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issue 26 october 2013

The Bram Stoker Festival

YOUR INVALUABLE GUIDE TO DUBLIN WITH CITY CENTRE MAP INSIDE

26th - 28th October


Hello!

what’s inside

who we are

It’s one of those essential things that makes a holiday experience reach another level. If you don’t know where to go, or what’s on the menu, you will struggle to get the best out of your precious time. That’s why we have compiled The Dublin Tourist Guide, a comprehensive and useful insiders-guide for all things Dublin. As Dublin’s premier tourist guide the aim is to reveal Dublin’s little secrets alongside covering the more well-known landmarks. Now into autumn, with winter closing in, the city nights begin to take on a central role. Halloween, always a wonderfully atmospheric time in Dublin, will be celebrated by the Bram Stoker Festival, a weekend of fun and frights inspired by the Dracula author. With other highlights like the reopening of the revered IMMA, and the burgeoning Web Summit and its off-shoot events, means it’s not quite time for sipping tea at the fireside – there’s too much happening for that. Rather wrapup warm and get back out there – be warned though, the cold around Halloween can get a little spine-chilling!

4 - What to see, what to do Telling you where to go

The Dublin Tourist Guide HKM Media Ltd 60 Merrion Square Dublin 2 01 6870695

Enjoy, Aidan

12 - Where to Drink Traditional landmarks and hidden gems 16 - Vampire Weekend – The Bram Stoker Festival 2013 18 – Gray Matters – Eileen Gray at IMMA

Editorial Director Peter Christensen 01 6870695 / peter@hkm.ie Managing Editor Aidan Lonergan al@hkm.ie / 085-8519113

22 - Where to Shop Plenty to choose from

Advertising Greg McElherron 085 8519112 / gme@hkm.ie John Carey 087 1173511 / jc@hkm.ie Mary Clare Curran 087 9329513 / mcc@hkm.ie

28 - Where to Eat Dublin’s culinary treats

Art Director Lauren Kavanagh 01 6870695 / lauren@hkm.ie

34 - Listings

Distribution Kamil Zok 01 6870695 / kamil@hkm.ie

20 - Map

38 - Trad The best pubs for ceoil agus craic.

PICK OF THE MONTH __ 33&&445 3" "/ /55 __ 5" "6 63

Web Summit

What began three years ago as a small-scale technology showcase, Web Summit has flourished, expanding into a global event, attracting over 800 start-ups, and 10,000 visitors from around the world. The event explores technology’s ever-changing relationship with popular culture – Google, Amazon and Facebook are some of the big names to be featured, but this French cuisine withportfolios an Irishto atyear too, smaller scaleClassic designers are invited to exhibit twist. Using locally sourced ingredients, tract freelance work. Guests as diverse as Tony Hawke and VICE Magazine founder Shane Smith are set to appear on the 2013 bill. Running concurrentfrom the best suppliers, our menus cater ly are Food Summit and Night Summit, the food and music after-parties. for all tastes and budgets. October 30th – 31st in the RDS arena. Night Summit, running from October 29th – 31st33 at Exchequer venues around Dublin. See www.websummit.net -for more Street - www.thegreenhen.com 016707238 information.

~ Christmas Parties ~

Private Room Available (Groups 20-25)

26323 ALCHEMY-DUBLIN TOURIST GUIDE 111x165mm.26.04.13_26323 ALCHEMY-DUBLIN T

Group CEO Stefan Hallenius stefan@hkm.ie


RESTAURANT

LUNCH

OPEN

DUBLIN 4

EARLY BIRD

LUNCH 12-3pm

+353 1 6602367

PRIVATE DINING

DINNER 5pm


what to see and do

The Old Jameson Distillery

Christchurch Cathedral

The Old Jameson Distillery is the fount of the real ‘water of life’ in Dublin. An important and fascinating landmark in the history of the city, the old Distillery will give you a chance to put your taste buds to the test and prove you know your whiskey from your scotch. Offering guided tours daily with a choice of bars to sample a Jemmie, lunch is also served from the mezzanine restaurant.

Step back into history with a visit to Christ Church Cathedral, one of the city’s oldest and most loved buildings. It has been at the centre of Dublin life for nearly 1000 years, first established by Norse King, Sitriuc Silkenbeard c. 1030, rebuilt by the Normans. The stunning gothic naves sits on top of its twelfth century crypt, one of Dublin’s oldest structures, which also houses the exhibitions, a must see for visitors with guided tours, belfry tours and a beautiful café and gift shop.

Bow Lane, Smithfield, Dublin 7

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Christ Church Place, Dublin 8 www.christchurchdublin.ie c3

Tullamore DEW Visitor Centre (Outside Dublin)

Guinness Storehouse

Tullamore DEW, founded in 1829 by D.E. Williams, makes use of the country’s finest resources: water, barley and turf. The distillery itself closed down in 1954, but the newly renovated home of Tullamore D.E.W. Irish Whiskey stands proud on the banks of the Grand Canal. Visitors to the Centre are taken on an immersive tour which brings the stories of Irish whiskey, the distilling process and Tullamore D.E.W. to life, and showcases the legacy of Daniel E. Williams, founder of Tullamore D.E.W., whose initials lend themselves to the brand. All tours end with a tutored tasting of the triple distilled, triple blended Irish whiskey. Whiskey beginners will be brought up to speed on the idiosyncrasies of Irish distilling, while experts can delve a little deeper into the history and process of this most Irish of tipples.

It’s been in St. James Gate since 1759, and potential natural disasters aside, it’ll be there for the rest of eternity. The cheapest lease in town, you’ll smell the country’s alcoholbrewing institution a mile off - you can see the black stuff being born yourself in the tourist-friendly Storehouse.

Bury Quay, Tullamore, Co. Offaly (+353)57 932 5015 tullamoredew.com/our-birthplace

109 James’s Street, Dublin 8 b4


Kilkenny Café

www.newbridgesilverware.com

Ireland’s Largest Selection of Waterford Crystal, Irish Design, Gifts, Jewellery, Fashion & Accessories.

Located in the heart of Dublin, overlooking Trinity College, our Nassau Street flagship store & restaurant opens Mon - Sat at 8.30am. Opens 10am on Sunday with a live Jazz band. Free Shipping Promotion Now On Tax Free Shopping · Free Gift Wrapping

MURRAYS Best place to watch live sports in Dublin Wholesome Irish Food Irish Dancing & Trad Music 7 nights a week Estd: 1908 33-34 O'Connell St Upper, Dublin 1 t: +353 1 8787505

Nassau St, Dublin · Cork · Galway · Killarney · Trim Cashel · Stillorgan · Swords · Douglas · Shanagarry New Store Opening this October in Whitewater Shopping Centre, Newbridge, Co. Kildare.

www.kilkennyshop.com


what to see and do

Wax Museum

Dublinia

Fitzwilliam Card Club

On a leafy cul de sac in the dead centre of town, Dublin’s wandering Wax Museum finally found its new home a few years ago. Over four stories of a beautiful Georgian building on Foster Place, visitors can take a stroll through scenes from Irish heritage, discover our scientific history or simply ogle some never aging celebs. A healthy mixture of cool and kitsch ensures that the Wax Museum will keep both the young and not so young entertained of an afternoon.

Located on St Michaels Hill, at the historic Christchurch Cathedral, Dublinia is one of the city’s best loved attractions. An interactive passage through the history of Dublin, allows visitors to meet a Viking, be an archaeologist, and to learn about Medieval times. Suitable for adults and children of all ages, Dublinia is an experience which blends fun and education perfectly. A new summer programme of events has just been announced, see dublinia.ie for more details. Open Daily 10am – 5pm – tickets are €7.50 for an adult and €5.00 for children. There are discounted family tickets at €23.00 (2 adults, 2 children). St Michaels Hill, Christchurch, Dublin 8 (01) 679 4611 www.dublinia.ie d4

Dublin’s favourite casino and card club, the Fitz, as members know it as, is the home of poker in Dublin. For adults membership is free with a photo ID, leaving them free to wheel away the night chancing their arm for a dance with that most elusive of mistresses Lady Luck. The Fitz runs large poker tournaments for afficianados but also offers casual players an opportunity to while away the wee wee hours at blackjack, roulette or craps.

Dublin Zoo

Stephen’s Green

Archbishop Marsh’s Library

Dublin Zoo is much more than a fun-filled, stimulating day out for all the family... it’s a place to learn about wild animals, especially those which are endangered. The Zoo is a registered charity – your visit will help maintain Dublin Zoo to a high standard, improve the Zoo and contribute to conservation programmes. Located in the Phoenix Park in the heart of Dublin city, Dublin Zoo is Ireland’s most popular family attraction, and welcomed over one million visitors last year. 

Ireland’s best known Victorian public park. Re-opened by Lord Ardilaun in 1880 for the citizens of Dublin. This 9 hectare / 22 acre park has been maintained in the original Victorian layout with extensive perimeter tree and shrub planting, spectacular spring and summer Victorian bedding. The herbaceous border also provides colour from early spring to late autumn. Sanctuary from inclement weather can be obtained in the Victorian lakeside shelter or in the Victorian Swiss shelters in the center of the park.

Marsh’s Library, built in 1701 by Archbishop Narcissus Marsh (1638-1713), was the first public library in Ireland. It was designed by Sir William Robinson (d.1712) the Surveyor General of Ireland, and is one of the very few 18th century buildings left in Dublin that is still being used for its original purpose. Many of the collections in the Library are still kept on the shelves allocated to them by Marsh and by Elias Bouhéreau, the first librarian, when the Library was opened. It is a magnificent example of a 17th century scholars’ library.

City Centre, Dublin 2

St Patrick’s Close, Dublin 2

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2 Foster Place

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Phoenix Park, Dublin 8

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Clifton Hall, Lower Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin 2

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the celt

  

ǧ     ĆĞnjÄŽÄ’ÄŠĊĚēċėĔĒÍ•Í–ēĔĔē strolling into the celt is like taking a trip to the west, play boys and chailĂ­nĂ­ payfor attention and dance along the way to the early light ÍœÍ•ÇŚÍœÍ––ƒŽ„‘–•–”‡‡–ǥ†—„Ž‹Â?…‹–›…‡Â?–”‡ ™™™Ǥ–Š‡…‡Ž–Ǥ‹‡–‡Žǣ͔͕͚͙͙͛͜͜͜

www.MAGEE1866.com


what to see and do

Malahide Castle & Gardens

Phoenix Park

This magnificent 12th century castle is set in 260 acres of land and is one of the oldest castles in Ireland. It has been home to the Talbot family for nearly 800 years. Located on Dublin’s North coast just 13KM from the city centre and on the DART line. Today, friendly guides and a brand new interactive exhibition help you explore its rich history and interior. Visit the Oak Room, Small and Great Drawing Rooms and the Great Hall before heading to the Walled Garden, home to some of the world’s rarest plants. A new gift shop and Avoca foodhall, café and retail store complete this enchanting daytrip.

The Phoenix Park at 707 hectares (1752 acres) is one of the largest enclosed recreational spaces within any European capital city. About 30% of the Phoenix Park is covered by trees, which are mainly broadleaf parkland species such as oak, ash, lime, beech, sycamore and horsechestnut.  A more ornamental selection of trees is grown in the various enclosures.  A herd of Fallow Deer has lived in the Park since the 1660’s when they were introduced by the Duke of Ormond.  The Phoenix Park is a sanctuary for many mammals and birds and a wide range of wildlife habitats are to be found in the park.  One such area is the Furry Glen, which is managed as a conservation area. Áras an Uachtaráin, the residence of the President of Ireland dates from 1750 and is located in the centre of the park adjacent to the United States Ambassador’s residence, which was built in 1774.  Many other historic buildings and monuments are located in the Park. Dublin 8

Open daily 9.30am-5pm. Last guided tour of castle 4.30pm. Book online at www.malahidecastleandgardens.ie or call 01 8169538

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National Botanic Gardens

Chester Beatty Library

The National Botanic Gardens is noted for its fine plant collections holding over 15,000 plant species and cultivars from a variety of habitats from all around the world. Famous for its exquisitely restored and planted glasshouses, notably the Turner Curvilinear Range and the Great Palm House, both recipients of the Europa Nostra award for excellence in conservation architecture. Visitors can enjoy such features as the Herbaceous borders, rose garden, the alpine yard, the pond area, rock garden and arboretum.

The Chester Beatty Library, Dublin is an art museum and library which houses the great collection of manuscripts, miniature paintings, prints, drawings, rare books and some decorative arts assembled by Sir Alfred Chester Beatty (1875-1968). Its rich collections from countries across Asia, the Middle East, North Africa and Europe open a window on the artistic treasures of the great cultures and religions of the world. Chester Beatty Library was named Irish Museum of the year in 2000 and was awarded the title European Museum of the Year in 2002.

