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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Welcome! to Issue 29 of

‘The DeuxSèvres Monthly’ magazine.

Well, we  certainly  have  a  packed  issue  for  you  this   month,   with  many  new   advertisers   and   lots  of   things  to  do  and  festivals  to  visit.     It  does  feel  like   the   theme  this  month  is  music!     Let’s  hope  that   the   weather  stays   dry   for   these  events   as  they   take  such   a  lot  of  organisation,  and  it’s  a  shame   for  them  not  to  be  enjoyed. I’ve  also   got   my  ‘organisational   hat’  on   for   our  second  Trade  Fair   (Foire  Commerciale)  in  September.    It  will   again  be  held  in  our  village,   Secondigny,  and  the  stands  are  booking  up  fast!    We  are  always  looking   for  demonstrations  for   the  day,  so   if   you  think  you  have  something  of   interest  to  share  /  demonstrate,  please  do  give  me  a  call. If  I  could  dance,  I  would  do  so  for  some  sunshine.....  let’s  hope  it  puts  in   an  appearance  soon!   rah.

à plus, Sa

Email: info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or Tel: 05 49 70 26 21 website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

Emergency Numbers: 15 SAMU, Medical 17 Gendarmes, Police 18 Pompiers, Fire

112 European emergency 113 Drugs and alcohol

CONTENTS

What’s On.....................................................................................4 Hobbies,  Clubs  &  Associations.....................................................6 Getting  Out  &  About....................................................................7 Take  a  Break...............................................................................16 A-­‐Z  of  the  Communes  in  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres.................................17 Health,  Beauty  &  Fitness............................................................18 Our  Furry  Friends.......................................................................20 The  Great  Outdoors...................................................................22 French  Life,  Food  &  Drink..........................................................26 Motoring....................................................................................29 French  Adventures.....................................................................32 Communications........................................................................33 Building  &  Renovation...............................................................35 Business,  Finance  &  Property.....................................................41

THIS MONTH’S  ADVERTISERS  

79 Renovations.....................................................................................................39 A2B  Food  Services............................................................................................... 27 A  La  Bonne  Vie  (Restaurant)................................................................................ 28 Ace  Pneus  (Tyre  Supplier  &  Fitter)...................................................................... 30 Affordable  UK  Designs  (Kitchens  &  UPVC  D/Glazing)......................................... 2 AKE  Petits  Travaux  (Builder)................................................................................ 39 Alan  Pearce  (Plumbing  &  Heating)..................................................................... 37 All  In  One..............................................................................................................39 Andrew  Longman  (Plumber)............................................................................... 38 Angie  Weston  (Mosaic  Workshops).....................................................................11 A.P.S.  Automobiles  (FORD  Garage)...................................................................... 30 Arbrecadabra.com  (Tree  surgery)........................................................................22 Bar/Brasserie  Vue  du  Chateau.............................................................................9 Belle  Maison  (Construction  &  Cleaning  Services)............................................... 37 Bijoux  en  Fleurs  (Handmade  jewellery)...............................................................11 Bill  McEvoy  (Plumber  /  Heating  Engineer).......................................................... 38 Blevins  Franks  International  Tax  &  Wealth  Management................................... 41 Blue  Bicycle  B&B  /  Chambre  d’Hôtes.................................................................. 44 British  Mobile  Mechanic  (John  Purchase)...........................................................30 Buzay  Autos......................................................................................................... 30 Café  des  Belles  Fleurs.......................................................................................... 28 Caniclôture  (Hidden  fencing)............................................................................... 20 Centre  de  Beauregard.......................................................................................... 7

...continued.

Centre Régional  ‘Résistance  &  Liberté’............................................................... 8 Chris  Bassett  Construction.................................................................................. 39 Christies  (English  Book  Shop  and  Tea  Room)...................................................... 7 Cleaning  Services  by  Karen.................................................................................. 44 CSB  Construction................................................................................................. 36 Currencies  Direct  (Money  Transfers)................................................................... 42 Cut  46  (Hair  Salon).............................................................................................. 19 DB  Electricité....................................................................................................... 36 David  Cropper  (Stump  Grinding  &  Jungle  Busting)............................................ 22 DJ  Jeff  (Professional  DJ)....................................................................................... 9 D  J  Maintenance  (Handyman)............................................................................ 37 EcoPower  (Solar  Thermal  Trading  Company)...................................................... 44 Electricien  Anglais  en  France.............................................................................. 36 Energie-­‐79........................................................................................................... 38 Franglais  Deliveries.............................................................................................. 31 Fresco  Interiors.................................................................................................... 11 Futuroscope......................................................................................................... 40 Gan  Assurance  (Insurance  Services)................................................................... 31 Gardens  &  Stuff.................................................................................................... 24 George  Rayner  Computers.................................................................................. 34 Give  the  Dog  a  Comb  (Dog  Grooming)............................................................... 20 Glass  2  France...................................................................................................... 2 GL  Joinery  (Carpenter  /  Joiner)........................................................................... 36 Hallmark  Electronique  (Electricians  &  Sat.  Engineers)........................................ 36 Heather’s  Pet  Care  Services................................................................................ 20 Homes  In  France  (Tony  Murdoch)....................................................................... 39 Insink  Plumbing................................................................................................. .. 38 James  Harris  (Plasterer)....................................................................................... 37 John  Spray  Maçonnerie  (Stonemason)............................................................... 39 Jon  Crocker  Photography..................................................................................... 43 Keith  Banks  Pool  Services.................................................................................... 38 La  Deuxieme  Chance  (Annie  Sloan  chalk  paint  supplier).................................... 35 La  Petite  Épicerie  (General  Groceries  &  British  Produce)................................... 27 L’Étable  Gastronomique  (Restaurant)................................................................. 26 Leggett  Immobilier.............................................................................................. 46 Les  Bons  Voisins................................................................................................... 44 Les  Deux  Chênes  (Cattery)................................................................................... 20 Les  Ecuries  du  Saumort  (Horse  Riding  School).................................................... 20 Le  Petit  Cadeau.................................................................................................... 11 Le  Petit  Logis  (B&B  and  Chambre  d’Hotes)......................................................... 44 Le  Petit  Pillac  (Holiday  Accommodation)............................................................ 27 L’Immobilier  de  l’Autize....................................................................................... 44 Man  &  Van  (Keith  McNie).................................................................................... 31 Mad  Hatter’s  Kitchen.......................................................................................... 26 Mark  Sabestini  Renovation  &  Construction........................................................ 36 MB  Plumbing  &  Building  Services....................................................................... 38 MCH  Groundworks/Construction....................................................................... 40 Michael  Glover  (Plasterer,  Renderer  &  Tiler)...................................................... 37 Michael  Hobson  (Painter  &  Decorator)............................................................... 35 Michael  William  Hairdressing.............................................................................. 19 ML  Computers..................................................................................................... 34 Motor  Parts  Charente.......................................................................................... 29 Mutuelle  de  Poitiers  Assurances......................................................................... 31 Nathan  Foster  Building  Services.......................................................................... 36 Needa  Hand  Services........................................................................................... 39 Owners  Direct...................................................................................................... 45 Pamela  Irving  (Massage  &  Reflexology).............................................................. 18 Pascale  Matéo  (French  Lessons)......................................................................... 15 Pause!  Café.......................................................................................................... 27 Philip  Irving  (Mini  Digger  hire)............................................................................. 40 Polar  Express  (Frozen  Foods).............................................................................. 27 Premier  Autos  (Mechanic).................................................................................. 30 Restaurant  des  Canards....................................................................................... 26 Rob  Berry  (Plasterer)........................................................................................... 37 Robert  Walker  Plomberie.................................................................................... 38 Ross  Hendry  (Interface  Consulting  &  Engineering)............................................. 33 Sandy  G  (Ladies  &  Gents  Hairdresser)................................................................. 18 Sarah  Berry  Online  (Graphics  &  Website  Design)............................................... 34 Satellite  TV  (Nigel  Gubb)...................................................................................... 34 sarl  Down  to  Earth  (Groundwork  &  Construction)............................................. 40 Sawmill  -­‐  Alain  Miot............................................................................................. 39 Sentinel  Security  Systems.................................................................................... 44 Siddalls  (Financial  Advisors)................................................................................. 43 Simon  Bienz  (Carpenter  /  Joiner)........................................................................ 36 Simon  The  Tiler.................................................................................................... 38 Spectrum  IFA  Group  (Amanda  Johnson)............................................................. 42 Steve  Enderby...................................................................................................... 35 Sue  Burgess  (French  Courses  &  Translation)....................................................... 15 The  English  Mechanic  &  Son  -­‐  Tony  Eyre............................................................ 30 The  Market.......................................................................................................... 7 Threading  by  Carolyn.......................................................................................... 18 Total  Renovation  Services  (Michael  Dominey)................................................... 35 Tracey  Bowring  (Hairdressing  &  Nails)................................................................ 18 Vendée  Carriers................................................................................................... 31 Vendée  Houses.................................................................................................... 14

© Sarah  Berry   2013.     All   rights  reserved.    Material   may   not   be   reproduced  without  permission.    While   care   is   taken  to  ensure  that  articles  and  features  are  accurate,  Sarah   Berry   accepts  no  liability   for   reader  dissatisfaction.     The   opinions  expressed   and  experiences   shared  are   given  by  individual   authors  and  do  not  necessarily  represent  the   views  or  opinions  of  the  publisher.    Please  ensure  you  verify  that  the  company  you  are  dealing  with  is  a  registered  trading  company  in  France  and/or  elsewhere. <<The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly>>  est  édité  par  Sarah  Berry,   La  Bartière,   79130,   Secondigny.   Tél:   05  49  70   26  21.    Directeur  de  la  publication  et  rédacteur  en  chef:  Sarah  Berry.   Crédits  photos:  Sarah  Berry,   Clkr   et   morgeufile.com.  Impression:  Raynaud  Imprimeurs,  zone  industrielle,  BP13,  79160,  Coulonges-­‐sur-­‐l’Autize.    Dépôt  légal:  juillet  2013  -­‐  Tirage:  5000  exemplaires.    Siret:  515  249  738  00011  ISSN:  2115-­‐4848

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

What’s On... July 2013 1st July  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Limalonges See  www.tophatquizzes.com  for  more  information. 1st  July-­‐16th  September  -­‐  Summer  Exhibition. At  the  Château  de  Coulonges,  79160.     Photographs  of  Church  wall   paintings   -­‐   Peintures   murales   -­‐   médiévales   et   gothiques"   by   Howard   Needs.   Can   also   be   seen   during   guided   tours   of   the   Château   which   are   bilingual.  For   further   information  see  website:   www.ville-­‐coulonges-­‐sur-­‐lautize.fr 3rd  July  -­‐  Open  Guitar  Night  at  Bressuire at   Bar/Brasserie   Vue   du   Chateau.     Bring   your   guitar,   strum   with   friends.    From  6.30pm. 4th  July  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Chef  Boutonne See  www.tophatquizzes.com  for  more  information. 6th  July  -­‐  Charroux  Festival For  more  information,  see  flyer  on  P.8  or  call  05  49  87  60  12 9th-­‐14th  July  -­‐  Airvault  Music  &  Dance  Festival See  programme  of  events  on  the  right  of  this  page. 10th  July  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Aigre See  www.tophatquizzes.com  for  more  information. 11th  July  -­‐  Traders  Day at   Pause!   Café,  l’Absie   with   Paperback  Jan,  Red,  White  &  Blue  and   much  more.    2pm-­‐5pm.    See  advert  on  P.27  for  details. 11th  July  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Champniers See  www.tophatquizzes.com  for  more  information. 12th  July  -­‐  Quiz  Night At  Camping  Moulin,  Chef  Boutonne.    Please  see  advert  on  P.26  for   details. 13th  July  -­‐  Live  Music  with  ‘Mr  BlackJack’ At  Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux  from  8pm.     See  advert  on  P.28  for   details. 14th  July  -­‐  Fete  Nationale  at  Bressuire at   Bar/Brasserie   Vue  du  Chateau.    Panoramic  view  of  Chateau  and   fireworks,   Menu   15€,  Reservation   Only  with   live   music   60s  group   Three+One. 16th  July  -­‐  Novice  Pony  Day  at  La  Chapelle  Thireuil With  Les  Ecuries  du  Saumort.    Please  see  advert  on  P.20  for  details. 17th  July  -­‐  Mind,  Body  &  Soul  Pampering  Afternoon At  Pause!  Café,  L’Absie.    Everyone  welcome,  2-­‐5pm.    See  advert  on  P.27 19th  July  -­‐  Music  Night  with  Angie  Palmer at  Mad  Hatter’s  Kitchen,  Caunay.  Please  see  advert  P.26 20th  July  -­‐  Live  Music  with  ‘Geoff  &  Helen’ At  Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux  from  8pm.  See  advert  on  P.28. 20th  &  21st  July  -­‐  British  Weekend In   La   Mothe   St.  Héray.   Numerous   activities   will   be   on   offer:   an   English  breakfast,  afternoon  tea,  tug  of  war,  British  market  etc.     For   information  please  call  05  49  05  06  05. 26th  July  -­‐  Quiz  Night At  Camping  Moulin,  Chef  Boutonne.    See  advert  on  P.26  for  details. 26th  July  -­‐  Show  Jumping  Day  at  La  Chapelle  Thireuil With  Les  Ecuries  du  Saumort.    Please  see  advert  on  P.20  for  details. 27th  July  -­‐  The  Royal  British  Legion  Summer  Fair At  Salle  de  Fêtes,  Linazay.     Trade  stands,  Brocante,  Music,  Classic  cars,   Food,  and  much   more.     Please  find  more  info   on  P.9  or  on  website:   www.rblpoitou-­‐charentes.fr 28th  July  -­‐  Horse  &  Dog  Fun  Show From   8.30am   at   Centre   de   Beauregard,   86250   Asmois.   For   information,  please  see  advert  on  P.9 28th  July  -­‐  Café  Crafts  Club At  Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  11am-­‐4pm.    Please  see  more  details  on  P.13 31st  July  -­‐  PC  Course  “Using  the  Cloud” At   Pause!   Cafe   L’Absie,   10.15am.   Please   contact   Ross   on   rs.hendry@gmail.com  for  further  details  or  to  book  a  place.

What’s Coming Up... 9th-­‐10th August  -­‐  Mad  Hatter’s  Music  Festival See  full  details  on  P.10 13th  August  -­‐  Picnic  ride  at  La  Chapelle  Thireuil With  Les  Ecuries  du  Saumort  -­‐  please  reserve  a  place  on  05  49  05  30  75 15th  August  -­‐  Village  Family  Fun  Day At   Loubillé,   79110   from  12   noon.     For   more   info,  please   email:   frenchvillagediaries@gmail.com

Monthly services  at  the  English  speaking  Church  in  Deux-­‐Sèvres Jassay The  Chaplaincy  of  Christ  the  Good  Shepherd,  Poitou-­‐Charentes,     has  a   Home   Group   Service   at   Jassay  commencing  at   11.00am     every  2nd  Sunday  in  the  month.   It   is   held  at   the   home  of  Ann   White,  where   a   warm  welcome   awaits   everyone  for   a   time   of   worship  and  fellowship. St Leger Church  Services  on  the  1st  Sunday  of  each  month  at  10.30am   at   the   St   Leger   near   Melle   starting   its  summer   season   from   May   5th.  After  each  service  tea  or  coffee  is  served  and  an  opportunity   to  meet  other  people  in  the  area. Parthenay Church  Services  on  the  4th   Sunday  of   each  month   at  10.30am  in   the  Presbytery  Rooms,  rue  de  la  Citadelle,  Parthenay,  opposite  St   Croix   Church.   After   each   service,   tea   or   coffee   is   served   and   everyone  is  invited  to  a  'bring  and  share'  lunch. For   further   informaoon   about   locaoon   of   churches   and   about   what   else   is   happening   near   you,   please   take   a   look   at   our   website   www.church-­‐in-­‐france.com   or   contact   us   at   office.goodshepherd@orange.fr

Airvault Music and Dance Festival 9 July  (21.00)  at  Barroux:     Makhatchala  Ensemble  (9€) 10  July  (21.00)  at  Irais:     Ballets  Fambondy  from  Sénégal  (9€) 11  July  (18.30)  at  Soulièvres  (Airvault):               Djé  Ka  Fo  (percussionists)  free,         food  and  drink  available 12  July  Soulièvres  (20.00):     Brazilian   meal   and   show   with         Chalana     (16€,   advance   booking   is         necessary) 13  July  (21.00)  salle  du  Clos-­‐de-­‐L’abbaye  at  Airvault:         The  Ukranian  group  Podillya  (9€) 14  July,  Soulièvres  (Airvault):           Free   show   from   19h30:   National         Orchestra   of   Barbès   (couscous   -­‐         please  book  in  advance  if  you  want   to         eat)  and  fireworks  at  23.15.

Satyananda Yoga Rysz would like to Thank all those for attending his yoga classes. The last Satyananda Yoga Class will be Thursday 4th July, after which time he will be training to become a Farrier.

The National Holidays, Religious and Feast Days 2013 Sunday 14th  July............... Thursday  15th  August....... Friday  1st  November......... Monday  11th  November... Wednesday  25th  December.

Naoonal Day  (Fête  Na-onale  de  France) Assumpoon  of  Mary (Assomp-on) All  Saint’s  Day (Toussaint) Armisoce  Day  (Armis-ce  1918) Christmas  Day  (Noël)

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

                                                                         

Looking for   Authentic,   Fresh   Products  from  Our  Region?  

