ester A l e x a n d e r ,

Jr.

“A n af fab le a n d c o u r t e o u s g e n t l e m a n . ” — Shakespeare

How unbearable and dull life would have been had the Senior A bulletin board not been embellished daily with trivia graciously donated by Jimmy! It ^vas rum ored that Jimmy considered it sacrilege to be seen wearing the same tie more than once a year. However, this legend was shattered when after a lapse of several months, an observing Senior caught him wearing a very familiar cravat. Jimmy is entering Ohio State.

L aurence

A sh kin

"Jesters d o of te n f)rove p r o p h e t s . ” — Shakespeare

Lari'y's ^vinning smile won him not only the presidency of the Senior Class, but the affections of the opposite sex. Xor was he a slouch on the basketball court, wiiere, if his hands were not resting on his hips, they were dropping another t^\•o points for alma mater. Larry goes on to Coliunbia.

m

P age

10

o


| a\

B i .o c k

“ IikI sIiII

lliry gazed, xi’())t(lcy i r m v .

(iiid

slill

the

I hill o u r smuH liriiil c o u l d curry ull he i o m o . ” — (io ld sm illi

N'ouvilhslaiuliiig that laxalivc ad, Jay ahvays managed to strike a happy me­ dium. Proficient noi only in his sLudies he c'lU (]uite a figure on the athletic field. In his last year at Franklin Jay was obvi­ ously lorn between his two loves: the arts and the sciences. T h e retort and slide ride finally won hini over, and Jay enters M .I .r . this summer.

R obert B loch “ T l i o m o d e s t , on his u n e tn b a r r a s s ed brow N a t u r e h a d w r i t t e n — ‘G e n t l e m a n ’ — Byron

“ L ittle” Bloch, as distinguished from Jay, managed to breeze his w-ay with a smile through his first year at Franklin, perhaps because it was his first year at Franklin. W hen not adjusting that bow tie of his, he could usually be found en­ larging upon his successful career as an East Side socialite. Robert will enter New York University.

I ’ AGE

11


P e t e r C alisch “F o r exjen th o u g h v a n q u i s h e d he c o u ld a r g u e s till. ” — G o ld s m it h

T h e literary scion of the Senior Class caused quite a furor when one of his fic­ tion efforts was mistaken for fact. Al­ though all stigma was finally removed, Pete will never live those love stories down. Pete made it a steadfast rule never to know what was happening in class, and the rare times his brain returned to that rear seat he managed to argue his profes­ sors into complete submission over a topic which was not even under discussion.

J ack C harto ff “A

diplomatist debate.”

too,

icell

s k i l le d

in — H ein e

4 '

l'A<;i-; 12

T h e fiery Stephen Douglas of the Senior Class made up in oratory Avhat he lacked in geometry. Many 'were the times when the rest of the Social Studies class nodded ■wearily ^dien Mr. Berenberg enlightened us upon the color of Louis IV ’s coat b u t­ tons or Karl Marx's eighth version of socialism. Jack did not nod: he always had additional information on these and kindred subjects. Jack, ^\^ho certainly liveneil up many a Tow n Meeting, soon ^vill enter the Armed Forces.


J O K l.

C ^O IIK N

" l l ( ‘ xvds t he i n i l ( l r s / - n i a i n i n r ( l

man.”

— Hyroii

I

A lax

Lethargic Joel, it was rumored, pos­ sessed (lie most perlec I coiHure in Frank­ lin’s history. T h e only drawback was ihal aller all ihese years of carelul grooming his hands became slightly greasy. His singularly lazy manner was carried over lo the basketball court where he would nonchalantly puL in shots which woidd pul Ernie Calverly to shame. One tragic day, however, when Joel had forsaken his Wheaties in the morning, he was forced to sink his shots from midcourt instead of from the opposite end. Joel is heading out to sea with the Navy.

C ooper

“X o i u h c r so besy a m a n as tlier luas, A n d y e t h e s ein ed b isier tha n he w as .” — Chaucer

Probably there was no busier member of Senior A than Alan Cooper. During his four years he filled twenty-one posi­ tions of trust. Chief among these were the presidencies of the Chess Club and the Science Club; chairman of the Library Committee; chairman of the Red Cross Drive, the most successful in the history of the school; Moderator of the Student Council Congress, and Associate Editor of the Coimcilor. He also won scholarship medals during his last three years in school. Alan will enter Wesleyan U ni­ versity in November.

P ace

13


A l a n F leischer " T h e r e is n o life o f a m a n , fa it h f u l l y re c o r d e d , b u t is a h e r o i c p o e m of its sort, r h y m e d o r i i n r h y m e d . ” — Carlyle

Relations with the Calhoiin School would not have been so friendly if it h a d n ’t been for Alan. Preparations for the Calhoun dance, which came off so suc­ cessfully earlier in the season, were aided to a large extent by A lan’s thoughtful organization. T h e fellow with the blind­ ing hair, Alan was always seen with his two buddies, Larry Ashkin and Mai Kandel, a trio well known to Franklin stu­ dents. Alan has been accepted at Colum­ bia and goes up there this year Avith his friend, Larry.

H oward “ ’T i s

G o ld ex h eim good-zi’ill

makes

in te ll ig e n c e .” — Emerson

T h e frequent occasions \vhen boys went on a date 'vvith their fa\'orite girls ahvays brought about a consultation ^v’ith Ho'ward Goldenheim. For Howard had a remarkable faculty for naming all the decent movies in to^vn and all the actors and actresses in them. This ability won the respect of all his classmates, but How­ ard A\dll also be remembered for the cour­ ageous games of soccer he played. All will remember the day after that game ^\’hen he came to school with his innocent smile and banged-up leg. Ho^vard grace the halls of New York UniAersity next year.

P ac ; e

14


R

o

BKR 1

( iR l.K N H K R C ;

"'/'he Ydcc is iiol lo llir sxiufl .\'or the h d l l lr lo the s h o i i g . ” — Kc( lesiastcs

'" I’hc (i;nvk” as he was lagged l)y llial ni( kname-giver, Hob Mar/,, (lislinguished himseir by being last (lallesi) in tlie line of graduates. I'lie fell hall of this MuU jeir combination with Itddie Michelnian could usually be lound jx)uring oul his troubles to his feminine friends or vainly trying to procure a diamond for the baseball t:eam. And whichever he did he usually came out a loser. Derision greeted his tales of the female who spurned him and boos met his failure to provide a prac­ ticing ground for the ball team.

R obert “St ern

H arz o f p u r p o s e a n d fa ir of face.” — Stack

“ Muscles” (as he wanted to be called) was the true exemplification of the tri­ um ph of matter over mind. Oh, what M'e Avould not have done for eight more Harz’ on the baseball team and ten more H arz’ on the soccer field. Now that V-F (Victory over Franklin) has come and gone, the true story of chuckles during English class may be related without fear of retribution. It was only the one-man vaudeville team. Bob Harz—Performances 9 to 3, Admission—one sandwich at Itmch period. Robert is in the Navy now.

Pace

15


M alcolm

K andel “B us in es s t o m o r r o w . ” — Archias o f T h e b e s

“ Big Mai,” as he was affectionately known by his classmates, was the victim of a most unfortunate accident cliiring the year. Supported by two magnificent canes, he caused not only pain in the hearts of his fellow students but fury in the heart of Mr. Stevens, whose class he so unceremoniovisly interrupted. Mai’s immortal epigram, “Let the other guys be smart. I ’ll be rich,” was ably supported by his marks on the one hand and his wallet on the other. Mai enters Syracuse this summer.

A rthur

K lauber

“M o d e r a t i o t i is the s ilke n s t r i n g r u n ­ n in g th r o ug h th e pe ar l-c hain of all v ir tu e s . ” — F u ller

One alumnus who ahv’ays will rem em ­ ber Franklin is A rth u r Klauber. Artie came to school one day, sporting a big smile and a proud chest. T h e previous day he had achie\'ed the first t^\'o hits of his baseball career in his debut as an o u t­ fielder, a feat rare for Franklin rookies. Artie was always seen with little Bobby Bloch, both of them ^vearing never fad­ ing smiles, and both of them cooperating ably in history examinations. Artie goes up to Syracuse this year.

I ’ AGF.

16


joSKl'll

L k v in

" ( ) , i l is 1‘x c r l l n i l To h(rvc a g i i n i l ’s s l y c ng l l i , Bill

it

is l y u i i i i i D i i s

I ' d use i l l i l i r fi fi;ianl.”

— Sliakc“Sj)can“

The hc-inan piclurcd above would be Franklin’s entry in a Charles Adas con­ test. Joe entered Franklin in Senior B and soon made his mark on the athletic; Held, being in his senior year an outstand­ ing member ol the soccer, baseball, and basketball teams. Joe’s greatest regret was that Franklin d id n ’t have a football team.

E i:)w .a r i :) L

“ W ithin

evine

t h a t I’o h i m e lies th e m y s t e r y

of m y st e r i e s . ” — Scott

Eddie, the strong silent type, easily made friends -tvith his decorous conduct:, his easy going personality, and his ever­ present grin. A regidar on the soccer team, Eddie also w^as an able assistant in this year’s Red Cross Drive. W hen not hunting or fishing in the wdlds of Canada, dressed in those famous sweaters of his, Eddie wall be attending New' York University.

Pace

17


1

E dward

M ich elm an

“ T h e r e is a t i m e lo k e e p s ilen c e a n d a ti m e to s p e a k . ” — Ecclesiastes

Eddie, as he was called by everyone in­ cluding Mr. Hall, may best be compared to Shakespeare’s immortal c h a r a c t e r “Puck.” T ogether with Poliak, who was the second partner in the firm of Michel­ man &: Poliak, Inc., Eddie, with his amus­ ing antics and mussed-up hair, brightened many a dull afternoon. T h e saddest event of the year occurred when poor “ Mike” lost his Latin “pony.”

R obert

M ilch

“As k h o w to lixie?

]Vyite. w r i t e , -write,

a n y th in g ; T h e luor ld’s a fine, be lic T in g w o r l d , w r i t e nexus.” — B e a u m a n t a n d F letch er

Robert Milch 'was as versatile a boy as there ’^vas in our class. He was editor of the Councilor, member of the Student Council, associate editor of the Red and Blue, and a member of the soccer, basket­ ball, and baseball teams. Class Secretary in his Junior II year, and Class President in his Senior B year. He ^vas on the pro­ gram of one Tow n Meeting. He rep re­ sented the Councilor at the Columbia Scholastic Press Association and ^vas edi­ tor of the Franklinite. T h e broadest smile in the history of Franklin adorned his face the day he was accepted at Columbia. I’ a ( ; e

18


R |C :I1 A R 1 )

I’ l.K IIN

7 xt'oiild liv e lo s i u d y , 1)1(1 nol s t u d y lo Ihx'.” -liacon

Anylliing biil “])Ichn” would describe Richard Plclin, a (listinguislied historian and economist. Dicky sLarled in Inlerniediatc III and (|uickly showed his inter­ est in the record of civilization, excelling in World, Ancient, American, and Mod­ ern history. Richard was also secretary ol the chess team and holds the did^ious honor of not winning a match all year. Classic, though, was the expression on Richard’s face when Mr. Berenberg ru d e­ ly interrupted one of his forceful tirades in the Social Studies class. Richard will hold forth hereafter at New York University.

