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The DoG Street Journal November 2012 Photo by Lauren Su

2012 COLOR RUN »

LAUREN SU, DSJ PHOTO EDITOR

www.dogstreetjournal.com


The DoG Street Journal ( w h o weare)

E D I T O R I A L STAFF Editors in Chief sRyan Buckland sMax Cunningham Managing Editor sAlthea Lyness News Editor sJessica Edington

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november 2012>>>www.dogstreetjournal.com>>>volume 10 issue 2

Style Editor sChristine Shen Sports Editor sJeffrey Knox Opinions Editor sSean Sweeney

Photo by Lauren Su

( wh a t ’s inside) In every issue...................................

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>Editorial: On Being Enlightened

Photo Editor sLauren Su Layout Assistants sEmily Nalker

News ..........................................

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>A Dash of Color

OUR MISSION The DSJ is a monthy student magazine and online multi-media outlet which strives to provide an entertaining, thought-provoking and interactive resource for the William and Mary community.

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Style........................................... >Tales of the Zen Rainbow

COVER IMAGE His Holiness the Dalai Lama speaking at William and Mary Back Page: William and Mary’s first Color Run Photos by Lauren Su

Opinions.......................................

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>The Trouble with Online Courses

(tal k tous) The DoG Street Journal The College of William & Mary Campus Center Basement Office 12B Williamsburg, Virginia 23185 757.221.7851 dogstreetjournal@wm.edu

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Sports .......................................... >W&M Rivalries

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(editorial) Enlightenment comes to Williamsburg I couldn’t define what I expected before His Holiness the 14th Dalia Lama walked onstage at Kaplan Arena in October, and even with hindsight bias in my favor I still can’t. For instance, I didn’t expect his head to literally shine like the sun, but I expected at least a strong, subconscious light to emanate from his soul; if he didn’t literally float above the ground, at least his gait would be more graceful than my woefully undergraduate mind could imagine. In seriousness, I wanted to feel his presence. I wanted him to reaffirm my belief that life is more than material. I don’t know what I was expecting of His Holiness the 14th Dalia Lama, but the man who hobbled onstage to cheers that recalled a baseball game at the old Yankee Stadium, a W&M visor unceremoniously pulled down to his oversize glasses, was not it. He ate up the cheers like he was used to it. The visor stayed firmly on his head for the entirety of his time on stage. To say that I was initially disappointed on a spiritual level by this in combination with his opening statement, that on a “fundamental level” we’re all the same, sounds childish and naïve. But so I was, and growingly confused by His Holiness, now laughing hysterically at his own joke about green eye shadow. It can be argued that the Dalia Lama is the most globally important figure to come on campus in the modern William and Mary era. His personal history speaks for itself, let alone the legend of enlightenment that surrounds his name. Yet I found myself silently disagreeing with even his most basic arguments, that all people are driven by the same thing and that fundamentally we’re all alike. In the heat of the moment, I was actually a bit angry at how adoring the crowd seemed to be of this seemingly ordinary person. My roommate and I got home around the same time that day, and I immediately mouthed off my opinion, that the Dalia Lama was just this guy. Then my roommate said something truly enlightening: “That was the point.” As an undergrad, it’s easy to think of the world at large as distant, something we’ll one day attain if we work hard enough. Viewed through that lens, someone like His Holiness the 14th Dalia Lama, the leader of a major world religion, defiant for decades in the face of exile and persecution, transforms the concept of “larger-than-life” from a dull platitude to reality. But as His Holiness more or less said himself, this is truly backwards. On a fundamental level, the Dalia Lama is a person, nothing more and certainly nothing less. His Holiness is a person. In his appearance, his words, his laugh and, most notably, in his presence, the Dalia Lama expressed to us true enlightenment. People will always perceive other people to be impressive, intimidating in stature and accomplishment, larger-than-life. The enlightened individual recognizes the profound error in that kind of thinking. There is obviously something to be said for accomplishment and service, and in hindsight I don’t think the Dalia Lama deserved anything less than the applause and adoration he received from the William and Mary student body. In beautiful irony, the most striking thing this enlightened revealed is that he is one of us.