Glasnevin, Dublin 9

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Dublin Castle, Dublin 2

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COCKTAILS | TAPAS | BBQ | MUSIC

DUBLIN’S ULTIMATE LATE NIGHT VENUE WWW.ODEON.IE

TEL: +353 1 478 2088

OPEN 7 DAYS EVERYDAY IS A PARTY

GREAT BAR GREAT FOOD

5PM UNTIL LATE’

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E: HELLO@4DAMELANE.IE T: +353 1 6790291

/4DAMELANE @4DAMELANE WWW.4DAMELANE.IE

9 SOUTH WILLIAM STREET DUBLIN2 E: INFO@DAKOTABAR.IE T: +353 1 672 7696 /DAKOTABAR @DAKOTADUBLIN

OPEN 7DAYS A WEEK 12PM UNTIL LATE


what to see and do

Ethiad Skyline Croke Park

The Ark

Smock Alley

Etihad Skyline includes stops at five viewing platforms along Croke Park’s 0.6km rooftop walkway. Each stop gives visitors the opportunity to learn about the highlighted buildings and sites in their line of vision through multi-lingual audio guides. The audio guides include historical information, quirky anecdotes and interviews with key figures working at some of Dublin’s most famous locations

The Ark introduces children to the joy, wonder and creativity of the arts, and plays a vital role in raising the standard of culture for children. Here, in a unique building designed specifically for them, children aged two to 12 explore everything from theatre, music and literature to painting, film, dance and more. They discover what it means to be an artist, from respected professional artists. There’s no better way to nurture hungry young imaginations, or to inspire a lifelong journey through culture.

Smock Alley Theatre is a resource for Dublin, Ireland and the world. Respecting its extraordinary history and heritage of its original 1662 site, Smock Alley Theatre provides artists and audiences with a unique opportunity to create and experience work that challenges, inspires and entertains. The past, the present and the future of theatre in Ireland come to life in Smock Alley.

Jones’s Road, Dublin 1

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Eustace Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2

Lower Exchange Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2

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National Museum (Collins Barracks)

Iveagh Gardens

The Hugh Lane Gallery

Collins Barracks is home to the Decorative Arts & History leg of the National Museum. Featuring a wide range of objects, which include weaponry, furniture, silver, ceramics and glassware as well as examples of Folklife and costume in one of Dublin’s most historically important buildings, Collins Barracks is an essential spot for any

The Iveagh Gardens are among the finest and least known of Dublin’s parks and gardens.  They were designed by Ninian Niven, in 1865, as an intermediate design between the ‘French Formal’ and the ‘English Landscape’ styles.  They demonstrated the artistic skills of the landscape Architect of the mid 19th century and display a unique collection of landscape features. The conservation and restoration of the Gardens commenced in 1995 and to date most of the features have been restored, for example the Maze in Box hedging with a Sundial as a centrepiece.  Hatch Street Upper, Dublin 2

Located in Dublin’s city centre, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, originally called The Municipal Gallery of Modern Art, houses one of Ireland’s foremost collections of modern and contemporary art. The original collection, donated by the Gallery’s founder Sir Hugh Lane in 1908, has now grown to include over 2000 artworks, ranging from the Impressionist masterpieces of Manet, Monet, Renoir and Degas to works by leading national and international contemporary artists. Also houses the wonderful Francis Bacon Studio - which was transported in its entirely in 1998, from London to the Gallery in Dublin. Parnell Square North, Dublin 1

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visit to the city. Benburb Street, Dublin 7

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“This, I believe, the only house in Ireland to which the term palace can be applied.” Richard Twiss, 1775

CASTLETOWN HOUSE, Courtyard Café, Parklands, Events & Conference Centre

Celbridge, Co. Kildare (Just 20km from Dublin City) www.castletown.ie Tel: +353 1 628 8252 Facebook Castletown House & Parklands Twitter @opwcastletown FREE Parking: Exit 6, M4, Celbridge West. Dublin Bus: 67 from Merrion Square to Main Street, Celbridge


where to drink Buskers Why not come and join the party people in Buskers Bar in the heart of Temple Bar. Buskers has a modern décor and a fantastic atmosphere to match. There is live music every night which includes Traditional Irish & Tribute Bands, so there is something for everyone to enjoy. Fantastic food is available daily which will certainly cater for all tastes and Buskers boasts an ‘indoor garden’ where you can enjoy speciality cocktails and pitchers. Buskers is a well renowned Sports Bar, with 13 HD Televisions and 2 Large Screens they show all the major sporting events. Go on, give Buskers a try, it’s a real gem. 13-17 Fleet Street,Dublin 2 01 677 3333 www.buskersbar.com

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Dakota

The Porterhouse

McDaids

Dakota Bar opened in 2000 on Dublin’s South William Street and over the past decade has flourished as a destination. There are many facets to Dakota. During the day it serves fine freshly made food in an oasis of calm in the city centre. At night it transforms to a popular destination for drinks and rendezvous – and at the weekend becomes a great place to party, with late night revellers, cocktails and some damn fine music.

The Porterhouse in Temple Bar opened in 1996 as Dublin’s first microbrewery. Brewing three stouts, three lagers and three ales in the tiny brewery created much demand for the brews and lead to the growth of the craft beer market. The Porterhouse are widely recognised as having pioneered the craft brew scene in Ireland which has led to the opening of several craft breweries around the country. The Porterhouse is proud to announce that their Plain Porter has been awarded the gold medal by the Brewing Industry International Awards in 2012, the second time it has received this prestigious accolade. 16-18 Parliament Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2 01 679 8847 porterhousebrewco.com Fb: Porterhouse-Brewing-Company @Porterhousebars

McDaids is, if we’re honest, the kind of place where you’d call yourself lucky if you’ve nabbed a seat early in the night. Its much cosier, shoulder-to-shoulder affair where an unbeatable Guinness is only a quick shuffle away and commenting on overheard banter is de rigeur. The perfect place for whiling a night away righting the world’s wrongs with a few close friends or quiet pint in Brendan Behan’s memory.

8/9 South William St, Dublin 2 0 1 672 7696 dakotabar.ie

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3 Harry Street, Dublin 2 01 679 4395

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where to drink The Odeon Since reopening its doors late 2012, after an extensive renovation, The Odeon Bar has quickly built a reputation for being the go-to venue for evening drinks in the capital. With the promise of good food, good drink and a good time, in delectably decadent surroundings, The Odeon provides the ideal excuse for an after-hours aperitif with the friends, casual cocktails over a weekend catch-up or a quiet glass of vino in the library. Open from 4pm Monday to Saturday. 57 Old Harcourt Street Railway Station, Hartcourt Street, Dublin 2 01 4782088 odeon.ie

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__ 33&&445 3" "/ /55 __ 5" "6 63

Classic French cuisine with an Irish twist. Using locally sourced ingredients, ~ Christmas Parties ~ from the best suppliers, our menus cater Private Room (Groups 20-25) for allAvailable tastes and budgets. 33 Exchequer Street - www.thegreenhen.com - 016707238


where to drink Ashtons Ashton’s in Clonskeagh was and remains a leader in the Gastro Pub scene. Long before food was an important element of a public house, Ashton’s were committed to serving the best of Irish food. One of the unique experiences at Ashton’s is the Black Rock steak on the stone; a selection of the freshest fillets and sirloins are brought to your table along with your very own volcanic ‘Hot Rock’. You then cook the ingredients to precisely your taste without any oils or fats, making the food incredibly tasty and extremely healthy. Along with some innovative new dishes and a large selection of Irish craft beer on draught and bottle, you wont go wrong for value and choice, especially with the early bird menu from 4pm -9pm Mon – Thurs. 11 Verge Mount, Clonskeagh, Dublin 6 01 2830187 ashtonsgastropub.ie @BarAshtons

4 Dame Lane

Neary’s

Hogans

This funky venue, known for its edgy attitude, is spread over 2 floors, and is located bang in the middle of Dublin city centre, 2 minute walk from Trinity College. 4 Dame Lane attracts friendly and fun people for cocktails, dancing and events. Friday and Saturday has some of Dublin’s best DJ’s, pumping indie, electro and pop. A great place for drinks, cocktails and music. Open seven-nights-a-week.

There’s a reason that Nearys has remained so consistent over the decades - the formula works. Housed in an elegant slice of Edwardian Dublin with its old-world interior still in pride of place, the early evening buzz in Nearys is a rare sight to behold. With a crowd ranging from theatregoers and thespians from the nearby Gaiety to local suits and Grafton shoppers, Dave and his team of old-school barmen will take care of all your needs.

Hogans could easily be located somewhere in the East Village of Manhattan but to say that would be an injustice to its typically Dublin crowd. The large windows look out onto flower sellers and cycle chic passersby whilst inside remains the home to the laid back people watchers, good time seekers and newspaper readers. Brunch served 1pm-4pm Sat and Sun. Relax, chill and feast in your own time at this authentic Dublin imbibing emporium situated at the heart of Dublin’s Creative Quarter. Thursday to Saturday nights you can enjoy an eclectic mix of Live DJs till late downstairs at Hogans International Beat Basement.

4 Dame Lane, Dublin 2 0 1 6790291 4damelane.ie

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1 Chatham Street, Dublin 2 01-6778596

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35 South Great Georges Street, Dublin 2

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For the places and events you need to know in Town

PRESENTS

For the places and events you need to know in Town

21st Oct – 27th Oct 2013 See participating restaurants, bars and cafés offering special menus, events and activities throughout the week. Satisfy your taste buds at www.dineindublin.ie

DIEP

Dine in Dublin, is the perfect week to enjoy delicious food in Dublin City Centre.

/dineindublin

#did2013 @dublintown

Royal Thai Cuisine since 1999 Supported by:

DIEP DIEP DIEP Royal Thai Cuisine since 1999

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24/09/2013 13:31

Royal Thai Cuisine since 1999

Royal Thai Cuisine since 1999

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VAMPIRE WEEKEND The Bram Stoker Festival Words: Niamh McNeela This October, prepare yourself for the frightful transformation of Dublin city as its ghoulish inhabitants celebrate the life of one of its most famous gothicfiction writers, Bram Stoker. Now in its second year, the event will appropriately take place over the Halloween bank holiday weekend and will showcase numerous areas of the arts in a fittingly eerie atmosphere.

Although he spent much of his life in England, Bram Stoker was Irish, born-and-bred, and it is thought that thematic references in Dracula were linked to his own ancestry. Known for its multiple protagonists and titular anti-hero, Dracula has inspired countless film adaptations, teen-fiction series and Halloween costumes. The author’s Irish roots call for a unique and timely celebration of his success, against the backdrop of the traditionally ominous Samhain festival. Key events include pop-up performances, themed theatre and haunted walks, all in the macabre gothic vein. The Dublin Tourist Guide has selected several appropriately sinistersounding events for tourists and locals alike to sink their teeth into.

1. Several prominent literary figures are set to

appear in various locations, waxing lyrical on the redeeming qualities of the Count. Highlights include John Boyne of The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas fame, who will discuss the persistent allure of the ghost story with Diane Setterfield. Trinity College professor Jarlath Killeen will also be in conversation with Martina Devlin, Caroline McCall and Jane Casey debating The Pleasures of Dracula.

2.

Dracula in the Cathedral is set to take place in the chilling surroundings of St Patrick’s Cathedral and will feature dramatic readings by actors Laurence Foster and Michael James Ford. The choral group, Crux Ensemble, will also be on-hand to provide the necessary atmospheric accompaniment, promising a night of wholeheartedly uneasy enjoyment.

3. If you don’t like having your picture taken

then this could possibly be your worst nightmare. Literally. A cunningly disguised volunteer accompanied by his faithful assistant will be prowling the streets snapping unwitting passersby. Transforming your picture into something a little less like your usual self, the result will then be screened in Meeting House Square throughout the weekend, for your own personal enjoyment.

4. Culture Bites represents the event’s col-

laboration with local artists and innovators to showcase home-grown talent and enterprise. The live Graffiti Project in the Bernard Shaw promises fun for the artistically inclined but make sure to also check out Fast Intent Theatre Company who will be staging an ethereal performance in the Printworks, located in Dublin Castle.

5. What Dracula-inspired event would be

complete without the requisite film-screening, considering the entire genre that the original novel has spawned since its publication. Taking place in the brilliant outdoor/indoor Meeting House Square in Temple Bar, featured movies include the classics Dracula (1931) and Brides of Dracula (1974), with the more contemporary Hotel Transylvania (2012) to keep younger members of the audience satisfied. October 26th – 28th in various locations. See www. bramstokerfestival.com for more information.