R ichard

P ollak

“ G e n i u s is b o r n , n o t ta u g h t. ” — Dryden

Easygoing Richard Pollak quietly sat through the classes of Franklin School quite unassumingly ^vithout too many 'tvords. T h e only thing that really phased Richard Tvas the effort to hand to Mr. Stevens test papers on time. This was often not the case; noisy, if not futile, ap­ peals follow^ed. Richard w^as inclined to­ ward science courses and did rather well in these. All the teachers will sw^ear that his was the most unintelligible scrawl they ever came across. It wall now be the task of the faculty at Penn to read Rich­ a rd ’s papers. P a g e 19


Sa m u e l

P ropp

“ Then

he will

ta lk — g o o d g o d s , hoio

he w i l l ta lk . ” — Lee

Reputed by many to have the best sense of hum or in our class, ever-smiling Sammy was admired and liked by both teachers and classmates. His wonderful nature ap­ pealed to everyone so much that many a good mark, we suspect, was acc}uired by virtue of it. T h e funniest story of the year is the one Sammy tells about his army physical. Ask him about it. H e ’s in the Army now.

R obert

Sachs

“R e t i r e d L e is ur e , That in tr im p le a s ur e .”

gardens

take s

his — M ihon

If we had to name the boy in our class to fit the title, “T h e boy in our class who asked the most questions in Senior A,” Robert Sachs would unhesitatingly be oiu' choice. Bob argued about everything u n ­ der the sun: marks, marks, marks, marks, and marks. T h e amazing part of the story is that by dint of his persistence Robert invariably talked down all resistance and won his point. Robert -will continue his studies at New \'ork Universitv.

P agi

20


K

i

)(;a

r

S

k i d i

" lictuli

. i .k

i iKilwlli

II

full

uiaii;

r oi i -

jCyciicc a r r t u l y m i n i : i ni i l w v i l i t i g an (‘Mi l I n u m . " B aton

-

Eddy, as lie liked lo he called, built up an enviable record in three years at l^'ranklin. Never a grind, he enjoyed the ollice of viee-President in both liis Senior A and Senior B years. W hen not arguing wilh Mr. Stevens about the “principle ol the tiling,” which wasn’t olten, Edgar could be found whispering lo Jay Block about the lerriHc date he had last night. T h e picture that E d ’s name brings to mind is the scene during lunch hour when four or five boys sat wide-eyed while Eddy told utterly fantastic stories. Oh, well, Frank­ lin ’s loss is Colum bia’s gain—or is it the other ^vay aroimd?

D .\niel

S hapiro

“R e f l e c t th a t b lessing,

life,

like

enery

o th e r

D e r i v e s its v a h t e f r o m its use a l o n e . ” — Samuel Johnson

Described by Larry Ashkin as a “clean cut boy,” Danny entered Franklin “ ’way back w'hen,” and had he been permitted he no doubt w-ould have graduated with one of his now”^ famous color-splashed ties. Danny had the distinction of managing both the basketball and soccer teams anci was connected prominently with n u m er­ ous dance and prom committees. “Shappy” had the peculiar habit of appearing late for the first classes in the morning and afternoon. T his is no doubt explained by the fact that Danny lived 20 feet from school. Danny joins Poliak at the University of Pennsylvania. •

Page

21


R ussell “ W it

Sherman and

wisdom

are

born

with

a

man.” — S elden

If the Class of ’45 has any hopes for one of its members achieving musical fame, they rest on the sturdy shoulders of Buddy Sherman, the piano virtuoso. Buddy, one of the real old timers, is one of those boys who year after year turns out excellent records. Not one-sided by any means, Buddy, the pitcher on the softball team, is a rabid sports fan; and whenever he had some free time in school, h e’d be found in the gym. Bud was possessed of real school spirit—classmates term him just a “swell guy.” He will go to Columbia.

G erald

S ilver

'‘H a s t e n

s l o w ly

and

put

your

icork

t w e n t y ti m e s on th e anx’il. ” — B o il e a u

A Franklin school morning ’(vould not have been official if Jerry Silver had not walked in late ^vith furtive glances to see if Mr. Hall Avas looking. Jerry's classmates will remember him as a diligent, hard­ working boy particularly adept in plane geometry. Jerry ^vas \ery fond of the art classes given by Mr. Ross, and many an afternoon at three o ’clock Jerry ^vas still working hard over a clay model. \'o u will find Jerry at the University of Miami.

P a (; e

22


Al . I' RKl )

S i KKN

s k ill e d ill e v e r y liieh, ------- , he jvoiild ma he hlaek w h i l e look hlaek."

look

ivhite , a n d — O v id

Possessed ()l a very keen mind, Allred Slern always was with Iiis ready wiL agreeal)le lor lun any Lime ol the day. Sur­ rounded by admirers ol his inexhaustible supply of card tricks, Allred was liked lor his friendly way. He d id n ’t work so hard as he might have, but nevertheless A. Stern received good marks and was the elected captain of the chess team. An ill-directed apple though caused him no end of trou­ ble. He Avill continue his education at New' York University.

f

R ic h a r d “A n

Stra sser

h o n e s t yuan, t h e ch in ,

Broadclothed, within.”

and

close-buttoned a

warm

to

he ar t — C ow per

W ithout the subtle diplomacy of one Richard Strasser, it is doubtful whether either of the tremendously successful Cal­ houn dances would have taken place. Dick, practically by himself, planned, ar­ ranged, and ran both dances. A new comer to Franklin this year, Richard was on the honor roll most of the term and was a reg­ ular on the basketball team. W hen he wasn’t arguing with Shapiro about who was the better tennis player, they both were raising a riot in Mr. Kern’s Spanish class. Duke University will welcome Stras­ ser in July. •

Page

23


G erald

W alden “A life on th e oce an w av e ! A h o m e on the r o ll in g d e e p . ” — Sargent

Jerry was the first but certainly not the last member of the Class of ’45 to enter the Armed Forces. Jerry joined the Navy in April, but he left behind a host of friends he had made during his short stay at Franklin. Personable Jerry was a m em ­ ber of the soccer team and a tryout for the basketball squad. One of the big occa­ sions of the year, and a great source of pride for Jerry, occurred Avhen his father, a famous old timer in aviation, delivered some tales of his thrilling career.


Graciiiatic^n b xerciscs I

......

N RKci'i\ 1'1) tl u 'i r

l''i ; m k l i i i

Sc liool diploiiKis on

llic e v e n in g

One' ol them has enlisted in ihe Navy; ihe o l h e i s will c'nier the A rm ed l-'orees or will ( o n t i n u e iheir e d u c a li o n ;is eivili;nis at diflerenl c o l­ leges iintil called in to the s e r \ie e ol ilu'ir (o untry . The boys entered the a u d it o r iu m .it the (Hub H o u se lo the strains ol <i m arch playetl by Russell S herm an , '15. The sa lu t a l o i ia n , ihe historian, the })ro})hei. am i the \ aledic loria n. w h ose speec hes are prin ted in full on o(her jjages ol this y earbook, addressed the lars>e audience. Mr. Berenberg then presented the prizes lor the year to the Following boys: I'he Franklin Scho o l Mechil lor G eneral Excc;llence g iv e n to that m e m b e r o l the Senio r Cllass w h o has the best scholastic record chiring the tour years ol the h ig h school course; ■\w'ardecl to Jay Block I 'h e F ran klin Sch oo l M e d a l lor E x c e lle n c e in Latin: .-^warded to R ussell Sherm an T h e F r a n k lin S chool M e d a l for E x c e lle n c e in English: A w a r d e d to D a n i e l Shapiro T h e H e n r y K o p lik M e d a l for Creative ^\'^riting g iv e n a n n u a ll y by Mrs. A u g u s t L a m b e r t in m e m o r y o f her n e p h e w , a m e m b e r of the Class of 1929: ■\w'arded to Peter Calisch T h e Eli A ll is o n C u p for E x c e lle n c e in Science, g iv e n by the Class of 1940 in m e m o r y of Mr. Eli A llison: A w a r d e d to Jay B lock T h e A b r a h a m Zucker Prize for E x c e lle n c e in M a them a tics, offered by Mrs. Asya Zucker in m e m o r y o f her h u sba nd: A w a r d e d to E d w a r d W eiss I ' h e A r m a n d F in k e ls te in C u p for E x c e lle n c e in F"rench, e stablished in m e m o r y o f A r m a n d , a m e m b e r of the Class of 1930, by his family: A w a r d e d to George B u c h b a n d T h e A l l e n Flenry F ly m a n C u p for E x c e lle n c e in A thletics, g iv e n a n n u a ll y by Mr. a n d Mrs. Ir v in g F ly m an in m e m o r y of their son: A w a r d e d to R o b e r t Flarz T h e John D o o b C up, offered by the Class of 1926 in m e m o r y of a classmate, g i v e n a n n u a l ly to a m e m b e r o f the Senio r B Class w h o has d istin g u is h e d h i m s e lf by his character, his scholastic record, a n d his a c h ie v e m e n ts in e x t r a ­ curric ular activities: A w a r d e d to A lfred B r u m m e l

P age

25


T h e A l u m n i C u p offered b y the A l u m n i A s so c ia t io n to a m e m b e r ot th e S e n io r C Class w h o has d is t in g u is h e d h im s e l f by h is character, h is schola stic rec­ ord, a n d his a c h ie v e m e n t s in extra-curricula r activities: A w a r d e d to M a r t in D u k e T h e Frederick B lu m e n t h a l Prize for E x c e l le n c e in Scie nce, offered by Mrs. Clara B l u m e n t h a l in m e m o r y o f her son, Corp. Fred B lu m e n t h a l : A w a r d e d to L e o n a r d U l l m a n n I’he R o b e r t Ja cobson Prize for E x c e l le n c e in H istory , offered by Mrs. J u li a Ja c o b so n in m e m o r y of her son, l.t. R o b e r t J acobson: A w a r d e d to Ernst W e i l The Charles W e i l C up, offered by Mr. a nd Mrs. f r v in g W e i l in m e m o r y o f th e n son, g ive n a n n u a l ly to the best s t u d e n t in H is to r y in the J u n i o r II Class: A w a r d e d to P eter B e r m a n

CLASS

P R IZ E S

Senior A

J

Senior B Senior C J u n i o r 11 ...........

M St e p h e n

J u n i o r 1 ............. Intermediate IV

26

»

H

lock

E rnst

W

artin

D

Low

enth

obert

L

eil lre

.\l

e\ v

G

oldman

rnold

Cohan

arold

Intermediate III

A

Intermediate II

M

Intermediate I

I ’ ACi'.

R

B

ay

a r tin

Jo s e p h

C

ohen

Cohn


S C :H ()l,A R S IIII*

M K D A I.S

Laurc'iu'c Ashkin Alan ( lo o p r r A la n Fleischer Robert M ilch R ic h a r d IMehn Edgar Seidle r D a n ie l Shap iro Russell Sherm a n R ich ard Strasser A l lr e d Brinnniel (i c o r g c B u c h h a n d Jerome F einberg Bernard \\'e ndrolI Lewis C ole A lbert G o ttlie b Sam uel R o s e n f e ld S teph en Schenker Leonard LJllmann Peter B erm an Ernest Kuhl A rthur L an e A r n o ld Starr L h e od o r e W i e n e r M ic h a e l Juviler J u liu s S p ie g e lm a n

T h e m a i n address o i the e v e n in g was d e liv e r e d by Mr. R o g e r Bow er, Senior D irecto r, W^O.R.

