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F ro n t Row, L e ft to R igh t; S te ve n T a m a s, J e n n ife r Brill, S t e p h a n ie M o e lle r, C a t h y J a m p ie r r e , S a lly E n d e s h a w , C a rin d a G ree ne . S e c o n d Row, L e ft to R ight; J a s o n M au sk o p f, R yan M e g la th e r y , V a n e s s a T h o m p s o n , H e c t o r Arguello. T hird Row, L e ft to R ight; M a x B re skin , A le x Pe rpe r, M e lin d a N ixon, Shaun M itc h e ll. F ou rth Row, L e ft to Right: D o g an Baruh, P a tr ic ia L u ck, S e re n a D e p e ro , C eline D esg ra n g e s , Yun Ja ng . F ifth Row, L e ft to R ight; S a ra h Jillings, Ken F ie ld s , P ie tro B o tte r o , S h irle y M ic h a le v ic z , T a tia n a M artin. S ix th Row, L e ft to Right; G u ille rm o C a r ta y a , O m a r A lg h a n im . N o t P ic tu r e d ; M e la n ie D ille t, M a r y a n n e W i l ­ liam s, A m y S o m lo , and C o u rtn e y B a rne s . T h e y e a r b o o k s ta ff w o u ld like to th a n k G e ra r d o S o m oz a , O liv e r S o m o z a , and K im b e rly A sh, fo r th e ir s p e c ia l c o n ­ tr ib u tio n s to th e 1 9 9 1 - 1 9 9 2 y e a r b o o k .

Faculty Advisor

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Table of Contents .The Yearbook Staff .The Table of Contents .The Seniors .Senior Pages .The Underclassmen .The Faculty .The Arts at Anglo T h e Activities .Sports Miscellaneous Events .Candids .School Trips .To Thee I Leave Senior Votes Famous Last Words .Senior Listings Remember Me?!? Patrons' Page and the Advertising Section The Seniors’ Farewell

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4


Alejanfrro Alarma

6


OMAR ALGHANIM

T h a n k s Dr. D e m e n t o , K . Y .A ., W . K .A ., S.K.A ., L.M ., B.H., B.M., B.S., A.W ., D.S., V.U., S.C., T.C., A.S., H.G.

The bottle was dusty but the liquor was clean. — The Grateful Dead

The first duty in life is to be as artificial as possible. The second duty no one has yet discovered. — Grateful Dead

I’ ll te ll you w h e r e th e fo u r w in d s d w e ll, in F ra n k lin ’ s T o w e r t h e r e h a n g s a bell. It can ring from nig ht to day, it can ring like fire w h e n you lo s e y o u r w ay. —

G ra te fu l D ea d

Bricks and stones may break my bones but talk don’t bother me. — Ray Charles

7


Don’t push the world, let it roll. — Hugh Schoolman

I m a in ta in t h a t c h a o s is th e fu tu re and b e y o n d th a t is fr e e d o m . —

S o n ic Y o u th

An o rio le s a n g like an

Les grandes personnes sont decidement bien bizarres. — Antoine de St. Exupery

o ra n g e , h is b r e a s t full o f w o r m s and his tail c la w e d th e e ven in g like a h a m m e r.

>#8?

■y

"i

___________

Jerome Annum


JOSE M. BERNIK

S e e I’ m not insa ne . In fa c t, I’ m kind o f ra tio n a l. W hen I be a s k in g you w h o is m o re d r a m a tic a l? T h is one or th a t one, th e w h ite o ne or th e b la c k one. S h o w me a c h u m p and I’ ll ju m p up and a t t a c k one. —

KR S ONE

If th e d o c tr in e s o f M a rx , E n g e ls and Lenin h ad not tru ly p r o v e d t h a t th e c a p i t a li s t s o c ia l s y s te m w a s h is ­ t o r i c a ll y b ou n d to d is a p p e a r a s a r e s u lt of th e law s th a t rule th e e v o lu tio n o f h um an s o c ie ty , one w o u ld c o m e to th e s a m e c o n c lu s io n b y a s im p le a rith m e tic a l and lo g ic a l a n a ly s is o f th e w o r l d ’ s lim ite d n atu ra l r e ­ s o u r c e s , p o p u la tio n g ro w th , th e s q u a n d e r in g and d is ­ o r d e r in h e re n t in c a p i t a li s t s o c ie t y , th e in e s c a p a b le c o n s e q u e n c e s of all th is and th e n e e d to find ra tio n a l s o lu tio n s fo r m a n k in d ’s p re s s in g p ro b le m s . —

10

F id e l C a s t ro


PIETRO BOTTERO

11


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Kenny Fields

Thanks —

I h a d n o th in g to o f f e r a n y b o d y

E g g ie and th e P a tie n ts

e x c e p t my own c o n fu s io n .

R ich, J e ro m e , S te v e and

J a c k K erouac

th e L o w s . T im e s to R e m e m b e r, C.T. and G.F. w e 'll m e e t aga in .

W e w e re frien ds and have grown distant from one another. But it is right th a t should be so; le t us not dissem ble and obscu re it, as if it w e re som ething to be asham ed of. W e are ships, ea ch of w h ich has th e ir course; our paths can c ro s s and we can c e le b ra te a feast to g e th e r, as w e did —

and then the brave ships lay so pea ce fu lly

in one harbor and under one sun th a t it m ight seem they had a lready reached th e ir destin a tio n and bo th had one d estination. But then th e alm ighty pow er of our ta s k again drove us apa rt, to diffe ren t seas and diffe re n t clim es, and p erhap s w e shall never see one ano ther again —

or perhap s if we do we shall not recognize one another;

d iffe re n t seas and sun have chan ged us! . . . And so let us believe in our frien dship in th e s ta rs . — N ietzsche

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F riedrich


15


Sarah Jillings “ W ho

s a id

th e

re v o lu tio n

was

o v e r ? ” a s k e d th e lim e y w e n c h . To A n ne —

It s e r v e s us rig h t fo r

m e s s in g a b o u t w ith b o a ts ! To C la u d ia and A p a r n a —

Shame­

le s s H, M a d a m e X . . . all th e ‘c l a s ­ s ic s .’ To W e n dy —

W e a re th e ra p p in g ,

ja c k in g , w a n d e r in g w e n c h e s ! To S e re n a , P a t and A le x —

‘ F re re

J a q u e s , F re r e J a q u e s . . . ’ To S h irle y —

M y s h rin k (ju s t d o n 't

m en tio n o c tu p i!) T o th e ‘v o n ’ N ic h o ls — fa m ily

my d e p u ty

‘You c a n ’t be tw e n ty m o u n ta in ’

on s u g a r

T o M o th e r , D a d d y , and C a ro lin e F o r us and fo r c h ild h o o d ‘ I h a v e a c u n n in g p l a n ’ — adder

B la c k -


Carinda Greene

warn

17


fi w :

I g r e w up, w e n t in to r e h a b yo u k n o w th e d o c t o r s n e v e r d id m e no good. T h e y s a id , “ Son y o u 'r e g o n n a b e a n ew m a n .” I s a id , “ T h a n k you v e ry m u ch and ca n I b o r r o w fifty b u c k s ? ” —

A lic e in C h a in s

In th e d e s e r t I s a w a c r e a tu r e , n a k e d , b e s tia l, w h o , s q u a ttin g upon th e g ro un d h eld his h e a rt in his h a n d s, and a te o f it. I sa id , “ Is it g o o d fr ie n d ? ” “ It is b it te r —

b i t t e r , ” he

answ ered; “ But I like it b e c a u s e it is b it te r and b e c a u s e it is my h e a r t . ” — S te p h e n C ra n e

Shoun Mirchell T h a n k s ; M O M , S e rg io , R ich ( R o m a n tic s , Q u e e n ) Ken ( F a r m e r B o b lives), Tom (T h e L o w ), J e r o m e (N irv a n a ), E ric (you k n o w w h a t you d id ), S te v e , T a tia n a , P a tr ic ia , J o s e (w h o I’ve k n ow n fo r a w h ile ) L a t e r / S T O N E Y

21


Ei/^SsìiSasii;


Melinda Joy Nixon

I don’t know the key to success but the key to failure is trying to please eve­ rybody. — Bill Cosby

Strongest minds are often those of whom the noisy world hears least.

I do not fear tomorrow for I have seen yesterday and I love today.

23


Special shout out to Nick and Luke Thanks Mom and Dad for everything!


T o Irene, I v e k n o w n y o u m y w h o l e life,

y 0 ^ i n o , Aris, and R ob, yo u a re th e b e s t. Y o u ’ve a lw a y s

an ve g ro w n to lo ve you. Y o u a re my b e s t frie n d a nd ail I h a v e to s a y is o p ­ p o s ite s a ttra c t!

b e e n t h e r e th ro u g h t h i c k and th in. T h a n k s ! I love you all!

He w h o e n jo y s tru e le is u re h a s tim e to im p ro v e h is soul. — H.D. T h o re a u T o S o n y a and B ra n w im e , W e ’ve h a d our m e llo w tim e s

and

our

cra zy

tim e s . W e s tu c k th ro u g h it and i t ’ s b e e n and will be a * # * #

Amy Somlo

lo a d o f fun.