Clockwise from below: Eileen Gray portrait by Berenice Abott; Transat chair; E1027; Bibendum armchair

GRAY MATTERS Eileen Gray at IMMA

Eileen Gray remains one of Ireland’s most revered, yet little-known, 20th century designers and architects. The Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA) will reopen its main building this autumn, with an introspective of her life’s work, Eileen Gray: Architect, Designer, Painter. key modernist figure, Gray was born in Enniscorthy, Co Wexford, but spent much of her early life in London. She became one of the first women to be admitted to the Slade School of Fine Art, where she took up painting in 1898. She subsequently moved to Paris and remained there until her death in 1976. Gaining influence in France in the early 1900s, Gray began her artistic career as a furniture designer, specialising in the Japanese technique of lacquer. She opened her Parisian gallery in the 1920’s, working closely with prominent figures like Le Corbusier (details of their fractious relationship will be featured in an upcoming film biopic, The Price of Desire, a biographical look at Gray’s life). Her furniture designs in chrome, steel tube and glass were considered revolutionary at the time and are still stylistically relevant today. From the late 1920s, she began to dabble in architecture, of which her masterpiece E-1027 is internationally renowned. Her buildings were less “machines for living” but rather highly tuned sensory experiences with a focus on necessity, flexibility and practicality. Examples of her work can be seen across the globe, in London’s Victoria & Albert Museum and New York’s Museum of Modern Art, for example.

IMMA seeks to focus less on the typically biographical insights of Gray’s life but rather, to shift attention back to her extensive body of work as a whole. In this vein, UCD’s School of Architecture will feature a two-day symposium as part of the exhibition; City as Archive – A House for Eileen Gray, navigating Dublin as a relevant port of contact for the perception of her work. Other highlights include a keynote conversation with the curators of both the National Museum of Dublin and the Musée National d’Art Moderne, Jennifer Goff and Cloé Pitiot on October 13th, followed by a Vintage Tea Dance Party. Running from November 3rd to January 26th, IMMA will also run an exciting new venture with the Irish Architecture Foundation entitled The Everyday Experience, capitalising on the conventional aspects of Gray’s work. The event will showcase a range of designers and architects probing the pervasive influence of architecture on our everyday lives.

The Venue: IMMA can be found in the Royal Hospital Kilmainham and, since 1990, is home to Ireland’s largest collection of modern and contemporary art. Under Director Sarah Glennie, the museum attracts over 400,000 visitors a year, to various featured exhibitions and to events organised all over the country. IMMA is also home to Itsa… Café located on the basement level, serving homebaked goods in a family-friendly environment. The IMMA shop (also available online at www. theimmashop.com) supplies an extensive range of books on art, art history, architecture and photography not to mention stationary, toys and, gifts. The event runs from October 12th – January 19th. Full-price: €5, Concession: €3. Find information and event schedules at www.imma.ie and www.eileengray.co.uk.


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where to shop

Brown Thomas A landmark on Grafton Street with its highly creative window displays, Brown Thomas is home to an unparalleled range of designer brands – in menswear, womenswear, accessories, beauty and homewares. The luxury retailer located at the heart of the capital’s premier shopping district hosts a range of international and indigenous brands within its opulent surroundings, guaranteed to satisfy your inner fashionista. Have a wander round The Luxury Hall for that special gift or enjoy a coffee and relax in the comfort of Domini and Peaches Kemp at The Restaurant. 88-95 Grafton Street, Dublin 2, Ireland t. +353 (0)1 605 6666 www.brownthomas.com

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Powerscourt Centre Situated in an elegant Georgian townhouse just yards from Grafton Street, the Powerscourt Centre offers a very different type of environment for shoppers, given it’s resplendent neo-classical style and old world feel. Inside there are fashion boutiques such as All Saints, 2nd Skin and Covet while the Pygmalion Café and the Lost Society offer shoppers a chance to take the load of their feet and relax over a coffee or glass of wine. Open 10-6 during the week and until 8 on Thursdays. 59 South William Street, Dublin 2 t: 01-6794144

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Phil Lynott by Colm Henry

Doheny & Nesbitt’s by Patrick Donald

Patrick Donald Photography Gallery This unique Black and White Photography Gallery is a treasure trove of stunning landscape images from all over Ireland, as well as many streetscapes of Dublin and its vibrant Pub life. The Gallery is centrally located not far from Bewley’s on Grafton Street in Dublin, and is well worth a visit to find a perfect gift for a loved one or an ideal memory of Ireland. In this ‘The Year of The Gathering’ they are offering three for the price of two for all unframed images which can be shipped for your convenience from the gallery. Or just go along to view this impressive collection. Open from 10 to 6pm daily.

Project 51

Cocoa Atelier

Although offering the facade of a boutique, Project 51 is, above anything else, a creative space for Irish designers. Upstairs is a designing loft, where you might find an upcoming Irish designer sketching away at their latest work. In the main shop, the stunning bespoke pieces are suspended from the ceiling with wire, giving the store an industrial yet modern feel. Project 51 concentrates solely on Irish fashion, with store assistants who know their stuff. Prices range on the more expensive end of the scale, but if you are shopping for a special occasion then this is the place to go.

Stepping into Drury Street’s Cocoa Atelier is like slipping into a melted chocolate dream. One in which brightly coloured and indulgently delicious macaroons embrace, and hot chocolate pastes drench the senses. Whether it’s yourself or another on the receiving end of the spoiling, there’s no better way than Cocoa Atelier!

South William Street, Dublin 2

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30 Drury Street, Dublin 2

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8/9 Royal Hibernian Way, Dawson St, Dublin 2 T: 016815225 www.blackandwhiteireland.com www.facebook.com/ IrishPhotographs

Trinity College by Patrick Donald

Susan Hunter Susan Hunter Lingerie is a small shop with a big welcome. Offering a full fitting Bra service, sizes 30” to 42”, A to I cup. Susan Hunter Lingerie is old fashioned in a 21st century way offering personal service with personal care. Some of the high quality labels carried include La Perla, Aubade, La Maison Lejaby, Prima Donna, Marie Jo, Hanro, Celestine and Rapture (an Irish designer specialising in pure silk). 13 Westbury Mall, (beside the Westbury Hotel), just off Grafton Street, Dublin 2. Tel/Fax 679 1271. susanhunterlingerie@gmail.com www.susanhunter.ie

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where to shop

Stephen’s Green Shopping Centre At the foot of Grafton Street lies the Stephen’s Green Shopping Centre, one of the most popular shopping centres in the city centre that is also handily serviced by both the Luas green line and a huge variety of buses to the city centre. The centre was developed from the old Dandelion Market in the mid 80s into the familiar façade we know today, along with a host of independent Irish shops and eateries. A perfect meeting spot for a day rambling in the city centre. St. Stephen’s Green West, Dublin 2 T: 01-4780888

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Celtic Whiskey Shop

Pen Corner

Think you know your scotch from your sour mash from your single grain? The Celtic Whiskey shop has a practically complete selection of whiskey brands from Ireland, Scotland and all around the world. Nestled in the heart of the city, the Celtic Whiskey Shop is a connoiseur’s paradise and indeed has become a mecca for whiskey lovers in Ireland and for visitors looking to take a slice of Ireland away with them. The staff have an encyclopaedic knowledge of whiskey and visitors will be invited to taste different whiskeys each day. The shop also provides a bumper selection of international spirits and liquers, and the sister shop next door specializes in wine.

Still stocking Dublin with the most sumptuous stationery in town, the Pen Corner’s continued existence after so many years and so many changes is a victory for romance. The Pen Corner is not only the city’s premier stockist of pens, paper, ink quills, etc but is very much a slice of older Dublin that warrants a visit (or five!).

27-28 Dawson Street, Dublin 2

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12 College Green, Dublin 2 t: 01-6793641

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Gift of Warmth

“one of Dublin’s best spots for a tasty and chilled out weekend brunch.” Georgina Campbell’s

Ireland Guide

Natural Irish and European gifts for all ages from infants to grandparents. Presents that are practical, healthy, beautiful and very good value for money (hand - knitted woollen jumpers €35). We also offer a wide selection of old style wooden and woollen toys for children.

Mention this ad for a 10% discount. Buy online at www.giftofwarmth.ie

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Some people say that we are fantastic. We think they are right. 126 Upper Leeson St. 087-793 9195


where to shop Schaparelli Brooch. Circa 1960

Dundrum Town Centre Probably the greatest monument to the unbridled consumerism of the Celtic Tigerera in Ireland, the Dundrum Town Centre is large-scale American style mall complex that is filled to the brim with international high-street brands (including Hollister and Debenhams), food outlets, a cinema (Movies @ Dundrum) even a theatre on the campus. The centre is handily serviced by the Luas green line which runs from St. Stephen’s Green. Open from 9 til 9 during the week and 10-7 at weekends.

out our amazing collection of Amercian designer jewellery, Haskell, Trifari, Weiss, Lisner etc.

pecialise in finding every style of costume jewellery that was made during the last twenty years, Victorian, Edwardian, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, Hollywood Vintage , 1950’s, 1960’s through to contempary silver and gemstone jewellery.

Sandyford Road, Dundrum, Dublin 16 t: 01-2991700

The AnTique & VinTAge Jewellery STore 18 ST. ANDREW ST, DUBLIN (Opp Dublin Tourism Office)

el: 01 6790759. Open 9 till 6.30 weekdays. Thursday til 9. Sunday 12-6

Rhinestones

Miriam Haskell Neckpiece circa 1930

Rhinestones is home to a century of amazing costume jewellery, Antique to Modern reflecting Art, Fashion, History and Romance. Walk through our door and you will experience a treasure trove of moments captured in time. From Early Victorian brooches to romantic Edwardian keepsake lockets, a great range of new pearl jewellery and European and American designer jewellery from the 1930s, such as Miriam Haskell, Trifari and Dior, are also among our stunning collection. There is so much to explore here at Rhinestones... find us on Suffolk Street and enjoy our fabulous diverse selection. Open Mon-Fri 9.30am - 6.30pm, Thu until 9pm, Sat until 6pm, Sun 12pm - 6pm. 18 Andrews Street, Dublin 2 t: 01-6790759

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ones is home to a century of amazing costume jewellery, antique to modern reflecting art, fashion, history mance. Walk through our door and you will experience a treasure trove of moments captured in time. From ctorian brooches, to romantic Edwardian keepsake lockets, to exquisite Venetian glass beads, to one-off studio silver creations. Selected Arts and Crafts items. European and American designer jewellery from the uch as Miriam Haskell, Trifari, Dior. etc. We also have a great range of new cultured pearl jewellery.

18 Andrew Street dublin | tel: 01 679 0759

pen 9.30 to 6.30 Weekdays. Open late on Thursdays. Sundays and bank holidays open 12 to 6 pm

20/06/2007 12:38:22

The Kilkenny Shop Celebrating its 50th anniversary, the Kilkenny Shop is home to Ireland’s largest collection of Irish designers and products! With 12 stores nationwide and an online shop, www.kilkennyshop.com, Kilkenny houses a stunning selection of fashion, homeware, jewellery and gifts for any occasion– international customers can avail of tax free shopping and for only €29.95 you can ship all your purchases to the EU or US! Open daily and adjacent to Trinity College, a trip to Kilkenny’s flagship Nassau St store is a must for any visit to the capital! Kilkenny’s Nassau St store also features the fabulous Kilkenny Café, where you can dine on the finest Irish artisan cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner!  www.kilkennyshop.com Kilkenny’s flagship store: Nassau St, Dublin 2

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where to eat

Kinara Kitchen

The Restaurant at The Schoolhouse Hotel

Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud

Kinara Kitchen specialises in Pakistani and Eastern cuisine. They are recent winners of Best Ethnic Restaurant 2012 National Hospitality Awards, offering great value lunch with ethnic naan wraps and thali style meals. Kinara is open 7 days a week from 12-11pm and offers an early bird deal from Monday to Thursday 4-8pm of €19.95 for a three course dinner. Also, their awardwinning bar manager Paul Lambert will introduce you to a varied and cool selection of drinks and cocktails!

The Restaurant at The Schoolhouse Hotel is one of Dublin’s best-kept secrets. The brilliant location and wonderful architecture and character make this a perfect setting for diners to relax and enjoy the surroundings. Head Chef Francois Grelet and his team make wonderful, simple food at a great price. The current offer is for 2 courses at €22.50, and 3 courses at €24.95 – including a complementary after dinner drink of choice in the School House Bar. Open 7 days a week 5-10pm, with brunch available on weekends.

17 Ranelagh Village, Dublin 6 @kinarakitchen t: 01-4060066 kinarakitchen.ie

2-6 Northumberland Road D4 01 6675014 reservations@schoolhousehotel.com

Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud began its dedication to the pursuit of excellence in 1981 and brings two highly coveted Michelin Stars to the city with its contemporary Irish cuisine and classical roots. French decorum and Irish charm are balanced to facilitate this faultless culinary awakening. Experience the height of fine dining with immaculately presented dishes as you luxuriate in the surroundings of the restaurant with views overlooking the Merrion Hotel’s delightful gardens. The impeccable service guarantees an unforgettable sense of occasion to savour.