Paperback Jan Books  in  English

3rd July:     Café  Cour  du  Miracle,  Vouvant  85120.  2.30pm-­‐4.30pm   4th  July:     Bar  le  Palais,  St  Aubin  le  Cloud  79450  2pm  -­‐  5pm   4th  July:     Bar/Brasserie  Vue  du  Chateau,  Bressuire  79300  10am  -­‐  12pm 5th  July:   Bar  de  la  Paix,  Thouars  79100.    12pm  -­‐  2pm 5th  July:     Le  Tipsy  Bar,  Coulonges-­‐sur-­‐l’Autize  79160.  4pm  -­‐  6pm 7th  July:     Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux  79160.  2pm  -­‐  4pm 11th  July:     Pause!  Cafe,  L’Absie  79240.    2pm-­‐  5pm 12th  July:     Jan’s  home,  La  Ferrière-­‐en-­‐Parthenay.  11am  -­‐  4pm 13th  July:   Cafe  Le  Chauray,  St  Maixent  l’Ecole  79400.  10am  -­‐  1pm 21st  July:   British  Day  at  La  Mothe  St  Héray  79800.  10am  -­‐  6pm 25th  July:   Le  relais  des  2  moulins,  Clessé  79350.    4pm  -­‐  6pm 26th  July:   Le  P’tit  Bar  Boucard,  Ménigoute.    4pm  -­‐  6pm 28th  July:   Horse  &  Dog  Fun  Show,  Asnois  86250.    from  8.30am 31st  July:   Jan’s  home,  La  Ferrière-­‐en-­‐Parthenay.  1pm  -­‐  6pm For  more  info  contact  Jan  on: 06  08  30  73  29  or  email:  paperbackjan@gmail.com

Mr T’s Friterie

Open 6.30

-9pm

With regular venues at:

                           F    oire  (27th  month) • Aulnay    (Open  from  6pm)        •          Rouillac   • Gourville                     • St  Hilaire  de  Villefranche • Loulay • St  Jean  d’Angély • Matha

+ Cognac Camping Municipal - Every Weds 6-9pm from 10/7 + 21st July: Gourville

The Thursday  weekly  market  of  La   Mothe   St-­‐Héray  fulfills  all  these  functions.   In   addition   this   summer,  a  novelty.     On   the   1st   Thursday  of   July,   August,   September   and   October,   the   market   will   run   throughout  the   day.  Local   residents  and  residents   of   nearby   villages  and  tourists  can  take  advantage  of  this  opportunity  to   find  products  that  will   delight  the  taste  buds  and  other  small   pleasures.  Do  not  miss  this  opportunity! Information  :  05.49.05.01.41.

Local Markets • • Tuesdays: • • • Wednesdays: • Thursdays: • • Fridays: • • Saturdays: • • • • • • Sundays: Mondays:

Benet 85490 Lencloître (1st Monday in month) 86140 Lezay 79120 Coulonges-sur-l’Autize 79160 Thouars 79100 Parthenay 79200 Sauzé-Vaussais 79190 Niort 79000 Thouars 79100 Melle 79500 Chef-Boutonne 79110 Airvault 79600 Niort 79000 Coulon 79510 Saint-Maixent-l’École 79400 Neuville-de-Poitou 86170

Photo: Lisa Roberts

                                                                                             

+ See www.frying2nite.com  for  details  or  call  06  02  22  44  74

Reel Fish & Chips Traditional English style Fish & Chips

3rd July - The Canteen, Etusson 5th July - Bar Tabac, Bouille-Loretz 6th July - Bar Vue du Chateau, Bressuire 17th July - The Canteen, Etusson 18th July - St Martin de Sanzay 19th July - Bar Tabac, Genneton 20th July - Café des Sports, L’Absie

18H30 - 21H30 18H30 - 21H00 18H30 - 21H00 18H30 - 21H00 18H30 - 21H00 18H30 - 21H00 18H30 - 22H00

Tel: 06 04 14 23 94 or visit: www.reelfishandchips.net

Open Fish 4 Chip Fish, Chips & mushy peas!

SUMMER MARKET SUNDAY 9th JUNE Organised by Aidez Association (Terves)

We would  like  to  thank  all  the  Stall  Holders,  Keynotes,  3  plus  1  and   everyone  who  came  along  to  help  make  the  day  a  great  success. All  the  profits  will  be  donated  to  French  Local  Charities

THANK YOU!

6-8pm

Mondays: Bar Tilleuls, Champniers (near Civray) Tuesdays: Sauzé-Vaussais (Main square & can be eaten in local bar) Wednesdays: Chef Boutonne (near Chateau) Thursdays: Sauzé-Vaussais - Lunchtime & Evening. (Main square & can be eaten in local bar) Fridays: Mansle (Car park of Simply Supermarket) Tel: 06 37 53 56 20 or visit : www.mobilefishandchipsfrance.com

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Hobbies, Clubs & Associations... Book Club  Thouars.    Do  you  enjoy  reading  a  cracking  good  story?   And  talking  to  others  about  it?  Do  you  live  in  north  79,  south  49   or  north  86?  Come  along  to  our  book  club..... Contact  Alison  Morton  at  info@bookclubthouars.fr  for  more  details.

Cycling Group Do  you  enjoy  cycling?     I  am  a  keen  cyclist  and  looking   for   others   to   meet   up   with   me   for   outings   once   or   twice  a  week.    Purely  for  leisure  and  very  informal  with   a  coffee  stop  en  route.  I  live  at  Pamplie,  near  Secondigny. Contact:    steve.coupland@hotmail.com    /  05  49  28  24  06 Open Door Lending Library Over 7000 fiction and non-fiction books and DVDs Open Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday mornings from 10h00 to midday at 18 rue Pierre Pestureau, Civray (86400) Individual membership 6€, family membership 10€ www.opendoor-civray.com

Book Group....meeting 2nd Thursday of the Alone in  France? We  are  a  group  of  people  living  alone   in  the   L'Absie  area  who  meet   regularly  for  coffee  and  lunches.    We   meet   on  the  1st  and  3rd  Tuesdays  at  11am   for  coffee  at  the  Pause  cafe  in   L'Absie.    Our  lunches  are  at  different  venues  each  month.  There's  a   warm  welcome  if  you'd  like  to  join  us.   More  details  from  Frank  05  49  69  80  47.

Franglais Thouars The   Thouars   ‘Franglais’   group   meets   every   Wednesday   from   19.30h   to   21.00h,   in   the   Association’s   centre   at   7   rue   Anne   Desrays,  Thouars,  for  conversation  in  English  and  French. We   welcome   those   of   all   nationalities   who   would   like   to   participate.  Either  come  along  to  see  us  one  evening,  or  contact  us   at:  Mobile:    06  52  21  92  34  ~  Email:    jcbed@orange.fr

Association Meridien Green We are   an   Anglo-­‐French   group   which   was   founded   in   2001   for   mutual   understanding   of   each   other's   language   and   culture.   We   meet   twice   weekly   in   the   Salle   des   Associations   in   St   Coutant,   79120.     The   best   way   to   find   out   more   is   to   visit   our   website   -­‐   www.meridiengreen.asso.fr  or  contact  Maureen  Dalby:   05  49  29  94  50.  The  name   of  our  group  comes  from   the  fact  that  St   Coutant  is  on  the  Greenwich  Meridian! Le   Tallud   Boules   en   bois   are   offering   sessions   every   Wednesday   from   16h   to  18h   from  April  through  to  September   2013  at   the  parc   de   Loisirs,   Le   Tallud.    Everyone  is  welcome  to   come   and   play   or   learn   the   game   of   boules   en   bois.   We  have  all  the  equipment,  just   turn   up   for   half   an   hour   or   more   for   a   bit   of   exercise   and   socialising.   Details   from   Rosemary   Williamson   rw.williamson@orange.fr

The Harmonics Singing   Group.   Based   in   the   Salle  

d'Annexe behind  the  mairie  in  Civray.  We  meet  each  Wednesday  from   2.00pm   to  4.00pm.   No   experience   necessary   just   a   willingness   and   commitment   to   learn.   We   sing   all   sorts   of   music   and   in   several   languages,  whatever   the  music  dictates.  We   are   a  small   and  friendly   group  who  would  love  to  meet  you. Contact:  Dolly  Ait  Boualou:  05  45  22  89  32  or  sylvia.murray@wanadoo.fr   or  Margaret  Gomersall  on  05  49  48  09  02  or  margaretgomersall@sfr.fr Through the Lens Group Local photography group meets on the last Monday in each month to chat about all things photography! New members welcome. For further information contact: Ian Gawn: 02 51 00 84 52 or Brian Preece: 05 49 72 09 94

month from 3pm at Christies Tea Room & Bookshop, Gençay, 86160. Take a look at the Book Group page on the website: www.chezchristies.com for more information. The Filling  Station  ~  Poitou-­Charentes The   Filling   Station   is   a   network   of   local   Christians   of   all   denominations   who   meet   together   regularly   for   spiritual   renewal  &  evangelism  purposes.    ALL  WELCOME. Please  see  our  website  for  details  of  meetings  and  spring   programmes  www.the=illingstation.org.uk  or  locally  contact   05  49  87  18  58  or  email:michael.willis@sfr.fr

2nd Sunday Motorcycle Club www.2ndsundayclub.fr If you would like to attend our coffee mornings please contact us via the website........New members always welcome!

Rubber Bridge:would any of you bridge players out there in the Deux-Sèvres, be interested in making up an occasional 4? Email David Rowe: djfrowe@hotmail.com or' phone 05 49 63 26 57.

Les Amis Solitaires We are  a  group  of  people   living  alone  in  France.    We  meet  up   for   coffee  mornings  from  11am. 1st  Tuesday:  The  Gallery,  Civray  (coinciding  with  market  day). Every  2nd  &  4th  Thursday,  The  Lemon  Tree,  Sauzé  Vaussais. Every  3rd  Thursday  in  Ruffec.      More  details  from  Gwen  on  05  49  87  91  79  ~  email  gwanshep@gmail.com A R E  Y O U A M O D E L R A I L W A Y ENTHUSIAST? If so, join a group of likeminded modellers who meet on a monthly basis to visit members' layouts and swap information. We are based on the DeuxSevres/Vendee border but also have members in the Vienne and Charente. If you are interested please contact Gerry Riley for more information on 05 49 63 34 01. Secondigny Running Club... Put the bounce back in your step. Join our friendly and supportive running group. All abilities welcome. Email Kelly for more details: kellyencezelle@hotmail.co.uk

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Getting Out & About...

Summer Activities for All the Family... There are  lots  of  fun  and   exciting  things  to   do   over   the   summer   holidays  as  a  family  in  the  department  of  Deux-­‐Sèvres.    I  have  listed   some   of   these   activities   below   to   help   you   decide   what   to   do.     These  chosen  activities  are  for   all   ages  and  for  both  families  living   in  the  area  and  on  holiday  in  France. Whatever  you   choose,   have  fun   and  remember   to  stay  safe  in  the   sun!  

Activities for Children Children's activity  camps  like  “Le  loup-­‐Garou”  are  great   for  children   from  6  to  14  years  old.    They  can  go   on  small   adventure  holidays   and   do   all   sorts   of   outdoor   activities   like   camping,  horse  riding,   mountain  biking,  swimming  and  canoeing.     Visit  www.loup-­‐garou.fr  for  more  information.  

(This is   a  french  association,   so  it   would  be  best   if  your  child  has  a  high  level  of   french.    Schools  usually  send  you  a  leaflet  about  these  camps.)

Local swimming  pools  are  great   for   families  with   kids.    There  are   many  outdoor   and   indoor   pools  to  choose   from.     You   can   leave   your  children  at  the  pool  for  an  afternoon  and  they  can  have  lots  of   fun.  You  can   buy  a  pack  of  10  tickets   for   10   swims  at   most   pools.     This  is  a  cheaper  way  of  getting  lots  of  swims.   Visit   www.guide-­‐piscine.fr   to   find  your  local  pool.   This  is   a   french   website   and   can   not   be  translated  into  english.

by Philippa George

Family Activities

• Park Adventure:   A  great  day  out  for  all  the  family.     Go  swinging   though  the  trees  on  a  zip  line   course   or   go  climbing  across  the   forest  on  their   3  different   courses  for   all  ages.    If  you   don't   like   heights,  you  can  do  a  round  of  mini  golf. Visit:  www.parc-­‐aventure-­‐79.fr  for  more  information. • Boca   speed   karting:     A   fun   activity   for   families   with   older   children.  Race  each  other  around  the  outdoor  880  meter  course. Visit:  www.bocaspeed.fr  for  more  information. • Le  rocher  branlant:    A  fun   park  for  families.  Ideal  for  picnics.  It's  a   fun  place  for  small  children  to  play  and  a  great  place  if  you  like  to   walk.   • Mouton   village:    A  great   place   for   young  children  where   they   can  see  and  touch  the  animals. Visit:  www.moutonvillage.fr  for  more  information. • Park  de  la  vallée:     A  fun  amusement  park  for  all  ages.     Includes  a   small  roller-­‐coster,  western  themed  area  and  a  small  aquatic  area. Visit:  www.parcdelavallee.com  for  more  information. • Le  Venise  Vert:    A  relaxing  day  out  to  the  villages   of  the  Marais   Poitevin.    A  great  place  for  picnics  and  looking  around   as  well  as   all  the  different  boat  rides  around  the  canals. Visit:  www.ville-­‐coulon.fr  for  more  information. There   are  lots   of   plans  d'eau,  lakes   where  you  can   fish,  swim,  canoe,   and  all  sorts  of  other   activities.    There  is  also  usually  a  restaurant,  cafe   and  a  life  guard  onsite.     You   can   find   one   in   Secondigny,   Lambon,  Verruyes,  St   Christophe   sur   Roc  and  Luché-­‐Thuouarsais.

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RBL Summer Fair 2013..... Saturday 27th  July,  10am  -­‐  4pm This  will  be  our  third  annual   Summer   Fair   and   we   hope   we  are   learning   more  from   the   feedback   given   to   us   from   you,   the   general   public. This   year   there   will   be   many   craft   stalls,   light   refreshments,  fish  &   chips,   ice   creams,   British   beer   bar,   live   music,   a   raffle   with   an   80cm   HD   flat   screen  TV  and  HD  FREESAT   recorder   as   first   and   second   prizes   and   much,   much  more.

For full  details  please  see  the  “Summer   Fair  2013”  page   on  web   site:   www.rblpoitou-­‐charentes.fr.     Come   along,  have   fun   and   support  our  Armed  Services  and  their  dependants.     Every  centime  made  will  go  to  the  Poppy  Appeal  2013.

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English Speaking Church Forms New Singing Group

Do you  love   to  sing  with   other  people?  Then  Nexus  could  be   the  group  for   you  and  we   would  love  to  hear  from  you. We  are  a  group  of   Christians  who  love  to  sing,  and  have  fun   together   making  music.    We   support  and  help  lead   the  music  in   our   worship.  We  include  non-­‐religious  music  in  order   to  take  part  in  other  events,  or  simply  for  the  fun  of  doing  so! We   meet   together  on  the  first   and  third   Fridays  of   each  month  in  the  upper  room  of   St   Nicholas's  Church,  Civray  from  2.30pm  -­‐  4pm.      New  singers  are   always  welcome  -­‐  there   are  no  voice  trials.     There   is  no  faith   requirement   save   the   willingness  to   take  part   in   Christian  worship.  Just  come  along  and  enjoy  making  music.    Sessions  finish  with  tea  and   a  time  to  chat  together. For   more  information,  contact  Carolyn  Kimber  on  05  45  84  19  03   or  Andy  Shepherd  on  05  45  29  08  93

Bar Brasserie Vue du Chateau, Bressuire Following our  successful  opening  night,  we  are  pleased  to  be  welcoming  a  steady  flow  of  customers   to  our  English  style  bar/restaurant.    It's  fair  to  say  it's  been  a  challenging  few  months,  but  all  the  hard   work  has  certainly  been  worth  it,   as  we   are   enjoying  meeting  lots  of  new  customers  and  receiving   some   lovely  comments.     We  are   now   busy  planning   our   forthcoming  events,  which   will   happen   throughout  the  year,  and  hope  many  of  you  will  come  and  pay  us  a  visit. The   highlight   of  our   events   calendar   has  to  be  the  ‘Fete   Nationale’  on  the   14th  July,  as   we  are   ideally  placed  for  you  to   enjoy  in  comfort   (either  inside  or  outside  on  the  terrace)  the    wonderful   firework  display  at   the  Chateau.     On   this   occasion   we  are  offering  a   set  menu   for   €15  -­‐  you  are   advised  to  book  early  to  avoid  disappointment.   July's  events   include:     Open   Guitar   Night,  Fish   and  Chips  Night,   Paperback  Jan   &  Jo   Ashforth   of   Phoenix   cards,   Friday   Pie   Night   and   80's   Night.     For   more   details   please   visit   our   website:   www.bar-­‐brasserie-­‐vueduchateau.com Other   events   to   look   forward   to:   Themed   Music   Nights,  Afternoon   Cream   Teas,  Speed   Dating,   Pimms  O'Clock,  Halloween  Night,  Traditional  Games  Afternoons  and  much  more...    We  hope  you'll   find   something   for   everyone,   but   please   let   us   know   if   you   have   any   other   event   ideas   and   The view from the terrace suggestions.   Got  something  to  celebrate?    We  can  cater  for  parties  and  large  groups  by  offering  a  set  menu,  and   the  ability  to  hire  a  section  of  the  restaurant  or  terrace,  more  information  available  on  request. Cheers:  Finally,  thanks  to  everyone  (English  &  French  alike)  for  all  your  support,  it  is  really  appreciated.     We  look  forward  to  your  continued   custom  and  to  seeing  you  again  very  soon.      

à bientôt, Amanda and Mark.