H i s remarks w ere w ell received.

P ag e 27


Salutatory M r . H a l l , M r . B e r e n b e r g , m e m b e r s of th e fac ul ty , h o n o r e d guests, a n d f e l l o w s t u d e n t s :

I

T IS MY DIFFICULT bu t n o t too u iip lc a s a n t task to w e l c o m e y o u to the seventythird c o m m e n c e m e n t exercises o f the F ra nk lin School. I h a ve always e n j o y e d a t t e n d in g form er gra d u atio n s. T h e y h av e ne v e r b e e n

too short, so as to c o n ve y little m e a n i n g , yet they w ere n o t lo n g e n o u g h to cause uneasiness.

W e h o p e that this year w e h a v e p l a n n e d n o t o n l y a m e m o r a b l e ,

b u t an e n jo y a b le e v e n i n g for you. T o n i g h t y ou w ill hear speeches by o u r h o n o r st udents, by our headm asters, a n d by our h o n o r e d guest. Y ou Avill see prizes a n d d i p lo m a s aw'arded.

Perhaps

if you lo o k carefully e n o u g h , you w ill sec furtive g lan ces cast at the clock by the graduates, for w e are a n x i o u s to g a ther as Fra n klinites, after the exercises, this o n e last time.

As w'e stroll a l o n g to gether later, w e shall h a v e to realize

that this is the final chance to discuss o ld tim es w i t h o n e another. T h i s w ill be the last tim e w e shall in v o k e the sy m p a th ie s o f o u r classmates for the m ark received o n that last quiz. T h i s w il l be the last tim e w e shall dis­ cuss the m erits of o u r respectiv e girl friends. T h i s w ill be the last tim e w e shall d e b a te the injustic es o f the teacher w h o w e th e n t h o u g h t w'as so cruel, b u t w h o w e n o w k n o w was our true friend. In a sense, this w ill b e the last tim e w e shall g a ther en masse, b u t w e are l o o k i n g forw'ard to futu r e m e e tin g s . A n d w h e t h e r w e shall be discussing e x p e r ie n c e s in the A r m y or N a v y , or r e la t in g tales o f c o lle g e life, w e shall ne ver forget the g o o d tim es w e shared here. H o w can w e forget Mr. B e r e n b e r g ’s u b i q u i t o u s sm ile, e v e n in the face o f s u p p o s e d disaster? H o w can w e forget Mr. H a ll's dr)- h u m o r , or Mr. Kern's b i t i n g sarcasm, or Mr. S te ve n s’ f u tile efforts to keep a straight face w h e n a jo k e was cracked d u r in g his d isc ip lin in g . N o , w herever w e m ay m e e t, these m e m o ­ ries w ill foster w ishes— w ishes that w e w ere again back here. N everth eless, w e m a y feel d o u b ly gratified this e v e n in g . N o t o n lv h a v e w e successfully c o m p le t e d our high school studies, b ut w e h a \ e b e e n f o r tu n a te e n o u g h to see an e n d to o n e h a lf of oiu' country's g ig a n t ic struggle. I th in k I can see a paralle l bet^veen the struggles o f the a \ e r a g e Frankl in it e a nd the trials o f o u r n a tio n d u r i n g the pasi l o u r vears. As a s t u n n e d a n d s o m e w h a t u n p r e p a r e d A m erica e n tered the post-Pearl H a r b o r period, so -we e ntered Frank lin as naive an d i n n o c e n t c h ildren , un a w a r e o f the difficult tasks w e were u n d e r ta k in g . W e were, as was our coiuitry, full of spu nk, eager to

P ace

28


k'arn, I'cady lo ;ula|)t n o n e too sm o o th ly .

oiusoIncs

to

this

now \vay ol

lilc.

Al

liisl

ihc

(oiirsc ran

As Aincrica m i l t r m p o r a iy solbacks in flu' l*a<i(ic, so wc

cam e to gi ips witli Mi'. H all or Mr. B e n nl)i‘r!^ lor t h f in lr in ^ c m c n i ol som e rule w e "knew n o t h i n g \vhaisoe\('r a b o u l. ’ r h e n w e b u c k le d clown. ings.

W'e ac( iistomi il o i n s e U e s to oim' ne w s u r r o u n d ­

As A m erica p u sh ed forward in to N o r l h Africa, the ,\leutiair s, and (iu a d a l-

canal, and as she c o m m e n c e il a c h i e \ i u g \ ictory on every front; so we mastered l.a tin , chemistry, geom etry, and F.nglish. A n d tonight is our V-K Day. But the parallel does not end heri'. W'e, like . \ m e r i ( a , must still push for­ ward in an attemj)! to c o m p r o m is e otiy frie ndly e n e m y — e d u c a tio n , w hich indeetl may i \ e \ e r he c o m p le t e ly c oiupic red.

A n d w e ’ve got olf to a g o o d start.

A n u m b e r of us h a ve been accej)ted at colleges of our choic e. Still others o f Its \vill yet h a \ e to bear arms. B u t w?herever w e m ay l)c, w e shall he striving for the sam e goal. \V e shall t)c striving for success. W e shall be striving for pe a c e ot m i n d a n d security. B u t abo v e all, the Class of ’45 will be striving to m a k e all of y ou p r o u d o f all of us. E dgar Seidler

• t>A(.E 2y


ass H isto ry Ladies a n d G en tlem en : HiLE oissKRViNG THK, m a n y g ra d u a t io n s that I h a v e h a d the ple asu r e o£ a tte n d in g , I to rm ed certain defin ite c o nclusio n s. A m o n g these was the tact that of all the speeches the most b o r in g a n d tiresom e for the a u d i e n c e was the class history. W h e n I was chosen, how ever, to act as this year’s historian, I was forced to search th r o u g h m y brain for so m e in te r e stin g da ta c o n n e c t e d w it h the class. T h i s was a difficult task, b u t I h o p e I h a v e succeeded. It seems to m e that the history of a class is the m o s t la stin g o f so uvenir s. , \ s late age approaches, a person is c o m f o r t e d w ith t h o u g h ts of his form er schoolm ates. I h o p e that w h e n I am old er I shall trace the footsteps o f my class as eagerly as I d o now . I h o p e that w h e n I a m farther a d v a n c e d in years, I shall m e e t a n d converse w it h m y present classm ates a b o u t th e days sp e n t in Fra nklin . I a m sure that I shall be c o n t e n t w it h the record o f m y class. A lso, after all, the class history p rovid es a b a c k g r o u n d for a s t u d e n t ’s later life, a n d a g o o d b a c k g r o u n d h e lp s no e n d in m a k i n g a s t u d e n t ’s career b o t h successful and long -la sting. I am p r o u d to say that o n the w h o le our class is a fine one. It has m a n y b r illia n t students, a n d it is o n e o f the largest in a l o n g F r a n k lin history. It is frie ndly a n d g e n ia l, c o u r te o u s a n d self-sacrificing, a n d w h e t h e r c o n s id e r e d i n d i ­ v idua lly or c o lle c tiv e ly its m e m b e r s are always h e l p f u l a n d am ia b le . T h i s class b e g a n to assem ble at the earliest possible time.

For in P rim ary I

four boys e n te r e d F ra n k lin , little d r e a m in g that o n e day they w o u l d g r a d u a te from the school w h ose th r e sh old they passed over o n e early a u t u m n m o r n i n g i n 1934. T h e s e four boys w ere J i m m i e A l e x a n d e r , P eter Calisch, . \ l a n Cooper, a n d D a n i e l Shapiro. D u r i n g the In t e r m e d ia t e a n d Junio r years o u r class g ia d ua lly sw e lle d to fair-sized pro po rtio ns. Such d is t in g u is h e d boys as R ic h a r d P le h n , R o b e r t Harz, a n d R o b e r t M ilc h arrived. It was in S enio r C, ho w ev er, w it h the a d v e n t o f two boys, Edgar Seidle r a n d Jay Block , that the class was p r o v id e d w i t h w h a t is n o w its present b a c k b on e . T h e s e boys ha v e in their last three years b u i lt u p r e p u t a b le records, a n d they g r a d u a te to n ig h t w i t h h igh est honors. D u r i n g the last tw o years the class has a c q u ir e d m a n y o f its o u t s t a n d ­ ing students an d athletes. Boys like L a u r e n c e .\ s h k in , our p r o p h e t, D ic k Strasser, A la n Fleischer, a n d Jo e l C o h e n are in c lu d e d in this latter gro up. T h r o u g h o u t the eleven-year history of this class m a n y ev e n ts w o r th y o f m e n t i o n have o c c i u T e d . U n f o r t iu ia t e ly w e i i a \ e h a d to moiu'n the d e a th of two of our favorite teachers. I refer to Mr. ,\ l l i s o n a n d ^[r. G o rslin e, tw o friends w h o will always be r e m e m b e r e d by those w h o k new them . I ' h e to\\’e r in g figure of Dr. W e l l i n g , a l o n g w it h (he CN'cr po[)idar Mr. D alz ell, an d the ind on i-

P ag k 30


itablc Miss Ik'ck lia\'c joiiiccl ihc (iglilins; lorcc's ol' ilu' U iiiic d Slates. Mr. Bain has Ic'li us to broatlcast lo Soiiili A lii c a loi tlic Ollicc' ol War l i il o n ii a ii o n . D u r in g the lilc ol iliis class nunu'rous clubs have been inauf'uraied. Mr. Stc\'cns has started the Scienct' (Ilub, in whic h m any n ie n ib e is ol our (lass par:ieipate, A lan ( lo o p e r b ein g president, \ arious m usical d u b s have been o r g a n ­ ized, especia lly last year’s b and and this year's g lee d u b . Most im ])o ita n l, lunvever, is the c lu b Avhich the (lass itsell

has started.

Dubbed

the Varsity

t . l u b , it is e \ d u s i \ e l y lor athletes. R obert l i a r / is president ol the d id ) , w hic h alr eady has s e \e r a l c o n u n it le e s in c lu d in g o n e lor a c o n st it u t io n and a n o ther lor rules a n d regula tio ns. \ on may no tice that o n e chair on this platlorm is vacant. For already o n e o f oiu' nienibers. (i e r a l d \ \ 'a ld e n . has b een callctl to duty. W e are sure tlial as ho joins the m a n y others oL our a l u n m i in the service, he will return salely w ith h i g h d ecorations. A l l o f us k n o w that the light for freedo m m ust be won. I ’w o of the three e n e m y co u n tr ie s h av e already cap itu la te d , a n d the third is r a pid ly falling. I sincerely h o p e that w h e n the historian of n e x t year’s class delivers his speecli, c o m p l e t e vic tory w ill h a ve b e e n achieved. By n o m eans, how ever, w ill the history of this class term inate w it h its g r a d u a t io n , ff o n e thinks carefully, he w ill n otic e that the liistory of A b r a h a m L i n c o l n or any oth e r great m a n w o u l d n o t be very in teresting if it c o n c lu d e d w itli Iris s e v e n t e e n t h year. T h i s class w ill g o o n to w in m a n y m o r e laurels, and f a m e a n d glo ry w ill n o t be la c k in g to its m em bers. Yet w e shall always r e m e m ­ ber F r a n k lin S c h o o l for the f o u n d a t io n w^e receiv ed in life a nd for the basis of k n o w l e d g e w hicli th e school provid ed. R

ussell

Sherm an

P age

31


class Propnecy Ladies a n d G en tlem en :

W

HEN I WAS INFORMED by Mcssrs. H a l l a n d B er e n b e r g that I h a d b e e n chosen Class P ro ph et, I was as e la te d by the h o n o r as p e r p l e x e d by the difficulty

of the a ssig nm ent.