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21 Upper Merrion Street

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Sr Frango’s

Bay Clontarf

Chez Max

Indie Dhaba

Sr Frango’s is a brand new eatery on Camden Street. The decor is bright and colourful with a Mediterranean flavour to match the menu’s style. Front of house is Mohamed Saad formerly of the Chop House. The menu is an eclectic mix of European cuisine with a touch of Latin American thrown in for good measure. Expect dishes such as spicy fajitas, half chicken or their delicious steak. They have an extensive wine list and are open for lunch every day with brunch on Sunday.

Bay believe that healthy lifestyle anchors wellbeing, boosts energy & vitality. Their philosophy is to create seasonal, daily delivered fresh & affordable cuisine. Their menu design is intended to offer an experience so you can have a healthy guide that caters for all dietary needs & conscious eating, while still maintaining full flavored dishes. There are discounts of 20% available when you use Voucher Cloud, free to download on iPhone and Android.

77 Camden Street Lower, Dublin 2 t: 01-4758399 w: www.fb.com/SrFrango

367/368 Clontarf Road, Dublin 3 t: 01-8532406. www.bay.ie

Feel the spirit of France here in Dublin! Chez Max on Palace St (at the gates of Dublin castle) is very much a traditional French café, particularly well-known for its charming back garden. Expect frogs legs and boeuf bourguignon and a wait staff speaking fluent French. The sister restaurant on Baggot St is renowned for its outside seating, smart garden at restaurant level and sizable terrace on the upper level. In tune with the ‘everything French’ philosophy, the Epicerie serves freshly-baked filled baguettes, pastries and lunchtime salads.

Tucked away on South Anne’s Street, this wonderful open space is home to a truly hidden haven in the city centre. A stones-throw from Grafton Street, the Indie Dhaba experience lets you escape the buzz of the city and relax in the peace and comfort of the stylish surrounds. The food offering is completely unique to Dublin - Dhaba-style Indian food - brilliant and creative, full of authentic spices and flavours, created by top chef Sanjay Vishwakarma, who has worked with Oberoi Hotels. With a friendly team guiding you on your way, and cocktails made by award winning mixologist, Darren Geraghty, Indie Dhaba offers Dubliners a whole culinary journey.

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1 Palace Street, D2 & 133 Lwr. Baggot St., D2 www.chezmax.ie @ChezMaxDublin 01-6337215 // 01-6618899

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21-26 Annes Lane, Ann Street South, Dublin 2 01 707 9898 contact@dhaba.ie

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Shanahan’s on the Green

777

Pasta Fresca

Situated in the splendour of a historic Georgian building over 250 years old, Shanahan’s is a steakhouse and seafood restaurant that fuses Irish and American culture. Succulent steaks of Angus Beef are served alongside the celebrated bounty of the North Atlantic in a relaxed and attentive atmosphere. Hearty sides including creamed sweet corn and sautéed wild mushrooms provide the perfect accompaniment to the prime cuts on offer. The Oval Office Bar provides an ideal setting to enjoy a tipple whilst investigating the impressive collection of memorabilia on display including John F. Kennedy’s rocking chair.

Run by the same folks who operate two of Ranelaghs favourite foodie haunts, Dillingers and Butcher’s Grill, 777 is a new skinny jeans wearing kid of the scene, thriving on Ireland’s new found love of Mexican food. That said, this is no simple burrito bar (not that we turn our nose up a good burrito) but boasts a menu that runs the full gamut of Central American treats from spicy guava pork to dulce de leche bread and butter pudding.

119 St. Stephen’s Green

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New restaurants come and go, but Pasta Fresca has remained more than a neighbourhood favourite for 27 years. Just off Grafton Street, directly behind the Gaiety - an ideal spot for a speedy or leisurely lunch, pre- or posttheatre supper, dinner with friends or lazy Sunday dining. Real, delicious Italian food (with fresh pasta a speciality) can be enjoyed in a disarmingly sophisticated environment, where professionals and families dine without fuss and budgets can be kept with ease. A reputation for genuine hospitality with a commitment to superior service has earned Pasta Fresca its position as Dublin’s leading Italian restaurant and with the addition of their new Prosecco and Cocktail Bar, word is spreading amongst those in the know that this is the new spot for a fashionable cocktail.

7 South Great Georges Street, Dublin 2 01-4254052 www.777.ie

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4 Chatham St, Dublin 2 01-6792402, w: www.pastafresca.ie

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Rigby’s

Boulevard Café

The Port House Pintxo

Seagrass has a simple philosophy: to offer great food and service at affordable prices. A passionate and progressive restaurant in what they do and also offer a genuine and friendly atmosphere while sourcing the best local and international produce available. Now offering an early evening menu until 10pm from Sunday to Thursday and 5pm-7pm Friday and Saturday at €21 for 3 courses and also a group menu for 2 courses (€30) or 3 courses (€35) – both BYOW with no corkage fee charged.

Rigby’s on Leeson Street serves freshly baked pies and seriously sizeable sambos at lunchtime, boasting the “best chicken sandwich in Dublin.” In the evening time, Rigby’s operates with an idiosyncratic no-menu policy, where diners have a choice of two starters, mains and deserts conjured on the day by the irrepressible head chef James.

A stalwart of the Dublin restaurant scene since 1996, Boulevard has been offering quality Mediterranean fare in beautiful, warm, vibrant setting. Boulevard is open 7 days a week and has the reputation of having one of the best Early Birds in town served, which is served from 5pm to 7pm Sunday to Thursday. Above all, a really fun setting at weekends for that special celebration with friends or family.

The Port House Pintxo in Temple Bar serves an array of authentic Spanish Tapas and Pintxos plus a wide and varied selection of wines from Spain, Portugal and the Basque Region. With an impressive garden terrace overlooking Meeting House Square the soft candle light creates a romantic and relaxed atmosphere. Does not take bookings.

30 South Richmond Street, Portobello, Dublin 2 01-4789595 www.seagrassdublin.com // @seagrassdublin

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126 Leeson St, Dublin 4 087-7939195 @rigbysdeli

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27 Exchequer Street. Dublin 2 t: 01-6792131 boulevardcafe.ie

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12 Eustace Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2 t: 01-6728950 www.porthouse.ie/pintxos

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where to eat

ely bar & brasserie, IFSC

Dax

The Winding Stair

A stunning destination for lovers of food, wine and beer. In a 200 year old tobacco and wine warehouse, ely bar & brasserie offers everything from a relaxed family dinner, pre-theatre menus, private dining rooms and after work drinks. The classic bar and brasserie menu reflects the best of seasonal Irish produce – organic where possible, with all meats sourced through the family farm in The Burren, Co Clare.

Ideally located in the heart of Dublin City, Dax is an award-winning restaurant that is now one of Ireland’s premier food destinations. Lunch is served from 12.30pm to 2.15pm. At Dax they understand that many of you are under time constraints, so they guarantee fast service without compromising the quality of the food. Dinner is served from 6pm to 10.30pm. They offer Pre-Theatre and A La Carte Menus and guarantee to use only the freshest of seasonal produce, ensuring a healthy fine dining experience.

The Winding Stair is characterised by its timeless charm and lack of pretension. A favourite among artists and writers, the focus here is always on produce of the highest calibre. Artisanal operators utilising traditional practices and techniques have found a friend in this Dublin eatery as it aims to promote indigenous wares from throughout the country. The ethos is simple focusing on home-cooked and old fashioned honest to goodness food with a carefully curated wine and craft beer list. The independent book store attached is worth a visit to source unusual and lesser known titles.

IFSC, Dublin 1 01 672 0010 www.elywinebar.com

23 Pembroke Street, Dublin 2 t: 01 6761494

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40 Lower Ormond Quay

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Fade Street Social

Bloom Brasserie

Darwins

Bang Restaurant

A new venture by one of Ireland’s best known and most successful chefs, Dylan McGrath - Fade St Social has 3 carnations under one roof. The Restaurant is comfortable and bright – open for lunch and dinner each night. The food is based around the ethos of home-grown and super fresh produce. The Gastro Bar takes a less formal approach. There is a tapas menu available and an extensive wine and cocktail list. The last part of Fade St Social is the Bar & Wintergarden. Here you will find a relaxed atmosphere, and extensive list of world beers, ciders and ales. Cocktails and wine are also available. This is an exciting addition for socialisers in the city, and only 2 minutes from Grafton St.

Bloom Brasserie is a restaurant with lofty ambitions. Well versed in the traditions of French cuisine, Bloom’s offers up accessible cuisine that accentuates their quality local ingredients. Head chef Pól Ó hÉannraich has lovingly assembled a menu that sees Angus Beef carpaccio alongside Caramelised King Scallops, and Roast Seabass. All dishes are freshly prepared and cooked to perfection.

Winning the Best Steak In Dublin Award is no mean feat - Darwins in-house butchers guarantee the high quality and freshness of its meat, the backbone of its reputation as one of Dublin’s best restaurants. On top of an also exemplary seafood menu, there is variety for vegetarians in Darwins intimate Aungier Street premises.

Newly refurbished, Bang restaurant is stylish and relaxed with a great city centre buzz. Passionate about food, menus are changed regularly and always reflect what is freshest and seasonal. There’s lots of choice available at Bang – from the good value pre-theatre menu to Taste of Bang, a popular seven course, tasting menu and Afternoon Tea at Bang. With a fabulous private room that seats up to 40 guests, it remains one of the city’s favourite Private Dining venues. Open 7 days a week.

Fade Street, Dublin 2 01 604 0066 info@fadestreetsocial.com

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11 Upper Baggot Street, Dublin 4 01-6687170 www.bloombrasserie.ie

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80 Aungier Street, Dublin 2 01-4757511 www.darwins.ie

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11 Merrion Row, Dublin 2 t: 01-4004229 www.bangrestaurant.com

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Listings, Extended features, In-depth reviews, Exclusive mixes, Competitions... And silly .gifs. COME BY OUR SHINY, NEW SITE WWW.TOTALLYDUBLIN.IE IRISH WEB AWARDS winner best on line publication in Ireland 2012


GO WEST DINGLE - MY KINGDOM FOR A DONKEY words John Carey photos Nichola Thomas

It takes four and a half hours of driving from Dublin, but well worth every minute as the scenery is spectacular. The first thing that spreads across the horizon is the sheer gargantuan of beauty that is the Magillacuddy Reeks, a mountain range that stretches into the Kerry terrain like a swan stretching out its wings upon a sleepy landscape. Every bend in the road heralds a new breathtaking scene change. We arrive in Dingle about tea time and promptly proceed to our lodgings, the popular Dingle Skellig Hotel on the edge of town and only a five minute walk to the Harbour. The view from the spacious room out on to the bay is nothing short of spectacular. After a nice relaxing jacuzzi in the leisure centre we put on our glad rags and head for the dining room. Dinner in hotels at the best of times is not quite up to scratch in my opinion but we are pleasantly surprised by the quality fare. In Dingle there is a bar every ten yards you walk in any direction and they are no ordinary bars as they double up as grocery stores so you can go do your food shopping and have a pint at the same time. After a nice leisurely stroll we happen upon Dick Macks pub, a quaint little watering hole with pictures of Charles Haughey on the wall and old fiddles hanging from the old wood book cases. There is a guy on a tin whistle and another with an accordian belting out old gaelic tunes while in the corner there are a group of Americans munching on pizza from one of the local take

aways and quaffing down creamy pints. The next day we head for the Slea Head Drive a ring road beginning and ending in Dingle. Taking the R559 south we arrive at Ventry harbour, a beautiful horse shoe enclave with fantastic views and a long stretch of sandy beach very popular with windsurfers. Moving on from there we head west past Dunbeg Fort,with a steep cliff on one side and the roaring Atlantic on the other. We arrive at Slea Head peninsula which is marked by a stone crucifix and beautiful views of the Blasket Islands. We drive northwards passing Coumenoole Strand where part of the famous David Lean epic Ryans Daughter was filmed. At Dun Chaoin you can get the ferry to the Great Blasket but we decide to continue on to Ballyferriter. After a nice lunch in the Ceann Sibeal Hotel we head east taking in a number of neolitic sites including the early Christian site at Reasc. Dingle is famous for its pottery and when on the Slea Head drive do pop in to Louis Mulcahy Pottery on Clogher Strand where you will find little gems at afforable prices. Another great place along the drive is Ballydavid as it leads out to a cliff top drive with dramatic views and crashing waves with beautiful seabirds hovering below. Turning south we head past the base of Mount Brandon – the second largest mountain in Ireland. If you are a keen rambler you can find a pilgrimage route to the mountain summit. We now turn onto the main road back to Dingle and a well earned drink in the town before dinner.