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The Mad Hatter’s Kitchen Presents its 3rd Music Festival. Step in to Wonderland and enjoy a fun-packed weekend! 9th & 10th August 2013

Circus acts,  classic  cars,  skate  ramp,  sideshows,   bouncy  castle,  trade  stands.    Music  from  7  different   bands  of  every  style  to  suit  all!     Rag  Time  Ewan   (Ragtime),  Ghouls  (Gypsy  Punk-­‐Rock),   Paul  and  the   Suspenders   (Glam  Rock/Pop),   Swallow  and  the  Wolf  (Indie/Folk),  The   Grey  Goose  (Blues  Band   Rock/ Blues)  (playing  2  nights),  The  Brian  Mc  Combe  Band  (Celtic/Folk  Rock)  and  Imperial  Leisure  (Alt/Ska).   BBQ,  Hog  roast,  salad  bar,  Bar  all  day  and   evening.     Also  in   the  evening  we  have  a  Mad  Hatter’s  Feast   (reservations  only),  Friday  and  Saturday.   The  Festival  commences  on  Friday  from  4.30pm,  free  entry  and  on  Saturday  from  2.30pm,  free  daytime   entry.    Evening  music  is  strictly  tickets  only  and  starts  from  6pm,  cost:  10€  Friday  or  Saturday.    Tickets  for   the  feast,  with  wine:  25€  pp  includes  all  music,  Friday  or  Saturday,  from  6pm.    Camping  available  for  the   two  nights  35€  pp  includes  feast  on  Friday  or  Saturday  night.  All  tickets  must  be  booked  in  advance. Please  get  in  touch  if  you  would  like  to  bring  a  classic   car!    There  is  availability  for  trade  stands,  and  the   fee  is  25€  for  evening  markets  Friday  and  Saturday  afternoon-­‐evening.     For  further  details  please  call:   05  49  27  67  29  or  see  advert  on  Page  26  for  information  about  Mad  Hatter’s  Kitchen.  

COLOUR with Rupert !

Rupert Roxburgh-Abbs has been busy designing more pictures to colour! This time something for the Summer holidays. A selection of pictures can be downloaded and printed from our website:www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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I am   often   asked   “how   do   people   who   consider   themselves   to   have   no   artistic  ability  manage   to  produce   such  great   mosaics  in   my  studio?”.     The  answer  is  that  to   make   a   great   mosaic   you  need   to   follow   the   rules   of   art   and   design   that   apply   to   all   two   dimensional   art  forms.     We  study  composition,  line,  light,  shade,   perspective,   colour   theory   and   more,   then   apply   these   basic   principals  to   our   mosaic   artworks  so  we   improve  our   design  and   drawing   skills   whilst   creating   beautiful   long   lasting   mosaic   artworks.   Traditionally  if   you  hear  the  word   ‘mosaic’  you  think  of   smashed   up  plates  (‘pique-­‐assiette’  style)  and  badly  grouted  broken  ceramic   tiles.    This  is  not  what  we   do!    For   a  long  time  this  magnificent  art   form   has   been   overlooked   in   the   art/craft   world   as   something   ‘homemade’  not  ‘handmade’.  I  am  working  everyday  in  the   studio   to   change   these   ideas   and   show   people   what   an   amazing,   practical,  tactile,  dynamic   and   challenging  activity  mosaic   making   can  be.     We  are  trying  to  create  ‘paintings’  with  tiles.     Mosaics  are   durable,  never   fade  in   sunlight,  waterproof,  frost   proof   and  have   surface  movement   when   light   plays   on   them   which   make   it   the   perfect  medium  for  both  indoor  and  outdoor  projects.

Small Colour advert only 34€

Picture Mosaics with Angie Weston

We make   tables,   floor   panels,   wall   art,   bowls,   tableware,   decorations,  trays,  pots,  birdbaths  and  jewellery. This   year   the   studio   has   welcomed   makers   from   as   far   away   as   Russia   and   Japan,   America   and   Finland   for  residential  courses.     We   have   lots  of  ‘one-­‐ day’   workshops   for   makers   who   are   on   holiday   here   and   looking  to  learn  a  new   skill   during   their   holiday  (so  if  you  have   guests,  friends   or   family  staying  with  you   and  are   looking  for   an   activity  for   them,  then   here   we  are).  We  also   have  regular   weekly   sessions  for   makers  who  live  in  the  region  who   are  creating  some   brilliant   artworks   for   their   homes  and   gardens.  So   why   not   join   them? You   can   follow   us   on   Face   book  and   see   the   progress   week  on   week   of   our   talented   makers.     Call   in   and   see   us   Monday   toThursday  2pm  -­‐  5pm  every  week  and  be  inspired. Angie  Weston’s  books,  ‘Mosaic  Magic’  and  ‘Micro  Mosaics’   are   available  worldwide.     For  individual  client  commissions  or  for  any   shops/galleries   interested   in   becoming   stockists  of  her   work  please  email:   enquiries@mosaic-­‐courses.com

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Combined Services Support Group (CSSG) by Terri Laverick So what happens when we are not rehearsing for a play? After such   a   big   production   as   Calendar   Girls   many   of   our   members  are   taking  a   well   earned  rest,  if  you   can  call   gardening   and  DIY  a  rest,  but   there  are  still   a  few  groups  who  are  continuing   various  activities. Planning  is  now  going  ahead,  not  just  for  our   next  production  but   also  for  future  productions.    We  have  a  large  audience  with  a  wide   variety  of  preferences,  so  it  is  sometimes  difficult   to  balance   the   type  of   production  we  put  on  but  we  do  our  best.     So  send  me   an   email  with  your  views  and  who  knows  your  choice  might  be  one  of   our  next  productions. During   June   the   Keynotes   Singers   have   provided   two   concerts   where   we  raised  funds  for   various  charities.     Some   of   the   ladies   even  did   a  sponsored  slim,  although  why  I  don’t  know  -­‐  they  look   pretty  good  to  me  in  our  Alternative  Calendar   Girls  Calendar  which   is  still   very  much  for  sale...  always  get  a  plug  in  if  you  can,  I  always   say.    We  have  other  venues  planned  for  later  in  the  year,  dates  and   venues  will  be  advertised  in  future. The   Keynotes   have   a   wide   repertoire   ranging  from   “I  do   like   to  be  beside   the   seaside”   to   Christmas   Carols   in   both   French   and   English.     So   if   you   have   a   charity  and  you   would   like   the   Keynotes   to  come  along,  just  let  me  know. This  group  is  continuing  throughout  the  summer  with  both   weekly   indoor  meeting  and  plein  air  painting  trips.     I  have  been  reading  the  “ARTicles”  column  in   Deux-­‐Sevres  Monthly   written  by  Josie  Bounds.    As  all  my  art  experience  has  been  based   on   Representational   art,  painting  what   you   see,     I   must   admit   I   found   Josie’s  articles  a  bit  high-­‐brow  so  I  arranged  to  have  a  coffee   with  her  at  the  Pause  Café.    Josie  then  agreed   to   attend  a  couple  of   Art   Scene  sessions   to  enlighten   us.   The  sessions   were   great   and   caused   some   debate   and   some   disagreement   because   like  most   things  in   life  we  all  like  different   things  don’t   we?     My  thanks  to   Josie  and  I  suggest  you  read   her  column   and  look  at   the  courses   she  provides  -­‐  I  might  see  you  there. Don’t   forget   our   Calendar   is   still   for   sale   at   the   following   four   venues  and  will  remain  so  for  the  rest  of  the  year.:  Restaurant  A  La   Bonne  Vie  at   Le  Beugnon, Café  des  Belles  Fleurs  at  Fenioux, Pause!   Cafe  at  L’Absie  and  Cafe  Cour  du  Miracle  at  Vouvant. So   let  me  have  your  news  and   views  and  if  you  want  to  join  any  or   all  of  our  groups  send  me  an  email   John  Blair:  johnblair@btopenworld.com

For a  full  list  of  our  advertising  rates,   please  phone  05  49  70  26  21    for  an   advertising  pack  or  download  from  our   website:  www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

Well this   month  has   been  fairly  quiet,  only  two  events  to  remark   upon,  but  both  were  interesting  and  fun  in  their  own  way. On   the   8th   June   a   group   of   us   visited   the   bi-­‐annual   Highland   Games  in  Bressuire,  an  event   that  both   myself  and  my  husband   have   been   meaning  to  attend   on   several   occasions,  but   due  to   the  trip   organised  by  our  group  we  managed  to  make  it  this  year.     I  am  so  glad  that   we  did.     Parking  was   a  dream,  just   outside  the   venue,  it  definitely  pays  to   arrive   early;   therefore,  we  managed   to   get   some   of   the   best   seats   in   the   house   to   watch   the   participants   showing   muscles   that   I  had   only  learned   about   in   Anatomy  and   Physiology   lessons!    Between  us,   we  managed  to   keep   our   seats   all   day,   some   went   off   to   see   the   Irish   and   Highland   dancers,   others   wanted   to   visit   the   inside   of   the   chateau,  and  others   wished   to  buy  some  Haggis!    The  finale,  as   far  as  we  were  concerned,  was  the  parade  of  the  massed  bands   at   around  17.00  hrs  when  we  left   for  home,  although   the  event   went  on  well  into  the  evening. The   second   event  on   Sunday  9th  June,  was  at   St   Germain-­‐des-­‐ Longue-­‐Chaume,   where   we   had   our   tombola   stand.     We   managed   to  raised  the  sum  of  €91  which  will  shortly  be   wending   its   way   to   SSAFA   (Soldiers,   Sailors,   Airmen   and   Families   Association)  France. The   event  was  organised   by  the   Aidez   Association   (Terves)  and   we  had  a  thoroughly  good  time,  everyone  was   so  generous  with   their  time  and  money.    We  would  like  to  thank  those  of  you  who   bought   tickets,  won  prizes   and  especially  those   of   you   who   re-­‐ donated   their   prizes.   Perhaps   you   can   win   them   back   in   September   at   the   Gardening   Club   Produce   Show,   or   the   Christmas  Market   in  Terves,  where  you  can  be  sure  we  will  again   try  and  get  your  money  from  you.    All  in  good   fun   of  course.     A   special   thanks   must   go   to   those  who   manned  the   stall   and   to   those  who  originally  donated  prizes  for  the  tombola  stall. Our  next  event  will   be  the  bi-­‐monthly  meeting,  but   this  time  we   are  away   from  home.    We  shall   be  holding  it  at   the  vineyard   of   Pierre  and  Brigitte  Van  Den  Boom,  Domain  de  L'Enchantior,  in  Le   Puy  Notre  Dame  on  18th  July.    Pierre  will  do  a  tour   around   the   vineyard   and   explain   the   wine   making   process   and   Brigitte   is   providing  us  with  lunch  and  wine  tasting  after  the  tour.     If  you  would  like   further   details,  either   about   our   meetings  or  if   you  wish  to  join  us  at  any  of  our  events    please  contact  us  on  our   new   email   address,  which  is   CSSGroup@outlook.com.     CSSG   is   slowly  growing  in  numbers  and  we  always  welcome  new  friends   to  our  group.  So  please,  do  come  and  join  us.     PS.  We  are  making  good  progress  with  organising  the  Beer   Fest   on   19th   October,   2013.   So   watch   this   space   for   more   information.

Contact ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’  La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny.  Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21  or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

ARTicles

by Josie Bounds

In Munrau-­‐Steffelsee   1908  we   can   see   how  Kandinsky  begins  to   strip  away  the  representational,  reducing  recognisable  elements  of   the  landscape.     Although  we  can  recognise  this   is  a  painting  of  the  

Cézanne’s continued  influence  on   negating  the  negative A   good   example   of   how   Cezanne   took   the   representation   of   a   landscape   and   distilled   it   down   to   what   he   saw   as   its   structural   abstract  elements  is  Mont  Sainte-­‐Victoire  1904.

Wassily Kandinsky  Munrau-­‐Steffelsee  1908   landscape,  the   colour   palette   Kandinsky   uses   here   shows   us   his   heightened   sense   of   colour,   where   he   is   beginning   to   push   the   boundaries.  The  colour   patches  give   the   picture   its   special   depth   and  perspective. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Paul Cezanne Mont Sainte-Victoire 1904.

Cezanne’s emotional   response  to  the  landscape  can   be   described   through  his  exaggerated  use  of  atmospheric   colour,  juggling  shapes   that   nature  gave   him,   assembling  them  on   the   canvas,  giving  the   painting  abstract  conformity. In   1911   for   Kandinsky  ‘a  general  interest  in  abstraction   was  being   reborn,  both  in  the  form  of  the  spiritual,  occultism,  spiritualism  and   the   “new”   Christianity,   Theosophy   and   religion   in   its   broadest   sense’.1   Through  the   lectures  and  teachings  of  Rudolf  Steiner   and   Madame   Blavatsky,  Kandinsky  sought   a  special   blending  between   Eastern   philosophies   with  Christianity.    The  merging  of  Eastern  and   Western   philosophy  for   Kandinsky  galvanised   ‘the  romanticism   of   his   vision’.2     Studying   non-­‐Western   religions,   for   example,   Buddhism,  Kandinsky   ‘searched   for   a  style   that   would   effectively   change   the   moral   and  ethical  climate’.  3   Like  other   intellectuals   of   the  late  19th  century  and  early  20th  century,  Kandinsky  interpreted   his   age   as   one   dominated   by   a   relentless   struggle   against   the   effects  of  industrialisation,  materialism  and  the  bourgeoisie. On   The   Spiritual   in   Art   Kandinsky   describes   his   pathway   in   the   development   of   his   art   through   three   categories,  ‘Impressions’   –   observation   of   the   world,   ‘Improvisation’   -­‐   a   spontaneous   expression  of  a  mood  or  feeling  and  ‘Compositions’  -­‐  inner   visions.   Through  the  images  below   we  can  see  Kandinsky  implementing  his   vision. The   landscape  and  imagery  from  Russian   fables  inspired  Kandinsky   early  on   in   his  career.     Following   a  move  to  Germany  in  the  early   twentieth  century,  we   can  trace  the  beginnings   of   a  new  style  in   Kandinsky’s   work.     Another   influence   through   The   De   Blaue   Reiter,   Kandinsky   begins   to   conceive   an   alternaove   pathway,   through   his   painongs   to   spiritual   reality.   Classical   music   also   influenced  Kandinsky;  we  can  see  how  he  included  large  areas  of   colour,  encouraging  and  somulaong  an  emooonal  response  in  the   viewer.   These   large   areas   of   colour   could   be   argued   as   Kandinsky’s   response   to   the   influence   of   classical   music.   In   abstracong   the  landscape,  ‘Kandinsky  felt   that  he  had  discovered   a  spiritual   reality,  which  was   more  powerful   for  not  being  oed  to   the  outside  world.’  4

Golding G   (2000)   Paths   to   the   Absolute   Mondrian,   Malevich,   Kandinsky,   Pollock,  Newman,  Rothko,  Still,  Thames  &  Hudson,  U.S.A.  Ibid. Tuchman   M   (1986)   The   Spiritual   in   Art:   Abstract   Painting   1890   –   1985,   Abbeville  Press,  New  York,  p.  201. Kandinsky   W   (2006)   Concerning   the   Spiritual   in   Art,   MFA   Publication,   Boston.

Find Josie  Bounds  at  Le  Studio,  79240  Le  Busseau www.monpemtcoeur.info

SHOW CASE EVENT KICKS OFF NEW CRAFT SKILLS CLUB A unique   showcase   of   craft   skills  kicks   off  at   Fenioux   (79160)  on   July  28th   from  11.00  to  16.00  hours. This  taster  launch  of  the  new   Café  Crafts  Club  highlights  a  wide  range  of  crafts  which  will  then  be   featured  at  informal  learning  sessions  during  the  winter  months. Hosted  at  the   Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux,  the  launch  features;   Découpage,   jewellery  and   beading,  working  with  wood,   painting   on   silk,  mosaics,  drawing  for   beginners,  painting,   scrap-­‐booking,   calligraphy,   stamping   and   flower   arranging. Cake   decorating,   stained   glass  techniques,   photography   plus   chocolate   decorating   are   also   planned   as   learning   sessions   to   be   held   every   third   Thursday   afternoon   from   September   2013   to   March   2014   inclusive. A  spokesperson   for   the  newly   formed   Café  Crafts   Club   explains:   “We  are  excited  about  this  new  concept  which  we  hope  will  inspire   people   to   take   up   new   interests   as   they  learn   new   skills   in   an   informal   and   friendly   environment.   We   are   all   enthusiastic   amateurs  who   will   also   learn  from  each  other  as  we  pass  on  our   own  skills  to  others.    Everyone  is  invited.” For  more  information  contact:  Freddie  Main  Tel:  05  49  09  29  11 Email:  Freddie.main@gmail.com

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY More from  local  writer  Alison  Morton...    Please  see  back  issues  of   ‘The  DSM’  if  you  would  like  to  see  previous  articles.