1 w o n d e r e d if I w o u l d b e a p r o p h e t or a loss.

A p p a r e n t ly

iny b e w i ld e r m e n t was n o t co nc e ale d, for Mr. H a l l e n c o u r a g in g l y said, “I t ’s n o t that difficult . . . w it h the h e l p of p h r e n o lo g y , palm istry, astrology, a n d horoscopy . . . there’s n o t h i n g to it .” “A n d , ” Mr. B erenb erg, w i t h a t w in k le in his eyes, added, “If you c a n n o t g a ther sufficient i n f o r m a t io n th r o u g h those sciences, try . . . theom an cy , scio m ancy, a n d p sycho m a ncy; a n d if you n e e d any m o r e h e lp , feel free to call on m e at any t im e . ” T h e m u lt isy lla b le s fired at m e by these e r u dite g e n t l e m e n left m e in a dazed c o n d i t i o n . As I w a lk e d in t o th e street, a p o w e r fu l w i n d b le w a n e w s p a p e r a gainst m e. f r o m m y bodv, I n o tic e d the da te lin e .

R e m o v i n g the paper

. J u n e 5th, 1985.

I shall n o w read items from this n e w sp a p e r that refer to the m e m b e r s o f this g r a d u a t in g class: R ic h a rd

P le h n

has just c o m p le t e d p lan s for the n e w F r a n k lin S c h oo l

l:)uilding w h ic h is to be erected on the site form erly o c c u p i e d by C entral Park. It is con sid e r e d the greatest a dv a nce in archit ecture since the c o n st r u c t io n o f the seven layer cake. T h e reason for the p h e n o m e n a l g r o w t h o f this sc h o o l is the n e w e d u c a t io n a l program in stitu te d by the h e a d masters, R o b e r t G r e e n ­ berg

and E d w a r d M i c h e l m a n .

B o t h h o u s e of Congress are b e i n g s w a m p e d by

an av a la n c h e of tefegrams from stu d e n ts p l e a d i n g for n a t io n a l a d o p t i o n o f this plan. A n e w type o f e x a m in a t i o n is the basis of this p o p u l a r idea. Q u e stio n s , very difficult ones, are given; an d if the stu d e n t k n o w s the answers, he sim plv writes the w o r d “yes.” J im m ie A l e x a n d e r

a n d R o b e r t B l o c k are fo r m in g a ri\ al school.

In their

e x a m i n a t io n , the w o r d “yes” w ill be p r in te d after the q u e s t io n . A te stim o n ia l d in n e r was te n dered D r . A l a n F l e i s c h e r , the c e le b r a te d brain surgeon, w h o , a few years ago, startled the m e d ic a l w o r l d by r e m o v in g h a lf o f the b rain from a patie nt. Physicians, in v it e d to witness the o p e r a t io n , so m a r ­ v e ll e d at his skill that they stoo d u p a n d a p p l a u d e d .

Dr.

F leischer b o w e d

graciously a n d for an encore r e m o v e d the r e m a in in g h a l t of the brain. T h e patie nt, by the way, is e n j o y i n g the best of h e a lt h to this day a n d has d i s t in g ­ uished h im s e lf as E dit or o f the “ N e w \ ' o r k D a i l y N e w s . " A n i n t e r v i e w w i t h A l a n C o o p e r , w h o , as h e a d o f the w e a t h e r b i u e a u . has m a d e an i n t e r n a t i o n a l r e p u t a t i o n

for exact w e a t h e r p re d ic ti o n s , disclosed th e

c o m p l i c a t i o n o f w e a t h e r prophecies. the

P age

32

«>

rea d in g s

of

th e n n o n i et e rs ,

T h e reporter obser\ed C oo p e r recording

b a ro m e te rs ,

and

other

com plex

instrum ents.


A l t e r a le w i n \ o l \ e ( l c a le u l a li o n s , ( l o o p e r i n r n e d to (he re| )orlci' a n d so ieiinily a n n o i i i u ' c d , " I t ' s j^oing to r a i n . "

The r e p o r t e r was impressed a n d said, “ M a r -

\ e k ) u s , Av'ould yon m i n d c'xplainint;- liow' yon a r r i v e d a( y o u r (o n ( Insion?” . . . "My

c or n ii u rt s ," was ilie rt'])ly. J a c k C'ai V Rrori' a n d

Kunii-

l ) u [ ) c r Swiss (iheese ( i o m p a n y . Swiss (Iheese.

I . i a i n I’ a n n o u n c e I'he\

w ill

It is composc'd e n t i r i 'l y ol hok's.

lacltu'ed, it c o i d d n ' i he seetr

lect a slicing m a c h i n e Cheese

1 hat

A rth i

o f li)e Snpc r-

A l t e r the lirst cheese was m a i u i -

1 his d il li c ii lt y was p a r t i a l l y solved l>y g i v i n g the

p r o d u c t a d i s t i n c t i \ e , il not too |)leasanl, o d or . t h o u g h \ o u ca n't see it.

ilie l o r m a i i o n

in t r o d u c e a c o m p l e t e l y n e w tyjie ol

N o w you k n o w i t ’s there, even

D a n n 's S u a i m r o , a clean-cut le l l o w , is w o r k i n g to perlo r this i n v i s ib le cheese.

I' he a d v e r t i s i n g slogan, “ T h e

Fills the Br ee /e, ' was c o n c e i \ e d by p u b l i c i t y m a n , A m ' r k d S i k r n .

R K t.A t isvR an d H oward (ioruKNUKiM have in tr o d u c e d a new sh av ­

in g techniciue . . . no-brush, uo-lather, no rub-ni, n o razor, no n o t h in g .

I ’liis

m e t h o d is lor the e x c l u s i \ e use lor the boys ol the 1985 Franklin Senior Class. I ' h e no-brush, no-lather, no rub-in part ol this techniciue was p r o d u c e d by • \ r t h i R Ki At I'.i'R. . . . T h e no-razor part was prochiced by F I o w a r d G c)ldi ;n H E iM . . . . Fhe boys ol the 1985 F'ranklin Senior Class were procktced by the F r a n k lin A l u m n i ol ’-15.

T h e foIloiL’in g is a g o s sip c o l u m n in this ne ios papcr : V our inc]uiring reporter, B o b M i l c h , r e m e m b e r e d that today is the 40th . \n n iv e r s a r y o f his g r a d u a t i o n from the F'ranklin School. H e has v is ited som e o f his form er classmates to see h o w tim e has d e a lt Avith th e m a n d is h a p p y to report; that J e r r y S i l v e r w’as \ o t e d a place in the Flail o f F a m e for his p la n of f e e d in g the G e r m a n prisoners. . . . “Serve th e m a seven c urse d i n n e r , ” w ere the w ords that m a d e Jerry fam ous. that the o u t s t a n d in g success of the a u t o b io g r a p h y by S a m u e l P r o p p , retired f u r n itu r e m an u fa c tu r e r , is the talk o f the literary w orld.

T w enty -fiv e

years in the f u r n itu r e business, w it h the slogan, “ I sta n d b e h i n d every b e d I se ll,” has p r o v id e d P r o p p w it h sufficient m ateria l for m a n y best

sellers.

tha t J o e L E ^ ’I^■ a n d J o e l C o h e n , w h o were always g o o d at figures, are the hea ds of that f a m o u s agency for m odels. L ev in is c o m p le t e ly w r a p p e d u p in his work, a n d Coheir, w h o m arrie d o n e of the C o h e n o v e r girls, is a m o d e l h usb a n d . that J a y B l o c k , a n h o n o r g r ad u a te of M. I. T . , has realiz ed his l if e ’s a m b i ­ tio n to b u i l d bridges. b e e n d e s ig n e d by Jay. that D i c k

S trasser

S o m e of the finest brid ges in use today have Jay is a dentist.

addressed

the Busin ess A fen’s L e a g u e

P r o sp e r ity at their last m e e tin g .

for P erpetua l

Fie surprised the g a t h e r in g by a d m i t ­

t in g busin ess was dead. H is listeners were r e lie v e d to learn that he is air u ndertaker. H e le a r n e d th e busin ess fro m the g r o u n d d o w n .

o

Page

33


that D r . E d g a r S e i d l e r has b e e n aw a r d e d the N o b e l Prize for tw o r e m a r k ­ ab le a c c o m p lis h m e n t s in b o tan y . H e created the T o m a b a n a n b y cross­ in g the to m a t o a n d b a n a n a ; a n d by crossing the p u s s y w illo w w i t h k e tc h u p , h e created the pussyket.

H e is n o w the w o r l d ’s m o s t fa m o u s

double-crosser. that R o b e r t S a c h s , r e cently e le c te d to the Senate , has already e a r n e d the u n d y i n g g r a t it u d e of the r ad io a u d i e n c e by p a ssin g a la w b a n n i n g s in g in g com m ercia ls, w it h o n e e x c e p t i o n — the “C a n

Y ou T o p

T his

G le e C l u b . ” that R u s s e l l S h e r m a n has finally am assed sufficient p o in t s to be discha rg ed from

the

Army.

that P e t e r C a l i s c h is a film producer.

H i s p r o d u c t io n “L it t le L o r d Faun-

telro y” was d e la y e d for so l o n g a tim e that the y o u n g star g rew a beard. T h e p icture is n o w c a lle d “T h e H a ir y A p e . ” that R i c h a r d P o l l a k Bank.

is p re sid e n t of the Six a n d Seven -eighth s N a t i o n a l

H e started his b a n k i n g career at tfie b o t t o m as P r e s id e n t o f the

First N a t i o n a l B a n k a n d w o r k e d his w ay up. that J e r r y W a l d e n , the first m e m b e r o f the F r a n k lin Class o f ’45 to enter the U n i t e d States N a v y , is n o w a successful fruit m e r c h a n t. "When asked the e x ac t d e fin itio n o f a tangerine, he r e p lie d , “A n o range, n o t cjuite u p to n a v a l standards.” that B o b b y history success proved before

is m an a g e r o f th e N e w York G iants, the o n ly tea m in the of o rg a nized baseball to w in every g a m e o f the season. T h e o f this tea m is d u e to B o b b y ’s b r illia n t le adership . H e has i m ­ o n the b a t t i n g t e c h n iq u e o f M e l O tt, w h o , by r a isin g o n e le g h i t t in g the ball, increased the p o w e r o f his drive. H arz teaches H arz

his players, before h i t t i n g the ball, to raise b o t h legs. that M a l c o l m K a n d e l h a d b e e n e x p e r i m e n t i n g w it h a ne'W’ b e \ e r a g e . H is first product. O n e Up, was n o t successful. H e lo c k e d h i m s e l f in his laboratory a n d d id n o t e m erg e u n t il h e c o m p l e t e d an i m p r o \ e d p r o d ­ u c t he n a m e d T w o Up. T h e r e was still s o m e t h i n g lacking. In q u ic k succession, he p r o d u c e d T h r e e U p , F o u r U p , F i v e Up. a n d Si x Up. N o n e was satisfactory.