Restaurants are aplenty in Dingle and the only place for seafood has to be Out of The Blue at Dingle Harbour. I cannot recommend this place highly enough. On my visit there I had the freshest Grilled Lemon Sole. It was practically jumping off the plate as all fish is caught daily and landed at the harbour just across from the Restaurant. The highlight of this trip for me was undoubtedly the 8th wonder of the world - Conor Pass. The Conor Pass is the highest mountain pass in all of Ireland and is a must visit for anybody visiting the area. Driving up to the pass from Dingle you know you are in the lap of the Gods - you might pass the odd cloud meandering around its many bends in the road. The views on the way up are simply amazing - watch out for a few dozen sheep feeding off the mossy hillsides as they sometimes tend to cross the road. When reaching the pass itself you are greeted with the most spectacular views of the corrie lakes and the glaciated landscapes. On a clear day you can see the Aran Islands off the coast of County Galway. Upon decsending the other side of the pass you are greeted with a road so narrow that you can barely fit one car through and the sheer drop on the left hand side and cliff base on the other makes for a truely awesome adrenalin filled car journey you will never forget.


VIKING DUBLIN

MEDIEVAL DUBLIN

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LIVE MUSIC Saturday October 5th Hard Working Class Heroes Various venues, prices and times See hwch.net for details Katherine Lynch – Songs from Settling Dust The Sugar Club €18, 7.30pm An intriguing new endeavour Bednarek The Village €24/€30, 7pm Polish multi-tasker Julio Bashmore The Button Factory €18, 11pm Hilariously named house guru No Age The Grand Social €15.50, 7.30pm LA duo plug new album Caroline Moreau Upstairs In Whelans €15, 8pm Analogue Wave Twisted Pepper Free, 8pm Saturday October 5th No Age (Sub Pop) The Grand Social €15.50, 7.30pm LA duo plug new album Sunday October 6th Jay-Z The O2 €59.50-€69.50, 6.30pm Selling tickets ain’t one John Fullbright Whelan’s €16, 7.30pm Singer-songwriter Passenger Vicar Street €20, 7.30pm First of a two-night run Ultan Conlon Upstairs In Whelans €10, 8pm Monday October 7th Rudimental The Academy €22.90, 7pm Tuesday October 8th Everything Everything The Academy €22.50, 7.30pm Wednesday October 9th Passenger Vicar Street €20, 7.30pm Second of a two-night run Glasvegas Whelan’s €16.35, 8pm Scots rockers Lil Wayne The O2 €47.95-€45, 8pm Face tattoo aficionado The Jeremiahs Upstairs In Whelans €12, 8pm Thursday October 10th Dan le Sac vs Scroobius Pip The Workman’s Club €16.50, 7.30pm Hip-hop duo, two night run Children of Bodon Vicar Street €30.50, 8pm Death metal troupe Jeanette Byrne – No Regrets: The Music of Edith Piaf The Sugar Club €15, 8pm Zebra w/ Amidships & The Disconnected Bliss Upstairs In Whelans Free, 11.30pm Coma Button Factory

€30, 8pm Poland’s biggest rock band, not Kompakt electronica duo Friday October 11th Dan le Sac vs Scroobius Pip The Workman’s Club €16.50, 7.30pm Kacey Musgraves Whelans €15, 7.30pm Cry Before Dawn Button Factory €25, 7.30pm Celtic rock is greatest of all genres Saturday October 12th The Boomtown Rats Vicar Street €39, 7.30pm Two-night run Laura Mvula Olympia Theatre €25.40, 7.30pm Soul singer-songwriter Kids in Glass Houses Academy 2 €16, 5pm The Answer Whelans €18, 7.30pm To an unasked question Written In Sound Button Factory €TBC, 7.30pm Album launch gig Wife Workmans Club €12, 8pm Sunday October 13th The Boomtown Rats Vicar Street €39, 7.30pm ‘An you been caught Monday October 14th Jamie Cullum Olympia Theatre €44.05-€49.65, 7.30pm Parquet Courts Whelans €16.50, 8pm Remember guitar rock? Tuesday October 15th Duke Special & Friends The Sugar Club €17.50, 7.30 Playing songs of Harry Nilsson Kate Nash Whelan’s €17.50, 8pm Sex Mob Workman’s Club €22, 8pm With downtown jazz legend Steve Bernstein! Wednesday October 16th Alunageorge The Academy €17.35, 7pm Jessie J The O2 €33.50-€41.55, 6.30pm Really it’s ALL about the money Otis Gibbs Whelan’s €15/€13, 8pm Folk artist and yo-yo champion Shangaan Electro The Sugar Club Free, 8pm South African dance phenomenon Johnny Flynn & The Sussex Wit Whelans €15, 8pm Lady Lamb The Bee Keeper The Sugar Club €12.50, 7.30pm Thursday October 17th Shangaan Electro The Sugar Club €15, 8pm South African dance phenomenon Stewart Agnew

Workmans Club €10, 8pm Sweet as candy floss Friday October 18th Róisín O Whelan’s €12, 8pm Return gig after US debut NC Lawlor + George Borowski & The Fabulous Wonderfuls Upstairs In Whelans €10, 8pm No Monster Club Upstairs In Whelans Free, 11.30pm Hey + Guests The Village €27.50/€30, 6pm Cocaine Ponytail The Sugar Club €10, 8.30pm Album launch of 80s future music Deptford Goth + Bantum Unitarian Church €12, 7.30pm Ghostly electronica Queensrÿche Button Factory €27.50, 7.30pm Unimpeachable umlautery Saturday October 19th Keywest Vicar Street Early-bird €10, Full Price €19, 7pm Lisa O’Neill Whelan’s €10, 7.30pm Cavan folk singer Forrests & Snakehips The Button Factory €5, 11pm Whole Lotta Zep – Led Zeppelin II Live The Sugar Club €12, 8pm The Barley Mob The Village €10, 8pm And you get a free album Monday October 21st Travis Olympia Theatre €27.50, 7.30pm Tueday October 22nd Chic Vicar Street Ah the lads Wednesday October 23rd Agnes Obel Vicar Street €22, 7.30pm Danish singer-songwriter Devon Sproule & Mike O’Neill The Grand Social €15, 8pm Canadian duo Méav The Sugar Club €15, 7.30pm Awna Teixeira, Brandy Zdan & Cara Luft Upstairs In Whelans €14, 8pm Folk jams Hermitage Green Whelans €16, 8pm Sounds like a coffee shop Thursday October 24th Local Natives Olympia Theatre From €22.90, 7pm Tindersticks Vicar Street €33.50, 7.30pm 21st anniversary concert Friday October 25th Ghostpoet The Button Factory €16.30, 7.30pm Rescheduled date

Sam Amidon Whelans €16, 7.30pm Folk artist Bastille Olympia Theatre €26.40, 7pm Chart-topping toffs Lissie The Academy €18, 7.30pm Masaki Batoh Workmans Club €16, 8pm Saturday October 26th God is an Astronaut The Academy €22.50, 7pm But Pink says He’s a DJ? Efterklang The Button Factory €20, 7.30pm Danish indie rock Waxahatchee The Workman’s Club €10.50, 7.30pm Support from Swearin’ Jimmy MacCarthy Vicar Street €35.70, 7.30pm Prophecy/Conspiracy tour Raekwon The Chef [Wu Tang Clan] The Sugar Club €22.50, 7.30pm Sunday October 27th Paul Van Dyke The Academy €26.80, 10pm Primal Scream Olympia Theatre From €29, 7.30pm Still Movin’ On Up The Hot 8 Brass Band The Sugar Club €17.50/€20, 7.30pm Russian Circles + Chelsea Wolfe Button Factory 7.30pm Sargent House heavies Monday October 28th Casey Black & Mick Flannery Upstairs In Whelans €20, 8pm Pete Molinari The Village €12, 8pm Tuesday October 29th Chic ft. Nile Rodgers Vicar Street €38.50/€43.50, 7.30pm First of a two night run Wednesday October 30th Chic ft. Nile Rodgers Vicar Street €38.50/€43.50, 7.30pm Le Freak, C’est Chic Simon McBride Upstairs In Whelans €14.50, 8pm Tim Easton Whelans €11, 8pm Friday November 1st Delorentos Vicar Street Early Bird €10, Full-price €17, 8pm Billy Joel The O2 €76/€95, 6.30pm Piano Man returns KT Tunstall Olympia Theatre €25.50, 7.30pm Saturday November 2nd Mmoths The Button Factory €15, 7.30pm Much-hyped Newbridge-native Lloyd Cole Vicar Street €25, 7.30pm

Solo acoustic show Jake Bugg Olympia Theatre €26.40, 7pm First of a two-night run JAZZ SUNDAY Cary Posavitz Shelbourne Hotel, St.Stephens Grn. D2 12pm, Free Merrion Gates Fitzpatrick Castle Hotel, Killiney. 12.30pm, Free Jazz (Piano) Brunch Brasserie 7, Capel St. 2pm, Free Stella Bass Quartet Cafe en Seine, Dawson St. 2pm, Free Kevin Morrow Duo Hampton Hotel, Donnybrook 6pm, Free Sweeney’s Jazzmen Sweeney’s Bar, Dame St. 6.30pm, Free MONDAY Essential Big Band Grainger’s, Malahide Rd. 9.30pm, €5 TUESDAY The Lounge Quartet Leeson Lounge, Upr Leeson St. 9pm, Free Jazz Session International Bar, Wicklow St. 9.30pm, €5 WEDNESDAY Jazz Session The House, 4 Main St. Howth, Co.Dublin 7.30pm, Free THURSDAY Cary Posavitz Mint Bar, Westin HoteL, D2 9.30pm, Free Jazz Session International Bar, Wicklow St. 9.30pm, €5 FRIDAY Solar Trio The Gables Rest. Foxrock, D18 6pm, Free Piano Jazz Brasserie 7, Capel St.  6pm, Free Bradley Gillis Brasserie Le Pont, Fitzwilliam Pl. D2 7.30pm, Free Emilie Conway 4tet Wild Goose Grill, Ranelagh 9.30pm, Free SATURDAY The Jazz Globetrotters The Globe, Sth Gt Georges St. 5pm, Free Piano Jazz Brasserie 7, Capel St.  6pm, Free Bradley Gillis Brasserie Le Pont, Fitzwilliam Pl. D2 7.30pm, Free Jazz Session Brasserie 7, Capel St. 9.30pm, Free ONE OFF Thursday 3rd October Jazz Masters 4tet JJ Smyths, Aungier St. 8.30pm, €8 Friday 4th October Susannah De Wrixon Sings Peggy Lee John Field Room, NCH 1.05pm, €15 Sunday 6th October Louis Stewart 4tet JJ Smyths, Aungier St. 4.30pm, €10 Thursday 10th October Jeanette Byrne

Sings Edith Piaf Sugar Club 8pm, €15 Thursday 10th October Nigel Mooney Septet Feat. Jean Toussaint JJ Smyths, Aungier St. 8.30pm, €12 Monday 14th October Jamie Cullum Olympia Theatre 8pm, €44 Thursday 17th October Tommy Halferty Trio JJ Smyths, Aungier St. 8.30pm, €8 Sunday 20th October Louis Stewart & Jim Doherty JJ Smyths, Aungier St. 4.30pm, €10 Thursday 24th October Colette Cassidy 4tet JJ Smyths, Aungier St. 8.30pm, €8 Sunday 27th October Louis Stewart 4tet Purty Kitchen, Monkstown 4.30pm, €10 Wednesday 30th October Melanie O’Reilly John Field Room, NCH 8pm, €20 Thursday 31st October Spooky (Halloween Jazz Special) JJ Smyths, Aungier St. 8.30pm, €8 More Details 087 2878755


FESTIVALS/COMEDY Comedy

Bachelor Comedy Club October 6th, 13th, 20th, 27th The Bachelor Inn, 9pm, €5 The Comedy Improv October 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th International Bar, 9pm Talk Talk: The All Ireland Comedy Show October 8th, 15th, 22nd, 29th International Bar, 9pm, €5 Wicked Wolf Comedy Nights October 8th, 22nd The Wicked Wolf, 8.30pm, €5 Laughter Lines Dublin October 9th, 16th, 23rd, 30th The Duke, 8.30pm, €5 Bad Ass Comedy Club October 9th, 16th, 23rd, 30th The Bad Ass Café, 9pm, €10 Comedy Anseo October 9th, 16th, 23rd, 30th Anseo, 8.30, €5/€8 Ardal O’Hanlon 4th October Vicar Street, 7.30pm, €28 Andrew Lawrence 5th October Whelan’s, 7.30pm, €15 Roy Chubby Brown 5th October The Olympia, 8pm, from €30 Foil Arms & Hog 7th October Woolshed Baa & Grill Micky Flanagan 12th October The O2, 8pm, €33.50 Central Remedial Clinic Comedy Night 17th October The Olympia, 8pm, €28 Stewart Lee 20th & 21st October Vicar Street, 7.30pm, €28 Bernard O’Shea 25th October Vicar Street, 8.30pm, €23 Ireland’s Got Mammies – Colin O’Regan 2nd November Draíocht, 8pm, €12/€15 Bo Burnham 7th November Vicar Street, 7.30pm, €22 Stephen Lynch 9th November The Olympia Theatre, 7.15pm, €28