(savethedate)

nov 6 who: possibly you what: U.S. Presidential Election when: 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. where: polling stations in Williamsburg (United Methodist Church on Jamestown Road for those on campus) why: for the sticker

nov 8-9 who: William and Mary Alumni Council what: Arts and Entertainment Conference where: Cohen Career Center why: to take in the wisdom of William and Mary’s successful alumni

nov 23-27 who: presumably you what: Thanksgiving break where: beautiful homes around america why: tradition

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» NEWS

A dash of color and a dollop of service:

Photos by Lauren Su

College’s first Color Run is a recipe for fundraising success » CYRENE

SCHWEITZER, DSJ STAFF REPORTER

AND JESSICA EDINGTON, DSJ NEWS EDITOR

On Saturday, October 20, at 10:15 am, a horde of about 300 white shirts shot away from the starting line in front of the Student Recreation Center. About 45 minutes later, the racers came trickling in, covered in varying powders of blue, red, yellow, and green. On this Saturday morning, William and Mary hosted its first color run, a fundraising event cocreated by service trip groups Students for Belize Education and Students Helping Honduras (SHH). Color runs, or 5K races in which the participants are doused color (usually some form of died water, powder or paint), are becoming a rapidly popular craze across the nation. Major companies such as the Color Run and Color Me Rad put on large-scale events in cities across the country that draw crowds in the thousands. Though there have recently been color runs in Virginia Beach and Richmond, this is the first to ever be held on William and Mary’s campus. Students for Belize traditionally does a regular 5K every year as a fundraiser, and averages at around 75 participants and brings in around $300. The larger scale color run in combination with SHH was quite a jump from past years, as it was also their first time working with SHH. Meredith Dost (’13), one of

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the two co-leaders for the Students for Belize Education alternative break trip co-leaders, originally got the idea to work with SHH on an event by talking with her roommate, Emma Merrill (’13), who is one of the SHH co-leaders. The idea for doing a color run was proposed at a meeting and was widely supported by members of both organizations. “A bunch of our team members had actually run a real color run, so that’s how they got the idea. We knew it would be super popular so we had to cap registration at 300 people because we wanted to make sure that we had enough paint and powder for everyone. We had about 75 people who wanted to register over [that limit], but we had already bought the paint, and we wanted to make it a good experience for everyone,” said Dost. The two organizations are non-profit organizations aimed at improving education in Latin American countries. After doing extensive fundraising throughout the year, they travel to their respective locations for a two-week trip over winter break with teams of around 15 students. Students for Belize Education was founded by a William and Mary student five years ago. It is a small, non-profit service trip led by undergraduate students from the College. Every January students venture to Bermudian Landing, Belize to help a school in the rural school district

by providing assistance and promoting educational awareness in the community. This year they are extending their program into Cave Caulker, off the coast of Belize. Students Helping Honduras aims at raising awareness and funds to provide opportunities for children in Honduras. It was founded in 2005 by William and Mary alum Cosmo Fujiyama (’07) and her brother Shin Fujiyama, then a student at the University of Mary Washington. Cosmo created the program to help communities and engage college students in service learning opportunities in Honduras to transform how youth engage in development issues. Due in large part to the Fujiyama’s relentless fundraising efforts, in its first three years of operation SHH raised over $1.2 million dollars. “I sold baked goods outside of Swem during finals. We had benefit concerts at the [Sadler Center] lounge. We collected spare change at the Student Exchange. Walker Somerville organized a walkathon. We tried to get people engaged in a genuine way,” said Fujiyama in an e-mail. Fujiyama, now a Reynolds Fellow at the New York University Wagner School of Public Service, recently returned from a trip to Honduras where she visited the schools SHH has helped to build and the communities it has affected.