You don’t want to be alone Sitting by  yourself,  in  a  spare  bedroom,  study,  or  even  at  the  dining   room  table,  and  tapping  away   can  be  a  lonely  business.     People   wonder   why  you  don’t  go  outdoors  on  a  sunny  day  or  wander  into   the  village   for   a  leisurely  drink  at   the  local   bar  or  browse  around   the  market.    You  don’t  want  to  see,  let   alone  talk,  to   other   people.   You  are  absorbed  in  your  writing  world. Of  course,  you  need  to  get  the  word  count  or   the  hours  in  on  your   latest  work  –  that’s  understood.     But  why  do  you  need  to  interact   with  other  people?    Ninety-­‐six  percent   of  people  are  not  interested   in   writing  or   in   your   latest   work,  you   mutter   to  yourself.     You’ve   often   watched   their   eyes   glaze  over   when   you  reply  honestly  to   the  enquiry  about   how  your   writing  is  going.     But  four  per  cent   are   interested  and  you  need  to  find  them.  Why? • Your  mental  health  –  you   are  a  human  being  who  needs  contact   with  like-­‐minded  souls • Learning  from  others’  experiences   –   competitions,  agents,  the   ever-­‐increasing   number   of   routes   to   publication,  conferences,   writing  and  book  events   • Getting  critiques   from   other   writers   –   not   Auntie   Maud   who   taught  English  or  your  mate  at  work,  but  working  writers • Learning  new  writing  techniques  and  approaches   to  work  –  not   just  how  to  sling  words  together,  but  about  characterisation,  the   senses,  novel  or  poetry  structure,  research • Networking   to   make   those   vital   contacts   to   get   your   book   published • Not  boring  your  nearest  and  dearest

Blood Dona)ons by Philippa George

Expats living  in  France  can  donate   blood  as  long   as  none  of  the  conditions  below  apply  to  them.     Why  give  blood? 3  000  000  blood  donations  can  save   1  000  000  lives  a  year.  There   is  no   artificial  product  to  replace  it,  so  it  is  essential  that  people  give   blood.     The  blood  that  you  donate  is  used  for  most  hospitalized  patients  from   victims  of  road  accidents  to  cancer  patients.    The  blood  you  donate  will   be  sent  to  hospitals  all  over  the  country. You  should  not  give  blood  if: • You  have   lived   in  any   of  the   Great   British  Isles  for   over  12  months   between  1980  and   1996  because   of  the   risk   of  transmitting   “mad   cow's  disease”.  This  rule  applies  to  any  nationality,  not  just  British. • You  are  pregnant. • You  have  given  birth  in  the  last  6  months. • You  have  been  taking  an`bio`cs  for  the  last  2  weeks. • You  have  had  an  infec`on  in  the  last  6  days. • You  have  had  a  taaoo  or  piercing  in  the  last  4  month. • You  have  had  a  dental  treatment  in  the  last  3  days. • You  have  done  another  blood  dona`on  in  the  last  8  weeks.         • You  have  had  an  opera`on  in  the  last  7  days  to  4  months. • You  have  had  a  trip  to  a  malaria  infected  country  in  the  last  4  months. • You  weigh  less  than  50  kg. • You  have  diseases  such  as:  HIV,  syphilis  and  viral  hepatitis  B  and  C. For   more   informa`on  and  to  find  out   where   you   can   give   blood   in   your  area,  visit:    www.dondusang.net (This  is  a  French  website  and  it  can  be  translated  into  English).

So where  are  these  fellow-­‐writers?  Starting  locally,  try  and  find   a   writing  group.     Look  in   the  English  language   press  and   on   online   apps  like   Facebook.    Ask  anybody  who  has  a  faint  connection  with   writing.    Ask  at  your  local  book  club.  Have  a  chat  to   the  organiser   and   go  and   try  out   such   a  group.     The   main  requirements  are   a   supportive  open  atmosphere,  honesty  and  a  lack  of  ego-­‐tripping! Next  are  writing  associations,  usually  specific  to  a  genre  of  writing,   such   as  the  Romantic   Novelists’  Association   or   the  Crime  Writers’   Association.     They   have   events,   newsletters,   Facebook   pages,   websites,   blogs   –   you   name   it!   Even   remotely,   you   can   benefit   enormously.   Online  critique  groups  like   Authonomy  can  be   a  little  daunting   at   first,  but   as  you  grow  a  writer’s   thick  skin,  you’re   likely  to  find  it   helpful   and   inspiring  as   well   as   immensely  valuable.     But   you’ll   need  to  plunge  in! Going  to   conferences  can   be  a  real   boost  to  your   writing.     There   are  hundreds   of   literary  festivals   each   year   in   the   UK,  including   more   practical   ones   for   writers   such   as   the   Writers’   Workshop   Festival  of  Writing  in  York  and  the  Festival  of  Chichester  where  you   can   meet   fellow  writers,  agents   and   publishers.     Moreover,  you   may  hook  up   with  another   writer   you   can  develop  into  a   writing   buddy,  or   more  formally,   critique  partner.     With  Skype  and   email   it’s   no   problem   to   discuss   and   work   on   writing   together   at   distance.    The  writing  buddy  must  be  someone  you   trust,  so   it  may   take  a  little   while  to   get  to  know  them.     Mine  has  kept  me  sane  so   they’re  worth  their   weight  in   gold!   And   she  will   have  scrutinised   this  article  before  it  goes  to  print… Happy  writing! Alison  Morton  writes  alternate  history  thrillers,  blogs  about   wriRng  and  Romans  at  hTp://alison-­‐morton.com/blog/  

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

We’re All Going on a Summer Holiday

Vocabulary /  Vocabulaire  : partir  en  vacances  

to go  on  holiday

Well, July's  here  and  the  schools  have  broken   up   for  two  months  of   grandes   vacances   (the   long   summer   holidays).  The   kids   sont   en   vacances  (are  on  holidays).

partir en  weekend

to go  away  for  the  weekend

partir en  voiture

to go  by  car

A lot  of  French  families  partent  en  vacances   (go  away  on   holiday),   often  for  three  weeks.  

prendre le  train

to go  by  train

by Sue  Burgess

Family holidays  are  generally  taken  either  in   July  or  in  August,    but   rarely  across  the  two.    French  families  like  to  spend  their  holidays  à   la  mer,  à  la   campagne  or   à   la   montagne.  (at  the  seaside,  in   the   country  or   in   the   mountains).   They   don't   often   go   à   l'étranger   (abroad). Some   families   decendent   dans   un   hôtel   (stay   in   a   hotel)   whilst   others   font   du   camping   (go   camping)   or   ont   une   maison   secondaire  (have  a  holiday  home). Many  families  partent  en  voiture  (go  by  car).     The   last  Saturday  in   July  and   the  first  Saturday  in  August  as  classed  as  noir    (black)  by   Bison   Fûté,  the   authority  that   keeps   a   watch   on   road   transport.   Traditionally   there  are  huge   bouchons   and  embouteillages   (hold-­‐ ups   and   traffic   jams).   Let's   hope   you   don't   tomber   en   panne     (break  down). The  kids   generally  have  cahiers  de  vacances  (holiday  books  which   help  them  to   revise  their   school   work   from  the  previous   year,  so   that  they  haven't  forgotten  everything  when  it's  time  to  go  back  to   school   la   rentrée).   You   can   find   these   cahiers   de   vacances   in   supermarkets.    For  kids  from  infant  school  to  high  school,  some  are   general   cahiers   which   revise   all   the   subjects   studied   and   others   specialise  in  one  subject.

passer ses  vacances  à  la  mer to  spend  one’s  holidays  at  the  sea  side faire  ses  valises

to pack

réserver

to book

retenir une  chambre

to book  a  room

descendre dans  un  hôtel

to stay  in  a  hotel

monter une  tente

to pitch  a  tent

se baigner

to bathe  /  to  swim

prendre un  bain  de  soleil

to sunbathe

bronzer

to tan

passer des  vacances

to spend  holidays

passer une  nuit  dans  un  hotel

to spend  a  night  in  a  hotel

envoyer des  cartes  postales

to send  postcards

When their   parents   are   at   work,   children   can   go   to   centre   aeré   (day   camps)   or   even   centre   de   vacances   (holiday   clubs)   which   could   be   colos/colonie   de   vacances   (summer   camps)   or   camps   scouts  (scout  camps)  or  centre   de  loisirs  (activity   clubs)   for  horse-­‐ riding,  canoeing,  camping.

Please mention ʻThe DSMʼ when responding to an advert Page 15


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Take a Break... DSM Easy  Crossword Across: 8.   City  in  Florida  (5) 9.   Found   in   the   ordinary   course   of     events  (7) 10.   Learned  person  (7) 11.   The  path  of  a  moon  (5) 12.   Very  large  passenger  aircraft  (8) 13.   Nourishment  (4) 15.  Close  friend  (4) 17.   Size  of  paper  (8) 21.   Aromatic  herb  (5) 22.   Knee  cap  (7) 24  .  One  of  a  class  of  artifacts  (7) 25.   A   person   who   moves   about     according  to  the  seasons  (5)

DSM Toughie  Crossword Across: 8.   Neglect   to  point   out   there’s   a   group     performing?  (7) 9.   Settle  over  a  fish?  (5) 10.   Was   it   Blackbeard’s   vocation   to   do     this?  (5) 11.   One  to  go  against  all  the  others;  cheer  it     up  (7) 12.   Genuine  foreign  currency?  (4) 13.   Turn  right  for   town  to  get   the   best     view  of  the  theatre  (5,3) 16.   R e d s   s a n k   d i s a s t r o u s l y   i n     condiQons  of  poor  visibility  (8) 19.   After  a  word  of  choice,  state     provides  the  biggest  dolphin  (4) 22.   Associate   parent   mistakenly   with     right  shambles!  (7) 23.   Smart  confidence  trick?  (5) 24.   One   way   to   bet   a   thousand   is     symbolic  (5) 25.   Naïve  international  organisation  goes     back  into  three  of  a  kind  (7)

Quiz-tastic!

Down: 1. Mischievous  fairies  (4) 2.   Measurement  of  water  depth  (6) 3.   Someone  who  spoils   the   pleasure  of     others  (7) 4.   Come  into  view  (6) 5.   Receive  pleasure  from  (5) 6.   Tropical  woody  grass  (6) 7.   Made  warm  (6,2) 12.   Of  or  relating  to  James  I  (8) 14.   Without   any  attempt   at   concealment     (7) 16.   Distresses  (6) 18.   Large  harmless  fish-­‐eating  hawk  (6) 19.   Vertical  structure  (6) 20.   A  film  of  oil  floating  on  top  of  water  (5) 23.   Assistant  (4)

Down: 1. Unable   to   at   first,   but,   with   some     hesitation,  journalist  set  a  fair  pace  (8) 2.   AlternaQve  taken  out  of  view  in     central  America  (6) 3. Paid  a  hotel  bill  in  state  cover-­‐up  (5) 4.   Something   to   drop   ranch   in   a   mess     over  nothing  (6) 5.   Letting   off   the   hook   article   in   season     (7) 6.   React   oddly  about  one   side   of  a   large     hole  (6) 7.   Stylist  young  bird  loses  a  key  letter  (4) 14.   Learn  about  unusual  old  train  organisation     to  become  a  rider  on  the  range(8) 15.   An  arrangement  with  my  son  bizarrely     brings  up  other  names  (7) 17.   Try   air   variety   that   is   not   found     everywhere  (6) 18.   Takes  things  off  big   cat’s  markings  out     east  (6) 20.   Isadora  is  invited  to  hold  some  of  the  fruit     cake  (6) 21.   Pressure   taken   off   drug   dealer,  allowing     him  to  show  up  at  the  wedding  (5) 22.   Stop,   put   it   in  reverse   and  fetch  some     containers!  (4)

With thanks  to  M.Morris

New monthly  quiz  by  Roland  Scoa.....how  many  can  you  get?

1)  In  the  song  "Puff   the  Magic  Dragon",  what  is  the  name  of  the   little  boy  who  was  the  dragon's  friend? 2)    Name  the  British  band  leader   who  had  a  BBC  radio  show  from   1949  to  1968,  his  signature  tune  was  "Somebody  Stole  My  Gal" 3)     Who   was  captain  of  the  Tottenham   Hotspur   team  which   won   the   FA   Cup   and   League   Championship   double   in   the   1960/61   season? 4)   Who   conducted   the   Promenade   Concerts   from   their   inauguration,  in  1895,  until  his  death  in  1944? 5)    Which   "Archers"   (Radio  4)   character   is  the  second  husband   of   Peggy  (Archer)?    He  is  played  by  Arnold  Peters. 6)   Which   English   playwright   and   dramatist   is   best   known   for   "Pennies  From  Heaven"  and  "The  Singing  Detective"? 7)     Which   former   England  Rugby   Union   captain   is  married   to   the   Queen's  grand-­‐daughter?

8)  Born  Thomas  Hicks  in  London  1936,  how  is  he  better  known? 9)    Born  May  1942,  he  was  M.P.  for   Ormskirk,  1974-­‐83;  Knowsley  N.   83-­‐86;   joined   UKIP   in   2004   and   presented   his   own   TV   show   1986-­‐2004,  who  is  he? 10)  Which  American  TV  series  starred  Sharon  Gless  and  Tyne  Daly? 11)    Which  American  Country  singer  had  a  British  Top  Ten  hit   with   "Don't  it  Make  My  Brown  Eyes  Blue"?   12)   Which  company,  formed   in   1953,  was  responsible   for   cinema   advertising  in  Britain? Assuming  you  have  12  correct  answers,  each   answer  or   part  of  an   answer   has  a  connection.  Award  yourself  an  extra  point   if  you   can   spot  it. Find  the  answers  on  our  website:  www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr  Copyright  RJS  2013. Page 16


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

A-Z of the Communes in the Deux-Sèvres A-Z of the Communes of the Deux-Sèvres. by Sue  Burgess CLESSÉ The   village   of   Clessé   is   part   of   the   Communauté   de   communes   Terre  de   Sèvres.     The  inhabitants   of   the   village  are   known   as  les   Clesséens   and   les  Clesséennes.     At  the  time  of  the  last  census  the   population   of   Clessé   was  923.     The   village   boasts  an   infant   and   junior  school.    The  river  Cébron  flows  through  the  commune. The   commune  has  a  bakery  and  a  new  bar   has  just  opened   with   newspapers  and  groceries.

revolution. The  masses   were  very  popular  until   the   Republican   authorities  put  a  stop  to  them. • The  ruins  of  Villegué The  only  part  of  this  fortified  house  that  is  still  standing  is  a  large   round  tower   with  thick  walls  with  arrow  slits.     There  is   also  part   of  the  main   building  with  doors  and  arched  windows.    There  is   a   pigeon  loft  at  the  back. • La  Voie  Verte The   Voie   Verte   is   the   old   Parthenay/Bressuire   railway   line.   Nowadays  it  is  a  walkway  for   pedestrians  and  cyclists.  The  Voie   Verte  was  opened  in  2005  and  is  30  km   long.  You  can  us  it  in  all   weathers. • The  crosses  and  calvary There   are   many   simple  crosses   and   calvaries   which   are   larger   monuments.  In  the  village  centre  on  the  road  to  Laubrecais  there   is  a  calvary  which  dates  from  a  mission  in  1868.  Originally  it  was   a   wooden   cross  on  a  high   base.   In  1881  it  was  completed   with   five   other   statues.  In   1892  the  wooden   cross   was  replaced   by   a   cross  in  granite.  The  two  side  staircases  were  added  in  1934.   On   the  road  to  la  Chapelle  (route  de  la  Gourbeillerie  et  la  Gare)   :   The   calvary   of   Peu   was   erected   after   the  1910   mission   and   a   procession  of  over  2000  people.  The  calvary  was  built  on  a  mill.  It   is  16  metres  high  with  an  8  metre  high  cross.  

A  VOIR  /  MUST  SEE • La  Formnière Four  beautiful  mullion   windows  and  three  skylights  light  up   the   facade   of   this   old  manor   house  built  in   1577.  The   crest   of   the   Maynard  family  with  a  boar's  head   and  a  lion  can  be  seen  on  the   triangular   fronton   of   the   main   door.   The   building  still  has  some   large   chimneys. The   Fortinière   is  a  private   property.    

• Route de   Parthenay   and   route   d’Amailloux:   An   important   ceremony   was   organised   in   1945   for   the   inauguration   of   this   calvary.   • Route  de  Moncoutant  and  route  de  Boismé  :  A  virgin  on  a  stand. • La  Roche  Gabard This   doorway   is   characteristic   of   the   XVIIth   century.   It   had   a   pedestrian   doorway  and  a  doorway  for   carriages.  The   archway   was  sculpted  with   the   crest   of   the  Menard  family  and   the  date   1688.

• Les Fréaux The  small   holding  and   the  pond   of  les  Fréaux   b e l o n g e d   t o   t h e   monks   of   the   abbey   of   l'Absie   from   the   middle   of   the   XIVth   century   but   the  property  was  confiscated   during  the  revolution  and  sold  in  1793. The   property  is   owned   by  the   MENARD  family  who   have  three   high  quality  gites  and  15  fishing   sites  at   the  "logis  et   l’Étang  des   Fréaux".   • Saint  Ambroise  Chapel The   chapel   was  built   in  the  XVIIth  century  and   enlarged   at   the   end  of  the  XVIIIth   century.  The   chapel   is  found  in  the  middle  of   the  fields  a  few  hundred  metres  from  the  Clessé/Boismé   road.  It   is  close  to  a  spring  which   is  said  to  have  therapeutic  virtues.    The   water  is  supposed  to  heal  headaches.   During  the   revolution,  secret   masses   were   held   in   the   chapel.   They   were   celebrated   by  priests   who   did   not   agree   with   the  

More ‘A-­‐Z  of  the  Communes  of  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres.’ next  month...

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Health, Beauty & Fitness... 2013 Beauty Recommendations... Samantha’s 3 Tips to Fuller Hydrated Lips

1. Exfoliation.    No   ma…er   how   many  lip  balms  or   hydraong   lip   products   you   apply   unol   you   have   removed   all   of   your   dry   skin   they   simply   won't   work.   Exfoliaong   your   lips   is   simple.   You   can   either   buy   a  lip   exfoliater,   Clarins  do  an   amazing   product   for   this,   or   if   you   are   watching   the   pennies  an  old  tooth  brush  will  work  just  as  well.   Simply  gently   brush   over   your   lips   unol  all  dead   skin  is  removed.  