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F o r all s a d w o r d s o f to n g u e or pen; T h e s a d d e s t a re th e s e : “ It m ig h t h a v e b e e n .” —

Jo hn G r e e n le a f W h ittie r

H a p p y is th e man w h o h a s b ro k e n th e c h a in s w h ic h hurt t h e mind and h a s given up w o r r y in g o n c e and fo r all. —

Ovid

If I ca n s to p o ne h e a rt fro m b re a k in g ,

L ife is to o s h o r t to w a s t e

I sh a ll not live in vain.

in c r it ic p e e p or c y n ic b ark,

If I ca n e a s e o ne life th e a c h in g ,

Q u a rre l or re p rim a n d :

or c o o l one pain,

’T will s o o n be d a rk;

or h elp o ne fa in tin g robin

Up! M ind th in e o w n aim, and

unto his n e s t aga in ,

G od s p e e d th e m ark! —

I sh a ll not live in vain. —

R a lp h W a ld o E m e rso n

E. D ic k in s o n

25


Vanessa £ve Thompson

“ I don’t say we all ought to misbehave, but we ought to look as if we could.” — Orson Welles

To Mom: Thanks for being my Mom and a pretty O.K. Dad. Bren:

W hat’s the haps brah? Through the good and the bad, you’re the only one I have, and I Love You! You two mean the world to me!

“ You’re in my thoughts:” Amy Mass The “ Boys” J.R. A.M. B.G. S.E. L.K. K.R. F.F. ‘‘To get the best results you must talk to your vegetables.” — Prince Charles

27


28


29


C o u rtn e y and C a rin d a

C o u rtn e y , “ Y o . . . t h a t 's k i c k i n ’ !”

Shaun, “ H ey M o n ik a , w h a t ’s that

sim u lta n e o u s ly , “ P U, w h e re is

O m ar, “ H ere s h e g o e s a g a in , n ow

th in g o v e r t h e r e . . . A le ja n d ro ? ”

th a t o d o r c o m in g f r o m ? ”

w e ’ ll n e v e r be a b le to t a k e th is

M o n ik a , “ Shaun, I th in k it ’s

T a tia n a , “ C a rin d a , a re you O .K .? ”

p o rtra it!”

uh, w e ll i t ’ s . . . did you s tu d y? ”

P ie tro , “ Shaun, I th in k M o n ik a is

A s J o s e and C o u rtn e y

C o u rtn e y , “ T a tia n a , . . . w h a t ’s

tryin g to s a y th a t i t ’ s th e re m n a n ts

c o n te m p la t e lifting up th e ir fe e t

up?” T a tia n a , “ C o u rtn e y , yo ur sole is

o f a b o w e l m o ve m e n t, o f a

c le a n .” C o u rtn e y , “ I k n e w t h a t . ”

c a n in e . ” J e ro m e , “ F a r o u t!” A le ja n d ro , “ I tin k d a t s o m e o n e s te p in it.”

M e a n w h ile . . . b o th C a rlo s and

Shaun, “ Ms. W a n g , w o u ld you

C a rin d a , “ W ell, s o m e o n e s te p p e d

p le a s e g e t to th e b o tt o m of this.

in it b e c a u s e I can still s m ell it

M o n ik a s m ile fo r th e y k n o w w ho

W hat about J o s e ? ”

way over h e re !”

th e rea l c u lp rit is.

C o u rtn e y , “ Y o, J o s e . . . p ic k up

P ie tro , “ J e ro m e , I th in k th a t

your fe e t!”

n a u s e o u s o d o r is c o m in g from your s h o e s !”

30


1i t 5

ixst Guade

F ro n t Row, L. to R., M is s M ic h e lle G anci, D avid S c h a a p , J e n n y M a rie N ilsson, A d n a n d A l-O th m a n , S a ra Koulen, A h la m A l- N a fis e e , N ic h o la s S o c h a , A n d r e w Sm ith, S h o h e i Hori, B a c k Row, L. to R., T e lly R ipoll, S t e p h a n ie W illia m s , V a le n tin a M azzi, E le a z e r G o re n s te in , K a s s a n d r a Von E tzdo rf.

I like firs t g ra d e b e c a u s e w e g e t to p la y g a m e s and K a s s a n d r a is n ice to me. I w ill a lw a y s like my t e a c h e r M is s Ganci. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

32

T e lly Ripoll

I like g o in g to th e lib ra ry , g oing to th e park, and I like D.E.A.R. tim e ! (D ro p E v e ryth in g And R ead) â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

A n dre w Smith


I h a ve a n ice te a c h e r , and nice frie n d s . I love m ath, art, and g o in g to th e p a rk. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

A h la m A l- N a fis e e


Vlt

Second Guade

F ro n t R ow , L. to R., C a s s ie J e n k in s , Kim A sh, E u g e n e Hori, D a v id V o lk m a r, B a c k Row, L. to R., M rs. E liz a b e th Bell, A d e n ik e O p e tu b o , S h a y n a N e lso n , P a tr ic k F ra m e , E lh a rith Y o u s if

T he th in g s I like a b o u t s c h o o l a re th e r e a d in g g r o u p s and fr e e tim e . E v e ry F r id a y w e go to th e p a rk. M rs. Bell is r e a lly fun. W e h a ve a d e s k a n g e l th a t b rin g s us c a n d y o r s t i c k e r s if our d e s k s a re cle a n . W e a ls o h a v e a club in our c l a s s c a lle d th e T ig e r Club. W e h ave to listen to th e rules to be a g o o d m e m b e r! â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

D avid V o lk m a r


I like th e s e c o n d g r a d e b e c a u s e w e g e t to d o a lot o f a c t i v it ie s and w e h a v e o ur own club. I like to go to th e lib ra ry and re a d b o o k s . â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Kim Ash

35


T kd Guade

R ow , L. to R., M a r s h a ll C o h e n , L y d ia G e d d e s , Elena R u s s le r, N a w a f AlN a fis e e , O livia S ta rr, Em m a A rn o ld , O liv e r S o m o z a

36


In c la s s w e do a lot of fun th in gs like re a d in g , m ath, art, m usic and s c ie n c e . â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Emma A rnold

I lik e th e lunch th e y se rve . I like all th e frie n d ly te a c h e rs . I like th e c o m p u te r clu b , and I like th e w arm w e lc o m e on my firs t d a y o f s c h o o l. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

D aniel Rosen

37


TRe. pJouurtK. Guade

F ro m L e ft to R ight; C arl P u rcell, Evan Yu rm a n, J a s o n R o se n , C h r i s t o p h e r M a s s a , K ari S c h a a p , H ana H a s s a n , J e n n ife r A u g u st, H e a th e r W a lle r s o n , A v in a s h Singh, M a r itz a Puello, H arith A l-A n b a ri, B ra n d o n C aro.

O ne of my fo n d e s t m e m o r ie s o f th e fo u rth g r a d e is w he n my t e a c h e r , Mr. C o p la n d , d r e s s e d up like S n o w W h ite . I th in k that s c h o o l is a lot of fun! â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

'

38

H e a th e r W a lle r s o n


Our c la s s h a s a d is c u s s io n e v e r y M o n d a y to h elp us so lv e p ro b le m s . O n c e M a r itz a g o t u p s e t and s t a r t e d cryin g b e c a u s e I w a s m ean to her. I s t a r t e d cry in g and w e m a d e up cryin g in th e b a th ro o m . — Kari S c h a a p

I only k n o w one guy th a t can c h e w up and e a t his p e n c ils , and I only k n o w one t e a c h e r th a t w ou ld d r e s s up like S n o w W h ite . —

C h ris M a s s a

39


TE\£

G/iqcIe

T he F ro n t Row, L to R; L y n n e tte M im ia s ie , A liso n B a m s e y , S h e e m a A IN a fis e e , L a u ra M ari, T he S e c o n d Row; R ic h e lle B rind le, O h o u d A l-O th m a n , W illia m N e l­ son, T he B a c k Row; L yle M in c h e ff, D anny C a r ta y a , J a m a a l M a t t h e w s , John R o s e n b e r g e r , J o n a th a n S c r o g g s .

M y c l a s s is fun, in te r e s tin g and big. I th in k my g r a d e is unique b e c a u s e w e a re th e o ld e s t g r a d e in th e lo w e r s c h o o l and w e h a v e to s e t an e x a m p le fo r th e y o u n g e r c h ild re n . —

40

L y n n e tt e M im ia s ie


I th in k th e fifth g r a d e is a v e ry e n e r g e t ic c la s s . I th in k th e c la s s is unique b e c a u s e w e s e e m to get in tr o u b le a lot, but th e n e x t d a y w e c o u ld be having a p a r ty fo r our g o o d b e h a v io r. —

A lis o n B a m s e y

I th in k our g r a d e is unique b e ­ c a u s e lo ts of k id s a re a r tis ts and we know

m ore

a b o ut M arvel

C o m ic s th a n a n y b o d y . W e a re a g o o d c la s s s o m e of th e tim e. I m ust s a y o ur c l a s s can b e v e ry fu nn y and w e ir d s o m e t i m e s — like th e d a y w h e n D anny to ld me a jo k e and I lau g h e d fo r th e w h o le ■

day. —

J o n a th a n S c r o g g s

41


Tile, Sixrft GliQCk

F ro n t to b a c k , left to right; D a is u k e Suzuki, B ra d A n d e r s o n , R e m y F is h b e in , F a b r iz io M o re tti, S t e p h a n ie M o e lle r, J e n n ife r Brill, C h a r lo tte L a th a m , Em ily Billet, V a n e s s a N orto n, S a ik a M a ts u y a m a , J o s h F a rb e r, M a c q u a r ie C lark, K e a n e F e rre tti, H an a d i H a s s a n , N a ta lie D arby, C h ris h e n a S ta n le y , Anna H o rv a t

42


I th in k my c la s s is unique not only b e c a u s e it h a s k id s from all o v e r th e w o rld , but m a n y h a v e fa m ilie s from tw o or m ore c o u n trie s . W e a re all s m a r t and w e g e t a lo ng w ith e a c h o th e r v e ry w ell. W h e n s o m e th in g is w ro n g , or s o m e o n e is s a d w e all try to h elp out. —

F a b r iz io M o re tti

M y c la s s is inve ntive and can be a lot of fun to be w ith, I w o u ld n ’t t r a d e th e m in fo r a n yth in g . I h ave g re a t m e m o rie s of my c la s s , o n e s t h a t will a lw a y s s ta y w ith me.