» NEWS Commenting on both her trip and its relevance to the color run event, Fujiyama said, “I go back every year to see my brother, the families and kids of the community. This trip was particularly special because I was able to witness the kids at Villa Soleada attending the bilingual school many students from William and Mary have made an impact in… I think any fundraiser that gets people engaged is a great strategy. The reason why I started SHH with my brother was because of the people. The reason why it continues to succeed is because of the people – the leadership of the student leaders and the leadership of the Honduran families.” Likewise, Students for Belize has made significant imparts in Belizean communities since its founding. For Meredith Dost (’13), one of the two trip leaders for the alternative break trip, it will be her third visit to Belize. “In January, we go down to Belize for two weeks and work in two separate communities in the schools,” said Dost. “So not only are we tutoring and working with them in the classrooms and giving donations, but we give them a thousand dollars to pay for construction, supplies, and things like that to help them. We built a cafeteria last year and funded that process and hired local workers to come and help with the kids.” For many participants, the combined facets of the community service organizations, the athletic nature of the event,

and simply the fun of doing a color run significantly contributed to the overall successful turnout of the event. “There were several motivations for me – the color aspect, supporting the two campus organizations who ran the run, the fitness aspect, and doing a fun activity with my roommate,” said Jennifer Thorne, a student in the Master’s of Science Computer Science program and a participant in the run. “I have a good friend in one of the organizations, and I wanted to support her as well as have fun running the 5K with my roommate.” Though there was a spectacular turnout, the event did not go exactly as hoped. Unlike major color runs, the two organizations did not have the amount of volunteers nor the color materials to make the run as colorful as similar events. “The only thing I would change would be to have more people at each color station so that we could have gotten covered more with the color,” said Thorne. “I haven’t done a color run before, but my sister did one earlier this year. I think they had a lot more people throwing color at hers, so she and her friend were completely covered in color afterwards.” Students for Belize and SHH ran into some problems after setting the initial price for registration. Hesitant to charge students too much, they set the price at $15, and only later learned that the official powder for the color run would have cost around $20 a person. As they had

already begun to collect registrations, they improvised. “I think that what we did – dyed corn starch and water – worked out,” said Dost. “People looked really colorful when they were coming back… It ended up turning out ok. So we decided to see what people thought. If they would prefer the more powder kind, then that would be fine, but we’d have to charge around $25 to make this an annual thing… I’d definitely like to turn this into an annual thing, just because it was so successful.” Despite the few difficulties, participants certainly expressed an interest in continuing the new tradition of the color run. “The Color Run was a really awesome event! I had a great time and would definitely do it again if the opportunity arose,” said Thorne. On a campus with so many organizations fundraising for various causes in various ways, it is essential to find a distinct fundraiser that stands out from the rest. In reference to the creative new approaches that SHH and other service organizations have taken to fundraising, Fujiyama said, “SHH’s growth is a reflection of the caliber and relentless commitment of the student leaders. I am also proud to see the organization grow and in ways I never even imagined. I am so happy to see the next generation of W&M change-makers take the reins and bring their creativity and innovative ideas forward.” Photo by Lauren Su/DSJ

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Giving Back So We Can Move Forward Students work with the William and Mary Development Office long before graduation

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ELIZA SCHEIBE, DSJ STAFF REPORTER

The November air was thick with conversation as Erin Spencer (’14) made her way through the crowd of alumni at the President’s Tailgate last year, an event hosted by William and Mary Development. Incidentally enough, she ran into a couple of alumni from D.C., where she told them about her plans to eventually relocate. Suddenly, they gave her contact information so she could find a job and housing in the city after graduating. It’s fortunate meet-ups like these that afford William and Mary alumni one way to give back to their school, and giving back is what Development is all about. The purpose of the William and Mary Development Office is to fund scholarships and grants for undergrads. In order to do so, Development fundraises contributions from alumni, family and other private donors, who provide the bulk of funding. As undergrads, we aren’t spending much time thinking about donating to our alma mater after we graduate. If anything, we’re probably wondering how long it’s going to take for us to pay off the debt we’ve accumulated over several semesters of tuition, room and board. We tend to see philanthropy as a luxury we’ll be able to afford once we’ve paid off that college debt and secured high-paying jobs. However, as President Reveley announced in a message to the William and Mary community on April 15, 2011, philanthropy has become increasingly important in funding the College. According to Reveley, private donations covered 10 to 11 percent of William and Mary’s operating expenses. It’s likely that an even greater percentage of the College’s budget is now dependent on philanthropy.