In disgust, he gave up.

L ittle d id he kno^v

h o w close h e c a m e to success. Ladies and Gentlem en: If there is any d o u b t in your m in d s as to the a u t h e n t ic it y o f th e ite m s I have just read, be p a tie n t, co pies of this n e w sp a p e r w ill reach y o u o n J u n e 5,

1985. L

P age

34

aurence

A

sh k in


V aleclictorv

I

M i x i n c'lnolions that 1 slaiul boloic' you this cvt'iiing to hid tlic Iasi ad ieus ()1 the Sc'uior (Uass. 1'here a te (c'tlaiii times chiring o u f lives w h e n

I IS w r i i i

w e teel b oth h a ppy and sad, joyous yi't ])eiisi\'e, ( h e e i l u l yet soinl)ei'.

Ciradua-

tioii night is o n e ol these occasions. O u r p ositio n may be c o m p a r e d in a small n\easure to that ol Kdward ( l i b b o n Avho alter twenty-loui- years ol work concludetl his masterjiiece, " The n e c i i n e a nd Fall ol tiie R o m a n Enijjire.” H e later said: "1 w ill not d issem ble the lirst e m o t i o n ol joy on the final c(jmpletion o f the histor)'. Rut niy pride was soon h t n n b le d a n d a sober m e la n c h o ly was s pread over my m in d by the idea that 1 had taken an e verlastin g leave ol an o ld a n d agreeable c o m p a n io n ." r o n i g l u , too, w e Seniors are pleased, because w e h a \ e at last c o m p le t e d to the best oi our ability s o m e t h in g w e set o u t to tio tw elv e years ago. W e are conilorted, because w e have h ad the lu ll benefits o f a tiem ocratic system of e d u c a tio n , ft is a system w h ic h em phasizes free expressioit o f t h o u g h t a n d o p i n i o n and w h ic h fertilizes origin al e x p e r i m e n t a t i o n a n d ob servation. It has a t t e m p t e d to im b u e in us the ever -b u r n in g desire to seek truth a n d k n o w le d g e . O iu e d u c a t i o n has in tlie final analysis p r o d u c e d self-confident y o iu ig m e n — self-confident bec'ause w e have le a r n e d to d istin g u ish b e t w e e n g o o d a n d e \ i l , rig ht a n d w rong. f^erliaps these reflections e x p l a i n partly the sm iles o f c o n t e n t m e n t o n the faces o f the graduates tonight. Yet b e lo w the surface w e find the same s e n t im e n t of sadness exp ressed by P a u l H a m i l t o n H a y n e in liis worcfs, “A little w h i le I fain w o u l d lin ger y e t.” Every boy w h o has a t t e n d e d F ra nk lin has associated w it h the sc ho o l a certain i n e x p li c a b l e fe e lin g of c o m m o n interest a n d frie n d sh ip that c a n n o t be c o n n e c t e d w it h any other place. T h i s im pression p erm eates every classroom a n d corridor of the school an d seems q u i t e as in d e s tr u c tib le as F r a n k ­ l in S c h o o l itself. W h e t h e r the se nsation stems from the in fo r m a l d e m o cra tic ^vay o f teachin g; w h e t h e r it springs fro m the h eartfelt interest of our teachers w h o are alw ays w i l l i n g to share our problem s; or w'hether it is a b l e n d i n g of a h u n d r e d little th ings characteristic o n ly of F'ranklin scfioof, I k n o w not. Yet it is tfiere, a n d tfie t h o u g h t of feav ing sobers us.

M ere tim e w ill ne ver erase

these m em o ries. W i t h these re c o lle c tio n s the Senior Class reaches the final p a r tin g of ways, a n d p a u s in g o n ly to than k G o d by w'hose grace w e are here, casts a l o n g i n g lo o k o n the past a n d says farewell. Jay

L. B l o c k

®

Page

35


Lost

and F ound Lost

F o u n d By

C a lis c h ’s N o is e C hartoff’s D r a l t N o t i c e M i l c h ’s C o h m i b i a P i n

S ha pir o W ald e n Seidle r

Sherm an's Shirt P l e h n ’s B o o k b a g

L e v in e Cohen

Block's H o m e w o r k P r o p p ’s P h o t o g r a p h

Sachs Greenberg Strasser Harz

A l e x a n d e r ’s N a v y L e v i n ’s E x c use K la u b e r ’s C ane C o o p e r ’s D ig n i t y

Kandel

S te r n ’s Girls P o l i a k ’s F orgetfulness M i c h e l m a n ’s C om pass A s h k i n ’s W i n d s o n T i e

Fleischer R. B lo c h G oldenheim Silver J. B lo c k

Vox Pop F a v o r i te S u b j e c t .................................................... H istory 8, E n g lish 7 M o s t P o p u l a r ............................................................Harz M o s t W i t t y ................................................................ Seidler 13, H arz 9 M o s t S o p h i s t i c a t e d ............................................... Shapiro M o s t U n s o p h i s t i c a t e d ...........................................Sherm an M o s t D i g n i f i e d ......................................................... C ooper M o s t U n d i g n i f i e d ..................................................Calisch M o s t L i k e l y to S uc c e e d ......................................Jay Block Be st D r e ss e d ..............................................................Shapiro 9, A l e x a n d e r 8, Fleischer Be st L o o k i n g ........................................................... A shkin Most Talkatw e (hiietesl

.......................................................Calisch

........................................................................G o l d e n h e i m 8, Silver 6, L e v in e

6

M o s t P o p u l a r w i t h G i rl s .....................................\ s h k i n 12, Levin 8, B. B lo c h 4 M o s t P o l i t e ..................................................................\ l c x a n d e r 13, Fleischer 9 F ( w or i te M a g a z i n e ............................................... Escjuire 8, Life 7 l u m o r i l e A c t o r ......................................................... Bogart 6, E. G. R o b i n s o n 5 F a v o r i t e A ct re ss .................................................... R i i a H a y w o r th 5, J u n e A lly so n 5 Best A t h l e t e ..............................................................Harz 26, L e v in I Best Bl uf f er ..............................................................Plehn

Pace

3f)


bielcl D ay i r i p t-

...............

)K ll ic w o r l d ’s lar^c'si c ily, Hui

to I ' r a n k l i n i l e s

the

jim c

1, 1915, d ii w n c d d a i k ,

weather

was to be the d a te ol the a n n u a l ouiins^ (o I n d i a n l‘ o i n t .

b o ded

il l,

lot

this

D es p it e liiis, a n d w i l l i

t h e i r t a \ o r i t e w i n t e r coats anti l u i u h boxes sec in ely i n c k e d

nndei

i h e i r arms,

the boys ol F r a n k l i n p l o d d e d t h r o u g h the mist l o w a r d ih c p i e r at Korly-second Street to w h a t they ea rnestly h o p e d w o u l d be a n o t h e r pleas ain

oiuing.

The trip to the Point was u n e v e n t l t d lo)' the m ajority ol the fellow s save those selected lew ^vho were lo r tn n a te e n o u g h to w in ou t in the knock-dow nand-drag-out g in riuiniiy games. O u r yotnigcr sc ho o lm a te s, no t as yet k n o w i n g the finer p o in ts o f that eriulite pastim e, am u se d them selv es by a skin g w h a t it m e a n t w h e n o n e had 3-4-5-() o f spades, three aces, a n d three u n m a t c h e d cards or by firing their h i d d e n water jjistols. O th ers d o z e d tpiietly or ate their lunches. ■ \ t Gin' d e s tin a tio n , Mr. K in g q u ic k ly ran oH the track a n d field events. I ' h i s ^\’as practic ally useless for e v ery on e knew the results fjefore the s h o o t in g started. Harz, Fr anklin's ace of aces, took the g o ld first place m e d a l to a dd to his o\e rffo^\ing c o lle c tion , Joe L e \ i n received the se c o n d place m e d a l, a n d Jay B lo c k w o n the bronze third place m edal. I m m e d i a t e l y after the cessation of activity o n the track, tlie Seniors h a ste n e d to tlieir r e ndezvo us w it h the profs. B u t the teachers (tfiey’re no fools) d e c lin e d the i n \ i t a t i o n , shall w’e say, to play the Seniors a n d sent the S en io r B ’s a n d C ’s in their stead. T h e result was that alm o st all of the Seniors h it homers, a n d after the score was in th e d o u b le num bers, eve n the Senio r B ’s a n d C ’s d e c id e d tfiat it was tim e to q u it. Mr. H a ll officiated from b e h i n d the p la te a n d Mr. Berenbe rg c a lle d the plays o n the bases. T h o s e o f us w’h o were less enth u sia stic to e x p e n d o u r energies at a g a m e o f ba seball i n d u l g e d in T o m T h u m b G o lf a n d a q u ia tic m e r r im e n t in the p o o l w h i c h w'as alm o st as g o o d as it was advertised. O th e r s lo a f e d in the tall grass w h i l e m u n c h i n g ice cream cones an d s ip p in g soda pop. B u t alas, the b e ll s u m m o n e d us to the pier. O u r day lin e r was ne a r in g the dock. T h e sm all fry a n d their bigger brothers w ere n o lo n g e r a n x i o u s to play their respectiv e games. E v ery o ne w^as truly tired a n d w e l l n ig h e x h a u ste d . A n o t h e r field day h a d com.e to a h a p p y end. W e were g o i n g h o m e .

Page

37


Letters HEADQUARTERS 307th

a ir b o r n e

E N G IN E E R B A 'F T A L IO N

A P O 469, U . S. A R M Y 1 N o v e m b e r 1944. D

M

ear

rs.

Ja c o b i u s :

You h a v e n o d o u b t been advised by the W a r D e p a r t m e n t o f the d e a t h of your h u s b a n d , Capt. H e r m a n L. Ja c o b iu s, 0 - 4 9 8 5 4 4 , w h o was k ille d in actio n in H o l l a n d o n S e p te m b e r 28, 1944. fake, as w e all n a tu r ally ca lled h im , w’as k ille d w’h ile d o i n g the w ork that he h a d w a n t e d to do, achiiinistering aid to a rather severely w o u n d e d m an. D e a t h was i n s t a n t a n e o u s a n d occurred w h il e he was d o i n g that for w h i c h he was trained, d o i n g it ca lm ly a n d efficiently w i t h o u t regard for personal danger. Jake’s grave is in the p r o v in c e o f G u ild e r la n d , H o l l a n d , a n d I feel you w ill be g la d to k n o w that w e w ere able to secure the services o f a J e w is h C h a p ­ l ain to officiate at the b u r ia l service. I ' h e n ig h t before w e h a d a l o n g talk together a n d Jake to ld m e o f his ho pes a n d p la n s for the futu r e w h e n he r e tu r n e d to you a n d his practic e there at h o m e . D u r i n g that talk he said that h e w o u l d like to get so m e m or e real e x p e r i­ ence w it h casualties as h e felt he was g e t t i n g a little rusty in his surgical tech­ n iq u e .