C h a rlo tte L a th a m

I

i

43


Tile SelteKtR Guade.

F ro n t to B a c k , L e ft to R igh t; J o e y M iller, B a k a r i G a y n o r, C e d r ic W ile rs o n , G e o r g e S c h n e id e r, K e ith H y a tt, H yg ie G rah am , M a r k D avis, J o n a h P a rs o ff, C a th e rin e B a m s e y , M ic h e lle W illia m s , J a s o n K h a lie V in c e n t, J a y Hugh B ro w n , A le w a n d e r F ilip p a , S a ra H orvat, S u sa n n a G o ld h ir s c h , M a ry a n n e F e ie rs te in

44


M y c l a s s is a v e ry s p e c ia l c la s s . It is not only m a d e up of p e o p le from d iffe r e n t c o u n trie s , it is m a d e up of d iffe re n t a ttitu d e s , b e h a v io r s , and lik e n e s s e s . M y g r a d e is unique in a w a y th a t w e a re v e ry ta lk a tiv e . W e d o n â&#x20AC;&#x2122;t h old in a n y th in g , w e ta lk a b o u t our p ro b le m s . â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

C e d r ic W a lle r s o n

45


lit

SgfoR Guade

F ro n t to b a c k ; L e ft to R igh t; W illia m C arry, K h a r to o n O han, J e n n ife r B a ile y, A ix a M o ra n , M e la n ie Y oung, D a n ie lle K ip n e s s , A s m a A la n b a ri, M ic h a e l P a yto n, M ie c h ie l Rijke, Guy G re e n b e rg , G e ra ld T a y lo r, K a m ra n Feili, P a b lo C a r ta y a , M ic h a e l Sm ith. Not p ic tu r e d ; S tu a rt S te iz e r, Kiva M o tn y k , Anna S u na ra, S id d h a r th a B la lo c k , G e o r g e B a k e r

46


M y c la s s is filled w ith m a n y d if fe r e n t t y p e s of p e o p le . W e w o r k w ell to g e th e r , w e a re c r e a t i v e and w ild s tu de nts. I like s c h o o l e v e n ts and s h o w s . â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

P a b lo C a r ta y a

I th in k th a t w e a re d e fin ite ly th e b e s t d r e s s e d g ra d e in th is s c h o o l. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

K a m ra n Feili


TRe

G/iQCk.

Front to Back, Left to Right; Hope Venning, Sim on Bodner, E zra Ellis, John Uiterw yk, Y un Young Jang, Kip Lubliner, H ector Arguello, Leonardo M oretti, Frits M ackertich, Aleta Lefargue, Celine Desgranges, Liz Peters, N o a h LaneySteiner, Sylvia H artow icz

48


It took us a while, but wc finally becam e one class. Even though we arc all different, we love each other in a friendly kind of way. We improved a lot with the new students in our class. I am looking forward to next year when we will all be together again, and we’ll know each other better. — Celine Desgranges

T his school is N Y C E and Sm ooth — Joe and John M y class is the gossip c en ter of the school. T he boys in m y class a re very com ical — tru e pranksters! — John U iterw yk

49


7He "TeKtft. Guade

Front to Back: left to right; A n n a Shem etoff, R o bert Brooks, Shaliva G aynor, C aroline Jillings. Avanish Singh, M elikaya N tshingw a, S usan Pollock, M a r ia n a Paz, Jessica Fisch. Jason Schecter, N a ta n e Adcock, M a x Breskin, Lucia M ancini, G regory Gould. Alex Reventlow, C raig Ellis, Abdul A l-othm an, Alex Perper, Alex Gudgeon. F ran k Tsu, R yan M eglathery, A nthony Ulseth, P eter M c N a m a r a . Dennis Gonzalez, Abdi M oazam i, B arron Craig, W halid S aad. N o t pictured, A a ron S anchez


T he Anglo A m erican International School is a great place. It is a home to learn. It opens you from the d ark to the light. It improves the English and knowledge of the nonEnglish speakers. I c a n ’t forget this school, it’s great! — M elikaya N tshingw a


TRe. SfteU'ewtR Guade.

arci

IDSi

pera di of 01 ! alwa

Front to Back, Left to Right; C atherine Jam pierre, Dam on Kovelsky, N om buyiselo Nstingw a. Ita Pinelli, M arco Depero, Massimiliano M azzi, R obert M ackertich, C hristophe M cKeon. Jason Mauskopf, M aryan ne Williams, John Grasso, Sahlie Endeshaw, Susan Tilly, Jacqueline Socastro, Evan King. Brian Roth, E th an W a n tm a n , Daisuke K aw am ura, A k a ra Holder, W a rre n Miles, Thom as Rausch, Guillerm o C artaya, S atoru Kaitto, Oliver Parades, not pictured; M elanie Dillet, Jo an n a Rice, Em m y P errym an, Derick Tim mel

52

?


The eleventh g rade at Anglo is well . . . unique. There are twenty five of us, almost all of different nation­ alities and cultures. O ne of our best attributes is our different cultural backgrounds, and abilities to teach one anoth er about them , with a com m on u n d e rsta n d ­ ing th a t we are all different. W e all have different personalities, m erits, defaults, and we definitely have different senses of hum or. W e all contribute to the life of our classes, some more th an others, and we almost always get along and have a wonderful time. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sahlie Endeshaw


T h e elevnth g ra d e is a class th a t is d iffere n t but m uch th e sam e in a way. T h e sam e because we a re like one big fam ily. F rom eight fifteen in the m orning until th ree fifteen in the afternoon we a re all together, (except Ita, she com es in late ). T h ro u g h o u t the school y ear we work to g eth er to accom plish m any of our goals. T hro u g h the good tim es and the bad, we a re alw ays together. T his is very im p o rta n t to have because, believe it or not, school is your hom e aw ay from hom e five days of the week. T o establish such a close relatio n sh ip betw een your classm ates and keeping it th a t way is very im p o rta n t, because good friends a re h a rd to find. G uillerm o C a rta y a C lass of 1993

54


In a school as sm all as ours, a class is not usually very diverse (even though we a re a n in te rn atio n al school). A n exception to this is the C lass o f 1993. N o o th er class h as such a m ix o f political a n d social view points. From left-w ing liberals to rig h t wing conservatives: F rom socialist view s to c a p ita list views; from in tellectu als to athletes. W hile th ere m ay be c erta in “ g ro u p s" who sh a re one view, th ey a re alw ays open to opposing ideas. (W ell, m ost o f the tim e.) H aving been here “ for th e longest tim e ,” (alm ost too long!) I find it h a rd to believe th a t in a y e ar from now, o u r class will have g ra d u a te d and will w alk out “ the big red doors’" for th e last tim e as A n g lo -A m erican stu d en ts. T h e m em ories a re all so vivid. F rom m y first d a y here, to the day D r. S h a m u s O ’H anlon (H e a d m a ste r E m eritus and 6 th G ra d e te a c h e r) passed aw ay in 1986, to w atching the C h allen g er Space S h u ttle d isa ster on the schools T V in the S tu d y C e n te r (b ack w hen the school still had c ab le), to e n te rin g high school, to w atching the E agles a th le tic team s win (and som etim es loose) countless gam es. W elcom ing stu d en ts, tea ch e rs and a d m in istrato rs to th e school, a n d b idding th em farew ell. T h ro u g h school dances and d ra m a pro d u c­ tions. Science F airs a n d A rt Show s. S inging C h ristm a s C arols a t L ord and T aylors, and singing in a B roadw ay p roduction of A Christm as Carol. All of these m em ories, along w ith everyone elses, both jo y fu l a n d tea rfu l, a re w hat m ake this class, this school, this stu d e n t (a n d fa c u lty /a d m in istra tio n ) body unique. Looking back upon them bring to m ind th e w ords o f Bob D ylan, w ho said “ T h e tim es th ey are a c h an g in g ” , and indeed th ey are. — Jason M au sk o p f

1 ?»