Festivals

Hard Working Class Heroes The festival, in its 11th year, runs from Thursday October 3rd to Saturday October 5th following a jam-packed schedule spanning several venues all over Dublin. Artists like Tieranniesaur and So Cow are set to appear at locations like Meeting House Square, The Twisted Pepper, The Button Factory, The Workman’s Club, The Grand Social and The Mercantile. Weekend tickets come in at €45 or nab a day ticket at the wallet-friendly €20. 3rd – 5th October Open House Dublin From the 4th to the 6th of October, avail of the opportunity to stroll through a range of architectural gems, heretofore inaccessible to the public. The perfect opportunity to take that long-overdue walking tour of the city, allowing tourists and locals alike the freedom to pick and choose and tailor the event to suit themselves and their feet. 4th – 6th October Blackrock Animation Festival Now in its third year, this film festival (taking place from the 11th to the 12th of October) the aims to inject (extra) humour and enjoyment into cinematic

animation, giving short film-makers the opportunity to showcase their work alongside workshops and talks and wrapping up with the Festival Awards at the end of the weekend. Celebrating Best Irish Short Film, Best International Film and Best Irish Graduate Film, the Festival is the ideal starting point for aspiring and established directors, producers and animators. 11th – 12th October Dine in Dublin Restaurant Week From the 21st to the 27th of October resident foodies and roving instagammers alike can fawn over the latest creations from a range of Dublin’s best eateries. This bi-annual event is a celebration not only of the food but also the sentient experience of tasting and offers diners one-off sample menus and thrifty deals suiting all palates and pockets. Examples of previous deals include 20% off regular menus alongside tastings, competitions and demonstrations from chefs around the city. 21st – 27th October Bram Stoker Festival Strategically scheduled for the Halloween Bank Holiday weekend, Dublin will play host to the second Bram Stoker Festival from Saturday 26th to Saturday the 28th of October. Celebrating the life of Ireland’s most recognised gothic fiction writer, the Dracula creator has inspired a myriad of films, novels and classic 90s cartoons (see: Little Dracula, be inspired). Featuring walking tours, literary workshops and themed theatre prepare to be appropriately spooked at this Bank Holiday weekend event. 26th – 28th October Dublin Beatles Festival This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the only Irish Beatles concerts at the Adelphi Cinema (now Arnotts’ carpark on Middle Abbey Street) with the band staying at the nearby Gresham Hotel. From the 7th to the 10th of November Dublin will gear itself up for a resurgence of Beatlemania, featuring more than 20 Irish and international bands in locations all around the city centre. 7th - 10th November

POKER

Poker @ Fitzwilliam Casino & Card Club Monday 8:30pm: €75 + €5 No Limit Freezeout. Tuesday 8:30pm: €50 + €5 No Limit Double Chance Freezeout. Wednesday 8:30pm: €20 + €5 Hold’em Multirebuy. 7:30pm: Satellite Tournament. Thursday 8pm: €45 + €5 + €10 Scalp No Limit Freezeout. 9:30pm: €30 + €5 Pot Limit Omaha Triple Chance. Thursday End of Month €250 + €20 Freezeout. Friday 8:30pm: €70 + €5 No Limit, Double Chance. Saturday 8pm: €100 + €10 Deepstack No Limit Freezeout. 9pm: €20 + €5 No Limit Freezeout. Sunday 8:30pm: €50 + €5 No Limit Freezeout. Details www.fitzwilliamcardclub.com

UPSTAGE The Abbey Theatre The Events €20 -€25 Tues-Fri 8.30pm, Sat matinee 2.30pm Tues 1st October – 5th October Debuting at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, David Greig’s new work explores the complexities of collective grief and persistent faith in the aftermath of an incomprehensible tragedy. Claire, a local priest must come to terms with the consequences of a shooting during a choir rehearsal, overcoming the harshness of reality to recover a fraction of humanity. The Hanging Gardens €13-€45 Mon-Fri 7.30pm, Sat matinees 2pm Thurs 3rd October– 9th November Faced with the realities of ageing, a married couple must recalibrate their existence as their children fly the nest. But when crisis strikes, the initial reformation of the family dynamic is challenged by the appearance of some unflinching honesty, leading to irrevocable consequences. Silent €18-€25 Wed-Sat 8pm Wednesday 6th November – 7TH December Silent returns to the Peacocke Stage of the Abbey Theatre after successful runs in 2012 and 2011. The show chronicles the moving story of McGoldrig as he explores pieces of his past after misfortune strikes. Through the guise of his alter-ego Rudolph Valentino, he attempts to escape the harsh reality of homelessness by reliving the more enjoyable memories of his past. Axis Theatre Ballymun What Would Ma Say? €10/€12, 8pm 4th October – 5th October Adapted from the memoir by Kathleen Doyle, this performance explores the often challenging life of the author, seen as the dependable elder child in a family of twelve. Despite hardship and difficulty, a sense of family persists with humour permeating the script. An intriguing insight into Dublin in the 1950’s and 60’s. The Family/Heroin €12/€15, 7pm 16th October – 18th October The first two parts in a trilogy, recounting the sociological history of Ireland. The Family, explores the nature of the changing Irish family dynamic, a concept ingrained in our constitution since the 1920s. Heroin, meanwhile, navigates the growth of heroin use in the country and its hugely detrimental effects on the fabric of society, on the lower levels of the social model in particular. The Gate Theatre The Threepenny Opera €25-€35, 7.30pm Brecht and Weill’s 1928 opera centres around the notorious Macheath, a pimp and murderer and his gang of criminals. The Threepenny Opera is a satire of bourgeois life, with a score inspired by American jazz and German cabaret. This run also features a live orchestra. The Gaiety Waiting For Godot €15-€25, 7.30pm Wednesday 2nd October-6th October Beckett’s absurdist drama focuses solely on two characters Vladimir and Estragon as they wait in vain for the obscure Godot. Instrumental

to Beckett’s success, this dramatic piece, published originally in French, has been produced countless times in numerous countries, marking it as one of the most recognisable of his works. Cabaret €29-€59, 7.30pm Tuesday 29th October – 2nd November Everyone’s favourite Pop Idol winner, Will Young reprises his role in the critically-acclaimed Cabaret. Following on from a stint on the West End, the musical showcases impressive choreography and a stellar cast. Rufus Norris’ production sets the scene in 1930’s Berlin, specifically at the notorious Kit Kat Klub, adapted from the novel by Christopher Isherwood, Goodbye to Berlin. Heartbeat of Home Wed 25th September – 12th October €15 - €30, 7.30pm A world premiere, from the producers of Riverdance, Heartbeat of Home is a mingling of Irish, Latin and Afro-Cuban music and dance. Featuring a cast of thirty-eight and a live band of ten, this show will begin its world tour after an opening run in Dublin. A night of story-telling through song, dance, music, narration and a 3D projection awaits. Wednesday, Friday, Saturday matinees, 2.30pm Bewley’s Café Theatre Fred and Alice Mon 23rd September – 12th October €8 - €12, 1pm A comic work with the tagline: “love in the time of OCD”. Having met Fred in “the home”, Alice fell in love at first sight. It took Fred a bit longer. But, after a few years, he realised that he too had fallen in love with Alice at first sight. The play follows the couple as they move to independent living, pet care, cooking and their individual approached to coping. Holia: Without the Dark Thurs 17th & Thurs 24th of October €12, 8pm A combination of monologue, conversation, dancing and singing entertaining audiences for a second year with a focus on the darker issues of depression and deep-seated trauma. The hour-long performance pitches itself as a “unique experience” for the open-minded theatre-goer, running for two performances only on Bewley’s top floor. Theatre Upstairs @ Lanigan’s Bar Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde Tues 22nd October – 2nd November €8/€10, 1pm Tuesday October 22nd – Saturday October 26th Tuesday October 29th – Saturday November 2nd 7pm Thursday October 24th – Saturday October 26th Thursday October 31st – Saturday November 2nd Sickle Moon Productions present their latest production, an adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s novella of the same name. Explore the nature of the split personality set in the midst of eerie Victorian England, particularly apt around the ominous Hallowe’en holiday. Featuring Paul Travers as Henry Jekyll and Finbarr Doyle as Mr Hyde. Project Arts Centre Taramandal Tues 8th October – 12th October €20-€25, 7.45pm, matinee Sat 12th

October, 2.45pm Based on the short story by Satyajit Ray, this production recounts the dissatisfaction of would-be actor Patou Babu. When he chances upon a huge opportunity, Patou seizes it, thus changing his life forever. An inspirational tale of courage and perseverance performed by The Tadpole Repertory, one of Delhi’s most celebrated theatre groups. Neutral Hero Wednesday 9th October – 12th October €25-€30, 7.30pm Matinee Sat October 12th, 2.30pm An experimental endeavour from American director, Richard Maxwell, this work tells the tale of a young man on the trail of his father in the vast American Midwest. Told through the perspectives of 12 separate characters, Neutral Hero, attempts to retain a level of objectivity throughout. Lauded as one of The New York Times’ top 10 shows of 2012, the show runs as part of the Dublin Theatre Festival. Smock Alley Theatre Desire Under the Elms Wed 2nd October – 13th October €23/€25, 7.30pm, matinees Sat 5th October, Wed 9th October Annie Ryan directs this period drama, set against the backdrop of 1850s New England. Ephraim Cabot introduces his third wife to the family home to the displeasure of his youngest son leading to intense friction and irreparable damage. Fresh from the success of last year’s successful production Dubliners, The Corn Exchange present a fresh interpretation of colonial America. A True Tall Tale Sat 12th October – 13th October €12, 2pm/4pm An adaptation of a Swedish children’s story, A True Tall Tale engages the imagination in a trip through the Goringe Forest, which (or so it is told), turns into a blossoming summer garden every Christmas night. The Abbot Hans, accompanied by his apprentice Johannes undertake the journey to witness the spectacle, but of course, all is not as it seems. Produced by Teatret Gruppe 38 and Carte Blanche. Dorset Street Toys Thurs 24th October – October 26th €12/€15, 8pm Produced by the Galway-based Fregoli Theatre Company, Dorset Street Toys is a portrayal of love and lost childhood set in Dublin city. Various characters are represented in a piece designed to stir emotions and captivate the imagination under the direction of Maria Tivnan and Rob McFeely. Samuel Beckett Theatre Ground and Floor Fri October 4th – October 5th €30, 7.30pm Toshiki Okada’s latest work attempts to portray a pessimistically abject visual of Japan presented as part of the Dublin Theatre Festival. Set in the unspecified future, the country is under threat of invasion by China, with a loss of Japanese culture and language. At its heart, this is a tale of loneliness and misunderstanding, following characters haunted by their pasts, living in fear of the future. Bord Gáis Energy Theatre Priscilla, Queen of the Desert Tues 15th October – 26th October From €20, 7.30pm Jason Donovan starts as lead char-

acter Tick in the latest production of the feel-good classic, direct from a run on the West End. Adapted from the film, The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert, three friends (two drag queens and a transsexual) embark on a trip to Alice Springs in the Australian outback. Hilarity ensues, combined with a stellar soundtrack, including I Will Survive, Pop Muzik and of course Girls Just Wanna Have Fun. West Side Story Tues 29th October – 9th November From €17.50, 7.30pm One of the most successful stage shows ever, West Side Story comes to the Bord Gáis Theatre, 56 years since its first appearance on Broadway. Loosely based on Romeo and Juliet, the scene is set with two star-crossed lovers on Manhattans Upper West S


ART

Sam Keogh, Mop Chester Beatty Library Dublin Castle, D2 Costumes Parisiens: Fashion plates from 1912-1914 One hundred years after the publication of the fashion magazine Journal des Dames et des Modes (1912-1914), this exhibition features almost 150 of the Journal’s unique fashion illustrations, known as Costumes Parisiens. October 10 - March 30 The Copper House Gallery Synge Street, D8 The Art of Superstition Illustrators Ireland present a new group exhibition examining the world of irrational beliefs featuring works from 40 leading Illustrators, including PJ Lynch, Steve Simpson and Children’s Laureate Niamh Sharkey. October 11 - 31 Cross Gallery Francis Street, D8 Shelter Belt Michael Wann’s studies are meticulously observed remnants of lost moments, of obscured or discarded memories, of unconscious arbitrary events found in a local landscape: a pile of sticks in a field, a derelict habitat, a forgotten or neglected interior. October 3 - November 2 Douglas Hyde Gallery Nassau Street, D2 Francis Upritchard Francis Upritchard, born in New Zealand and now resident in London, makes figurative sculpture that treads a line between realism and fantasy; while in some respects flamboyantly theatrical, it is also keenly observant of human nature. Made from polymer clay, painted, and clad in colourful textiles, the figures are displayed on elaborate bases; they seem, very often, to be taking part in a pageant or masquerade, for their expressions and gestures appear to be orchestrated and conceived in unison. September 20 - November 6 Ema