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More than ever, the College needs more students and alumni to start giving back, and the Development Office is out to spread awareness. In recent years, the Development Office has been utilizing social media like Facebook and Twitter, as well as campus-wide flyer campaigns to inform students about the increasing need for private donations. When asked why it’s important for the Office to get the word out, Spencer said, “People need to realize we get next to nothing from the state.” And it’s true. Only twelve percent of the Development Office’s funding comes from the state. The rest is entirely dependent on private donations. Spencer knows from experience how important it is to spread the word about giving back. Having worked in Development for a few years now, Spencer has noticed that, for each graduating class, there’s a “huge drop-off” in donations for the first 10 to 15 years after students contribute to their senior class gift. “Every small bit counts,” said Spencer. When each student contributes, even $25 a year makes a difference. Development is also responsible for informing donors about life at the College, such as reporting how their donations are benefiting campus life and academic resources. Each year, for this very purpose, the Development Office hosts dinners and reunions for all those who contribute. Spencer feels that these outreach events really help to “put a face on the school Development Office.” They provide opportunities for current students and alumni to make connections with fellow members of the William and Mary community. “It’s about more than the money,” said Spencer. Participating in the events can lead to long-lasting relationships with

successful people who can help you get where you want to go after college. At the President’s Tailgate mentioned earlier, Spencer was able to connect with William and Mary alumni who turned out to have useful information for her. For Spencer, the Development Office’s reunions are important because they give students a chance to meet alumni who “go out of their way to help current students succeed.” Helping fellow students transition to their lives and careers after college is just another way alumni can give back to the William and Mary community, thereby improving the College’s reputation in promoting success. According to the U.S. World and News Report 2010, despite being ranked 31st among national universities, William and Mary ranked only 85th in academic resources. President Reveley considered this information substantial enough to call to our attention in his 2011 report. In order to improve, or even maintain, the quality of resources available to us at the College, increased private donations will be crucial. “It’s not just your four years here,” said Spencer. It’s important that students “get in the habit of giving” every year after they graduate regardless of the amount they contribute, and to stay in touch with the Development Office as alumni. The Development Office contributes to both the education and the experiences that students gain at William and Mary. With continued funding, they will continue to support high quality education, as well as a unique and memorable college experience. But the relationship is reciprocal. Students need to give back to the College so that they can continue giving to the William and Mary community for years to come.


» NEWS

Breaking Barriers and Cultivating Connections

Photo by Lauren Su

The Dalai Lama’s talk on human compassion resonates with a diverse audience »

JESSICA EDINGTON, DSJ NEWS EDITOR

Wednesday, October 10 opened on an seemly paradoxical scene – over 8000 William and Mary students, faculty, staff and members of the surrounding communities gathered in nearly overwhelming excitement to hear His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama speak. They gathered to hear the spiritual and political leader of Tibetan Buddhism address what was, in large part, neither a Buddhist or Tibetan audience. The College has seen its fair share of prestigious, exciting and even royal visitors, from Jon Stewart’s address at the 2004 commencement to Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II’s visit in 2007 for the 400th anniversary of the Jamestown colony. But rarely do we have visitors whose backgrounds and experiences vary so distinctly from our own, and yet inspire such enthusiasm. Akshay Deverakonda (’15), who is currently participating in the William and Mary in Washington semester program housed in Washington, DC, made the three hour trip to campus to see the Dalai Lama speak, despite the promise of a live streaming of the event online. “There’s an intangible quality about

being in one’s presence versus seeing someone over the internet or through a screen, something that just helps you better understand or connect with that person,” said Deverakonda. “I wanted to experience this quality with the Dalai Lama. Being in Kaplan Arena with His Holiness was being in presence of peace, of calmness, of serenity. Throughout his talk and even afterwards I felt an indescribable joy and happiness just because I was simply there.” The large majority of campus and other attendees seemed to share this opinion, as many professors canceled classes during the time of the event, and even in the instances that they didn’t, many students prioritized the event over attending class. The tickets released to the public sold out within twenty minutes of when they were first available for purchase online. His Holiness opened with, “Dear brothers and sisters,” explaining that he always begins his addresses with “brothers and sisters,” as “sometimes we put too much emphasis on diversity, status, and things like that… we put too much emphasis on the secondary level of differences, on things like religious faith… and different races, different color, different nationality.”