56


iugene H o rĂŹ, 1st and 2nd gradi


^ oUinistnoto/is 4

W illia m G o o d in : H e a d m a s t e r W e s h o u ld m a k e a n o tc h e v e r y d a y on our c h a r a c t e r s a s R o b in s o n C ru s o e on his s tic k . W e must be at th e helm at le a s t o n c e a d a y ; w e m ust fe el the tille r r o p e in o ur h a n d s, and k n o w th a t if w e sail, we s te e r. —

H en ry D avid Thoreau

S a n d ra J e n k in s : A s s is ta n t H e a d m is tr e s s T he c o u n try is lyric —

th e to w n d ra m a tic . W hen

m in gle d th e y m a k e th e m o s t p e r f e c t d ra m a . — L o n g fe llo w

M a r k G re e n w a ld : A s s o c i a t e H e a d m a s te r E d u c a tio n b e g in s at h om e. Y o u c a n ’t b la m e th e s c h o o l fo r not p u ttin g into y o u r c h ild w h a t you d o n ’t put into him. You d o n ’t ju s t t a k e y o u r c h ild to b a lle t c la ss. F irs t, you d a n c e w ith him w h e n he is a b a b y . Every fa m ily h a s its own rh yth m ; if yo u d a n c e w ith y o u r c h ild re n , th a t rh y th m w ill b e c o m e a p a r t o f th e m , and t h e y will n e ve r f o r g e t it. —

G e o f fr e y H old er


S t e p h a n ie G re e n w a ld : D ir e c to r o f A d m is s io n s , D ir e c to r o f C o lle g e G u id a n c e Y ou c a n ’t h a ve e v e r y th in g , w h e re w o u ld you put it? —

S te v e n W rig h t

N igel Urry: A c a d e m ic Dean, In te rn a tio n a l B a c c a l a u r e a t e C o o r d in a to r A little bit of pain n e v e r hurt a nyone.

R o w e n a W illia m s: F in a n c e D ir e c to r He w h o b in d s to h im s e lf a jo y D o e s th e w in g e d life d e s tr o y ; But he w h o k i s s e s th e j o y a s it flie s L iv e s in e t e r n i t y ’ s sunrise. —

W illia m B la k e

59


Michelle Ganci: First Grade Im a g in a tio n is th e h ig h e s t k ite o ne ca n fly. —

L au re n B acall

Elizabeth Bell: Second Grade If you a re a d re a m e r, c o m e in, If you are a d re a m e r, a w is h e r, a liar, A h o p e -e r, a p ra y -e r, a m a g ic bea n b u y e r . . . C o m e in! C o m e in! —

Shel S y lv e rs te in

Roma Mahbubani: Third Grade T hin k w ro n g ly , if you p le a s e , but in all c a s e s th in k fo r y o u r s e lf. —

60

D o ris L e s s in g


Robin Copland: Fourth Grade

Claudia Ocello: Fifth Grade T he th o u g h t th a t life c o u ld be b e tt e r is w o v e n in d e lib ly into our h e a r ts and our brains. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Paul Simon

S a n d ra Je n k in s : P r im a r y S c h o o l S c ie n c e C lea ning y o u r h o u s e w h ile y o u r k id s a re still g ro w in g is like s h o v e lin g th e w a lk b e fo r e it s t o p s sn ow ing . â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

P h yllis D ille r

61


N ige l Urry: Science S u c c e s s is not e n o u g h . S o m e o n e m ust lose.

S t e p h a n ie G re e n w a ld : S c ie n c e U nd er th e m o s t r ig o r o u s ly c o n tr o lle d c o n d it io n s of p re s s u re , te m p e r a tu r e , vo lu m e , h um id ity , and o th e r v a ria b le s , th e o rg a n is m will do a s it dam n w e ll p le a s e s .

B h a w a n ie Singh: S c ie n c e H ow e d u c a te d you a re m ust be r e fle c te d in yo u r d e a lin g s w ith p e o p le and th e w o rld .

R o s a lie B o s tic k : S c ie n c e I ya m w h a t I ya m . â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Popeye


David A n s te y : A p p lie d A n a ly tic s W in g C o o r d in a to r M ath

G e o r g e H enry M c C o r m a c k III: M ath A m a th e m a tic ia n n a m e d Klein

I do not k n o w w h a t I m ay a p p e a r to th e w o rld ; but to

th o u g h t th e M o b io u s b an d w a s divine.

m y s e lf I s e e m to h a v e b e e n o nly like a b o y p la y in g on th e

S a id he, If you glue

s e a s h o r e , and d iv e rtin g m y s e lf n ow and th e n fin ding a

th e e d g e s of tw o ,

s m o o th e r p e b b le or a p r e t t i e r s h e ll th a n w h ils t th e g re a t

y o u ’ ll g e t a w e ir d b o tt le like mine.

o c e a n of tru th lay all u n d is c o v e r e d b e fo r e me. —

Sir Is a a c N e w to n

S a rita Kale: C o m p u te r s S h e ld o n P e rly s k y : C o m p u te rs L ig h t to m o r r o w w ith to d a y ! —

E liza b e th B ro w n in g

F ail now join th e June rush


-■I

Ju lie F o u h y: F re n c h , L a n g u a g e A r ts C o o r d in a to r F a is c e que tu v o u d ra s . —

R a b e la is

Language y k s ck/iKg Anna B e lia : F re n c h II fa u t v o y a g e r loin en a im a n t sa m aison. —

J u le s S u p e r v ie lle

N ic o le H a d a d : F re n c h , S p a n is h , Latin Unos, duo, tr e s , R om ani Q u a ttu o r, q uinque, se x , R om ani S e p te m , o c to , nove, R om ani et, d e c e m R om ani

64


i r l e n e Feili: Latin l o g i t o e rg o sum.

Inma M a rtin e z : S p a n is h N e v e r fo r th e s a k e o f p e a c e and q u ie t d e n y yo u r c o n v ic tio n s . â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

D ag H a m m e r s k jo ld

I l e s s a n d r a M azzi: Italian ' la liguria una t e r r a le g g ia d r a Ge s a s s o rdente, 1 a rg illa p u lita, s a v v iv a n o di p am fini til sole . . . Ge m a re in c e r ti g io rn i E un g ia rd in o norito. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

V. C a r d a r e lli

C ristin a C a rta y a : S p a n is h T he g re a t h o p e o f s o c ie t y is ind ivid ua l c h a r a c te r . â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

W illia m E llery Channing


Jo hn C a n z a n e lla : English, H is to ry , T h e o r y o f K n o w le d g e 11 Y o u r c h ild re n a re not y o u r c h ild re n , T h e y a re th e s o n s and d a u g h te r s o f l ife ’ s longing fo r

B ru c e K e lly: E n glish , T h e o r y o f K n o w le d g e 12 W e had fun, fun, fun, till h e r d a d d y t o o k th e T-bird —

itse lf. T h e y c o m e th ro u g h you but not from you, and th o u g h th e y a re w ith you y e t th e y b e lo n g not to you. You m a y g ive th e m y o u r lo ve but not y o u r th o u g h ts , fo r th e y h a ve th e ir own th o u g h ts . —

Ka hlil G ibran

^

a w a y. T he B e a c h Boys

tì(M(MieS

G o rd o n H a s tin g s : H is to ry , G e o g ra p h y

B All h is to ry , so fa r as it is not s u p p o r te d by c o n te m p o r a r y e v id e n c e , is r o m a n c e . . . T h a t c e rta in kin g s r e ig n e d and

l A

M a r k G re e n w a ld : H is to r y

c e rta in b a t t le s w e r e fo u g h t w e can d e p e n d upon as true, but all th e c o lo rin g , all th e p h ilo s o p h y of h is t o r y is

I d o n ’t b e lie v e in th e a fte r life, but I’ m bringing a

c o n je c tu r e .

c h a n g e of u n d e r w e a r ju s t in c a s e . —

Samuel Johnson

W o o d y Allen


W illia m G o o d in : G o v e rn m e n t You go on th e te n n is c o u r t to p la y te n n is , not to s e e if th e line s a re s tr a ig h t. —

R o b e r t F ro s t

M arilyn M e a d : H u m a n itie s W in g C o o rd in a to r, E nglish To do is to be. S o cra te s To be is to do. P la to Do Be Do Be Do S in atra

Bill L iv in g s to n : English A man and a w o m a n

Julie F ouhy: English

a re one. A man and a w o m a n and a b la c k b ir d a re one. —

W a l l a c e S te v e n s

. . . L o o k h o w w e d o u b le d e a l ju s t to k e e p th e p a c k at b a y . . . —

G e n e ra l P u blic


L e s a W a n g : Art, C r e a tiv e W in g C o o rd in a to r A n y w a y , I k e e p p ic tu rin g all t h e s e little kids, p la ying

K ris ti H anna: Art W e all h a v e our b a d m o m e n ts . —

so m e g a m e in th is Big fie ld o f rye and all. T h o u s a n d s

_

M a d a m e de Brinvilliers

4

of little kids, and n o b o d y ’ s around, n o b o d y BIG I mean. And I’m s ta n d in g on th e e d g e of s o m e c r a z y cliff. W h a t I h a v e to do, I h a ve to c a t c h e v e r y b o d y . If th e y s ta r t to fall o v e r th e cliff, I m ean, if th e y a re running and th e y d o n ’t lo o k w h e re t h e y ’ re going, I h a ve to c o m e out from

CdeQtiOe.

c

V

J l w

^

s o m e w h e r e and c a tc h th em . T h a t ’s all I’d do all day. I’d ju s t be THE C ATC H ER IN THE RYE and all. I k n o w i t ’ s c r a z y but t h a t ’ s th e only th ing I’d re a lly like to be.