2. Hydration.     Now  your  lips  are  free  from  any  dead  skin  you   can   start  hydraong  them.     Before  I  apply  my  lipsock  or  gloss  I  like  to   apply  a  lip  balm.  This   stops   my  lips   from  drying  out  through   the   day,  and   is  a  cheap  and   simple   way  of   keeping  my   lips  looking   their  best. 3.   Fuller   lips.   For   those   of   you   that   have   thinner   lips   I   recommend  choosing  a  lip  liner  that  is  similar  to  your  natural  lip   colour.  Carefully  line  just  outside  your   lips  to  give  the  illusion  of   fuller   plumper   lips.   Also   another   good   op   is   to   place   a   light   reflecong  concealer  onto  your  cupids  bow,  add   some  high  shine   gloss  and  this  will  give  you  the  perfect  summer  pout. Samantha's  recommend   product   is  Clarin’s  Extra  Firming  Lip  and   Contour  Gentle  Exfoliater For  booking  call  Samantha  06.50.04.37.30  

Emma’s Summer Hair Care Tips

Your hair  during  the  summer  needs  that  little   bit  of  extra  TLC,  there  are  a  number  of  things   to  contend  with.  The   drying  sun,  chlorine  in   the   pool   and   sea   salt   are  just   some   of   the   things   you   need   to   tackle.   Here   are   a  few   tips:   Hydration:  Your  hair  like  your  skin  will  need  to  be  hydrated  so  drink   plenty  of  water  through  these  summer  months.   Call   your  Stylist:   Make   sure  you  have  regular   trims,  to   keep   hair   that  is  dry  at  bay.  I  would  recommend  every  6-­‐8  weeks. Moisture:  Your  hair  can  lose  moisture  in  the  sun  especially  if  you   have   highlighted  hair.   Try  using   a  moisturising  hair   mask  once   a   week  or   use  shampoo  and  conditioner   that  contains  oil   that  will   penetrate  the  hair  shaft. Protect   your  hair:  Wear  a  hat  in  the  midday  sun.  This  will  protect   your  scalp  and  hair. Bleached  Highlights:  Try  swapping  bleach  highlights  for  a  high  lift   tint.  Tint  is  not   as  harsh  as  bleach   and  will  lift   to  a  lighter  colour  in   the  sun. Emma's   recommends   all   types   of   Argan   oils.   These   can   be   purchased  at  local  supermarkets  in  the  hair  care  secoon. Charente  Hair  &  Make  Up Tel:  05  45  31  56  93  /  06  50  04  37  30 www.charentehairandbridal.com

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

New Salon Now Open

In the   centre   of   Chef   Boutonne,   the   salon   provides   a   light   and   modern  space  to  enjoy  all  the  hairdressing  services  expected  from   a  highly  experienced  and  dedicated  team.  

Colour Advert Size A or B, only 38€ per month or from 33,33€ per month for 12 months.

Established over   thirty   years   ago   in   the   UK,   Michael   William   Hairdressing  expanded  into  the  Haute  Vienne  in  2009   and  is  proud   to  have  now  launched  a  second  salon  in  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres.

Michael William  Hairdressing  philosophy  is  simple: To  provide   a   unique  speciality  in   hair   care  and  design,  welcoming   clients   whatever   their   needs   to   receive   the   highest   standards   at   affordable  costs. Our   salon   allows  you  to   relax   from   the   moment   you   enter;   fresh   refreshments   are   always   on   hand,  as   well   as   wi-­‐fi   and   the   latest   magazines,   all   of   course  complimentary.     We  also   have   plenty   of   space   for   those   accompanying  you  to  relax,  everyone   is  welcome.   Your   time  with   us   is   as   individual   as   you   and   you   can   always   be   assured  of  our  undivided  attention. What  makes  us  unique? Well   it's   simple.  We   listen   to   what   people  want  and   we  identified   that  people  missed  the  'salon'  experience.   Our   consultation   process  allows   you   to   discuss  in   confidence  your   ideas  and  needs  and  we  work  together  to  create  a  style  that   not  only   looks  and  feels  great  at  the  time  of  its  creation  but  lasts  and  is   easy   to  manage.   As   your  haircut  and/or  colour  is  the  focus  of  your   time  with  us,  you   can   have  confidence   that  the  techniques  we  use  are  those  passed   down  from  major  industry  leaders  as  we  now   continue  to   develop   and   lead  the  next   generation   of   stylists.  Professionalism  is   always   imperative  to  us.   So  whatever  your  requirements,  from  a  precision   cut  to  a  complete   restyle   and/or   colour,  or   if   you   have   a  concern   with   your   hair   or   scalp,   visit   Michael   William   Hairdressing,   a   real   salon   experience   delivered  with  care,  expertise  and  professionalism.......every  visit.

A HUGE  Thank  You  to   all   the   lovely   ladies   who   joined  the   ‘Race   For   Life’   to   support   C a n c e r   S u p p o r t   D e u x -­‐ S e v r e s   o n   Saturday  15th  June. A  fun  time  was  had  by  all  and  we  raised  a  tidy  sum  for  a  very   worthwhile   cause.     If   you   would   like   to   make   a   donation,   please  email:  sabestini@orange.fr.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Our Furry Friends...

HOOF (Horse Orientated Open Forum)

HOOF is  open  to  anyone  with  an  equine  interest.     You  do  not  need  to  own  a  horse!    We  meet  about  once  a  month   for  talks,  visits  etc.    Interested? Contact Jo Rowe on: 05 49 64 30 59

Equine Rescue France

We are always looking for new members and we are in need of donations so we may continue to help equines in France. Please support the ERF.

Please contact Equine Rescue France via their website www.equinerescuefrance.org

Phoenix Associamon,   who   rescue   and   re-­‐ home   animals   in   need,   has   a   new   website.   Please  visit:   www.phoenixasso.com   and   find   out   what  you  can  do  to  help  animals  in   need   in  south  west  France!

MAYDAY MES AMIS Mayday Mes Amis has  been  formed  to  help  animals  in  need  in   l'Absie  and  the  surrounding  area.   For  more  information  please  email:  jill.zub@sky.com.

Hope Book  Sale  May  2013

Once again  our  May  Book  Sale  has  well  and  truly  broken  all   records.    We  have  had  our  most  successful  event  yet.    This  is   down  to  you,  the  public,  supporting  HOPE  by  coming  along  and   spending  your  money.    Also  to  the  volunteers  who  worked   tirelessly  and  turned  up  in  great  numbers  every  day  to  help,   without  their  endless  dedication  and  determination  the  event   would  not  have  been  the  success  it  was.    

Thank you  to  everyone  involved,  you  have  been  part  of  a  great   success  and  many  animals  in  need  will  be  helped  as  a  result.     Watch  this  space  for  the  dates  of  our  October  event!

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

APPEAL HOPE have  had  a  plea  for  help:  "Please  can  anyone  help  me  out  by   taking  on  one  or   two  of  these  beautiful   kittens.     Two  have  been   re-­‐homed  but  there  are  still  5  to  adopt  or  foster.     The  kittens  have   been   well-­‐handled   and  are  socialised.    They  are  almost   6   weeks   old.    We  are  in  Biarge,  Chaunay,  Dept.  79  -­‐  05  49  43  51  18.      I  can’t   keep  any  more  myself,  I  have  a  full  house  already.    Please  call  Carol   any  time." There’s   only   5   of   these  kittens  left  now,   so   if   you’re  dithering   about   adopting   one   you’d  better  be  quick.  

There are   more   cats,   kittens,   dogs   and   pups   looking   for   homes   on   the  HOPE  website. www.hopeassoc.org.

40 KILOS  OF  LOVE...ALSA ALSA  is  a  big  girl   with  an   equally   big   heart.  A  non-­‐destructive,   non  barking,  obedient  Matin  Espagnol  cross  of  5  years  old. Alsa   is   fun   loving   and   lively   in   the   garden   but   calm   indoors.   She   is   always   willing   to   please,   loves   human   company   and   long   walks,   and   will   sleep   at   your   feet   at   the   end  of  the  day.

Light at the End of a Tunnel? The French  system  for  dealing  with  stray  cats  and  dogs  requires  that   they  stay   in   a  fourrière,  an  officially  recognised  kennel/pound  for   8   working  days.  After  that  period,  if  they  haven't  been  returned  to  their   owner   they   can   be   given   to   an   association   for   the   protection   of   animals,   provided   that   the   association   has   access   to   an   officially   recognised  shelter.     If  they  can't   be  adopted  and  a  vet   agrees,  they   may  be  put  down.    When  the  legislation  was  discussed  in  the  Senate,   it   was   assumed   that   every   town   would   sign   a   contract   with   an   association  and  that  putting  down  animals  would  be  a  last  resort. Unfortunately,  it  hasn't  turned  out  that  way.     Firstly,  there  is  a  lack  of   associations   that   have   access   to   an   appropriate   shelter.   They're   expensive  to  build  and  it's  a  big  commitment  to  do  all  the  paperwork   and   get   the  appropriate  qualifications  for   running   one.     Secondly,   back  in  1998  when  the  legislation  was  proposed,  it   was  thought  that   a  contract  would  cost  one  franc  (about  15  eurocents)  per  inhabitant   per  year.    That  was  a  bit  optimistic  and  anything  from  50  cents  to  one   Euro   soon   became   the   norm.     This   resulted   in   many   towns   not   signing  up   with   any   association   at   all,  so   that   euthanasia  became   standard   practice,  rather   than  a   last   resort.  Because   they  are   not   identified   so  their  owners  cannot   be  found,  it's  estimated  that  about   half  of  the  stray  cats  and  dogs  in   France  are  put  down.    Clearly  this   situation  needs  to  change. As   you   probably   know,   NALA   doesn't   have   an   animal   shelter;   in   addition   to   the   reasons  enumerated   above,   we  don't   think  that   a   shelter  is  the  best  place  for  a  cat.     We  use  foster  families  so  that  it  is   kept   in   a   loving   environment   and   we   can   accurately  evaluate   its   personality   and   behaviour,   which   is   essential   for   a   successful   adoption.    In  shelters  there  is  also   the  risk  of  an  epidemic  affecting  a   large  population,  whereas  in  a  foster  home  the  numbers  affected  are   significantly  less. Recently  we  had  one   of  our   regular   6  monthly   meetings   with   the   Direction   départementale  de  la  protection  des  populations  which  is   the  service   responsible  for,  amongst   other   things,  animal   welfare.   They  asked  us  to  explain  how  we  operate  with  foster  families,  which   we  did.    Then  came  the  bombshell:  they  are  exploring  how  to  modify   the   requirements   so   that   it   would   be  possible   for  associations  like   NALA  that  don't  have  a  shelter  to  adopt  animals  from  the  fourrière.   This   is   fantastic   news,   as   that   would   remove   one   of   the   major   obstacles  to  getting  animals  adopted  and  is  one  of  the  things  that  we   are  asking  for  in  our   petition.    Hopefully  something  will   come  of  this   proposal  as  it  seems  like  a  win-­‐win  scenario:  more  animals  saved,  less   cost  to  the  ratepayers.    We'll  keep  our  fingers  crossed.

Alsa loves   all   other   animals,  even  those   from   down   on   the   farm,   but   whilst   she  gets  on  with   other  dogs,  she  would  be  best   suited  to   be  the  only  dog  in  the  family. Alsa   is   micro-­‐chipped   (2502698020705995),   vaccinated   and   neutered.     This  is  a  lovely  dog  best   suited   to  a  family   who   like   and   understand   the   larger   breed   of   dog  and   can   give   her   the   attention  she  deserves. There   is   an   adoption   fee   for   Alsa   and  if  you  think  you  could  give  her   a   "home   for   life"   please   contact   Isabelle  on  09  77  48  71  43  or  email   asso.orfee@laposte.net   for   more   information.    Thank  you. www.association-­‐orfee.forumactif.com/f49-­‐english-­‐corner  

Above: Harvard,   Hall   and  Lina   all   under   1   year   old,   are   all   waiting   for   a   good   home.   Please   contact  NALA  if  you  can   help.... Nos Amis Les Animaux 85480 (NALA 85480). Tel: 07  70  31  54  59

Email: nala85480@hotmail.com www.nosamislesanimaux.com

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

The Great Outdoors...

Bonne Pêche

by Simon Tee

Recently I  did   some   tiling   work  for   a  retired  Vicar,  near   Angouleme.     When  I  told  him   I  have   fishing   lakes,   I   was   amazed   to   learn   that  he  was  a  very  close   friend  of  the   late  Jack  Hargreaves   and  that  Jack  left   the   Vicar   all   his   fishing   tackle.   The   afore-­‐mentioned   tackle   is   still   in   storage  in  England,  but   I  have   a  date   with  the  Vicar  when  it  arrives  in  France!    Jack  was  one  of  my  heroes  …   when  I  saw  “Out  of  Town”  I  was  hooked! This  month  I  have  returned  to   Carp  fishing  tactics  as  Carp   are  one  of   the  most  popular  species  of  fish.     Whether  it  is  the  size,  the  power  or   just  the  elusiveness  of  Carp,  anglers  in  their   thousands  want   to  catch   them.    Here  are  a  couple  of  handy  tips  that  could  help  you   put  them   on  the  bank: To   fish   for   Carp  off  the   surface  try  cutting  a  very   small   groove   in   the   back   of   a   dog   biscuit   and   superglueing  the  shank  of  a  size  6  or  8   hook  into   the  groove.     The  result   is  that  the  weight  of  the   hook   automatically  pulls   the   biscuit   over   so   the   hook  is  underneath,  a  perfect  hooking  position. Start   by   throwing   in   10-­‐15   biscuits,   then   wait.     When   the   fish   start   taking   them,   put   in   a   few   more.    Don’t  cast  in  until  you  have  them  taking  the   biscuits   off   the   top   with   confidence;   almost   competing   for   them.   Then   cast   your   biscuit   amongst  them…  and  hold  on! My  next  tip  is  “The  Knotless  Knot”.     It’s  a  great  way  of  presenting  a  hair-­‐rigged  bait  on  the  bottom.    Why  go   and  buy  them  from  your  local  tackle   shop  when  you  can  make  them   yourself?     The  satisfaction  of  catching  and  landing  a  fish   on   a  rig  that   you  have  tied  is  a  better  feeling  than  having  that  first  beer   after  a  long   hot  day  (almost!). First   tie   a   very   small   loop   in   whatever   hook  length   you   choose  (I   personally  like  to  use  braid).     Push  a  baiting  needle  through  your  bait   (i.e.  maize,  boillie),  put  the  small  loop  onto  the  needle  and  pull  it  back   through  the  boillie,  thus  pulling  the  loop  through  it.    Then  put  a  boillie   stop  through  the  loop  and  pull  it  tight  against  the  bait. Pass  the  line  up   through   the  back   of  the  hook   until  the  bait  is  level   with  the  bend  of  the  hook.    Wrap  the  line  around  the  shank,  about  6-­‐7   times,  and  put   the  line  back  through  the  rear   of  the   hook  as  before.     Moisten  the  knot  before  you  pull  it  tight. This  technique  doesn’t  rely  on  the  strength  of  a  tied  knot.    The  strength   comes  from  the  resistance  of  the  line  being  pulled;  the  harder  the  line   is  pulled,  the  tighter  the  knot  will  become.

Bonne Chance et Bonne pêche, Simon

Simon Tee  is  the  proprietor  of  2  coarse  fishing   lakes  in  Secondigny  (www.francefishinggites.com)

CONTRIBUTIONS.... We are always looking for new contributions for consideration in future issues. Do you have an experience to share? Are you a tradesman with a Top Tip? or perhaps an avid reader who would like to contribute a book review? Whatever it may be, either long or short, we would love to hear from you. You can call Sarah on 05 49 70 26 21 with any ideas, or send them on an email to: info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Domaine des Forges Golf Resort With the  winter  finally  out  of   the  way,  what   better   way  of  getting   out  and  about  in  the  fresh  air  and  sunshine,  than  playing  golf.   You   can   explore   the   nature   and   participate   within   a   sporting   environment   at  the  same   time.     Sometimes  you  may  find  more  of   the   natural   terrain   than  you   wish  for,  but  it  is  an   excellent  way  to   pass  a  few  hours  by  yourself  or  with  your  friends  and  family. Blue   Green   Golf   des   Forges   is   situated   30   minutes  from  Poitiers   and   30  mins  from  Niort.    The  nearest  town   is  Vasles   and  with   27   holes  available  there  will   always  be  space  for   you  to  play  and  enjoy   the  splendid  views  of  the  countryside.   Even   for  non-­‐golfers  the  golf  complex  offers  a  bar/restaurant,  with   a  attractive  terrace  overlooking  the  9th  green,  which  is  open  to  the   public  7  days  a  week.    There   is  also  a  driving  range,  with  space  for   up  to  30  people   at   a  time   and  a  putting  green,  so  for  those  of  you   who   have   never   touched   a   club   before,   you   are   welcome   to   discover  Golf  des  Forges. Starting  from  the  7th  July,  during  the  summer  months  there  will  be   golf   lessons   for   youngsters   aged  between   6  and   17  years   of   age.   Over  a  4  day  period  they  will   learn   the  basic  skills  of  the   game  of   golf   and  get   to   experience   the   highs  and   lows,  which  come   with   the  sport. The   lessons   will   be  given   by  Stewart   Cronin,   Golf   Professional   at   Golf  des  Forges.  Stewart  has   20  years  experience,  as  both  a  coach   and   a   player   and   the   lessons   will   be   available   to   all   youngsters.   Stewart  speaks  French,  English  and  Dutch. There  will   also  be  group  lessons  for  adults  during  the  same  period,   with  options  of  either   6  or   10  hours  of  coaching.    This  will  be   an   ideal   way   to   start   your   golfing  life  or   even   to   improve  your   golf   game.     Groups   will   consist   of   between   4   and   8   players   so   the   quality  of  the  lesson  will  not  be  affected. For  more  informaoon  on  Blue  Green  Golf  des  Forges,  please  call   05  49  69  91  77  or  email:forges@bluegreen.com   Website:  www.bluegreen.com  

On Your Bikes... This August,  on   the  24th/25th,  a  team   of  eight  French  and   English  cyclists  from   the  local  area  around   Civray  are  entered   into  the  Le  Mans  24  hour  Velo  Race.  This   is  an  annual  event  for  amateur  cyclists,  fans   and   their  families,  taking  place  where  some   of   the   greatest   motorsport   champions   have   already  made  history:  The  Le  Mans  Bugatti  Circuit. There  will  be  approximately  2500  contestants  either  riding  solo   or   in  teams  of  up   to   8.  The  format   is  that   of  a  continuous   24   hour  team  relay  on  the  closed  circuit. Our   team  consists  of  seven   men   from   the   local   area,  and   one   coming  from  the   UK   a  few  days   before  the  event  for   their   final   training  sessions.    Their  ages  range  from  21  to  53. The  training  for  the  event   started   early  this  year  in  March   and,   despite  the  very  rainy  weekends  so  far  this  year,  they  have  been   out  together   for  several   hours  most   Sundays  and   getting  rather   wet  in  the  process! The   custom   kit   which   will   be   in   very   fetching   red   and   white,   bearing  the  team  name  of  “Les  Templiers”  and  the  Templar  cross   as   well   as   some   corporate   sponsor’s   logos   is   currently   under   production. They   are   raising   sponsorship   from   private   donations  towards  research   and  awareness   of   testicular  cancer,  and  have  corporate  assistance   to  help  fund  partial  event  costs  (cycling  attire).   Each   team   member   has   paid   their   own   entry   fee  and  equipment  costs. If  you  would  like  to  sponsor  ‘Les  Templiers’,  you   can  do  so  via  the    link  below  and  all  donations   will  be  very  gratefully  received. https://www.justgiving.com/LesTempliers24HR

Please mention ʻThe DSMʼ when responding to an advert.