F r o m that talk I k n o w that Jake left us d o i n g w h a t he w a n t e d to d o

a n d his le a v in g us has left a defin ite v o i d b ecau se w e all lik ed h im . T h e d e a th of a lo v e d o n e leaves a v o id in the life o f those that are left to carry o n a n d in your case it is i m f o r t u n a t e that there h a d to be so m a n y m iles o f space s epa rating y o u a n d Jake at the tim e. I ' o b o t h you a n d his jjarents we, the officers a n d m e n o f this b a t t a lio n , send ou r heartfelt c o n d o le n c e s a nd the assurance that his d e a th was in the hioh O est traditions of the M edica l Corps. Sincerely, E. A. B e d e l l , Major, 307 A / B Engr. Bn., C om m anding.

I ’ AGK

38

o


A low ( l a \s hcloi't' tlie d e a t h ol ( ; a | ) l a i n ho e i i t n i s t e d to his ehissmate at F r a n k l i n , to M r , a m i beautilul

(a t o h s o n , he w r o t e a le t te r w li i c h

lie n ja iiiin

/Vriistein, to be d e l i v e r e d

M r s . Jacobson in ease R o b e r t was lost in b a ttl e.

M x t o p l s ol

the

niessai>e lo l lo w : June

Hi ar

18,

l!)M

Bi n :

1 a m e m losing in

this a l e t t e r

to m y

|)arents whic h

\ v o u l d t>i\e t h e m s h o u ld a i n t h i n g ha[)])cn to me.

I wish

you

This is b e in g w r i t ­

ten h u r r i e d l y —

Dt-AR

Mcvmi R AM ) D a d :

The liiiure is most uncertain: co m b a t seems to be sine. Your son at the m o m e n t leels that sense ot e latio n that; nuist ccjme to ail m en w h o b e l i e \ e they are a m o n g the “best; w h o w alk this e a r th .’’ Further, 1 h a \ e d e \ e l o p e d a keen dislike or hatred lor the Ciermati— so in som e respects my m e n t a l a ttitu d e is good. Ho^vever, at a tim e like this, I am lo o k in g backw ard too— a n d find m u c h to do that I tailed to take care of. Life, because of you, has been go o d , f h a \ e b e e n blessed in m a n y ways by h a \ i n g h a d you as m y Parents. I shall always strive to m e e t your ap p r o v a l— to m ake you proud

o f m e.

l l i e f i u i n e has great app ea l to m e — after the war. f feel I can m a k e m y w ay w it h the Best. (Several j^ersonal lines o m itte d .) So 1 w a n t to live \ e r y m uch. S h o id d a n y t h i n g h a p p e n to m e do no t feel too badly. W e o w e m u c h to the c o un try for w h ic h I am fighting. A short life there is far m o r e d esirab le tlian o n e elsewhere. (Several personal lines o m itted .)

S h o id d I be u n lucky , it is m y

desire that B e n j a m i n have his choice of any tiling 1 have. I also w a n t H erbert, B o b , a n d E v e ly n to ha v e s o m e th in g . (Several personal lines o m itted.) It is late. I n e e d sle ep— to m o r r o w is a busy day. I h o p e y o u wall never read this. If you d o — be p r o u d a n d be grateful to our coimtry. Love,

B(jb

P

age

39


HEADQUARTERS 87th

IN F A N T R Y D IV ISIO N

APO

448, c / o

P ostm aster

N e w York, N e w York

M

y

D

ear

M

rs.

B

uschhoff:

I k n o w o n ly to o w ell that w ords c a n n o t b r in g c o m fo r t to yo ur h eart in these hoin 'S

o f loss.

H o w e v e r , as your b o y ’s d iv is io n c o m m a n d e r , I Avant to tell you

that all of us w h o r e m a in in the d iv is io n grie ve w i t h y o u in the loss of our comrade. Your son, P riv ate F rederic k M. Buschhoff, f 2 2 2 f l 5 0 , was k il l e d in a c tio n 31 January 1945 d iu in g o u r a d v a n c e near H erresb ach, B e lg iu m .

H e was b u r ie d in

L u x e m b o u r g , after an a p p r o p r ia te service at w h ic h a J e w ish C h a p l a i n officiated. Y ou m ay secure m o r e d e t a il e d in f o r m a t io n c o n c e r n in g the l o c a t io n of the grave a n d the disposal o f y o ur s o n ’s r e m a in s a n d effects by c o m m u n i c a t i n g dir ectly Vv^ith the Q uarterm aster G en e r a l, A r m y Services Forces, W a s h i n g t o n , D. C. H e d id his d u t y s p le n d id ly a n d was l o v e d a n d a d m ir e d by all ^vho k n e w h im . W e w ill n o t forget. H e gave his life in b a ttle in the service o f his c o u n tr y — these s im p l e w ords c a n n o t li g h t e n o u r sorrow, b u t th ey b r in g great prid e a n d in s p ir a tio n to us all. (sign ed )

F' r ,a.n k

L. C

llin

, Jr.

F R A N K L. C U I J N . J r . B rig a d ie r

G en er a l,

C o m m a n d in g .

P ace

40

U . S. A r m y ,


SENIOR A ©

T o p Row; Stern, Plehn, Chartoff, Milch, Shapiro, Harz, Le­ vine, Klauber, Fleischer, Alex­ ander Middle Ro^v: Calisch, Kandel, Cohen, Levin, Greenberg, J. Block, Poliak, Sachs, Cooper, Goldenheim, Sherman Bottom

Row;

Silver, Propp.

Strasser, Seidler,

Mr.

Beren-

berg, Mr. Hall, Ashkin, Michelman, R. Bloch


SENIOR C â&#x20AC;˘

T o p Row: Shapiro, Gottlieb, Birnbaurn, Rosen, Skupsky Middle Row: Grubm an, Ullmann, Mallin, Weiss, Witty, Sobel, Mohr Bottom Row: Goldstein, Schenker, Duke, Dr. Standerwick, Aronson, Cole, Rosenfeld


JUNIOR I •

Top

Row:

Levy, Rosenthal,

Commanday, 'Wilson, Philips, Toback, Sacks Bottom Row: StaiT. Lane, E n­ gel,

Miss

Fullagar,

Michelnian, Kommel

^V'^iene^^


SENIOR B •

T o p Row: Grohman, Philips, Kono, Jacobson, W^eil Middle

Row:

Rosen,

Buch-

band, Pollowitz, Dardeck, Moscov, Joseph, Schwartz Bottom Lane,

Row: Mr.

Rapp,

Kern,

Weiss,

Brummel,

Wendroff, Pindyck

P age

43


JUNIOR II •

Top

Row:

Berlin,

Klatsky,

Sweet, Jacobs, Margulies Middle Row: Jubiler, Lowenthal, Wilson, Lederman, Kuhl. Wess, Rosenberg Bottom

R oa\’:

Wallach, Schnei-

erson, Bennan.

Mr. Softietti.

Fischer, Levinsohn, Stern

I’M.F

44

^


INTERMEDIATE IV ^ III •

T o p Row: B. Holstein, Rogers, F. Holstein, Goldman Middle Row: Bogen, Bower, Gruff, Caplan, Welker Bottom

Row:

Cohan,

Levy,

Jiiviler, Miss Limbach, Lane, Bernstein, Weiler

P

age

45


INTERM EDIATE II « I •

Back Row: M. Coheii, Alex­ andre,

Holtzman,

J.

Cohn.

Mrs. Lynn, Engel Middle Row: Hodas, Spiegelman. Ollendorf, Geist, Gold Bottom Ro^\': Richter, Meyers


PRIMARY II •

T o p Row; Bienen, Kautz, H a r­ mon, Fay, Braunschweig, Rich­ ter, Von T ill Bottom Row:

Miss Russack,

Betty A nn Holtzman, Feigin, Ztxcker, Block, Friedman

P ace

47


PRIMARY I â&#x20AC;˘

From left to right: Mrs. Coufall,

Edelman

Marx, Schwartz,

Jacobs,

Rosencrantz, Kirsch,

Joan Kl i n g ,

Goldfarb,

Starr, Bergen, Pogasch, Maier, Smith, Bienen


KINDERGARTEN â&#x20AC;˘

From left to right: Linda Ellenbogen, Anne Hecht, Peter Kaplin, Laiirence W anderman, Eugene Vesell, Linda Breslow, Anne

Blvimenfeld, C a r o l y n

Smith,

Daniel

Hyman, Jane

Geller, Stephen Marx, Stephen Chaplin, Robert Paley, W alter Stein

o

P age 49


Page

50


A C T IV IT IE S


S TU D EN T COUNCIL •

Back

Row:

Berman,

Duke,

Lane, Ullmann. Engel Bottom Milch, Calisch

P

age

52

Row: Harz,

Block, Poliak, Cooper,

Sachs,


S tu d e n t Council I

X m s M'AR iHK s r i'D i'N i c o i Ncii. i i i u l o r i o o k a s^rcal deal ol

im p o rla n i

work.

I t h e l p e d in the selling ol n e a rl y 3 2 0 0 , OOO ivoi lli o f bonds in ih e .Sixth a n d S e v en th \ \ ’ar Loans.

It sponsored ih e ex c e lle n t w o r k ol A l a n C^ooper in raising

S 400 l o r the R e i l C'.ross.

It h e lp e d

o f th e peo[)le ol l i b e r a t e d E i n o p e .

in the c o ll e c ti o n ol c l o t h i n g I'or the re li el I t a r r a n g e d the (hmce to w h i d i the ( J a l h o u n

S cho ol girls w e r e i n v i t e d .

I ' h e F r a n k lin Scho o l T o w n M e e t in g s were c o n d u c t e d un d e r the auspices o l the C o iuicil. I ' h e s e mc'etings, m o d e l e d on Mr. D e n n y ’s I’o w n M eetin gs, d is ­ cussed the \e \^ ' \'ork State A nti-B ia s B ill, P e a c e tim e M ilita ry d rain ing, p a rtici­ p a t i o n in post-war E u r o p e a n affairs, a n d the a d o p t i o n of a N a t io n a l Service Act. A m o n g the boys w h o p a r tic ip a te d in these m e e tin g s were L a u rence A sh k in , Ja y B lo c h , G eo rge B u c h b a n d , Jack Chartoff, Lew'is C ole , M a r t in D u k e , J e r o m e F e in b e r g , R o b e r t M ilc h , J o se p h

M osc o u ,

R ic h a r d P le h n , S a m u e l

R o se n f e ld ,

L a u r e n c e Sch o e n , R u s se ll S herm a n, A lf r e d Stern, L e o n a r d U l l m a n n , W e i l, B er n a r d W’endroft.

Ernest

R o b e r t Harz and A la n C o o p e r served as nroderators.

P age

53


COUNCILOR 9

T o p Ro^v: Schoen, Brummel, Grohman, ^Veil, 'Wendroff Middle Row: Alexander, Flei­ scher, Buchband, Moscou, Le­ vine, Chartoff Bottom Row: Sherman, Sha­ piro, Seidler, Milch, Cooper, Mohr, Calisch

Page

54


1lie Councilor c:c)UNcu,()R

_L

iacopliou

in

HAS

19.S9.

»!■ !• N tlu' o l l u i a l

nc\vs|);i|)c'r ol

I'lu' late F r c d r i c k

I' Va ii kl ii i School since ils

li i i s ( l i l i o l i , ’ 12, a n d

'42, \vcro the lo u n d e r s a n d (irst K d i t o is in-Clhiel ol the |)a|)ei'.

lleyw ood

Kling,

Since that Sep-

tenibei' m o r n \ \ h e n the s t u d i n t s o f I ' l a n k l i n School (irst f^a/ed u p o n

theii' o w n

school n e w s p a p e r, the boys each year h a \ e be com e used to a la rg er a n d b et te r C '.o rN c n O R .