Paul K a s s e l:; D ra m a , E nglish P e g g y S tern: M u sic

Hum an s p e e c h is a c r a c k e d tin drum on w hich we

W h is p e r in my h ea rt,

pou nd out tu n e s to m a k e b e a r s d a n c e w h e n we long

I am h ere to s a v e you. — St. A u g u s tin e

to r e a c h th e s ta rs . —

G u s ta v e Flaubert

:


P h y s ic a l E d u c a tio n W ing D o ric C a p s is : P h y s ic a l E d u c a tio n W in g C o o r d in a to r Real e m o tio n is built up o v e r tim e and its fo u n d a tio n is p re p a ra tio n . â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Tom L a n d ry

icrt. Sducotton E n ve rs P u rov ic: P h y s ic a l E d u c a tio n T w e n ty - fiv e h u n d re d y e a r s a g o S o c r a t e s to ld us th a t N o b o d y b e c o m e s g o o d a c c id e n ta lly . O nly w o rk , learning, and th in k in g can g u a ra n te e s u c c e s s .

s P ip p a M a ye ll: P h y s ic a l E d u c a tio n Our n atu re lies in m o v e m e n t; c o m p le t e c a lm is d e a th . â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Pascal

69


M a ry Ellen Kail: Q u e s t

W illia m L iv in g s to n : Q u e s t

I k n o w s o m e g a m e s w e c o u ld play, sa id th e Cat.

T he b la c k b i r d w h ir le d in th e autu m n w inds. It was

I k n o w so m e n ew tr ic k s , s a id th e C a t in th e Hat.

a s m all p a r t o f th e p a n to m in e .

It

A lot o f g o o d tr ic k s .

— W a lla c e Stevens

I will s h o w th e m to you. Y o u r m o th e r will not mind at all if I do. — Dr. S e u s s

S

p

e

c

i a

l

M a u re e n B a m s e y : E n g lis h A s A S e c o n d L an gu ag e (ESL) K riste n Edm unds: R e a d in g It is p o p u la r to d a y to s a y th a t w e h a v e to find th e

G re a t fle a s h a v e little fle a s upon th e ir b a c k s to b ite ’em,

ch ild w ith in us. F o r me, th is w o u ld be a s h o rt s e a rc h .

And little fle a s h a v e l e s s e r fle a s , and so ad infinitum.

— Bill C o s b y

— A u g u s tu s de M o r g a n ( 1 8 0 6 - 1 8 7 1 ) A B u d g e t of P a r a d o x e s

g


Donna O rlo ff: C o n s u lta n t

L e e D aniel Levine: C o n s u lta n t

It is n e ve r to o la te to h a v e a h a p p y c h ild h o o d .

I b e lie v e th a t w e s h o u ld only re a d th o s e b o o k s th a t b ite and stin g us. If a b o o k w e a re r e a d in g d o e s not ro u s e us w ith a b lo w to th e h ea d, th e n w h y re a d it? B e c a u s e it will m a k e us h a p p y , you te ll me? M y God, w e w o u ld a ls o be h a p p y if w e h ad no b o o k s , and th e kind of b o o k s th a t m a k e us h a p p y w e co u ld , if n e c e s s a r y , w rite o u rs e lv e s . W h a t w e nee d a re b o o k s th a t a ffe c t us like s o m e r e a lly g rie v o u s m isfo rtu n e , like th e d e a th of one w h o m w e love m ore th a n o u rs e lv e s , a s if w e w e r e b a n is h e d to d is ta n t fo r e s ts , a w a y from e v e r y b o d y , like a s u ic id e ; a b o o k m ust be th e ox fo r th e froze n se a w ithin us. T h a t is w h a t I b e liev e .

E liz a b e th Y o u m a n : L ib ra ria n

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Franz K a fk a , B rie fe 1 9 0 2 -1 9 2 4

A b o o k is like a g a r d e n in y o u r p o c k e t. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A ra b p ro v e r b A tia T eyn ou r: In te rn a tio n a l R e la tio n s G ra c e is m o re b e a utifu l th a n b e a u ty . â&#x20AC;&#x201D; R alp h W a ld o E m e rso n


C ris tin a C a r ta y a : H e a d m a s t e r ’s S e c r e t a r y And now h e re is my s e c r e t, a v e ry s im p le s e c re t; It is only w ith th e h e a rt t h a t one can s e e rig h tly ; w h a t is essential is in visib le to th e eye. —

A p a s s a g e fro m The L ittle P rin c e by

A n to in e d e S a in t- E x u p e r y

"TK&Stajyjy Ellen Duffy: A d m in is tra tiv e A s s is ta n t to th e A s s o c i a t e H e a d m a s te r If you p r a c t i c e an art, be p ro ud of it and m a k e it p ro ud of you . . . It m ay b re a k y o u r h e a rt, but it will fill y o u r h e a rt b e fo re it b r e a k s it It will m a k e you a p e rs o n in yo u r own right. —

72

M a x w e ll A n d e rs o n

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K a th le e n B rig h a m : A d m is s io n s A s s is ta n t A lw a y s r e m e m b e r t h e r e a re tw o t y p e s of p e o p le in th is w o rld . T h o s e w h o c o m e into a room and sa y, W ell, h e re I am! and th o s e w h o c o m e in and sa y, Ah, th e r e you are! â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

F r e d e r ic k L. C ollins

S a n d ra D arzy: A d m in is tr a tiv e A s s is ta n t Do not let p e o p le put you d ow n. B e lie v e in y o u r s e lf and sta n d fo r y o u r s e lf and tr u s t y o u rs e lf. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

J a c o b N e u sn e r

L e o n o r S o le rm a rin o : S e c r e t a r y and N urse H e a lth w ith o u t w e a lth is h alf a s ic k n e s s . â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

T h o m a s F uller

73


1?uiftdinQs and Gnounds

Juan L o re n z o W o r k c o n s is t s o f w h a te v e r a b o d y is o b lig e d to do, and p la y c o n s is ts of w h a t e v e r a b o d y is not o b lig e d to do. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

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Jo hn Selden


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The 1991-1992 Student Government

Fron t to Back, Left to Right; M ichelle Williams, Cedric W allerson, Fabrizio M oretti, Jennifer Brill, Jason M auskopf, Celine Desgranges, Caroline Jillings, A sm a Al-Anbari, R ichard Grasso, S erena Depero, S ara Jillings, Sahlie Endeshaw, not pictured; Dennis Gonzales, Danielle Kipness

82


Yearbook

Drama

83


Chess

Music Appreciation 1

Table Tennis


Basketball

Board Games Ii',— i.

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Short-Story Writing

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International Dance

Computers

Environmental Awareness

86


VARSITY VOLLEYBALL

F ro n t to B a c k , L e ft to R igh t: C e lin e D e s g r a n g e s , A le x Engel, S e re n a D e p e r o , S y lv ia M a r to w ic z , A islinn S m ith, M s. M a y e ll, Alia A l-A n b a ri, A le ta L a fa rg u e , S h a liv a G a y n o r, H o p e Ve nn ing , M e la n ie Yo un g , Eli F rie d m a n . N ot P ic tu r e d â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

88

K h a r to o n O han, Yun Y o u n g J a n g


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VARSITY SOCCER

F ro n t to B a c k , L e ft to R igh t, G u ille rm o C a r ta y a , T a e Youn Ja n g , C o u rtn e y B a rn e s , M a r c o D e p e r o , Mr. C a n z a n e lla , T om R a u s c h , A le ja n d r o A la rm a , A le x P e rp e r, C ra ig Ellis, J o s e B e rnik, O liv e r P a r e d e s , D e ric k T im m el, M a s s im ilia n o M azzi, D o g a n B a ruh, Mr. C o o k e , N ot P ic tu r e d â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

90

S teve Tam as


91


F ro n t to Back, Left to R ight; John Rosenberger, D anny C artay a, S id d h arth a Blalock, Fehed Al-Nafisee, Joey Miller, R y an A n d e r足 son, H ygie G rah am , Willy C arry, M icky Caro, G uy G reenberg, Coach Calvin Hastings, Pablo C a rtay a, S tu a rt Selzer

J.V. Soccer


J.V. Basketball

Front to Back, Left to Right; D anny C artay a, Hygie G raham , Ryan Anderson, Brad Anderson, M icky Caro, Coach Mr. Guillerm o C artay a, Joey M iller, George Schneider, Gustavo Torres, M ichael Payton, John Rosenberger, S id d h arth a Blalock, M iechiel Rijke, S tu art Stelzer, Gerald Taylor, not pictured; C oach W illiam Ferguson, Pablo C artay a

93


Girls Varsity Basketball

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F ro n t to B a c k , L e ft to R ight; T a tia n a M artin, M a ria n a Paz S e re n a D e p e ro , A le x Engel, M e la n ie Dillet, C a rin d a G re e n e , N o m b u y is e lo N ts h in g w a , C o a c h L e e L e vine , S a ra h Jillin g s, V a n e s s a T h o m p s o n , M a r y a n n e W illia m s , not p ic t u r e d J a c q u e lin e S o castro


Varisty Basketball

F ront to Back, Left to right; T ho m as R ausch, A nth o n y U lseth, R o b e rt Brooks, W a rre n Miles, C ourtney Barnes, Evan King, Joe Brown, G reg Gould, John Bailey, M ichael Bach, John Grasso, C oach Capsis


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The 1991-1992 Boys’ Varsity Basketball team is one of the strongest in our schools’ history. While they sometimes had a slow beginning, they have almost always dominated the later half of their season. After a five year absence, the Eagles have returned to the A.C.I.S. League, and are currently in first place with a 9-3 league record, and a 13-5 overall record. The Eagles also took first place in the Martin-Luther King Tournament, they beat the Dwight School, and are now on their way to the New York State Association of Independent Schools Tournament.