Votive plaques from Japan Ema are small wooden votive plaques on which Japanese Shinto worshippers inscribe their wishes or prayers. Often depicting figures, animals, or parts of the body, they are hung at shrines where, it is believed, the gods receive them. The more common wishes are for better health, children, success at work, and marital happiness. September 20 - November 6 Draiocht Blanchardstown Christine Mackey For this work, artist Christine Mackey presented the opportunity to devise and realise an exhibition with children from St. Francis Xavier National School, using the publication ‘A Year in the Field’ as a starting point. By facilitating an open model of engagement, the children were given the time and tools to explore their immediate environment of their school grounds and gardens including a field trip to the Phoenix Park with tree expert Noel O’Shea. Rather than devising a prescriptive set of activities the work developed with the children on a more participatory level, activating the invisible and imaginary in their physical environment and furthermore, the unfamiliar. September 13 - November 16 Nicole Tilley Nicole Tilley investigates the idea of the threshold - a boundary between one condition and another and the potential for change. Her work points to movement, transition and metamorphosis. She knowingly references classical children’s book illustration and it is her hope that the viewer will engage with this. Her work operates on both an intellectual and sensual level. She is deeply interested in working with shadows and often the work is equally about the shadow cast as it is about the object. For her the interaction between viewer and

object, the flickering middle space is, perhaps, where the art lies. October 11 - November 23 Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane Parnell Square North, D1 Dublin Divided: September 1913 Dublin Divided: September 1913 provides an opportunity to reflect on the different agendas of the individuals involved in the Lockout, and how the history of the Gallery was interwoven with the it. The workers’ leader, James Larkin, though raised in poverty, appreciated art and beauty and sought the cultural as well as economic and social liberation of the manual labourer. Seán O’Casey noted that Larkin wanted the rose along with the loaf of bread on a worker’s table. September 26 - February 2 Green on Red Gallery Lombard Street, D2 Ronan McCrea Ronan McCrea is an artist living and working in Dublin working in photography, projected slide installations and sculpture. October 3 - November 2 IMMA Royal Hospital Kilmainham, D8 Leonora Carrington The first major retrospective of Leonora Carrington’s work in Ireland, this iconic exhibition is a timely rediscovery of this Surrealist painter and her role in the Surrealist art movement. Carrington is known for her figurative dreamscapes filled with extraordinary and complex narratives informed by her rich interest in mythology, alchemy, fairy tales and the occult. Leonora Carrington The Celtic Surrealist comprises some 50 paintings, eight sculptures, eight tapestries, and 20 works on paper from the 1940s onwards, holds a particular focus on the imagery that enchanted her as a child and on the cultural influences of Mexico. September 18 - January 26

Eileen Gray: Architect Designer Painter A major retrospective of the work of Eileen Gray, one of the most celebrated and influential designers and architects of the 20th-century. Designed and produced by the Centre Pompidou, Paris, in collaboration with IMMA, this exhibition is a tribute to Gray’s career as a leading member of the modern design movement. The exhibition at IMMA celebrates Gray’s Irish roots and presents a number of previously unseen works that offer new insights into Gray’s extraordinary career. October 12 - January 19 One Foot in the Real World Drawing on IMMA’s Collection, One Foot in the Real World, includes works that explore the urban environment, the everyday or the domestic. Prompted by the Eileen Gray, Leonara Carrington and Klara Lidén exhibitions which run concurrently; the exhibition One Foot in the Real World addresses the psychology of space; scale and the body gravity and transformation. Elements of architecture and design recur as points of departure in the works; such as bricks; the keyhole; the window; the door and the table. October 12 - February 1 Klara Lidén: The Myth of Progress The first solo exhibition in Ireland by Swedish-born artist Klara Lidén, featuring a selection of her Poster Paintings, accompanied by a film work. Central to the exhibition are Lidén’s recent Untitled (Poster Paintings), 2010–11; objects comprising layers of advertising posters removed by the artist from city streets, to which she has added a top coating of white paint. October 12 - January 19 In The Line of Beauty In the Line of Beauty presents the work of a key group of eleven young Irish artists, whose current practices evoke a vitality and freshness in their engagement with the historical concept of beauty. October 12 - February 1 Kerlin Gallery South Anne Street, D2 Sam Keogh: Mop ‘Mop’ is a profanation and rehabilitation of Oscar the Grouch. A large, graphic vinyl spread across the entire floor of the gallery casts the environment for an array of multicomposited images, sculptures and found objects. These items point toward multiple aspects of Oscar: ugly, fury, charming, funny, angry, dirty, discarded. But no one thing provides an essentialized image of him. Instead, Oscar is sculpted through a constellation of conflicting associations, histories, biographies and materials. September 27 - November 9 The LAB Foley Street, D1 NINE A family exhibition about being nine years old. With work from Irish artists Alan Butler, Aideen Barry, Maeve Clancy, Sam Keogh and designer Oonagh Young, NINE explores a pivotal developmental time in a child’s life. This is identified as the age when children are expanding their ideas about the world and becoming autonomous human beings, yet still need lots of security and reassurance from their family group. July 29 - November 9

Mermaid Arts Centre Bray Wittgenstein Research Group I won’t say I will see you tomorrow is a multi-disciplinary project that explores the work and legacy of Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein. He lived in Kilpatrick House in Redcross, Co. Wicklow in 1947 while writing his influential book Philosophical Investigations. Artists, architects, writers and musicians have been invited to respond to his writings and architectural legacy and will present events over the next six months culminating in an exhibition at Mermaid Arts Centre. September 15 - October 31 Mother’s Tankstation Watling Street, D8 Shane McCarthy September 25 - November 2 National Gallery of Ireland Merrion Square West, D2 Shades of Grey: Painting Without Colour Colour, like form and tone has been long regarded as an integral element of Western painting. This display will explore the ways in which a number of artists have chosen to make colour absent from their work. It will demonstrate how painting ‘without colour’ is a determined artistic choice, one informed by factors such as technical interests, fashions and social climate. June 22 - September 29 From Galway to Leenane: Perceptions of Landscape In 2008 the National Gallery of Ireland acquired a collection of 41 watercolours of West of Ireland scenes by the English topographical artist William Evans of Eton (1798-1877) who taught at the famous public school. Evans travelled to Ireland in 1835 and 1838, touring around Galway and Mayo, recording images of the landscape of Connemara and its inhabitants. Few images of pre-Famine Ireland exist and Evans’s watercolours help us to understand life in the West of Ireland in the first half of the nineteenth century. 15 June - 29 September 2013 The World of Performance An exhibition dedicated to the world of ballet, theatre and opera spanning the period 1880s to the 1940s, featuring images, in different media, of performers in costume, by Edgar Degas, Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso, as well as portraits of well-known Irish actors and singers, by Seán Keating, William Orpen and Muriel Brandt. August 10 - December 8 Oliver Sears Molesworth Street, D2 Jason Ellis, Corpus Having worked for over twenty years in conservation, Ellis was working on the restoration of a monument by John van Nost the Younger in the crypt of Christ Church Cathedral and was especially moved by the carving of the left forearm of the grieving female. He reflected on how the artist had captured perfectly a human emotion and set it, literally, in stone. This inspired the artist to enquire further into the power of individual ‘disfigured’ moments in art. In his research he studied many works including Christ’s right arm in Michelangelo’s Rondanini Pietá, Marat’s right arm in David’s ‘Death of Marat’ and various fragments from Greek and Roman antiquity. These observations took the artist from the purely abstract forms of his earlier practice to the detailed, yet abstracted,

figuration of the human forms that comprise this body of work. September 5 - October 10 Project Arts Centre East Essex Street, D2 Jennifer Tee The gallery will be transformed with intricate woven floor pieces, talisman-like sculptures and a hint of performance, in an exhibition of new work made for Project Arts Centre. The exhibition expands on her fascination with cultural identity, ritual and spirituality, to create a unique environment which blurs the line between art and object, the exotic and the banal, in an attempt to align the mind, body, and spirit in one space. August 29 - October 26 RHA Ely Place, D2 Marlene McCarthy, Hard-Keepers September 5 - October 20 Natasja Kensmil, Crying Light September 5 - October 20 Bennie Reilly, Rara Avis September 5 - October 27 Tony O’Malley, Constructions September 5 - December 20 Joanna Kidney, Dig, undig, redig September 5 - December 20 Stephen Brandes September 5 - December 20 RUA RED Tallaght Co-Location ‘Co-location’ is a solo exhibition of new work by Fiona Marron completed while on residency at RUA RED. The exhibition encompasses elements of video and sculptural installation, which together, through a number of researched histories, examine value systems and probe the dynamic infrastructure behind current international channels of trade. September 21 - November 16 Talbot Gallery Talbot Street, D1 This is the Point of Contact Kate Murphy’s work is concerned with ‘the house’, as an extension of The Self, as an archetype of both physical and psychological boundary and as the primary site of the development of personal, cultural, gender and sexual identity. The house or dwelling, as an artifact, serves as a source of materials, forms and objects with which to investigate notions of social convention, ritual, nostalgia and the unconscious. The work is very personally grounded in expressions of longing, loss, embodiment and the duality of protection versus isolation. October 12 - November 9 Temple Bar Gallery Temple Bar, D2 The Worker’s Café The Workers Café transforms the Gallery at Temple Bar Gallery + Studios into a social space for discussion, learning, working, sharing skills and food.The project also aims to provide the infrastructure for artists to earn money in ways which relate to their practices. October 11 - November 2 September 5 - 26


CLUBBING Mondays Soul, Funk and Disco with Upbeat Generation Industry Club and Venue 11.30pm Sound Mondays Turk’s Head, Parliament St Indie rock, garage and post-punk 11pm, free Dice Sessions Dice Bar, Smithfield DJ Alley King Kong Club The Village, Wexford St 9pm, free The Industry Night Break For The Border, Stephens Street Pool competition, karaoke and DJ DJ Ken Halfod Buskers, Temple Bar Chart pop, indie rock, rock 10pm Lounge Lizards Solas Bar, Wexford St Soul music 8pm, free Thank God It’s Monday Ri Ra, Georges St Electro, indie and big beat 11pm, free Simon S Fitzsimons, Temple Bar 11pm, €5 Floor fillers Language Exchange Ireland DTwo 6.30pm Like speed-dating, but for learning languages Tuesday We Love Tuesday Ri Ra, Georges St Martin McCann’s eclecticism 11pm, free C U Next Tuesday Indie, pop, hip hop hipsterdom Lost Society, Sth William St 11pm, €6 Ronan M Fitzsimons, Temple Bar 11pm, €5 Chart pop Wednesday FUSED! Ri Ra, Georges St 80s and electro 11pm, free Fubar! The Globe, Georges St 11pm, free Vinyl jams Dirty Disco Dtwo, Harcourt St Chart pop Wednesdays at Dandelion Dandelion, Stephen’s Green Student night Moonstompin’ Grand Social, Liffey St Ska and reggae 8pm, free Bruce Willis Lost Society, Sth William St 10.30pm, €10 Dance music for students and hipsters Somewhere? Workman’s, Wellington Quay Free before 11 Indie and dance Simon S Fitzsimons 11pm, €5 Party night Thursday Decades Club M, Bloom’s Hotel, Temple Bar FM 104’s Adrian Kennedy plays classics Free before midnight LITTLE big Party

Ri Ra, Georges St Soul, indie and rock ‘n’ roll 11pm, free Mischief Break For The Border, Stephen St 11pm, €8 After Work Baggot Inn, Baggot St Quiz night with band and DJ from 11pm 8pm, free Take Back Thursdays Industry Bar and Venue, Temple Bar 10pm Blasphemy The Village, Wexford St 11pm Get Loose, Get Loose Mercantile, Dame St Indie, Britpop and alternative 10.30pm Push Workman’s, Wellington Quay Soul, funk, disco and house Phantom Anthems Workman’s, Wellington Quay Rock, indie rock, other rock Weed and Seven Deadly Skins Turks Head, Parliament St 11pm, free Live reggae Loaded Grand Social, Liffey St 8pm, free Indie and alternative Zebra Whelan’s 11pm, Free Bands and DJs show their stripes Friday My House Buck’s Townhouse, Leeson St With special guests Ladies Night Baggot Inn, Baggot St Cocktail masterclasses from 7 7pm, free Club M Friday Club M, Bloom’s Hotel, Temple Bar DJ Dexy on the decks We Love Fridays Dandelion, Stephen’s Green DJ Robbie Dunbar Friday Night At Vanilla Vanilla Nightclub, D4 Chart-topping hits 11pm Car Wash Sin, Temple Bar Retro disco 9pm, free before 11 Friday @ Alchemy Alchemy Nightclub, Temple Bar Chart floor-fillers 11pm Living Room Lost Society, Sth William St Moves from 7, music from 10 7pm, free WV Fridays Wright Venue, Swords €10, 11pm Irish DJs Resident DJ Café en Seine, Dawson St 11pm, free War Andrew’s Lane 10pm, €8 Pop for students and hipsters Darren C Fitzsimons 11pm, €10 Chart hits Babalonia Little Green Café Samba, reggae and mestizo 9pm, free Saturday Simple Sublime Saturdays Club M, Bloom’s Hotel, Temple Bar