Photograph: Jon Crocker ©2013

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

THE AMATEUR GARDENER

tied to   support  canes.    Lettuce  and  other  salad  crops   need   to   be   planted   'little   and   often'   to   ensure   a   steady   supply   during   the   season.

Shall we  start  with  the  flower  garden  this  month?     Spring-­‐flowering  shrubs  have  given  us  a  nice  show   and  now  need   pruning.     Taking  out  the  stems  which  have  flowered  will   keep   the   shrub  a  manageable  size  and  good   shape   and  will  ensure  plenty  of   blooms   next   year.     Now   is   a   good   time   also   to   take   softwood   cuttings  of  Pyracantha,  Hypericum,  Potentilla,  Hydrangea  etc.

Finally this  month,  a  word  about  bindweed/bellbind   which  can  be   a  pesky  nuisance  at   this  time  of  year.     Apparently  bindweed  roots   can  penetrate  as  deep  as  5   metres  and  can  spread  about   2  metres   per  season!    With  roots  that   deep  it   is   very  difficult   to  eradicate   because   even   a  small  piece   of   root   left  in  the  soil   will   regenerate   the  plant.     Patience  is   a  virtue  in  this  case,  persistent   digging  and   hoeing   will   eventually  weaken   the  plant   and   kill  it   off.     However,   one   of   our   readers   has   bindweed   spoiling   his  rose   garden.     He   could   try   inserting   bamboo   canes   close   to   the   bindweed   to   encourage  it  to   grow  up  the  canes  rather   than  smother   the  roses.     These   stems  can   be   left  on  the  canes  and  be   spot-­‐treated   with   a   gel-­‐type   systemic   weedkiller;   or   alternatively,   untwine   them,   lay   them  out  on   the  ground  before  spraying  with   glyphosate   (be  sure   to  protect  your  roses  and  nearby  bedding  plants  while  you  do  this).     Spraying  with  glyphosate  is  more  effective  once  the  bindweed  has   reached   flowering  stage  because  there  are   more  leaves  to  absorb   the  weedkiller,  but  it  will  be  effective  well  into  the  autumn.

by Vanda Lawrence

Feed Roses   to   keep   them  flowering  strongly   and   continue   spraying   against   mildew   and   blackspot.     Interplant  with  Alliums,  Catmint,   Thyme  or  Parsley  to  deter  aphids. Collect   seeds   from   Foxgloves   and   sow   in   small   pots   of   compost.     Plant   out   in   the   autumn. Prune  the  long  side-­‐shoots   on   Wisteria   -­‐   cut   back  to  a  length   of   about   8".    Propagate  by  layering  long  lower  shoots  into  the  soil  and   cover   with   a  large   stone   to   hold   in   place  until   roots  have  formed.     Sever   this   new   growth   from   the   parent   when   you   are   ready  to   plant   in   its  new  situation.    Honeysuckle  can  be  propagated  in   the   same  way.

Happy gardening mes amis.....See you next month.

If your   Irises   didn't   bloom  well   this   year   it   could   be   because   they   have   become   overcrowded,   so   lift   and   divide   when   they  finish   flowering.    Reduce  leaves   by   half   their   height   to   avoid   windrock   and   re-­‐plant  about  5"  apart  with  leaves  facing   the  sun;  firm   them  down   into   a  shallow   hole,  just   deep  enough  to   half-­‐bury  the   rhizome  because  they  like  to  be  baked   by   the   sun.     Ideally,   this   should   be   done   every  three  or  four  years.

When planting  up  large   pots  for   the  terrace  put  about  6"  of  grass   cuttings   in   the   bottom   before   filling   with   peat.     This   will   retain   moisture   as  well   as   feed   the  plants   during  the  season.     Hanging   baskets  are  often  a  job  to  water   because  the   soil  surface  hardens.     If  you  add  a  little  washing-­‐up  liquid  in  the  watering  can  you  will  find   that   the  water   will   penetrate  the  soil   surface   easily  and   won't  run   off. For   the  vegetable  garden  broccoli/cauliflower/cabbage  plants  are   all  still  readily  available  and   you   can  sow   a  second   crop   of   broad   beans   for   harvesting   in   September-­‐October.     Onions   sown   last   autumn  will  become  ready  for  harvesting  now.     Early  potatoes  can   be   lifted   a s   re q u i re d   b u t   l a t e r   varieties   still   need   spraying   with   Bordelaise   (Bordeaux)   Mixture   to   prevent   blight.     Tomato   plants   will   also   benefit   from  this   treatment   and  don't  forget  to  pinch  out   side-­‐shoots   and   keep  plants  

Colour Advert Size A or B, only 38€ per month or from 33,33€ per month for 12 months.

Cut back  Lupins  and   Delphiniums  to  ground   level  after  flowering  to   encourage  a  second   display.    Stake  Gladioli   to  keep   nice   straight   stems;   Tie   young   Dahlia   stems   to   their   stakes   to   avoid   wind   damage  and   disbud   for   larger   flowers.     Deadhead   regularly  and   feed   fortnightly.     Sweet   Peas   need   regular   feeding   and   dead-­‐ heading  too.    Use   a   high   potash   fertiliser   on  all   summer   bedding   plants.

Page 24


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY Remember last   month   I  threatened   to   do  some   renovating,   well   disaster   struck.  Day  one:  I  fell   off  the  ladder,  badly  battered   and   bruised  but  luckily,  nothing  broken.    I  think  I  should  leave  it  to  the   experts  and  stick  to  being  a  smallholder.

Life on the Farm...

by Peter  &  Jenny  Sebborn.

What a  strange   month.   We   have   had   most   of   the   four   seasons   weather  in    30  days. We  have  been   busy  and  as  always  have   some  new   additions.    Our   latest   hatchlings   are   ducklings,  keets   (guinea   fowl)   and   just   two   goslings.     One  of  the  goslings   was  born  with  a  badly  deformed  leg   but   with   a   little   bit   of  shaped   plastic   and   some  sticky  tape   (Blue   Peter   here  we  come!)  we   made   a  splint  which  it   wore  for   a  few   days  and  voila  -­‐  perfect.

The first  bronze  turkeys  have   arrived   ready  for   Christmas  (I  know   we  haven’t  had  summer  yet).    They  are  so  small   they  walk  straight   though   the   stock   fence   and   follow  the  guinea  fowl   and  Fred   the   Rhode  Island  Red  cockerel  around   the  farm  and  pinch  all  our  lovely   strawberries.     We   have   to   keep   the   turkeys   and   chickens   in   separate   pens  as   the   turkeys  can   get   a   disease   called   Blackhead   which  can   be  fatal.     The  naughty  turkeys   found  an  open   bag   of   cement  and  decided  to  have  a  dust  bath  in  it.    Luckily  we  saw  them   before  it  rained  otherwise  we  may  have  had  a  few  concrete  turkeys   for  garden  ornaments! We  have  had  two  more  litters   of  rabbits  but  still  haven’t  been  very   successful  curing  the  pelts,  something  always  seems   to  go  wrong   (or  we  forget   about   them).    But   we   will   persevere  as  I’d  like  a   hat   for  the  winter. It’s  been  a  busy  month  again  in  the  garden.     We  have  a  huge  veggie   plot  this  year  for   us  and  the  animals  and  the  weeding  alone  is  a  full   time   job.   We   have   planted   lots   of   potatoes,   onions,   garlic,   tomatoes,  peas,  and  every  type   of   bean   you   can  imagine  and   for   the   animals,   fodder   beet,  sunflowers   and   chicory   which   can   be   used  as  a  natural  wormer.     We  will  certainly  have  a  lot   to  choose   from  and  our  ‘5  a  day’  will  not  be  a  problem.    The  secret  now  is  to   keep  planting  as  a  space  becomes  available.   I’ve  been  piggy  shopping  again  and   have  bought   two   large  black,   GOS  crosses   called  Corky  and   Porky,  they   are  great  fun  to   watch   and  are  enjoying  the  mud.      The  two  goat  kids  are  being  weaned  so   we  are  now  milking  twice  a  day  and  we  are  giving  any  spare  milk  to   the  sows  who  love  it.     We  have  discovered  only  one  down  side  of   having   goats   and   that   is   we   now   have  no   leaves   or   fruit   on   the   trees  below  2  metres!    We  live  and  learn....

The ewes  and   Beavis  the   ram  have  all   been   sheared  in  readiness   for  the  hot  weather.    We  will   probably  use  the  fleece  for  insulation   again.    We  have  been  so  busy  with  the  new  arrivals  and  the  garden   that  we  got  the  shearer  in  this  year.     He  did  a  fantastic  job  and  only   took  4  minutes  a  sheep  and  made  it   look  effortless.    He  sheared  all   12   in   less   time   than   it   takes   Jen   to   do   just   one.     We   have  also   treated  the  sheep   and   lambs  with  Butox   for   the  prevention  of  fly   strike  and  ticks  and  they  have  had   their  feet  trimmed  again   -­‐   need   to  look  good  for  the  summer!

So thats  all  for  this   month;  its  back  to  do  battle  with  the  weeds.     Enjoy   the   sunshine   -­‐   its   bound   to   arrive   soon.     See   you   next   month.

Peter &  Jenny  Sebborn.  Breeders  of  pigs,  lambs  and  poultry.   La  Gauteliere,  79220,  Pamplie.    Tel:  05  49  28  38  57.

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French Life, Food & Drink... French Village Diaries One of   the  things  I   love  about  this   time   of   year   is   the   opportunity  to   get  out  and   about  at  the  weekends   visiting   fêtes   and   vide   greniers,   especially  when   the  sun  is  shining.     Food  is  never  far  from  my  thoughts   or   purchases   and   whether   it   is   something  for  the  kitchen  I  pick  up   at   a  vide  grenier,  a  naughty  treat   of   freshly   cooked   frites   or   some   local  honey  or  walnut   oil,  I’m  sure   to  come  home  happy.

by Jacqueline  Brown.

In June  we  made  our  annual  visit  to  the  Fête  des  Plantes  et  du  Jardin   au  Domaine  de  Péré,  Beauvoir-­‐Sur-­‐Niort,  79360.  This  is  such  a  great   event  for   all  who  love  their  outdoor   space,  as  there  is  so  much  more   than  just  plants,  that  I  can  recommend  it  for  a  lovely  day  out.    Like   many  families  we  packed  a  picnic,  but  having  seen  and   smelt   some   of   the   lovely   savoury   and   sweet   pastries   being   sold   by   a   local   boulangerie,  maybe  next  year  we  will   treat  ourselves.    As  usual  I  was   in   awe   at   the   attitude   the   French   take   to   a   humble   picnic   lunch.     Tables,  chairs  and   gazebos   were   set   up   in   the   car   park,  food   and   wine  were  unpacked  and  life  stood  still  while  lunch  was  eaten.   One   of   the   things   I   love   in   a   picnic   is   a   homemade   quiche   or  cake,  or   both.  Before  moving   to   France   baking   was   not   something   I  did   very  often,  or   very  well,  but   I   could   make   a   decent   batch   of   scones.   In   recent   years   I   have   perfected   my  homemade  pastry  and   now   baking   a   quiche   or   tart   is   a   regular   for   our   picnics.     For   some   reason   though,   since   moving   here   every   batch   of   scones   I   have   tried   to   make   have  failed   to   rise.     I  know   all   the  tips,  not  to  work  the  dough   too   much,   to   be   gentle   with   cutting  out  and  not  to  over  roll   the   dough.    I  have  tried  different   recipes,  different  flours  and   it   is   beyond  annoying  that   they  just  don’t   work.  I  am  tempted  to  blame   my  beloved   oven,  as  it  would  be  fair  to  say  she  is  either  on  and  hot,   or  off,  and   can  also  be  rather  temperamental.  I   also   wonder  if  it   is   the  fact   she  runs   on   bottled   gas?  If   anyone  has  any  help  to  offer,   please   do   get   in   touch,  as   it   would   be   lovely  to   have   some   real   scones   (rather   than   flat   pancakes)   to   go   with   the   cherry   jam  I’ve   made  this  week,  thank  you.  

Keeping to  the  subject  of  picnics,  I  am  again  helping  to   organise  our   village  family  fun  day  this  summer.    As  usual  this  will  be  held  from  12   o’clock  on  the  15th  August  in  the  park  behind  the  church  in  Loubille   79110,  just  south  of  Chef  Boutonne.    Please  bring  your  own  picnic  to   be  eaten   on   the   village   trestle   tables  set   out   in  the  shade   of   the   trees.  Games  to  amuse  young  and  old  will  be  supplied;  badminton,   table  tennis,  cricket   and  pétanque.  Everyone  welcome.  If  you  would   like  more  information  please  email  frenchvillagediaries@gmail.com. For  the  recipes  please  email  me  at   frenchvillagediaries@gmail.com  or  visit   www.frenchvillagediaries.com  

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Greek Pasta  Picnic  Salad Ingredients: • Cooked  Pasta • Cherry  Tomatoes  -­‐  cut  in  half • Sliced  cucumber • Red  Onion,  chopped • 1tsp  lemon  juice • 10ml  Olive  Oil • A  pinch  of  dried  Oregano • Cooked  Chicken,  diced • Crumbled  Feta  Cheese Method:-­‐ Put  the  pasta,  cherry  tomatoes,  cucumber  and  red  onion  into   a   large  bowl  and  gently  stir  to  combine. Mix  the  lemon  juice   and  a  pinch   of  salt   together  in  a  small  bowl   until  the  salt  dissolves.     Add  the  olive  oil  and  dried  oregano,  then   stir  until  blended. Pour   over   the   pasta   mixture   and   fold  in.    Add   the  chicken,  feta  and   olives  and  toss  gently  to  mix.     Cool  for  two  hours  before  serving.     Perfect  for  a  picnic!


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

We Must Talk About Rudolf Biodynamic Winemaking

by John  Sherwin.

Rudolf Steiner   (1861   –   1925)   promoted   spiritual   philosophy,   or   in   the   words   of   the   General   Anthroposophical  Society,  sought  ‘to  nurture  the  life   of  the   soul   on  the  basis  of  a  true  knowledge  of  the   spiritual   world’.   He   thought   that   we   should   not   depend   on   outside  ‘authority’,  but  rely  on   our   own   rational   thought   processes  to  comprehend   spiritual   experiences.   OK,  he   was   a  geek   and   a   weirdo:   but   then   where   do   you   place   Lennon   (‘Imagine’),   da   Vinci   (helicopters),   Gandhi   (strange   underwear)  in  the  whole  scheme  of  things? Steiner  had  an  interest   in  lots  of  stuff:  medicine,  architecture,  social   activism,  the  performing  arts,  but  I  really  don’t  have  the  space  or   expertise  to  address  such  weighty  matters.   Biodynamic  agriculture   was   another   of   his   interests,   and   this   spawned   the   present-­‐day   trend  in  biodynamic  winemaking. This   is   where   the   cynics   come   down   from   the   hills,   with   their   sneers   and   chemical   treatments   and   optimum   yields   and   profit   margins.  They  will   tell  you  that   agriculture  based   on   the  positions   of  the  moon,  sun   and   stars  is  bunkum.  They   are  also  perhaps  the   same   people   who   ignore   the   fact   that   soil   is   an   extraordinary   structure,  one  which  has  its  own  natural,  self-­‐supporting  life  cycle,   which  has  no  need  of  unnatural,  outside  intervention. The   idea   is   that   there   are   days   within   the   lunar   calendar   more   suitable  to  one  activity  than  another.  So,  there  are  flower  days,  leaf   days  (favourable  to  leafy  plants   like  lettuce  and  spinach),  root  days   (carrots,  leeks),  and  fruit  days  (best  for  fruiting  plants,  including  the   vine).  There  are  also  red  days,  the  vineyard  employees’  favourites,   when  the  lunar  cycle  allows  no  work  to  be  done. To  see  a  shire-­‐horse,   not   a  tractor,  treading  between  the  rows   of   vines,  spreading  treatments   of   camomile  or   nettles  or   dandelion,   snorting  in   the   early  mist,   guided   by  just   the  one   man   who   has   trained   him  and   will   wash   him  down   at   the   end   of   the  day  is   a   glimpse  into  the  past  –  and  hopefully  a  sustainable  future. It   should   be   self-­‐evident   that   simple-­‐and-­‐natural   is   better   than   complicated-­‐and-­‐chemical,  but  the  proof  is  in  the  drinking.  I’ve  had   some   wonderful   examples   from   Montirius  (their   wines   from   the   Vacqueryas  and  Gigondas  areas  of  the   southern  Rhone),  and  from   Chateau   Pontet-­‐Canet   in   Pauillac.  But   are   they  really  better   than   their  non  bio-­‐dynamic  neighbours?  Personally,   I   think  it’s  too  early   to   tell,  but   I  also  think  the   question   is   irrelevant.  White   guys  can   play  the   blues,  and   black  guys  can  be   presidents:  if   it  works,  that’s   all  ye  need  to  know.  These  are  winemakers  who  are  taking   care  of   their  small  portion  of  our  earth.   Let’s  lose  the  voodoo  and  cut  to  the  chase.  Two  bottles  of  wine  of   which  you  must   buy  just  one  to  share  with  your   family  and   friends.   One   from  a  vineyard  where  they  buried   the  horn  of  a  cow  stuffed   with   ground   quartz   then   harvested   by   hand   by   moonlight;   the   other  from  a  vineyard   just   across  from  the   latest   version   of   Three   Mile  bloody  Island.  Your  choice.