STATISTICS (As of February 7, 1992) TEAM Games Played: 22 regular season and post-season Points Per Game: 65 average FG Percentage: 46% Average Victory Margin: 10 points Free Throw Percentage: 57% INDIVIDUAL Highest Scoring Average: 21.4 points per game Most Rebounds: average 9 per game Most Assists: Warren Miles — 4 per game Best Free Throw Percentage: Courtney Barnes — Best FG Percentage: Warren Miles — 58%

83%


99


Fall Production: The Suicide The Cast

F ro n t to B a c k ; L e ft to R igh t; A le x R e v e n te lo w , A ix a M o ra n , M a r y a n n e W illia m s , N o m b u y is e lo N ts in g w a , A le ta L a F a r g u e , Em m y P e rry m a n , Paul K a s s e l, S a h lie E n d e s h a w , B a c k R ow ; Kip L u b lin e r, R ic h a rd G r a s s o , Am y S o m lo , J e r o m e Annum, Jo hn U ite r w y k , J a s o n M a u s k p f, P ie tr o B o tte r o , S u sa n Tilly, C a r o lin e Jillin g s, Anna S h e m a to f f, C h r is to p h e M c k e a n , V a n e s s a T h o m p s o n , C h ris F e n n im o re , S a r a h Jillin g s

The Suicide is a comic satire of Stalinist Russia in the 1930's. It follows the story of one Semyon Semyonovich Podsekalnikov â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a man out of work. O ne night Semyon gets hungry and awakens his wife (Maria) to get him some leftover sausage. They argue. O n e thing leads to another and Semyon declares that Maria would probably prefer him dead and storms out of the house. W ord soon gets around the building that Semyon will be committing suicide, and a variety of people begin to call on Semyon begging him to kill himself for their cause. Then it gets complicated. Performed in New York by the Royal Shakespeare Com pany in 1978, The Suicide has never been produced in the Soviet (formerly) Union. Stalin did not like the play and Erdman found himself doing time in Siberia. Erdman did return to Moscow as a screenwriter, but he never wrote another play. It's funny, odd and highly theatrical.


I

TtìS 1991 TylL£jlTS<fcm/ ; I


The Upper School Science Fair


“ I ’ll push . . . you shove.’ “ Pietro here is five dollars, ta k e a cab and go as far as it will get you.”

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down M r. U rry, we can play show an d tell later.” “ They look nice, but I do n 't think they are my prescription.”


Boy, I c a n ’t wait to take these silly hats off!

“ M r. U rry , Sim on Says is for kids!”

“ Heim lich, heimlich, gag, H E I M L I C H . ” “ Wow, M elanie, your G e rm an is im proving.”

J u a n and his lucky woman.

115


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“ P e a n u t b u tt e r and je lly . . . a g a in ? ”

M e lts in y o u r m o u th and not in y o u r h a n d s.

“ Far o u t.” i

G ro u c h o r e tu rn s . . .

i I’ m s o r r y I w a s la te

W h a t s u n s h in e is to f lo w e r s , s m ile s a re to h u m a n ity . T h e y a re but tr ifle s , but s c a tte r e d a lo n g l i f e ’s p a t h w a y th e g o o d t h e y d o is in c o n c e iv a b le . —

J o s e p h Addiso n


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“ Yo, O m ar! I c a n ’t b r e a t h e ! ” H ow h a p p y th e life u n e m b a r r a s s e d by th e c a re of b u s in e s s . —

P u blilius S yru s, M a x im

H o w m an y c a r e s one lo s e s w h e n o ne d e c i d e s not to be s o m e th in g — but to be s o m e o n e . —

C o c o C ha ne l

I found n o n s e n s e s in g u la rly re fr e s h in g ! —

C h a r le s de T a lle y r a n d —

P e rig o ld

“ Hey, no ju n io rs a llo w e d in th e s e n io r lo u n g e !”


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“ S h o o t me, and I’ ll s h o o t you b a c k ! ”

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W h a t is s h e d o in g in th e b o y s ' b a th r o o m ?

“ L o o k , I c a n ’t h o ld it m uch l o n g e r ! ”

P ie tro , on a M o n d a y m orning

118


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“ It’ s to o b a d s h e ’s a lr e a d y m a r r i e d ! ’ And you s a id you n e v e r “ D o n ’t even th in k a b o u t using

“ L a m b a d a d ” Rich!

'M u le ' a s a c a p tio n th is y e a r ! ”

“ W h a t sh o u ld be my e x c u s e th is tim e ? ”

“ M ic h a e l, I ca n s e e s t r a i g h t up y o u r n o s e !” S e re n a : “ Purina C a t C h o w is r e a lly g o o d . Do you w a n t s o m e ? ” A le x : “ No th a n k s , I like Nine L iv e s . ”


ATLANTIS C all me N ic k y O d e on . I'm an A tla n te a n from th e lo n q /fo ^ t w oflt^ o f A tla n jis I’m not lo s t but you land p e o p le c a n ’t find us a fte r cen b la m e you. I'd lo o k to o if I co u ld find a w o rld th a t ha: W e live in an u n d e rw a te r c ity m any le a g u e s u n d er a s c ie n tis ts , a long tim e ago, in ve n te d a p la s tic w h ic h c ^ n w ith s ta n d e n o rm o u s o ce a n p re s s u re s and w e live in th e s e a u d ito riu m siz e plastic jo b s as s c ie n tis ts , b o ta n is ts , d o c to rs , c h e m is ts , and e n g in e e rs ria ls , ro b o ts , and c o m p u te rs not ye t in ve n te d by th e le nd p e o p le p e o p le h a ve a lo t to learn. I c a m e up h e re from below ju s t fo r a vis it. O f c o u rs e I’m

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in d is g u is e . M y lungs are m uch m ore developed.. W e la v e le a rn e d to live w ith te a s o x y g e n . But g e ttin g b a c k to my vis it. I w a n te d to sei

if you h a ve d one a w a y WiftT

w a r. W h a t did I learn? You h a ve ju s t fin is h e d th e P ers an G ulf w ar. M oslem s/FTghjipg { / j C h ris tia n s . W e a lth y n a tio n s fig h tin g p o o r n a tio n s. K in g d o m s a re fig h tin g d i c t a t o r s h ip In our w o rld th e re is no fig h tin g . A ll of us l|v ® ihfpèàde. W e d o n ’t h a ve any b u llyin g n e ig h b o rs . In fa c t, w e d o n 't have any n e ig ^ B W s ^ W o 'itfc h th in g as m oney e x is ts he re . Oil is long fo rg o tte n . O ur p o w e r s o u rc e

turbjjne se a w a te r e n e rg y. O ur scientists^

c re a te d it. T h e re is p le n ty o f fo o d . Our n u tritio n is ts a n d jb o ta n is ts h a v e .c re a te d g e n e tic p la n t fo o d w h ic h is b o th ta s ty and g o o d .for ycfur h e à lth . No c h o le s te ro l. E ve ryb o d y w o rk s to g e th e r and our g o ve rn m e nt is e le c te d ] C o m p u te rs now rurt m ost o f our gov ern m e n t b u re a u c ra c y so th a t w e can sp e n d m ore le isu re tim e enjoM ng a rt, arcrtitfec-_^ tu re , and a n c ie n t g re e k cu ltu re . S om e o f us lik e th e C la s s ic a l a rc h tè ^ fy je o f anfcient g re e k cu ltu re . W e have o rn a m e n ta l p ie c e s in o u j homfes. T h e re is n o w f ja i ize d re jig io n in our w o rld . W e w o rs h ip one g o d , th e n a ture s p irit.;T h e n jitu re sp rif§ha|s,.be«rrigood to us. O ur g e n e tic fa rm e rs can a tte s t to th a t w ith th e |g o o d j|rie ld s fr^rrijo u r underw ate? v e g ta b le fa rm s. All o f us w o rk in sim p le A tla n te a n uniform s |ia d e o f

m a te ria l in ve n te d

by our c h e m ic a l e n g in e e rs. It c a n ’t g e t d irty . It a lw a y s s ta y s p re s s e d and k e e p s us w arm . W ell th a t’s ju s t an in kling of my w o rld . But I haVe t o iit o p . M yjh e a d fe e ls g ro g g y and my e y e lid s a re s tic k y . I h e a r a fa in t v o ic e g e tt|n g lo u d er. It' ^ my m orn’ s vo ice , " S to p d a y d re a m in g , N icky! It's tim e to g e t up fo r s c h o o l!"