From the very start of his address, he emphasized the need to break down the various barriers we constructed between ourselves and other people, and to simply to see that “on the fundamental level, we are the same human beings.” In this way, the world religious leader was able to address a full Kaplan Arena and thousands of people who, for the large part, were in no way related to Buddhism, and impart not only words of wisdom, but advice that directly addressed the everyday issues that college students face. Jordan Cheresnowsky (’15), an Asian and Middle Eastern Studies major, believes that this approach may have been an attempt to promote a goal of Buddhism in a secular fashion. “One of the main teachings of Theravada Buddhism is that life is suffering, and the only way to achieve peace is to relieve yourself of that suffering,” said Cheresnowsky. “Though Theravada Buddhism generally means personal suffering, the Dalai Lama was speaking to a large American audience. Speaking of alleviating personal suffering would reach very few people. Instead, he emphasized that people should simply be kind to one another, which would resonate with the American audience. He was attempting THE DSJ - NOVEMBER 2012

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» NEWS

to relieve the world of mass suffering by telling college students, faculty and guests to treat people as human beings. This was a far more effective and easily understood way of getting across Theravada Buddhist teachings.” The address, which drew a record number of people and focused on the theme of human compassion, was well received by students. The sparkling humor mixed with wise commentary combined to create a delightful and enlightening experience for many. After the event, many students remarked on the infectiousness of His Holiness’ laugh. Sage expositions interposed with comic anecdotes reached the audience on a very familiar, one might say fundementally human, level. One of the most memorable anecdotes was included to convey the value of inner beauty. His Holiness told a story of a friend whose wife was not very “physically attractive.” “So I teased him. I said, ‘Oh, your wife is not very much physically attractive,’” said His Holiness. “Then he responded to me, ‘Yes, physical not much attraction. But inner beauty is very good.’ Then I have no further argument.” For many students, hearing the Dalai Lama tell a story about teasing a friend about the attractiveness of his wife brought him from the elevated status of a religious and spiritual leader down to a very relatable level, and enabled him to connect with his audience and have his message resonate much more effectively.

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Said Cheresnowsky, “I believe that the Dalai Lama did a very good job when addressing the American audience. Instead of delivering a religious or political speech, he taught about the values of human compassion. Though he clearly inserted some Theravada Buddhist ideas into his speech, I, as a Christian, can fully agree with his message. I do believe that people should be defined as humans and not by what backgrounds they come from… I find the Dalai Lama to be very logical and sincere with his values and perspective on the world, so I listened and will strive to follow his teachings.” One of the few times religion was even mentioned was when His Holiness communicated his belief that if you are born and raised into a certain religion, you should not abandon that religion for another, as all religions have the capacity to practice human compassion. “He did not try to impose the ideas of reincarnation on an audience that would possibly not accept it. Instead, he insisted that people should alleviate the world of suffering by following the moral code they were raised with. This way he allowed his message to reach the entire American audience, instead of potentially closing off their minds since Buddhist beliefs are not common in the United States,” said Cheresnowsky. In the Questions and Answers portion of the event, one of the student-submitted questions directly addressed how students can deal with feeling overwhelmed with

class work, activities, and other aspects of student life. His Holiness responded by emphasizing the importance of maintaining a positive attitude and relying on your own personal intelligence. Working in an internship in DC, though different from the strictly student experience, caused Deverakonda to reflect on the relationship between the stresses of school and work life, the manifestation of that stress in arenas such as politics, and the value of His Holiness’ words regarding the need for human compassion. “It’s so easy to get caught up in life and watch it pass by too fast. My experience with a nine-to-five internship has helped me learn that we just have to prioritize some things that to which we want to give our attention. In this day and age especially, being kind and being compassionate often might be kept on the backburner. You can see how this has infected our politics – both parties lash out and hurl verbal vitriol at each other. It was incredibly refreshing to hear His Holiness’s speech on compassion because the world simply needs more of it. It’s heartwarming to know that despite all of the hate and anger that collectively can overwhelm, there are people like the Dalai Lama that still preach the values of compassion, joy and happiness,” said Deverakonda. Aside from these obviously studentoriented issues, the general theme of the address also directly related to everyday life at William and Mary. While the talk