John Sherwin, French Wine Tours. Tel: 02 51 66 13 05 Email: johnsherwin@orange.fr ~ www.french-wine-tours.com

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Motoring... King Cobra

by Helen  Tait-­‐Wright

Whilst chatting  to   a  reader   the  other   week,  he  asked  why   I  hadn’t   featured  any  American   cars  in   this  column.     The   answer   is  simple,   they  are   not   really  my   thing   but   I   hope  that   this   particular   beast,   while  not  strictly  all  American,  will  satisfy  the  craving!! The   AC   Cobra,   is   famously   associated   with   Carroll   Shelby,   the   American   automotive   designer,  racing  driver   and   entrepreneur   but   AC   Cars   Ltd.,   the   builders   of   the   Cobra,   is   a   British   specialist   automobile  manufacturer  (formerly  known  as  Auto  Carriers  Ltd.)  and   one  of  the  oldest  independent  car  makers  founded  in  Britain. The   Weller   brothers   of   London   built   their   first   car   in   1903,   and   started  using  the  “AC”  logo  in  1911.  The  company  produced  a  variety   of  products  over  its  history,  including  engines,  railway  carriages,  golf   carts  and   invalid   carriages,  but   throughout,  it   was  their   racing  cars   which  grabbed  the  headlines. In  1962,  AC  was  approached   by  Carroll  Shelby.    He  needed  a  car  that   could   compete  with   the   Chevrolet  Corvette  in  US   sports  car   racing.     The  resulting   “289”  Cobra   with  a  small   block  Ford  V8  engine  in   the   AC   chassis   with   aluminium   bodywork   was   not   only   achingly   gorgeous,  but  a  very  powerful  roadster,  and  contributed  towards  the   introduction   of  the   70  mph  (110  km/h)  limit  on  British   motorways.   An  AC  Cobra  Coupe  was  calculated  to   have   done  186   mph  (299   km/ h)   on   the  M1   motorway   in   1964,   driven   by  Jack  Sears   and   Peter   Bolton   during   shakedown   tests   prior   to   that   year's   Le   Mans   24h   Race. However,  at   the  end  of  the  1964  racing  season,  the  Cobra  was  being   outclassed  in  sports  car  racing  by  Ferrari.     So,  in  collaboration  with   Shelby,  AC  completely  re-­‐designed  the  chassis  and  fitted   a  monster   engine   to  the   MkIII  or  “427”  Cobra.     The  Shelby  Cobra  427  is  one  of   the  rarest  and  most  powerful  road  cars  ever  manufactured. It  was  produced  in  two  versions:  a  street  model  with  a  tamer  motor,   optional   dual   carburettors,  a  glove  box,   and   exhaust   running  under   the  car,  and  a  competition  version  with  a  stripped  interior,  no  glove   box,   different   instrument   layout   and   revised   suspension.     Unfortunately,   the   competition   car   missed   homologation   for   the   1965  season  and  was  not   raced  by  the  Shelby  team.  However,  it  was   raced   successfully  by   many  privateers  and  went   on  to  win   races   all   the  way  into  the  1970s. Sadly  the  AC   Cobra  was   a   commercial   failure   when   in  production,   which  led  Ford  and  Carroll  Shelby  to  discontinue  importing  cars  from   England  in   1967.    Despite  this  the  AC  427  Cobra  has  now  become   one  of  the  most  sought-­‐after  and  replicated  automobiles  ever. From  the  late  1980s   onwards,  Carroll   Shelby  (Shelby  Automobiles,   Inc.)   and  associated   companies  have   built   what   are   known  in   the   trade  as  "Continuation  Cars";  Shelby  authorized  continuations  of   the   original  AC-­‐built  Cobra  series. There  are  also   many  replicas  on  the  market,  allowing  you   to  indulge   in  the  legend  that  is  this  wonderfully  sexy  car,  for  as  little  as  £14,000.   Of  course  for   the  purists,  the  real  deal  will  set  you  back  slightly  more   -­‐   anything   from   £100,000   to   a   cool   million   depending   on   the   provenance  ......   I  think  I  could  live  with  a  replica,  couldn’t  you? Contact  Helen  at:  helen@stodel.org.

Photo: www.mrwallpaper.com

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Do You Know What to do in the Event of a Car Accident? Here  are  a  few  handy  hints  for  you! Once   you   have   established   what   has   happened   and   of   course   assuming  that  you   are  not  injured,  one  of  the  very  first  things  you   should  do  is  call  the  'ASSISTANCE'. If   you   are  a   Gan  customer   the   number   can   be   found   on   your   assistance  card,  on  the  back  of  the   green   card   displayed   in   your   windscreen,  or  on  the  sticker   in   your   rear   windscreen.    So   no  matter   how  flustered   you  may  be,  you  should  find  it  easily.   Our   assistance   service   does   have   English   speakers   too   if   required,  helping   to  make  the   process  a  little  easier.    The  assistance  service  will   organise   your   vehicle   to   be   towed   to   the   nearest   garage   and  will  arrange  for  you  to  be  taken  home  or   for  you  to   have  a  replacement   vehicle  (depending  on   the  terms  of  your  contract).   Please  do   not   take   the   initiative  to   call   a   garage   yourself,  even   your  local  friendly  garage.     This  is  because  it  affects  the  validity  of   your   assistance  contract.    You  could  however  request  that   your   local   garage  be  called  by  the  assistance  service  if  you   know  their   name  and   address  as  most   assistance   services  will   try  to   comply   in  this  way  if  possible.   Once  the  vehicle  has  been  taken  care  of  you  will  have  time  then   to  complete  the  'constat   amiable'.     This  is  the  blue  form  that  you   should   have   in   your   glove   box   at   all   times.     Remember   it   is   important  to   stay  calm  no  matter   what  the   circumstances  of  the   accident.    If   you  are  at  all  unsure  of   how  to   complete  the  ‘constat   amiable’  then  speak  to  your  insurer.    Here  at  Gan  we  will  help  you   to  complete  it  correctly  if  in  any  doubt!   Following  an  accident  you  have  5  days  to  submit  your  claim   so  it   is  important   that  if  you   don't   complete  the  'constat   amiable'   at   the  scene  you   take  the  contact   &  insurance  details  of   the  third   party  so  that   you  can  contact  them  later  to  complete  and  sign  it   together.   In  case  of  a  serious   accident  you  must   call  the  pompiers  and  the   gendarmes.    In  case  of  emergency  you  can  call  112  or  15   Safe  motoring!

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

French Adventures...

Rock On!!

fence seeming  to   peer  in  to  watch  our   TV.     We  are  well  supported  to   live  our  dream  by  the  internet  with   email/Skype  access  to   family  and   grandkids  in-­‐between  visits  and  free  calls  to  UK  landlines.

So here   we  are   in   Deux-­‐Sevrés.     In   October   2012   we   left   behind   our  cosy  old   Yorkshire  terrace   in  Bradford  along  with  our  tired   and   dreary   alter   egos.     Like   countless  generations  before,  we  took   a  huge   punt,  upped   sticks  and   in   true   Yorkshire  spirit  I  said  to   the  wife  ‘Ey  up   our  lass  –  we’re  off’!    My  wife  Maggie   grabbed   the  chance   of   early  retirement   from  her  Senior  Manager  role  in  the  NHS,  quickly  trained  to  be   an   English   Teacher   (for   speakers  of   other  languages)  and  I   retired   from  my  role  as  Driver/Carer  in  the  NHS  (not  without  some  sadness   as   I   adored   my   job),   where   I   worked   with   amazing   adults   with   severe  learning  disabilities.

So what  have  I  been  doing  since  moving  to  Deux-­‐Sèvres?  (apart  from   golf,  walking,  fishing,  gardening,  art  class  and   learning  the   lingo….).     Firstly   I   have   established   my   auto   entrepreneur   business   as   a   professional   DJ.     In   my  previous  life   I  started   running   a   disco  and   karaoke  service  in  2007  as  a  pastime.    I  have  a  life-­‐long  love  of  music   and   initially  did   occasional  weddings,  birthday  parties  and  so  on.     In   2009  I  started  a  regular   monthly  gig  at  our  local  pub  which  grew  in   popularity   and   we   were   guaranteed   a   packed   house   on   DJ   Jeff     nights.  

We had   travelled   on   holiday  to   France   for   many   years   and   did   agonise   over  the  decision,  but  a  dream  is  a  dream  and   we  needed   to   live   it.       So,  we   packed   up   all   our   bits   and   bobs,  including   a   wagon  load  of  disco  and  karaoke  gear,  (more  about  that  later)  had   a  few  parties  to  see  us  off,  hugged  the  six  grand-­‐kids  to  bits,  (there   are  now  seven)  put  the   house  up  for  sale  and  hopped   on  the  ferry   (as   you  do).     We  have  initially  taken   a   long  term  let  as  a  change  to   the  original   buy-­‐a-­‐barn-­‐and-­‐convert-­‐it   plan  to   give  ourselves  time   to  settle  and  test  l’eau.      

I do  theme  events  like  Burns  Night  and  Hogmanay  as  well   as  hosting   quizzes  and   money  raising   events.     I  have  over   17  million   digitally   sourced   tracks  to  choose  from  and  in  excess  of  17,000  karaoke  songs   (French  and  English)  for  those  who  wish  to  sing.

For us  there  is  no  need  to  ask  why  we  have  moved  to  France.      Here   in  Le  Retail  we  enjoy  rural   life  with  beautiful  panoramic  views  from   a  house  that   radiates   beauty  with   a   lovely  hint  of  French  shabby   chic.         We  have  a  super  garden  with  tree  house,  chickens  to  amuse   us,  a  huge  old  barn  for  pottering   and  adorable  French  neighbours   who  communicate  in  English  at  our  level  of  French  -­‐    un   petit  peu.     We  are  warm  in  the   winter  heated  not  by  expensive  gas  or  electric   but  by  cheery  logs  burning  in  the  super-­‐efficient  wood  burner.      We   toddle  down  to  the  local  town   about  3  km  away  or  further  afield  to   the  bigger   markets  once  or   twice  a  week  and   buy  best  quality  fruit   and   vegetables.     We   shop   in   well   stocked   and   fairly   priced   supermarkets   where   staff   serve   us   with   genuine   courtesy.   “bonjour”,   “comment   ça   va?”,   “Bon   journée”,   “a   bientôt”….and   wait   politely  while   the   people  in  front   of  us  always  seem  to  take   ages   having  a  good  blether  at  the  checkout.        No  one  seems  to  be   in   any  rush.      There  is  no  litter   on  the   streets   (or   people  either  -­‐   depending  on  time  of  day  or  day  of  the  week). The  regional  walking  group,  local  theatre  and  art  groups,  horse  riding   school   (the   wife   not   me)  have  all   welcomed  us  kindly   and   invites   trickle  in   to  various  Anglo-­‐French  events,  from  ‘bring  and  buy’  sales,   art   exhibitions,   ‘pub’   style   quizzes,   to   the   village   VE   day   commemoration  parade  and  lunch.    The  best  of  all  of  this  of  course  is   that  we  have  the  freedom  to  go  to  them  all!    Our  new  French  friends   are   bemused   (and   amused)  by  our   clumsy  French   language  but  love  our   zest  for   life  and  appreciation   of  theirs  -­‐  c’est  la  vie!

Since those   early   experiences   I  have   worked   a   lot   of   interesting   venues  in  places  as  far  afield  as  Georgia  (Eastern  Europe),  Scotland  as   well  as  West  Yorkshire.    I  enjoy   providing  the   right  atmosphere  for   any  occasion;  be  it,  pop,  rock,  jazz,  modern,  Rock  n  Roll,  1950’s,  60’s,   70’s,  80’s,  90’s,  00’s.  

I have  found  Karaoke  has  become  even  more  popular  on  the  back  of   the  ‘X  Factor’,  ‘Britain’s  Got  Talent’  and  ‘The  Voice’.    It  is  amazing  how   many  wonderful  voices  there  are   in   the  community,  often   shy  and   quiet   folk  who   would  not   stand  out  from  the  crowd   -­‐   give   them   a   mike   and   hey!!     I  have  met   many  ‘Adeles’,   ‘Frank   Sinatras’,  ‘Mick   Jaggers’  and  ‘Amy  Winehouses’  in  the  villages  around  here. Despite  being  a   relative  newcomer   to  the  region   and  thanks  to   the   advert   in   this   magazine   I  now   have   bookings   for   weddings,  large   camping  sites,  and  a  restaurant.     I   am  starting   a   monthly  Games   night  at  the  Café   des  Belle  Fleurs  in  Fenioux  on  the  fourth  Friday  of   the   month   (starts   Friday   28th   June)   and   I   am   also   doing   some   themed  discos  starting  with  a  Tamla  Motown/Soul  night   on  the  18th   August,  so  if  you  fancy  a  groove  get  yourself  down  there. I   am   honoured   to   have   been   asked   to   provide   music   for   a   ‘Bal   Populaire’  on   14th  July  in  the  fantastic  Logis  de  la  Forêt  in   Le  Retail.   (Tickets   from:   mairieleretail@wanadoo.fr   and   includes  a  meal   and   fireworks,  of  course).   So  the  French  Adventure  is  going  well.    The  French  people  and  new   British  friends  have  made   us  feel   so  very  welcome  and  if  you  read   this  thinking  ‘I  wish  I  could   do  that’,  just   go  for  it.    Life  is  too  short  to   wonder.    Rock  on!   (I   am   sure   that  is  what   Shakespeare   really   meant   when   he   wrote   in   1602  ‘if  music  be  the  food  of  love,  play  on!).

Contact Jeff  by  email:  DJJeff@gmail.com  (or  please  see  advert  on  P.9) Siren  Number:  789  511  854

We slumber   peacefully  having  left  behind   the  noise   and   busyness  of  West   Yorkshire,  the  stress  and  huge   constraints  on  our  time  of  work,  the  cultural  changes   that  have  left   my  native  Bradford  unrecognisable,  the   dreaded   M62   with  daily  pile-­‐ups   and   traffic  jams  to   test   the   patience   of   normally   calm   Yorkshire   folk   (ahem).   Our   ‘noisy’   neighbours   now   are   a   herd   of   beautiful   cows  and  in   the  evening  they   stand  at   the   Page 32


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Communications...

by Ross  Hendry

Selecting and Buying a New PC

shelf" PCs  that   will   do   most   of  what  you   need,  they  may  benefit   from  the  addition  of  some  RAM  or  an  upgraded  Graphics  card.

In this   final   article  on   selecting  and   buying   a   new   system,  I  am   looking  at  the  more  powerful  end  of  the  PC  market.    The  type  of  PC   you   would   need   if   you   wish   to   use   it   for   resource-­‐hungry   applications  such  as  high   quality  Photo  or   Video   editing,  or   are   a   gaming  enthusiast.

Here are   some   examples   of   what   I   would   consider   entry   level   Power  User  Desktop  PCs  :-­‐ • Zoostorm  Desktop  PC  with  AMD  A8  5500  3.2GHz  APU  quad  core   processor,  8GB   RAM  and   2TB   hard   disk  drive,  DVD-­‐RW   multi-­‐ write  Drive  and   has  on-­‐board   AMD  Radeon  HD7560D   Graphics   and  no  operating  system.  Cost  inc  VAT  £269.99,  Incredible  value!   • Zoostorm   Desktop   PC   with   Intel   Core   i5   3330  3GHz  quad   core   processor,  8GB   RAM  and   2TB   hard   disk  drive,  DVD-­‐RW   multi-­‐ write  Drive  and  has   on-­‐board  graphics  and  no  operating  system.   Cost   inc   VAT   £329.99;  with   Microsoft   Windows   8,  64bit   home   premium  only  £396.99. • Zoostorm   Desktop  PC  with  Intel  Core  i7-­‐3770  3.4GHz  quad  core   processor,  16GB  RAM  and  2TB   hard  disk  drive,  DVD  Multi-­‐Write   drive,  has  on-­‐board   graphics   and  no  operating  system.   Cost  inc   VAT  £479.99,  this  one  is  available   from  Amazon  with  Windows  8   plus  a  keyboard  and  mouse  for  £587.99.