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By N ic k y B ild n e r

I Dream Of A World I w ish th e w o rld w o u ld n e ve r have any y^a rs-o f Revolutions, no

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o r c lo th in g . I w is h fo r a w o rld w ith o u t p o llu tio n and drug u se rs. No orte w o u ld g e t s ic k , and w e w o u ld n 't have h o m e le ss p e o p le pn th e s tre e ts . P a re n ts w o u ld n e ve r g e t d iv o rc e d o r s e p a ra te d . C h ild re n w o u ld ne ve r a rg u e or have d is a g re e m e n ts . I w ish fo r a w o rld o f h a p p in e s s . C h ild re n co u ld p la y in th e s tre e ts and n e ve r g e t run o ve rJW h e n I th in k of a p e rfe c t w o rld , I th in k of b u tte rflie s and b ird s. The sk y is a lw a y s flu e , it w o u ld n e ve r rain or snow . I w ish th e s e a s o n s w o u ld n e ve r ch a n g e , o nly s ta y ls p rin g o r a c o o l sum m er. I w ish w e w o u ld h a ve s c h o o l from j9 :0 0 -1 2 :0 0 a.m . It w fu ld be g re a t if p e o p le co u ld co m m u n ica te w e ll, if e v e ry co u n try in th e w o rld w o u la s p e a k E nglish or F re n ch . I w ish fo r a w o rld of tfo p e and g lo ry! il

By S t e p h a n ie M o e lle r, 6 th gr

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IF I WERE THE PRESIDENT If I were the president, I would take all the money in the world and share it. I would make women presidents, and give homeless people a place to live. I would give teachers triple payment. I would give schools more supplies, and books. I would give each class a calender and a chocolate every week. If I were president, I would find a cure for AIDS. By A lb e r t F e ie rs te in , 3rd g r a d e

I DREAM OF A WORLD . . . I dream of a world that never goes to war, and makes no one fat if they eat junk food, and makes no one ill. I dream of a world which has cartoon people when the weather is medium — to have a friend like Valcor, a handsome prince, a dog named Vinde, two kittens, one named Lea, the other Dazzle. I would like to play games with a lot of lights, and eat a lot of cotton candy — and have delicious food. I dream of a world like heaven. I could have a birthday every day, and never have any homework. I could grow my hair long. I would have a nanny that is sweeter than cream or wine. She would give me beautiful pictures of cats and dogs like Vinde, and the prettiest baby raccoon, and a picture of Queen Elizabeth. By Em ily Billet, 6 th g ra d e

I HAVE A DREAM My dream is for peace on earth. For people to be the same as the rest of the people who are rich. And in South Africa, my dream is for blacks to be as free as whites. I dream that we can stop pollution in cities that are polluted. I dream that prices would go down for people who can’t afford things. For everyone to have a job even if their clothes are dirty. I dream for a cure for AIDS, cancer, and other bad diseases. For people to be friends even if they are American, African, Saudi Arabian, Jewish, or from any other country. And to cheer people even if you don’t know them. And for noises to be quieter at night. By M a r s h a ll C o h e n , 3 rd g r a d e

C a s t le by S a e k a M a ts u y a m a , 6 th g ra d e

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As the shiny black limousine entered the d a r k g arag e of the luxurious hotel, its headlights shone on a small, ratty-faced m an, with a grey ja c k e t on. H e was leaning on a colum n with his legs crossed. H e seemed to have been waiting for this limo to arrive. His cap bounced as he walked towards the beautiful car. He knocked on the window. T h e black glass went down and a haug hty face appeared. “ Y-e-sss.” he said slowly. He had noticed how beautiful the fingers of the ratty-faced m an were as they were placed on the edge of the window. “ Elio guv’nor! 1 parked my car here and now I c a n ’t find my way out! C a n you show me where to g o ? ” “ H a ha ha!” the h aug hty face laughed sarcastically. “ I ’d never do anythin g for a stranger, especially a shaggy one. Drive on Jeaves!” T he ratty-faced m an looked at the limo as it sped away. He pulled out a black leather wallet and said, “ You shouldn’t have done th a t — guv’nor!” Fabrizio M oretti, 6th grade

T he m aitre d. noticed a m an walking in. Since he w asn’t wearing a tuxedo or even a suit like the rest of the people in the re sta u ran t, he assum ed he m ust need information. “ Bonjour monsieur. M ay I help y o u ? ” he asked, noticing the m a n ’s ra t like features. “ ’Elio Sir. A ’d like a table foh one.” H e responded. H e in turn noticed the m aitre d.’s thin eyebrows and pencil-thin m u stache raise in surprise both to his statem ent and his m an n er of speaking. “ But, but of course,” said the flustered m aitre d., “ Follow me please.” H e was ra th e r em barrassed to be walking throug h the re s ta u ra n t with this rat-of-a-m an following him. The m an was well aw are th at the whole re sta u ran t was staring at him, but he d id n ’t mind. H e sat down at his table and while supposedly looking at the m enu, he glanced at the nearby tables. All except one were occupied by domineering women with too m any diam onds on. “ T h e y ’d m ake easy pickings for a fingersmith, good as m e,” he thought to himself. To him the difference between a fingersmith and a pickpocket was the sam e as between a goldsmith and a miner. “ Really, S h ak esp e are’s Othello is much better than Rom eo and Ju liet,” said the nearest fat wom an in a red dress. Quickly our fingersmith opened her purse, took out her gold m ake-up holder which he knew would be there, took her diam ond bracelet off her wrist, and ju st as quickly was sitting in his seat looking at the menu. An hour later, after a full meal, payed for with a wad of bills filched from ano ther w om en’s purse, he went on his way. C harlo tte L ath a m , 6th grade

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Al lhe elderly place we drink juice and eal cookies. W e pul on a show and m ake all different kinds of lliings. We m ake cards for the old peo­ ple, and we help them m ake things. I like going there. My friend and I always sit together. W e m a d e V a le n tin e s tod ay. W e h ad fun m a k in g them! I m ade two, and my friend and I m ade one together. W e have lun! — Cassie Jenkins, 2nd grade

I have m an y friends a t the nusring home. I sing and do things with my friends. Dorothy likes m e a lot. She treats me like I a m her d aughter. She likes our songs, and she knows which school I go to. I like Dorothy a lot! — E m m a Arnold, 3rd grade ?

M y experience a t the hom e of the old people is very nice. I ’m Oliver. I am a student at the Anglo A m erican International School. O u r tea c h e r ju s t said th a t we are going to the old people’s home. “ Please go to the rest­ rooms and get your ja c k e ts ,” says my teacher. So our class walks out and lines up. W e walk down the stairs and walk a few blocks. W hen we enter the old people’s building we take the elevator up to the 15th floor. W e help the old people with activities, talk with them , and all th at kind of stuff. W e stay for an hour and then we leave. I enjoy m y tim e with m y friends th a t I have there. — Oliver Som oza, 3rd grade.

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T h e em pitness within us all is som ething th a t hides. It is h a tre d for no reason and it’s som ething th a t divides. People of all creeds and kinds are sent from G od above. So we should open up our h earts and fill them with love. R acism is wrong, but we can m ake things right. If you use your m ind and soul and give it all a fight. Hopefully with lots of love the world will be better. A nd so I leave you with this th ou g h t as I finish this letter. — A ixa M oran, 8th grade

I rang th e bell on V alentine’s Day. It brings hope to me. 1 trad e for chocolate candy. A nd on S atu rd ay , I pick apples in February. I hear harps playing. I ate sweet candy and sat in the shade.

— Vanessa N o rton, grade 6

T H E BEACH I I I I I

W hen you asked m e to be your m an It com pleted my em pty land. Y o u ’d hold me tight on a cold and windy night. Y ou gave m e a certain shine Like no other kind. As if we only existed on this land. Y o u ’d whisper in my ears It calm ed me and eased aw ay m y fears. ! trea ted you like a queen O r like someone famous on a movie screen. But things change. W e started acting strange You th ou ght everything was funny. But I knew som ething was wrong, honey. W e started going too fast, A nd we both knew it w asn’t going to last. Things never seemed right Because all we ever do is fuss an d fight. W e ’d be b etter off as friends I know it’s going to be a painful end. It hu rts to say good-bye C an we give it one m ore try? W e were a team N o w i t ’s ju st a bad dream . Roses are Red, Violets are Blue, I'll always Love you But . . . W h a t happened to me and you? R ob ert Brooks, 10th g rad e

L ea and Theodore

— Adenike O petubo, 2nd grade

S wans swim gracefully In deep ponds of blue and green Gliding all day long.

ME AND YOU

see water smell hot dogs h ear people taste salt feel sand.

— David Volkmar, 2nd grade

This is th a t tim e of year again. Lea and Theodore were leaves. They lived on the right b ra nch of the big red m aple tree. Lea noticed the left limb brake. Theodore and Lea moved because the limb broke. Theodore looked out the window and saw it. Lea and Theodore packed and left for a beach tree. K im berly Ash, 2nd grade


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W elcom ing the New Y ear

New Y e a r's Eve is a great day in my country, S udan. W e believe that because it is the beginning of a new y ear we have to celebrate. Tw o days before the new year, we start to clean our houses and paint them with new paint. W e buy new bed covers, new tables, new chairs, and we m ake everything look different. W e change the style of our house inside. W e buy new clothes for ourselves. W e buy cookies, candy, and drinks to give to our visitors. W e visit each other and wish every friend a happy new year, we also wish them to live for more than 100 years. On N ew Y e ar's Eve night a fte r we dress up, we invite our relatives and friends over. W e sing and dance until 12:00 p.m. Then we turn off the light until the clock passes midnite. W hen we turn the light back on, we wish everyone nice wishes for the future. W e stay aw ake until the next day laughing and having fun. Hinda Hassan, 9th grade

M y F riends CHUBS I have m an y friends big a n d sm all. S om e a re sh o rt a n d plum p. som e a re slim and tall. T h ere a re m an y kinds of frien d s a n d buds, B ut th e re is one in p a rtic u la r, his n am e is C hubs.