This ye ar the

C Ioiincii.or

has g r o w n to a li it ee n- pa g e j o u r n a l .

D u r in g the j>ast school year the paper has in tr o d u c e d n ew articles, h u m o r ­ ous I'catures, and interesting, ins])iring editorials. I’he ( k ) i i N ( : i i. ( ) R has greatly inlluencetl the school. es[)ecially d u r in g the past school year. It has had m u c h to d o w it h the in s t il u t i o n ol a larger a n d vaster a th le tic program , w it h the lu rther p o p u la r iz a t io n ot the to w n m eeting s, an d w ith b r in g in g to the a t t e n t io n ol the stu d e n t b o d v the etlorls ol the S tu d e n t C o u n c il. O th e r leatures to have been a d d e d w i t h i n the past school year in c lu d e the first u tiliz a tion of c o lo red inks, m e m b e r s h ip in the C o l u m b i a S c h o l a s t i c f^RESs A s s o c i a t i o n (a third prize in that association), an d the polls of the In stitu te of S t u d e n t O p in io n . T h e C o u n c i l o r staff has e n j o y e d m a n y hours of ple asant work o n the n e w s­ paper. Its m e m b e r s have w o r k e d hard a n d d ilig e n tly , have o fte n b e e n d isc o u r ­ aged a n d cast do^vn, but ha v e c o m e th r o u g h witfi colors Hying hig h. The

Class o f

f9 45 ,

Frank lin

Scliool,

m ay

w e ll

be

proud

of

its

own

C o u n cilo r.

T h e Staff; E d i t o r - i n - C h i e f ...

R

obert

A.

M

ilch

Managing Editor

A

A r t E d i t o r ............

E dgar S eidler

S p o r t s E d i t o r ..... L i t e r a r y E d i t o r ..

D

lan

C ooper

aniel

S hapiro

P eter

C alisch

o

P

age

55


SCIENCE CLUB •

Top

Row:

Sherman,

Block,

Poliak, Cooper, Seidler, Gott­ lieb,

Mallin,

Fleischer,

Mr.

Stevens Middle Row: Rosenfeld, Skiipsky, Weil, Schoen, Briniimel, Lane, Biichband Bottom Row: Mohr, Moscoii, Silver

P age

56


S c ie n c e Clul:) I

n

n I ars lu . u iu lt 'r i l u ' g u i i l a i u i ' ol not l i u i i l

ilseir

Mr.

A ll i s o n ,

i l u ‘ St iciux; ( i l u l ) d id

lo the o x p l o r a i i o n ol ih c inysU'iics ol |>liysics, ch e m is l ry , b i o l ­

ogy a n d a s tr o n o m y ,

li \ t ' n t u r c d b o l d l y in t o the r e a l m ol the s u p e r n a t u r a l .

I he

awe -s tri ck e n m e m b e r s h e a ri l strange ra p p in g s on w al ls a n d tables; they saw p i c ­ tures saving m a d l y I r o m

the \valls; they saw chairs m o v e w h e n by the laws ol

jihysics they c o u l d no t mov e.

-\11 this has c ha ng ed.

I'he clidj is no\v soberly e n g a g e d in s tu d y in g m ore

earth) things, such as the dietary hab its ot mice.

Its m e e tin g s are taken u p w ith

lectures by its m e m b e r s o n plastics, m e d i c i n e in war-time, and the scientific ■^vonciers o f the post-war -world.

Mr. Stevens, the la cu lty achisor, has s h o w n a

iiiu nber ot in te r e stin g m o v i n g pictures d e a lin g w it h these cpiestions.

T h e dis­

cussio ns at the m e e tin g s, if n o t ahvays p r o t o u n d , have at least been lively. 'I'his year’s officers were A la n Cooj)er, President; Edgar Seidler, Vice-Presi­ dent; A la n Fleischer, Secretary, a n d Jay Block, T reasurer. m e m b e r s h ip from the three S enior Classes.

I ' h e club draws its

A n in te r e stin g a n d instructive p r o ­

g r a m has b e e n pro je c te d for the n e x t season.

T h e club h o ld s a charter from

th e Scie nce C lu b of A m erica.

o

P

age

57


RED AND BLUE 9

T o p Row: Gottlieb, Michelman,

Weil,

Scheiiker,

Ull-

mann, Schoen, Pindyck, \Venclroff, Rosenfeld Middle Row; Alexander, Le足 vine, Sherman, Moscov, Levin, Sachs, Shapix'O, Chartoff, Stern B o tto m

Ro

: B ii c h b a n d ,

Milch, Mr. Hall, Calisch, Mr. Berenberg, Block, Brummel


1 lie Reel a n d B lue NDi R n il '. 1 1)1 r o K i A i , k';ulc’rslii|) ol

the Ri'i) AM) Hi.UK \v;is p u b l i s l u d Clhrislinas;

the o t h e r soon

alter

I ’t ic r C.alisc li, llu' l()rly-c'if>lilli c d i l i o n ol

in tw o volunu's, oiu' ;i|>j)C';n'iiij> s h o r ll y a l l c r Kasier.

I'lic

articles, six |)t)eins. a m i t w e n t y - i o u r stories. cerned w ith the te^v

tw o

the w r it e r s , m a n y

ol

seventeen

To o inu c li ol the m a t e r i a l was c o n ­

a t h e n t u r e s c onn ec tet l ^vith the w a r ;

t h o u g h ts o l

issues c o n l a i n e d

whom

but

w er e

th.it, a l t e r a ll, r e ll ec ie d

la c i n g

induciion

w ith in

a

m o n th s .

P r o b a b ly the best le a tu r e o f the R f. d

and

B

lue

was the fact that it was no t

the -(vork o f a fe^v boys. T h e r e were tw enty-tw o c o ntrib uto rs in all; a n d w h il e th e largest r e p r e se n ta tio n cam e from Senior A, in all the fields o f w r itin g the -Senior B a n d C boys h a d d o n e their share.

D u r i n g the visit o f the ten representatives of the A ssociatio n o f the M id d le States a n d M a ryla nd, w h o sp e n t tw o days in e v a l u a t i n g the school, copie s of th e C o u n c i l o r , the F r a n k l i n i t e , a n d the R

ed a n d

B

lue

were e x h ib it e d . T h e s e

p u b l ic a t i o n s w ere rated superio r by the v isita tion c o m m itte e .

T h u s the school

has every reason to feel p r o u d of the efforts of its s tu d e n t editors.

®

P

ace

59


GLEE CLUB •

T o p Row;

Berman, Fischer.

Rosenberg, Duke, Rosen Middle Row: Schoen, Lowenthal, Lederman. Dardeck, "Wil­ son, Witty, Winston Bottom Ro\\” Cole, Gottlieb, Rosenfeld,

Mr.

Gunderman.

Ullmann, Aronson, Skiipsky

I’a g k 0 0

o


A RT CLUB â&#x20AC;˘

Left to right: Silver, Skupsky, Sobel, Weiss, Cooper, Mallin, Grubm an, Winston, Mr. Ross, U llm a n n ,

R osen,

M ilc h ,

Schwartz

Pace

61


CHESS CLUB •

T o p Row: Wendroff, Schenker, Weil Middle Row: Fleischei', Buchband, Poliak, Moscou, Seidler Bottom

Ro^v:

Sachs,

Plehn,

Stem, Cooper, Sherman, Block, Ullmann

Page

62


Cliess CluL c:asi'.vi.ia

\ism N c

F ranklin School (Uirin» the past ycai- m ig ht have

be e n justiliecl in e o n c h u l i n g that w h ile studyins> was the s c h o o l ’s vo catio n, chess

was its a\c)cation.

T h e ie was a chess g a m e , o v e n or siirre|)titioiis, g o i n g on all

the time. A ll r e d Stern alw ays h a d his pockel-sct in actio n,

fay lilock a n d Edgar

Seidle r m o r e than o n c e h a d to be ejected Irom the B o o k k e e p i n g R o o m so that

Mr. S p a h n m ig h t h av e a cha n c e to c o n d u c t his classes in C o m m e r c ia l Law.

U n l o r t i i n a t e l y w e c a n n o t record that the a c h ie v e m e n t s o f the club ecjualled

its e n th u sia sm .

A fte r m atc h e s w ith oth e r schools the players p r o d u c e d alibis

in s te a d o f victories.

A fter all, the g a m e ’s the thing.

A l a n C o o p e r was P r e side nt o f the club.

R ic h a r d P l e h n m a n a g e d the team.

P

age

63


BASKETBALL TEAM ®

T o p Ro^\" Schneicrson. Rosen. Jacobson, Bi'ummel AFiddle Ro^\': Shapiro, Sachs. Lane.

Pollowitz.

Lederman.

Harz B o tto m

Row:

M r.

K in g .

Cohen, Ashkin, Block. Levin. Philips, Strasser

Page

64


Basketball -r-w T in i \ \

n il

1\c i

!• 1 1<),\ oi- oiu' s h o r t l i \ c d

sp .ii k ol

\i< io iy ,

ll ic

I'liiiikliii

l)as

kc th ;i ll liMin w o u i u l u p ii.s ( ;nu |). ii “ ii w i l l i (lie iiol <o i i i p l c l c l y ,s:il isl.u lot y

roc'oicl ot st.'\c'ii victories as a*;ainsi

l i \ t ‘ ilc lca ts a n d a l l u c c w a y

lie ioi

second

p o si ti on o n tlu' M . A . A . l ’ .S. la d d e r. r i i i n g s siartc'd o i u

n o n e too w e l l

first six i^aines ol the schedule. and o\e r-e on (u le iu e

that

l o r the

Red and

l i i n e as th ey s|)l il tlie

A l l the way lhrouj>h it was slo|>|)y ha ll h a n d l i n g

set the

Uea\ers

lo cleleat

e ve ry o t h e r

time.

As

has

been the case tor m a i n years in the past, L i n c o l n was the school we h a d to beat and

couldn't.

W hether

it

was socci'i,

l ) a s k e lb a ll ,

or

baseball

i.in co ln

alw a y s

m a n a g e d to nose us o u t.

F ic ld sto n was a p p a ll in g l y terrible, an d w c k n e w it, but they beat us. I lu; fellow s w ere k id d in g a r o u n d th r o u g h this g a m e , and they paid lor it. Ikit d o not let this reporte r pain t an u n t r u e picture o f the 1911-194.5 basketball team. It was a g o o d outfit. })crhaps not .so g o o d as last year’s cpiintet, b u t it w o r k e d a d m ir a b ly as a team. As Block a n d A s h k in w ere first strin g veterans of the 194o-44 team , they knew m ost of the ropes. I.evin was a se c on d stringer last year a n d was fairly w ell fa m iliar w it h the plays. I’h ilip s a n d J a c o b s o n w ere n ew -com ers \ \ h o lea rn ed cjuickly. W'ith Strasser these feflows soon s t e p p e d to the l im e lig h t . Harz was a tar better soccer a n d ba seball pla yer than lie was a basketball p la y in g

phiyer,

but

there

was

no

one

who

c o u ld

accuse

h im

ot

not

well.