Part 4  -­‐  Power  User  Systems

Whether it   is   manipulating   the   vast   amounts   of   data   required  to   edit  high  quality  photographs  or   videos,  or  playing   the  latest  high   definition   games,  the  secret   of   success   is   processing   power   and   loads  of  memory. Modern  PCs  have  more  than  one  processor,  in  fact  most  entry  level   PCs   have   two   cores   (processing   modules).   The   main   processor   manufacturers,   namely  AMD   and   Intel,   both   produce   processors   with  2,3,4,  6  and  8  cores.    The  more  cores  the  processor   has,  the   more  expensive  the  motherboard  will  tend   to  be,  as  they  have  to   have   the   capability   of   delivering  the  data  to  be  processed   to   the   processor/s  as  fast  as  possible  for   them  to  work  at  their  maximum   rated  speed. It   is   also   likely   that   these   more   expensive   motherboards   will   support  more  RAM.  24GB  and  32GB  are  the  likely  maximum  values   here,  there  are  generally  2,  4   or   6  slots  available  for  RAM  and  the   largest  individual  RAM  chip  I  have  seen  is  8GB. AMD's  Phenom  II  range  are  the  affordable  ones,  running  x4  and  x6.   At  the  other   end  of  the  spectrum  are  Intel's  i7  range  of  processors   that  max  out  at  6  core  processors. The   final   element   in   a  Power   PC  is  the  Graphics  or  Video  Display   Card.    If  you  have  selected  the  best   CPU  you  can  afford  and  got  as   much   memory   as   the   CPU   and   Motherboard   can   support,   and   unless  you  are  into  high  quality  3D  computer  aided  design,  you  do   not  have  to  go   mad   spending   on   the  Graphics  Card.  A  reasonable   quality  one  will  suffice,  it  is  best   to  be  guided  on  this  aspect  by  the   application/s   you   intend   to   run,   if   you   have   not   purchased   the   software  yet,  just  check  it  out  on  the  manufacturer's  website. So   here   are  the  important   components  and  what  you   should  aim   for   -­‐   the   CPU   quad   core   or   better,   the   RAM  8GB   or   more,   the   Motherboard  able  to  support   the  quad  core  CPU  and  at  least   8GB   preferably  16GB   of  RAM,  the  Graphics  Card   recommended  by  the   software  author/manufacturer.     With  this  in  mind  you   can  see  why   gamers  tend  to   configure  and   build  their  own   PCs,  although  this  is   not  strictly  necessary  as  there  are  some  reasonably  priced  "off-­‐the-­‐

On the   more   powerful   laptop   front,   here   are   a   couple   of   competitive  models:-­‐ • Samsung  -­‐  AMD  Quad  Core  A8-­‐4500M  1.9GHz,  6GB   RAM  and   a   500GB  hard  disk  drive,  -­‐   15.6"   High  Definition  Screen  with  AMD   HD7640G   Graphics,   Webcam   +   Bluetooth   and   Microsoft   Windows  8,  64  bit.    Cost  £400.00. • In   the   same   range   the   Lenovo   IdeaPad   Z585   Laptop,  with   an   AMD  A8  4500M  Quad   Core   processor,  8GB  RAM  and  a  1TB  hard   disk  drive,  15.6"  TFT  screen,  AMD  Radeon   7640G  graphics,  with   HD   Webcam   +   Bluetooth   and   running   MS   Windows   8,   64bit.   Cost  £427.11. • True  Quad  Core  Intel  CPU  -­‐  The  Lenovo   IdeaPad  Z580  Laptop  has   an   Intel   Quad  Core  i7-­‐3520  2.9GHz  processor  with  8GB  RAM  and   a  1TB   hard  disk  drive  with  a  15.6"  TFT  screen,  HD  Webcam  and   Windows  8,  64bit.    Cost  £612.50. Clearly  there  are   far   more  expensive   high  powered  PCs  available   "off-­‐the   -­‐shelf",  I  have  merely  skimmed  the  web  for   systems   that   are  relevant   to  this  article.    One  site  I  visited  when  researching  had   gaming   PCs   for   over   £4,000.00   and   Gaming   laptops   costing   considerably  more. My  best  advice  is  to  get  some  professional  help  if   you  are  planning   on  spending  anything  over  £500.00  and  also  if  you  think  you   would   rather  have  a  laptop,  because  these  are  going  to  be  by  far  the  most   expensive  way  to  purchase  a  Power  PC. I  do  hope  that  you  have  found  this  article  of  some  help,  please  let   me  know  via  email  if  I  can  help  further.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Contact ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny. Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21   or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or see our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

Useful English Language Numbers...

Cancer Support Deux-Sèvres:

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French State health insurance advice line:

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Elizabeth Finn Care (Grants and advice if in Financial need):

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Orange Helpline:

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Association La Porte Ouverte (Open Door):

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Passport Advice:

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Building & Renovation... History, Geography and Half Price Tiles!

by Rik  and  Sue  Newell

Annie Sloan   created   her   Chalk   Paint   ™   in   1990,   inspired  by  traditional   recipes  such   as   casein   and   gesso.       Ideal   for   painting   furniture,  woodwork,  walls   and   floors,  both   internally   and   externally,   allowing   walls   to   breathe,  it  is  ideal  for  older  houses. “It’s  my   unique  recipe  that  makes  it   special”   says  Annie,  “I  called   it   Chalk  Paint™  because   of  its  soft,  absorbent,  matt   finish”.    So  a  paint   based   on   recipes   from  the   middle  ages   has   now   come   into   the   21st   century,   with   a   fabulous   new   Facebook   page;   Share   ideas,   and   inspiration   or   just   to   ask   Annie   a   question,  at  www.facebook.com/chalkpaint. For   us   too,   exciting   times,   as   part   of   our   “guest   cottage”   has   now   been   transformed   into   our   new   shop.     After   having  the  entire   roof  rebuilt  came  the  exciting   stuff  –  painting!      Huge   supporting  timbers   with  fabulous  dry-­‐ brushed   effect,     co-­‐ordinating   blues   for   one   wall,  a   window   with   a  bold   oriental   colour   scheme,  shabby  chic  effects  on  panelling  and  doors  ,  and  finally  the  tiled   floor;  and  mostly  at   half  price! For  walls  and  concrete  floors  we  mix  with  equal   quantities  of  water.    The  paint  remains  thick  enough   to  cover   in  one  coat,  and   is  easier  to   apply,  whist  doubling  the  approximate  coverage  from  13  square  meters  to  26!    Now  there’s  value  for  money!   So,  Geography  -­‐  Our  new  shop  is  based  in  Le  Bois  de  Messé,  79120.    We  also  have  paint  available  at  La  Deuxieme  Vie,  an  exciting  little  shop   run  alongside   her  estate  agency,  by  Linda  Philips  in  L’Absie,   79240.    Linda  carries  limited  stock,  although  you  can  pre-­‐order   any  colour   for   collection.    For  details  of  all  opening  hours  please  see  our  website:  www.ladeuxiemechance.com  or  call  us.   Do   come  and   see  us  soon  and  be  amazed  by  this  unique  paint,  or   ask  about  our   paint  techniques  workshops,  as  taught  by  Annie   herself.   Painting  has  never  been  so  easy.

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Contact ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’  La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny.  Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21  or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Business, Finance & Property... More Exchange of Information Ahead

by Bradley  Warden,  Partner,  Blevins  Franks

It looks like more and more automatic exchange of information agreements will be signed over in the coming years. is means that a wide range of financial information will be shared between countries helping tax authorities prevent and track down tax evasion. France, along with its fellow G5 countries the UK, Germany, Spain and Italy, will develop and pilot a new multilateral automatic tax information exchange agreement. ey see this as an important, early step in a much wider move towards a new international standard which would remove the hiding places for those evading taxes. is push for automatic exchange of information started with the US’ Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA). Foreign financial institutions have to enter into agreements to automatically report on US clients.

transparency. Prime Minister David Cameron is urging them all to sign new agreements to exchange financial information. Luxembourg is preparing to ease banking secrecy, and the EU will negotiate an updated Savings Tax Directive tax accord with Switzerland. e Swiss Private Bankers Association has urged the government to opt for an automatic information exchange regime instead of its current approach, in particular with the EU. ese agreements will have implications beyond tax compliance. Governments will be able to track the wealth of its residents, and where it is held. Basically, it is the end of financial confidentiality in Europe and the US, and is expected to expand to other areas. For advice on compliant, tax efficient ways of holding your assets, and the best locations for your money, speak to an experienced wealth manager like Blevins Franks which has decades of experience advising British expatriates on their tax planning. To keep in touch with the latest developments in the offshore

world, check out the latest news on our website www.blevinsfranks.com

It was only a matter of time before other countries followed suit. e Isle of Man, Jersey and Guernsey have agreed to report client information to the UK authorities along similar lines, and the UK’s overseas territories will sign up to the G5 strategy on tax

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Ask Amanda.

Money Talk...

After reading  an   article  in   a  mainstream  UK   newspaper  recently,  a  customer  asked  me;  

Following on   from   last   month   here   are   some   more   ways   of   transferring  monies  with  Currencies  Direct:

“I understand that when I come to retire I can take my UK private pensions & purchase an annuity. I saw recently how someone had done this and taken an option which gave maximum income now, but provided no benefit to the spouse in the event of death. Their partner had died & now their widow received nothing. Is there a way to use my private UK pensions more effectively as the money forms part of our long term French plans?” Helping people  to   get   the  best  out  of   their   private   pensions  is   an   area  where  I  spend   a  lot   of  time.  It  is  possible  to  provide  UK  expats   with  certain  flexibilities  not  enjoyed  by  UK  residents  when  it  comes   to   private  pensions.  Since  2006,   expats  have   been  able   to   move   private  &  company   pensions   into   QROPS   (Qualifying   Recognised   Overseas  Pension  Schemes). QROPS  can  be  a  way  to  enhance  pension  flexibility  through: • Reduced  taxation  in  the  event  of  your  death. • Increased  investment   choices  which   are   in   line  with  your   own   attitudes  to  risk. • The   ability   to   change   your   investments   should   your   circumstances  change. • Protection  against  currency  risks. • The   ability   to   pass   benefits,  in   the   event   of   your   death,   onto   whomever  you  wish;  however  you  wish. QROPS   are   not   suitable   for   everyone  and   it   is   important   to   get   professional  advice  from  a  company  located  and  regulated  to  offer   financial   guidance  in   the   country  where  you  live  before  you  make   any  decisions. The   Spectrum-­‐IFA   Group   charges   no   fee   for   consultations.   This   allows   you   to   explore   whether   a  QROPS  is  right   for   you   without   incurring   up-­‐front   costs;   we  get   paid   by   the   companies  we  deal   with.  Please  ask  for  a  copy  of  our  customer  charter   which  explains   how  we  work. If  you  have  any  questions  that   you  feel  I  may  be  able  to  help  you   with,  please  “Ask  Amanda”   or  use   the   contacts   below  and   I  will   call   you   to   discuss   your   questions   and   arrange   the   most   appropriate  answer.  

Amanda Johnson,  The  Spectrum  IFA  Group.  Tel:  05  49  98  97  46 Email:  amanda.johnson@spectrum-­‐ifa.com or “Ask Amanda” at finance@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

by Sue Cook

Limit orders Limit   orders   are  a  great   way   of   achieving  the  rate   you   want   and   ensuring  you   don’t   miss   the  exchange  rate  when  the  markets  are   moving.  If  the  exchange  rate  is   close  to  where  you  want  it,  you  can   target  your   desired  rate  with  your   dealer  using  a  limit  order  which   monitors  the  rate  24/7.  As  soon  as  the  rate  reaches   an  achievable   level   for   us  to   buy  your   currency,  then   your   limit   will   trigger   the   purchase  of  your  currency.  These  deals  are  good  until  cancelled,  so  if   the  rate  doesn’t   reach  the  level  you  want  it   to   in  the   time  frame   available,  then  you  can  cancel  the  contract  at  no  extra  cost. Contract  Type

Spot

Min. amount

No min.

£10,000 £10,000

n/a

12 mths 12  mths

Max. length  of   contract

Forward Time Regular   Op4on   Transfer £150

Limit

£20,000

Good unol   Good  unol   cancelled cancelled

No deposit

10%

10%

No deposit

No deposit

Transfer dates

n/a

n/a

n/a

1st,10th, 15th, 20th,   25th

n/a

Transfer fees

No fee

No fee

No fee

No fee

No fee

Deposit*

*Depending on  the  size  of  the  transfer  and  the  length  of  the  contract,  deposits  can  be   nego6ated

Rate watch This  is   a   service  that   our  dealing  team  provide  for  registered  clients   looking  to  move  their  money  overseas.  If  you  wish  to  be  informed  of   movement   in   the  market   to  allow   you   to   make  the  most  of  your   money  when  you  transfer  it,  then  your  dealer  can  call  you  to  tell  you   which  way  the  market  is  moving  to  help  give  you  all  the  information   you  need  to  make  a  decision  on  when  to  transfer  your  money. iPayFX Our   new  online   international   payments   system   designed   to   make   online  international   payments  easy.  You   can   store  your  beneficiary   details   on   the   system,   make   regular   payments,   add   new   beneficiaries  or  edit  existing  ones  whenever  required.  iPayFX  has  live   market  rates  which  constantly  change  with  the  fluctuating  market   so   you  benefit  from  the  most  current  market  position.  Once  you  agree   the  rate,  it  is  locked  in  and  you  know  exactly  what  price  you  will  pay   for   your   currency.   You   can   review   a   statement   of   all   your   transactions  in  the  system  providing  you   with  a  record   of  all  online   payment  platform  payments. I  hope  this  information   has  been  helpful   please  do  not  hesitate  to   contact  me  if  you  have  any  questions.  

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Small Colour advert only 34€

Please mention ʻThe DSMʼ when responding to an advert

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

How Many Different Styles of French Houses do You Know?

by Trevor  Leggett,  Chief  Executive

Here at  Leggett   Immobilier  we  get   to  see  all   kinds  of  property  from   renovation  jobs  to  fully  blown  chateaux.    Of  course,  being  France  you   will  find  that  different  regions  use  different  names  and  terminology  for   house   styles   but   we   thought   that   readers   of   ‘The   Deux-­‐Sèvres   Monthly’  might   find   it   interesting  if   we  described   ten   of   the   more   common  ones  that  we  come  across  every  day. 1.     France  is  renowned   for   the   beauty  and   history  of   it’s   castles  -­‐   indeed   our   Leggett   Prestige   team   is   currently  marketing   some   real   beauties.     A  Chateau  is  actually  a  manor  house  where   the  Lord  lived   with  his  family  and  servants  but  most  people,  including  myself,  tend  to   say   chateau   when   describing   a   castle   (which,   strictly   speaking,   is   actually  a  Chateau  Fort).     2.     Maisons  a   Colombage  are  most   distinctive  and  can   be  found   in   northern  France.     They  are  half  timbered  houses   where  the  wooden   framework  is  prominent.    Techniques  used  date  back  to  the  stone-­‐age   but   half   timber   houses   became   popular   in   medieval   times   when   timber  was  in  good  supply  (the  wood  is  often  called  colombage,  hence   the  name).     3.     Right  at  the  other  end  of   France  you   will   come  across  the  Mas,   particularly  if  you  are  in  or   around  Provence.     It’s  a  generic  term  for   a   traditional,  stone,   country  property  that   used   to   be   smaller   than   a   farm  but  which   allowed  the  owners  to  be  self  sufficient.    They  nearly   always  face  south  to  protect  occupants  from   the  the  mistral   and  are   generally  full  of  character.     4.     One  of  our  most  popular  requests  is  for  a  country  estate  or  what   the   French   call   a   Domaine.     This   is   usually   used   to   describe   a   prestigious  country  house  (or  indeed   houses)  with  extensive  grounds   that  are   used  for   a  specific   purpose  such  as  hunting,  fishing,   golf  or   wine  production.     5.     The   Maison   de   Maitre   is   popular   within   the  Deux-­‐Sèvres  and   literally  means  “masters  house”.     The  properties  are  uniform  and  well   balanced   with   high   ceilings   and   they   tend   to   dominate   the   surrounding  houses.     6.     We  have   all   come  across   a   French   Longère   which  is  one  of   our   personal   favourites   as   they   tend   to   be   full   of   nooks,   crannies   and   character.     They  are  long,  rectangular   houses,  built   on  one  level   and   usually  have   their   back  to   the  prevailing   winds.     You   can   find   them   throughout   France,   but   are   particularly   popular   in   Normandy   and   Brittany.     7.     There   is   a   huge   demand   for   farms   (or   Fermes)   at   present   as   farmland  is  seen  as   an  ideal   investment.     Farms   tend   to  be   smaller   than  in  England  but  you’ll  usually  come  across  plenty  of  outbuildings   to  renovate.   8.  The  next  category  is   a  bit   of   a  cheat  as  it’s  the  contemporary  villa.     Of   course   many   of   these   have   been   built   in   a   bespoke   style   by   individual  architects  but  they  are  such  a  feature  in  the  south  of  France   that  we  had  to  include  them.     9.  In  a  similar  vein  is  the  Ski   chalet  which  can  come  in  many  shapes   and  sizes.    It’s  one  of  the  most  popular  search  terms  on   our  website   though  so  we  had  to  include  it. 10.   Finally   we’d   suggest   looking   across   the   border   at   a   typically   Charentaise   style  house.     They   are  big,  stone,   properties,   typically   rectangular  with  uniform  features  and  a  central  doorway  that  leads  to   a  hallway  with  big,  identically  sized,  rooms  either  side.  

End

These are  our  “top  10”  of  the  traditional  architectural  styles  available   in  France  and  we  don’t  have  room  to  include  a  mill,  a  bastide  house  or   an  equestrian  property  -­‐   we  do   hope  that  it  has  been  enjoyable  and   informative  though! Leggett  Immobilier  is  one  of  the  leading  estate  agents  in  France.   You  can  access  all  their  local  property  listings  and  articles  at www.frenchestateagents.com/poitou-­‐charentes-­‐property.

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theme park

Futuroscope is one of the best-loved leisure parks in France and the only one of its kind in Europe. It is the ideal place to relax in, with 60 hectares of tranquil green countryside and 25 original experiences you won’t find anywhere else: films in giant format, thrill-filled attractions, 3D rides with 4D effects, games, live shows, open-air activities, and more… The spectacular theatres inside Futuroscope are gigantic sculptures and their futuristic lines blend in smoothly with the surrounding landscape. Discovery and thrills guaranteed for everyone, young and old!

BERGERAC

Easy access!

-3 €

per person

The voucher is valid for adult, senior citizen (aged 60 and over) and child (aged 5 to 16) for 1 day dated-entry tickets and must be handed in at the Futuroscope ticket booths between the 16th february 2013 and the 5th January 2014* (1 to 5 visitors per voucher). Discount does not apply to packages, group tickets, and undated entry tickets (visa/ season). Offer may not be combined with other offers and backdated. *Please check opening dates on futuroscope.com

By road, by train and plane

futuroscope • com Futuroscope_Creation/Fotolia/Studio Ludo/S LAVAL/Robothespian-© Engineered Arts Limited 2012 - D LAMING, Architecte - Chorégraphies : Mourad Merzouki - CCN Créteil et du Val-de-Marne/Compagnie Käfig. Société du Parc du Futuroscope, capital de 6 504 455€, siège social : BP 2000 - 86130 Jaunay-Clan, RCS de Poitiers B 444 030 902.

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DSM-July13online  

English language magazine for the French department of Deux-Sèvres