Photo by Lauren Su


» NEWS largely dwelt on personal interactions, on a campus where service initiatives and volunteering are such a dominant part of the culture, human compassion certainly strikes a chord with many members of the William and Mary community. Melody Porter, the Associate Director of the Office of Community Engagement (OCE), found the talk intriguing in relation to the service work so many students engage in, ranging from local community projects to international initiatives. “I think the message of His Holiness relates to our work in really interesting ways. He started off his talk by saying that at the fundamental level, we are all connected. Students who work with members of communities through our programs are all, in some way, experiencing that connectedness. It may be through a shared purpose and vision, common frustrations with a life situation, or even a moment of understanding while working hard side by side on a project,” said Porter. An increasing trend in higher education is linking service and community engagement with academics in order to provide students with a more comprehensive view of the world in which they operate, that way they don’t just get stuck in the “college bubble” of endless exams and papers and lose the daily relevance of what they are learning. Such initiatives as the Sharpe Community Scholars Program

for incoming freshman, the Community Scholars House for upperclassmen, Branch Out trips, and many other programs run through the OCE include this marriage of service and academics and reflect the growing emphasis on a more encompassing and reflective approach to community engagement. Porter commented on the relationship between this trend and the Dalia Lama’s address, saying “I think the Dalai Lama touched on this some in talking about how people tend to tackle new problems with old ways of thinking. Creative thinking about how to address injustice in our world, which can happen through academics and research, is invaluable and may open up tangible and smart ways for all of us to be more compassionate with each other.” She also saw a direct link between the joy that comes from being compassionate, which His Holiness spoke about at length, and the actions in which many William and Mary Students are already engaged. “I really liked the Dalai Lama’s point that each single human being’s happy life depends on community, and since the existence of joy depends on community, you have to take care of it,” said Porter. “Getting involved in the deep struggles that others experience, and the ingenuity that people here in Williamsburg and around the world are using to create greater opportunity for themselves, is one way

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to cultivate community. If you talk to someone who tutors every week or cooks for Campus Kitchen or goes on an alternative break about why they do so, you’re bound to hear that (among other reasons) they do so because it’s fun. It makes them happy. That’s the joy that the Dalai Lama was talking about – the happiness of real connections to others.” Ultimately, the universality of the Dalai Lama’s address resonated with all attendees in different ways. Although campus has fallen back into the usual hum of activity characterized by midterms, club events, and trying not to spend too great a proportion of time in Swem, students will hopefully remember the main points of His Holiness’ message and not allow the event to fade into just another exciting day. As Deverakonda summarized, “College can be stressful for anyone, for academic, personal and all sorts of other reasons. It’s so easy for mental health to take the backseat with everything that students have to deal with. The Dalai Lama’s message of happiness and compassion is something we should all remember. I think it’s amazing despite everything that His Holiness has been through, he still maintains a positive outlook. It’s so easy to crumble under a mountain of stress –but as he said himself, developing and practicing compassion has benefits for ourselves, not just other people.”

Some of November’s Best Amp Events

N o v e m b e r 9 : L a t e N i t e Tr i v i a Come to Lodge 1 from 9 pm to midnight for the final Trivia of the semester! Form a team of any size and compete for prizes across six rounds including Silhouettes, Fictional Celebrities, and Pokemon.

November 15: A Separation, AMP and the Middle Eastern Students Association is showing A Separation in Tidewater A at 7 pm, free for all W&M students. This film won the category of “Best Foreign Film” at last year’s Oscar’s. , so it’s a can’t-miss!

November 10: Global Film Festival Co-sponsorship Double Feature Come to the Kimball Theater to see The Hollywood Complex at 5 pm, followed by a Q&A with director Dan Sturman. A reception with free food and drinks will start at 7 pm, followed by Moonrise Kingdom at 8 pm and a Skype interview with lead child actors Jared Gilman and Kara Hayward. Bring your ticket stub to The Crust afterwards for special deals at the Global Film Festival sponsored after-party. All of this is only $5 for WM students, $8 for the community!