"Iliougl^ the o u t c o m e o t w h a t p r o m is e d to be F r a n k l i n ’s first clia m p io n sfiip bask e tb a ll tea m in m a n y years was n o t so tjright as m a n y F r a n k lin ite s fiad e x p e c t e d , tlie season was far fr om a let-dow'ii affair. N o tan, ho w ev er, b a d as was o u r s h o w in g , c o u l d accuse the players o f p r o \ i d i n g a d u l l tim e, for every g a m e was n i p a n d tuck to the c lo sin g seconds. T

he

R

ecord:

F r a n k lin F r a n k lin

39 38 36

Barnard Staten Isla nd

39

L in c o ln East Irw'in F ie ld sto n Birch W a t h e n

33

Barn ard

F r a n k lin

55 29

F r a n k lin F r a n k lin

42 35

R iv e r d a le L incoln F ie ld st o n

F r a n k li n

49

F r a n k lin F r a n k lin F r a n k lin F r a n k lin F r a n k lin F r a n k lin

52 36

D w ight McBurney

40 30 43 43 42 16 23 29 33 33 47 43

Page

C,"


BASEBALL TEAM e

T o p Ro^v: Schneierson, 'Weil, Klauber, Strasser, Rosenberg Middle Ro^v: Calisch, Pollowitz, Lane, Greenberg, Kandel, Cohen Bottom

Row:

Mr.

King, J.

Block, Jacobson, Hai'z, Levin, Ashkin, Milch


BaseLall

A

(jriC K

(a .A N c i:

well

throughout

ai

com prchcnsiw

llu' and

baseball unbia si'd

rtxoid

leaves

mulc'rslaiuliii}>

llic rcadci ol

ilic

w ilh

1015

lar

Ir o n i

l)ascl)all

a

leain,

lo r no t o n ly d i d the team lose all ol its league f>aiiies, bin it also la r e d no nc- loo testily to the

alter

the r e m a i n d e r ol

laet, h o \ \ e \ e i ,

that

the seliedtde. tlu' breaks

Any

i’ r a n k i i n

supporter w ill

against

otu' boys t i m e

just w e n t

ti m e. A g a i n , as in soeeer, it was the o ld , o ld story ol the lack ol e x p e r ie n c e a n d

" a t h l e t i e " sense, so to speak, ol most ol the te a m ,

l i n t on M a y

16, w h e n

the

R o d a i u l B l u e b a l l players h a d h i n i g u p t h e i r toggs l o r a n o t h e r year, a learn t h a t sho^\■ed the fight th a t has e x e n i p l i h e d F r a n k l i n b a ll

teams l o r m a n y years

w e n t d o w n in n o t-t o o -g lo ri o u s history.

P aced by Claptain R o be r t H a r /, Jay Block, Bob M ilc h , Joe L e v in , a n d |oeJ C o h e n , the c lu b be c a m e a w ell- knit ag g regation alter o n ly tw o weeks ol pr ac­ tice. O th e r sta n d o u ts i n c lu d e d D ic k Strasser, Larry A sh k in , Stanle y Schneierson. A r t h u r Klaub er, Jack Pollow'itz, a n d H e r b Lane. C a p ta in B o b b y H arz finally exj^loded at the bat alter three years of varsity ball playin g. Startin g off w it h a sin gle against B r oo k ly n Frie nds early in the season. B o b really let lo ose against F ield sto n w h e n he parked a l o n g h o m e run over the center field lence. I n c id e n ta lly , Mr. Harz is the first player in d ie M .A .A .P .S. to a c c o m p lis h this leat du r in g a le a g u e contest. H e continued k n o c k i n g the ba seball a r o u n d an d against L i n c o l n w h e n h e h i t o n e for the distance, b u t was h e l d o n third by a fo o lish base coach. A lso again st L in c o l n h e h it a n o t h e r — this tim e g o o d for tw o bases. B o b e n d e d his h i g h school base ­ b a ll days again st State n Isla nd A c a d e m y w h e n he c o n n e c t e d a gain for tw o bases. T h e other b ig g u n in th e F r a n k lin offense was J o e L e v in . J o e d id n ot h i t a h o m e - r u n all season, b u t he g a th e r e d tw'o a nd three base hits tim e a n d tim e again. H i s b a t t in g average was .316. H a r z ’s average w'as .313. As for the line-up, R ic h a r d Strasser was sta tio n e d at first, Stanle y Scheiers on p la y e d at se cond, B o b Harz was at the short stop p o sitio n , a n d Larry Ashk in p e r fo r m e d at third. Bert Ja co bso n, w h o w ill be the o n ly varsity player a v a ila b le for n e x t year, tu r n e d in a fine jo b o n the m o u n d . J oe L e v i n ably h a n d l e d the catchin g. In the outfie ld . B o b M ilc h was in center, Jay B lo c k was in left, a n d J oe l C o h e n was in right. T h e s e boys p la y e d e x tr e m e ly w ell t h r o u g h o u t th e season. A l o n g w i t h A r t h u r Kla uber, w h o s ubstituted, they w'ere also to be d e p e n d e d u p o n . I t W'as a lo n g a n d hard season, a n d w e were n o t a victorious gro up, b u t we w ere fig h tin g all the way. M u c h credit m u s t also be g iv e n to C oa ch Sid ney K in g, w h o m a d e e v e n this p o o r season j^ossible, a n d to Ernst W e i l , the m anager. T

he

R

ecord:

F r a n k lin

0

F r a n k lin F r a n k lin

9

F r a n k lin F r a n k lin F r a n k lin

C ity C o lle g e J. V. B r o o k ly n Frie nds Barnard

3 6

F ie ld s t o n

6

L in c o l n

7

Staten Isla n d A c a d e m y

8 2 8 7 10 5 •

P age

67


SOCCER TEAM â&#x20AC;˘

T o p Row: Goldstein, Schoen, Shapiro, Stern, Grohman Middle Row: Klaiiber, Levine, Goldenheim, S ach s, J o s e p h , Chartoff Bottom

Row:

M r.

K in g ,

Cohen,

Milch,

Harz,

Levin,

Block, Lane


S o c c er

I

F A I ' K A M coiu .i ) call a season in w l i i c h il losl all ol ils live j^^amcs a su<(:c:sslul season, th e n the

1911 I ' l a n k l i n

l o r it ^vas \v i l h sneh a r i H o r d

ih a l

School soccci- (earn

e n jo y e d

(he

ended

Reel a n d l i l n e

thoui>h we w o n not a single s^anie, (he boys w o i k e d g a \ c t h e i r a ll to u p h o U l tlu' dwindlins^ li ^h t ol This y e a r ’s c a m p a i g n , a n d

ils seasoTi.

Yctl,

a d m i r a b l y as a (cam ai]d

I’ l a n k l i n soccer victories.

it \vas almost as

ol the lellows, was an u p - h i l l a l l a i r

a f>oo(l r(x:oi(l,

bad as a c a m p a i g n

I r o m start to linish.

lo r m a n y

Bob M a r / , c a jH a in ol

the tea m , p l a \ e d the e n t i r e season w i t h an i n j u r e d a n k l e a n d w i t h a la m e back; M i l c h p la y e d w i t h a ta p e d back; Clohen h a d tr o i d )l e w i t h his kn ee; a n d so it w e n t — ad

in lin itun i.

Kut at g a m e tim e the boys lorgot their m ala die s. A lt h o u g l i they pla yed hard, they receiv ed the w eekly beatin g: they still were o n the tail e n d ol the score. The o n e tr iin n p h that the tales alm o st a llo w e d us was at Bro o klyn Friends, l .e d by the b r illia n t p la y in g o l B o b Harz, our boys led the B r o o k ly n team by 2-0 at the half. B u t th en there was a secon d halt. As tor the rest, that is a n c ie n t history— w e lost, 4-2. T h r o i i g h o u l the season o n e c o td d easily p u t his h a n d o n the stand-outs. 'I'hey w ere B o b Harz a n d B o b M i lc h o n the forw ard w all, a n d JayB lo c k in the backfield. H arz was w o n d e r fu l. E v e r y th in g he d id W'as right. M i lc h p la y e d 9 0% of the g a m e on his back. H e pla yed e x tr e m e ly h a rd and h a d p l e n t y o f guts. I ' h e H ar z -M ilc h c o m b i n a t io n was really s o m e t h i n g to watch. Jay B lo c k was u n d o u b t e d l y the backfield ace. W h e n he was ne ar th e ball, a g o a l again st us was im po ssible. T h e r e was a boy w h o c o u ld really kick. As for the rest of the season, it was dark, dism al, a n d dis cou ra g in g. T h e F r a n k lin boys fell v ic t im to o n e team atter another. N e v e r was there m u c h h o p e o f victory, b u t w e w ere b a t t lin g every m in u t e . W e lost all ou r games, b u t w e d i d h a v e a g o o d tim e pla yin g. T h e m e m b e r s o f the team w ere as follows: A lf r e d Stern— O u t s i d e L e f t Larry S h o e n — I n s i d e L e f t Capt. R o b e r t H a r z — C e n t e r Foriuard R o b e r t M il c h — I n s i d e R i g h t A r th u r K la u b e r — O u t s i d e R i g h t Joseph L e v i n — R i g h t H a l f b a c k Jay B lo c k — C e n t e r H a l f b a c k Joel C o h e n — L e f t H a l f b a c k E d w a r d L e v i n e — R i g h t F u l l ba c k G e r ald W a l d e n — L e f t F ul l b a c k Herbert L ane— Goal D a n i e l S h a p ir o — M a n a g e r

Page

69


BEST W ISHES to

The Qlass o f 1 9 4 5

Chain Building Corporation L eo S ilver,

President


Best Wishes to th e

Class o f from a friend

â&#x20AC;˘

Page

71


From d loyal member o f

The Qdss o f 19^5


THE COUNCILOR R oukri' a . Mii.cii, ’ 15................................ K<lil()r-i))-CJii('l A i . a n C o o p k r , '45...................................... Ma)iagi)ig Editor E o c a r S e u m .e r , ’45............................................... Arts Edilor D a n i e l S h a p i r o , ’45........................................ Sports Editor P e t e r C a i . i s c h . ’45........................................ Literary Editor

Lester J. Alexander, ’45 Jack Chartoff, ’45 Edward Levine. ’45 Alfred Brummel, ’46

Russell Sherman, ’45 Creorge Buchband, ’46 Larry Schoen, ’46 Thomas Mohr, ’47

Compliments of

Lester J. oAlexander, Jr.


Compliments of

A FRIEND


FREK—100 Name

I'apcs willi $10 l’ui( liasc—l*'RKK

Independent Camp O utfitters 2447 BROADWAY'

a t

90th

ST.

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Compliments of

A Friend

Page

75


C O M P L I M E N T S

OF

The Propp Family in Commemoration of their Son entering the Armed Forces


Speak Spanish?

C o m p l im e n ts o f

Kasy willi RC^A - V id o r re­ corded inetliod ol I’rol. II. S. CHiown. Filteeii records and I50-i)age book.

MR. and MRS.

•1 15 .7 5

M. MALLIN

(Postpaid

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Mail Orders N e w Y o r k 2 3 , N . Y. E N dicott 2-6778

Best Wishes COMPLIMENTS OF

A FRIEND

from the

WENDROFF FAMILY

e

P

age

77


C o m p lim e n ts

of

Mr. and Mrs. Moe Sherman

Pagf

78

â&#x20AC;˘


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Page

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Franklin 1945  

Franklin 1945

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