Chart pop, dance and r’n’b Free before 11.30 Saturday @ Alchemy Alchemy Nightclub, Temple Bar Chart floor-fillers 11pm Dandelion Saturdays Dandelion, Stephen’s Green Two floors of summer sound Space: The Vinyl Frontier Ri Ra, George’s St Intergalactic funk, electro and indie 11pm, free Saturday Night SKKY Buck’s Townhouse, Leeson St Signature night Indietronic Grand Social, Liffey St Electro and indie 8pm, free Propaganda The Academy 11pm, €10 New and classic indie Saturday Night at Vanilla Vanilla Nightclub, D4 Andy Preston’s latest pop and rock 11pm Sports Saturday Baggot Inn, Baggot St Sports from 3pm, DJ til late 3pm, free Sugar Club Saturdays Sugar Club, Leeson St 11pm Hidden Agenda Button Factory, Temple Bar 11pm, €varies International techno and house Djs The Best Suite 4 Dame Lane Suck My Deck The Village, Georges St 11pm High Voltage Foggy Dew, Temple Bar 10pm Bounce Sin, Temple Bar R’n’b and chart 9pm, €10 Gossip Andrew’s Lane Indie, electro and pop 11pm Workman’s Indie Residents Workman’s, Wellington Quay New and classic indie 11pm, free BW Rocks Wright Venue Over 21s, neat dress €10, 11pm A Jam Named Saturday Anseo, Camden St Lex Woo and friends 7pm, free Sunday The Burning Effigies Turks Head, Parliament St Real funk and soul Sundays at Sin Sin, Temple Bar Tribal and electro house 9pm, €10 Well Enough Alone Dice Bar, Smithfield Bluegrass The Beat Suite 4 Dame Lane Indie, electro and pop 10pm, free Mass with Sister Lisa Marie Workman’s, Wellington Quay 80s classics and hip hop 10pm, free Saucy Sundays Grand Social, Liffey St Live music 4.30pm, free Reggae, Ska, Rocksteady

Julio Bashmore Foggy Dew, Temple Bar 7.30pm, free Darren C Fitzsimons Chart pop 11pm, €5 Saturday @ Alchemy Alchemy Nightclub, Temple Bar Chart floor-fillers 11pm ONE-OFFS Wednesday, 2 October Isaac Tichauer Button Factory €5/8, 11pm Thursday, 3 October Bonobo Live (UK) - North Borders Olympia Theatre 8pm Friday, 4 October Infinity Ink Eagles & Butterflies Button Factory €12, 11pm All City presents Some New Faces with M.Buckley, Omid & Phili Halton The Bernard Shaw Free, 9pm Gary’s Gang - Vertical67 Live The Sweeney Mongrel Free, 10.30pm DR Lektroluv Academy Green Room The Academy €15/€10, 10pm Lococrew Night Pres Giles Armstrong Turks Head €10, 10pm Saturday, 5 October Bodytonic present: Julio Bashmore Button Factory €20, 10.30pm Toejam: Frankie Grimes The Bernard Shaw Free, 8pm Sunday, 6 October 12DJs: I Am The Cosmos (DJ Set) The Bernard Shaw Free, 2pm Wednesday, 9 October

Satin Jackets Button Factory €8/6, 11pm Thursday, 10 October Culture Shock - Matador Live The Twisted Pepper €10/12, 10.30pm Ted Apollo The Bernard Shaw Free, 8pm Friday, 11 October Coma by Anti-PoP The Grand Social €12/15, 11pm DJ Caspa at Electric Ballroom The Lost Society Basement €10, 10.30pm MUD: Not Saying Boo present Joy O & Fold The Twisted Pepper €12/15, 10.30pm Scribble - Loudmouth Collective The Bernard Shaw Free, 8pm Saturday, 12 October Hidden Agenda: Ben Pearce Button Factory €10, 11pm Subject at Pogo - Move D The Twisted Pepper €tbc, 11pm Misery Beat presents: Basic House Siteation €8, 7.30pm Music Dogz presents. Kevin McKay/Glasgow Underground Turks Head €10, 9pm D:Fuse presents Steve Mills & Guests Fibber Magees €7/€10, 9pm Toejam - Dirty Dubsters The Bernard Shaw Free, 8pm Sunday, 13 October 12DJs: Discotekken Live with The Third Policeman (Live) The Bernard Shaw Free, 2pm Thursday, 17 October

The Flipside The Bernard Shaw Free, 8pm Friday, 18 October MUD: Absys Records present Blu Mar Ten The Twisted Pepper €8/€10, 10.30pm Gesaffelstein Button Factory €15, 11pm Saturday, 19 October Hidden Agenda: Forrests [live] & Snakehips [live] Button Factory €5/€7, 11pm Pogo: Fish Go Deep & Blondes The Bernard Shaw €13/€15, 10.30pm Sunday, 20 October 12DJs: Shane Mannion The Bernard Shaw Free, 2pm Wednesday, 23 October Olugbenga Button Factory Friday, 25 October Jack presents: MK Button Factory €15, 11pm Scribble: Beary and Friends The Bernard Shaw Free, 8pm Saturday, 26 October Nightflight & Hidden Agenda present: Mano Le Tough Button Factory €10/€12/€15, 11pm Sunday, 27 October Network #1: Omar S, Neil Landstrumm, AnD, Lerosa + Guests The Grand Social €5/€10/€15/€20, 5pm Paul van Dyk The Academy €tbc, 10pm Samhain – featuring Todd Terje Glendalough €65, all day BYOB


trad

O’Donoghues

Peadar Kearneys

Music is a huge part of Dublin’s History and traditional Irish music has its home in O’Donoghue’s famous bar. A favourite of Christy Moore and the Dubliners amongst its illustrious past, it has been an attraction not only for tourists from all over the world but is also a favourite haunt of local Dubliners.The whole bar is adorned with drawings and and photographs of some of Irelands finest musicians young and old alike who have all played their part in adding to what has become the unique musical heritage of Dublin at O’Donoghue’s. 15 Merrion Row, Dublin 4 t: 01 6607194 odonoghuesdublin@eircom.net

Peadar’s is a traditional pub with strong historic roots. The pub is named after a musician who lived in the building where the bar is located now, he composed Abhrán na BhFiann (The Irish national anthem). We continue this tradition with nightly traditional, toe tapping music. One of the regular musicians, Brian Brody, is a must see for any tourist visiting the city. He’s a one man atmosphere machine. There’s a basement bar downstairs when upstairs overflows, which also caters to sporting events including NFL games. If you’re looking for somewhere with temple bar music and atmosphere without the prices, take a look at Peadar’s.

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64 Dame Street, Dublin 2 085 726 7078 www.peadarkearneys.com

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O’Shea’s Merchant Bar

Devitts Pub

Blarney Inn

O’Shea’s Merchant is located in the heart of Ireland’s captial, just minutes from the city’s cultural quarter, Temple Bar. O’Shea’s Merchant is renowned for it’s live Irish music, traditional set dancing and unique atmosphere. One of the city’s few remaining traditional pubs is a firm favourite with visitors to the city. In addition to the traditional bar, O’Shea’s Merchant has 25 spacious guest rooms available, offering excellent value for money in a city centre location. O’Shea’s Merchant Serves from an extensive menu each day offering a selection of award winning Irish & International Dishes. 12 Bridge Street, Dublin 8 t: 01 679 3797

A family run pub for over 35 years unique is the perfect word to describe this pub. Every Thursday,Friday and Saturday night some of the most talented musicians in Dublin come to play in Devitts. Located right in the middle of the hustle and bustle of Camden St, Devitts provides excellent traditional music to both tourists and dubliners alike. The upstairs lounge is the perfect venue for an intimate session. The Friday night session in particular led by the mighty Gerry Quinn is a must see. 78 Lwr Camden St t: 014753414 devittspub@gmail.com

There’s a twist toThe Blarney Inn. It’s is a traditional Irish bar (with live Irish music and dancing), with a restaurant; renowned for their variety of speciality steaks, and a spectacular Irish nightclub - Club Nassau (home of the slow-set). It also has The Stella Lieu bar, a mult-purpose room, free for groups of up to 100 people. Very popular indeed. Located only minutes from Dublin city centre on Nassau Street the Blarney delivers a variety of entertainment and foods for every taste - authentic local dishes rub shoulders with European fare to satisfy all. Try the Beef and Guinness stew, it’s amazing - you are sure to get a feel for the best of Irish cooking, dancing and music. Kildare Street Hotel, 47-49 Kildare St, Dublin 2 t: 01 679 4388

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TAC at the Grand Social

The Celt Bar

If you’re lucky enough to be around town at the time, a must see is TAC (Traditional Arts Collective) This band have come from the fringes and taken the world of traditional music and dance by storm. The difference between TAC and your average Ceili band is that they have added a drum kit and bass guitar to the mix, this makes for a rocking sound! At TAC gigs an MC calls out lively set-dances and everyone in the room ends up dancing-a great opportunity to meet people and have ‘the craic’!upcoming Ceilis at The Grand Social; March 13th and May 1st. www.traditionalartscollective.com The Grand Social, 35 Lr Liffey St, D1 www.traditionalartscollective.com www.thegrandsocial.com

The Celt Bar is an authentic Irish bar located in the north of Dublin’s city centre, just a few minutes walk from O’Connell Street and The Spire. A regular haunt for locals and visitors alike looking for a real taste of Irish culture, the Celt Bar offers up live traditional Irish music, good food and great craic every day. The rustic interior belies its city centre location and the welcome is as warm as Kerry rain and the black stuff never ceases to flow. A great place for a quick lunch or a bite to eat in the evening while listening to the superb traditional music. 81 Talbot Street, Dublin 1 The Celt: 01 878 8655

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The Irish House Party

J. McNeill’s In a former life, McNeill’s plied its trade as a one of Dublin’s most famed musical instrument shops, and a window full of banjos, bazoukis and bodhrán’s still belies that image to the world outside on Capel Street. Inside however, the place has been reborn as the home of some of Dublin most highly-regarded trad sessions with music on a nightly basis, as well as a daycent pint of plain to go with it, as you’d rightly Ned Keenan’s pub, which is connected to the Mapleexpect. In a former life, McNeill’s plied its trade as a one of

Ned Keenan’s

J. McNeill’s

The Irish House Party is Dublin’s unique Irish music and dance show. Having just returned from a UK and US tour where theatres in London, Chicago, Missouri and New York were sold out, The Irish House Party is a show not to be missed while in Dublin. Located at 19 Francis St, firstly you dine in our restaurant from 7pm where you will enjoy a delicious four course traditional Irish meal before enjoying an evening of top class The Irish House Party is Dublin’s unique Irish music and entertainment from All Ireland champion musicians and dancers.

The Irish House Party

Hotel on Gardiner Street, Dublin 1 is a cosy, relaxing bar; dance show. Having just returned from a UK and US tour Dublin’s most famed musical instrument shops, and a 19 Francis Street, Christchurch, Dublin 8 140 Capel Street the perfect place to sit back after a busy day exploring where theatres in London, Chicago, Missouri and New window full of banjos, bazoukis and bodhrán’s still belies t: 01 6729272 t: 01874 7679 Dublin. Their friendly staff make Ned’s the most popular that image to the world outside on Capel Street. Inside c4York were sold out, The Irish House Party is a show not to d3 place for tourists and locals alike. Guests in our pub will however, the place has been reborn as the home of some be missed while in Dublin. Located at 19 Francis St, firstly enjoy a fresh pint of the finest Guinness in Ireland. Come you dine in our restaurant from 7pm where you will enjoy of Dublin most highly-regarded trad sessions with music along on a Friday or Saturday evening for their 11pm a delicious four course traditional Irish meal before enon a nightly basis, as well as a daycent pint of plain to go traditional music session with some of Dublin’s finest joying a night of top class entertainment from All Ireland with it, as you’d rightly expect. musicians. These sessions are always packed and go well champion musicians and dancer. into the night. Just like down the country! 140 Capel Street The Maple Hotel, 74 – 75 Lwr Gardiner St, Dublin 1 19 Francis Street, Christchurch, Dublin 8 01874 7679 t: 01 6729272 t: 01 855 5442 d3

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Ned Keenan’s

Legends bar @The Arlington Temple bar

The Merry Ploughboy



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