November 17: Comedian Adam Mamawala Come to Lodge 1 from 9-10 pm to enjoy the comedic styling of Adam Mamawala! This 25 year old standup comedian won the New Jersey Comedy Festival in 2007, was a semifinalist in the 2011 Boston Comedy Festival, and snagged a spot on Funny or Die’s “Top 30 under 30: Comedians to Watch” list. November 27: Free Hot Chocolate! From 5 to 7 pm on the Sadler Terrace, free hot chocolate will be handed out in ceramic AMP mugs (which you can keep,

too!) The number of mugs will be limited, so come get one before they’re gone! November 28: StoryBrew Grab a friend and come out to StoryBrew, happening in Lodge 1 from 7-10 on Wednesday, November 28th! Hot cider and snacks will be provided, too! Stories of lessons learned by students, faculty, and other members of the W&M community will be told. We will be bringing in Ad Booth, a professional storyteller/championship liar from West Virginia, to close out the night! November 30: Holiday Party Join AMP for a Holiday Party in Lodge 1 from 9 pm to midnight! Get ready for the holidays with gingerbread houses, ugly sweaters, and a classic holiday film. THE DSJ - NOVEMBER 2012


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STYLE

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Luke Allen

Babysitting, Marijuana, and Super Cops My experience shadowing a Williamsburg police officer »

LUKE ALLEN, STAFF REPORTER

Sergeant Brian Carlsen has been with the Williamsburg Police Department for over a decade. He admits feeling jaded about people lately, thinking that citizens are often incapable of compromising with each other. On this night, one such citizen requests a police presence at an apartment complex while she moves out. She and the apartment owner haven’t been getting along. Money for utilities may or may not be owed. Either way, Sergeant Carlsen is dissatisfied with his role in monitoring the situation. “Babysitting,” he calls it. It takes only five minutes or so for the woman to move her boxed up belongings out of the apartment and into a waiting pickup truck. But instead of leaving, she and the apartment owner stand on the sidewalk trading accusations. Officer Hughes, who has been with WPD only a year and arrived at the scene earlier, is content with quietly watching the argument. Sergeant Carlsen will later tell me that Hughes is too soft spoken. Sergeant Carlsen, in contrast, is burly, slightly impatient, and quite willing to speak out. Raising his voice, he announces to the bickering parties that while the courts will hear their complaints if they wish, nothing is going to be resolved that night on the sidewalk. As we drive away, the radio dispatcher informs Sergeant Carlsen of a noise complaint called in about a house just outside of campus. Sergeant Carlsen knows it as the “soccer house,” although he isn’t sure whether the name is still accurate. I’m unable to satisfactorily answer his questions about whether and why students should be partying on a Sunday night, but the sound of music and loud voices soon convince us both that a party is indeed happening. We park in an adjoining parking lot and step over beer cans and bikes to reach the house. Once there, Officer Hughes and I listen to Sergeant Carlsen verbally warn three male residents to turn down the volume. The party quiets and as we depart Sergeant Carlsen reminisces about once pursuing a drunken female student who was running outside of this very house. He recalls trying to stop her with the “full force” of his body, watching her ricochet off of him into a parked car, and being impressed when she kept on running. Sergeant Carlsen tells me that he could have ended the party in a much more dramatic fashion. He could have issued hundreds of