S L IM I have m an y friends big and sm all. Som e a re sh o rt and plum p, som e a re slim and tall. M y next good friend, H is n am e is Slim ; 1 could b re ak his bones from lim b to lim b.

C h u b e a ts from d a y till night. T h is gu y s' got fa t and cellulite. H e is a good friend how ever, H e is sm a rt, sw eet, a n d clever.

I t ’s not th a t I am very built, It’s ju st th a t it looks like h e ’s w alking on stilts. H e never e ats chocolate, heroes, or subs. H e ’s to ta lly th e opposite of fat little C hubs. A lth o u g h I th in k Slim is very nice, I believe he should e at m ore beans, sushi, or m aybe fried rice. — P ablo C a rta y a , 8th g ra d e

H e sh a res his food (n o t his b u t yours) H e e ats e v erything from ste ak to ch o co late covered sm ores. C hubs has got brow n a n d cu rly h air, B ut w a tch ou t, if h e ’s h u n g ry enough he m ay ju s t e at y our c h air. C h u b s is cool, I like him a lot. B ut if he ever sits on m e y o u ’ll h e a r m e go splot!

H ow the C am el G ot I t ’s H u m p O n e day th ere was a camel walking on the beach. His nam e was Fred. Fred had a flat back, H e tho u g h t his back was too flat. Then one day, two monkeys were clim bing a tree th a t Fred was standing under. All of a sudden the two monkeys lost their balance and fell on Fred. T h e re were two big hum ps on F re d ’s back. They were big bumps. Fred said to the two monkeys, “ T h a n k you, T h a n k you!” an d th a t is how the camel got its hum p. — L y n n ette M im iasie, 5th grade

W h y the Dog Chases His Tail O nce upon a time there was a royal dog ball where all the dogs would go and dance all night. Then there cam e a storm. T he dogs, in a hurry to get to their homes, grabbed the first tail they could find off the tree where they hung. (They hung th ere tails on a tree because th a t was the polite thing to do.) A nd so now when you see a dog chasing his tail, he is probably looking to see if he has the right tail on. — Jo hn Rosenberger, 5th grade

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Recent Arrivals

G re g g A nderson, Q uest G o ve rn m en t g rad e 10

K a te Tull, g rade 6

L au re Gerin, g rade 8

Veronique S hulm an , g rade 9

Francesca M altag liati, g rade 9

126


Hong Peng, g rade 9

H an -Jo o You, grade 10

Aaron Sanchez, g rade 10

A ndy C hu, g rade 1

127


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REMEMBER


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For answers; see page 136 Bottom right.

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PA T R O N S’ PAGE Mr. Kutayba Alghanim Mr. and Mrs. Norman Fields Mr. and Mrs. Prescott Mr. and Mrs. Kusmirek Mr. and Mrs. Jillings Mr. and Mrs. Depero Angela Luck Mr. Gerardo Somoza Dr. Haidar Hassan W inston’s Gourmet Deli The Parent’s Association McDonalds Greinder Garage all those who paid $2 for coming to school in blue-jeans!!!!

some miscellaneous personals: — SOPS, thanks for always being there for me — caring and helping. I love you so much I’ll never forget the good times. thanks a lot sis, — Celine Bunda — How am I going to make it without you? Remember all the good times. I’ll never forget you. PL SS W A SB OS — Celine P — I LOVE YOU — S Ita, Jackie, Sahlie — one more year to go! — Susan Joey, I love you! Friends Forever; M.W., M.F., J.M., C.B., C.W., S.H.

THE CLASS OF 1992

The Yearbook staff would like to extend a special thanks to Tom Swift for his help and guidance, to Rowena Williams for her help w ith fu n d ra is in g , and to L esa Wang, for doing so much of the work.

Congratulations to the Class of 1992 from the best food in town! W IN S T O N ’S GOU RM ET DELI

I h a v e e n j o y e d w o r k i n g w ith the 1991-1992 Yearbook staff, on a mission I once thought was impossible. We have made it through yet another academic year. We have seen many faces come and go. A nd thro ugh ou t it all, we have grown from our experiences. I would like to thank my staff, (my d edicated staff o f varying ages), all faculty members, and the entire student body, for a year worth documenting! Peace and best wishes to you all! — Lesa Wang

134


Ah no, it's always just my luck to get-one perfect rose. I LOVE YOU Brandi To be or not to be, that is the question May you fathom all of your strengths and weaknesses in order to become the best that you can be. I LOVE YOU Charmene To a grandson whose faults make dim his shadows, where much is to be gained, much is expected and we expect much from Tommy â&#x20AC;&#x201D; He has the qualifications of making a fine man and a good citizen. W E SURE LOVE TO M M Y Grandma and Grandpa Prescott To our son Tommy...Congratulations! Now on to more challenges. LOVE ALW AYS Mom and Dad

135


A Serena

M in h a Florzinha: C ongratulations to you and the class of 1992. â&#x20AC;&#x153; I love you as big as the universe.â&#x20AC;?

Grazie per tutte le gioie che ci hai dato e per quelle che ci darai: Ti auguriam o tanta felicita, tanto am ore e tanta fortuna. Con infinito amore Papa, Mamma, e Marco

Love, Happiness, lots of luck and success. Kisses, Mom.

1. M r. M c C o rm a c k 2. M rs. M artin ez 3. M r. Capsis 4. Mrs. Mayell 5. M rs. G reenw ald 6. M r. Kassel 7. M r. Kelly 8. M r. Somerevilie 9. M a d a m e Fouhy 10. M r. Singh 11. M r. G reenw ald 12. Mrs. Jenkins 13. M r. Livingston 14. Mr. H astings 16. Ms. M ead

136

1. M o n ik a K usm irek 2. S ere na Depero 3. A lejandro A larm a 4. C a rin d a G reene 5. Pietro Bottero 6. T a tia n a M artin 7. Shirley M ichalevicz 8. S h a u n M itchell 9. A m y Somlo 10. P atricia Luck 11. Jose Bernik 12. R ich ard G rasso 13. M elinda N ixon 14. S a ra h Jillings 15. C ou rtn ey Barnes 16. O m a r A lghanim 17. C arlos Tseng-K uo 18. Steven T a m a s


To my fa m ily. I t ’ s tim e fo r m e to le a ve . T h a n k s fo r b e in g t h e r e during all t h o s e s tr a n g e tim e s . No m a tt e r h o w m uch I like to h id e it, you r e a lly a re th e b e s t p a r e n ts a n y o n e c o u ld a s k fo r! I m ean, re a lly , n o b o d y is p e r fe c t , ( e x c e p t m a y b e m e!) —

L o v e , Kenny

Hello, H ello To RG, ST, SM, JA, TP, EM,

I d o n ’t k n o w w h y you s a y

ID, th e P a tie n ts , e s p e c ia l ly

g o o d b y e I s a y hello.

CT and GF. S e e you g uys later.

T he B e a t le s

137


Congratulations Omar!!

From dad 138


Best Wishes To The Class of 1992!

From The Alghanim Family


Congratulations to the class of

1992 W e appreciate a school with Great taste !

McDonalds of Columbus Ave.

■McDonald's

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OoKQHQt Ut o iCMS to ifte. Odass ofj 1992 wild dopes Ijo/i a

â&#x2013; jyUdjyiddinQ Qnd dappy {yUtlAJlfi.!

Pa/ie.Kts' AssodiQtion

141


Congratulations To Dll Of The Future Doctors. Teachers. Architects. Writers, Lam ps. Pilots. Entertainers. Physicists. Dentists. Psychologists... And of Course. Bankers. As a g r a d u a tio n gift, C h a s e S tu d e n t ServicesSMis giving y o u a b o o k le t w h ic h y o u ’ll fin d inside y o u r yearbook. It’s called “ H o w To A void Bad C r e d it A n d 7 O t h e r N ig h tm a re s ' - a n d was created to h elp y o u b e tte r h a n d le c red it as well as o th e r s itu a tio n s in college. W e h o p e y o u e n jo y it.

C H A SE C H A S E

M A N H A T T A N .

P R O F I T F R O M THF. F.X P E R I E N C E " 1


CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1992

ADVANTAGE TESTING S.A.T. AND ACHIEVEMENT TEST PREPARATION

For Information Call (212) 5 5 7 -5 2 9 9

143


Happiness

I asked professors who teach the meaning of life to tell me what is happiness. And I went to famous executives who boss the work of thousands of men. They all shook their heads and gave me a smile as though I was trying to fool with them. And then one Sunday afternoon I wandered out along the Desplaines River And I saw a crowd of Hungarians under the trees with their women and children and a keg of beer and an accordion. Carl Sandburg

Dear class of 1992, I have enjoyed this poem for many years. It is simple and honest and it always makes me smile. I pass it along to you with affection on behalf of myself and all of your teachers. Be happy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Happy Trails" Wil Goodin Headmaster


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Anglo-American 1992