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dollars in fines instead of a mere warning. He could have entered the house and taken the names of all involved. Arrests could have been made. Some of his colleagues – “Super Cops,” he calls them – often take this harsher course of action. According to Sergeant Carlsen, while these officers serve an important role in enforcing law and order, the Super Cops will rarely be promoted to very high positions. He likens them to low-level wrench turners in a factory who will never rise out of their roles. They may be very good at turning wrenches, but they lack the “balance” of skills necessary for management positions. After Carlsen tells me that he smoked marijuana for a year while in college, I ask him about his views on U.S. drug laws. He expresses support for a legalization policy that would allow the government to regulate and tax marijuana. I ask whether he ever felt bad about making arrests for marijuana related offenses. He tells me there were several reasons that making these arrests did not make him feel hypocritical. He asserts that citizens simply need to follow the rules. We live in a democracy, he reasons, where citizens presumably have some influence in what those rules are. If you don’t like the rules, you can organize to change them through the proper channels. Or, as Sergeant Carlsen suggests, dissatisfied citizens can leave the country. By the time we crossed into the early hours of Monday morning, Williamsburg had gone to bed. Sergeant Carlsen had time to talk to me about the police car and its varied features, which illustrate the irregular nature of the job. One of the features is speed. Sergeant Carlsen had personally reached 110 mph once while responding to a life or death situation. The car also includes seating that handily is not too comfortable, reducing the possibility that an officer falls asleep. The threat of sleep manifested itself in the last instance of criminal activity I would encounter that night. A female suspect, whose van was reported for being illegally parked in a yard, was asleep in the van when first approached by a community service officer. She soon drove off, leaving Sergeant Carlsen to resume his patrol through the silent city.


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STYLE

Steer Clear? There’s an app for that! A collaboration between two campus organizations makes safe rides more efficent and accesible »

MAGGIE SOUTHWELL, STAFF REPORTER

As the semester draws to a close, students can look forward to a more efficient, more effective safe ride service with easier access and a shorter wait time. Over the summer, Steer Clear worked with the Programming Club to design an entirely new system. In the future, students will be able to submit a request for a ride via a mobile app, and the system will calculate which van can pick them up within the shortest wait time according to where the students are and how many people are in the group. Within five minutes, students will receive a text that tells them what the estimated wait time is. “We think that this will completely revolutionize Steer Clear,” said Mark Moran (’14), the program director for Steer Clear. “It’s a program that’s been pretty stagnant for the last few years, but Steer Clear is really going to be more accessible with this.” For the system to work, drivers will have tablets that are connected to the online system. “The really cool thing about it is that it will calculate every turn,” Moran explained. “It’s kind of like what UPS drivers have.” This will cut down not only on the time that students have to wait but also on how much gas is used. We just received the funding for the tablets last week.” The Student Assembly unanimously voted to fund the new system. Currently, the wait for a van can be up to thirty or forty minutes. “There are a bunch of inefficiencies in the system,” Moran said, and that was something Steer Clear decided to address last semester. Steer Clear owns two vans, and in the current system, one is assigned to pick people up on campus while one is assigned to pick them up off campus. It isn’t an efficient system, Moran explained, because often at different times one van is overused and one van is underused. This won’t be a problem with the new system. Moran explained that nothing could have happened without the Programming Club. “The Programming Club has been absolutely instrumental in everything,” he said. “They’re the ones who really had a vision for it.” Nathan Schaaf (’15), a driver for Steer Clear, suggested the idea at a Programming Club meeting as a possible project for the club. “It started out a lot smaller,” Schaaf admitted. “Basically, I wanted a modified GPS. Now it’s grown into this whole other [project] that’s a lot cooler. I hope people use Steer Clear differently because of it. Right now between 11:00

p.m. and midnight people submit a lot of requests.” When wait times become too long, a lot of the requests are usually cancelled. But the program will allow people to see online when there is a long wait. “I hope that people are able to take advantage of that information to make Steer Clear more effective,” Schaaf said. “I hope that they use it.” Officially called the Drop Tables Programming Guilt, the Programming Club was founded three years ago, and this is the first large-scale project they’ve tackled. “The idea of the club was to get together computer science people who wanted to do outside projects but who hadn’t been able to for lack of motivation or lack of just where to get started,” said Kevin Ji (’13), the technical lead on the project. “It was a way to get them together to throw around ideas.” About five Programming Club members are working on the project at the moment. “Since this is basically a product that we’re giving Steer Clear,” Ji explained, “it’s something that needs to be polished. That’s how we’re looking at it – we’re treating it as though it were something that we would be hired to produce and that we would present to a company.” The new system is planned to launch before the end of the semester.

THE DSJ - NOVEMBER 2012

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STYLE

Best ofs:

a random assortment of the five best things

Best of Festive Pumpkin Recipes »

CHRISTINE SHEN, DSJ STYLE EDITOR

Pumpkin Cheesecake If you’re tired of pumpkin pie, try this easy and delicious pumpkin cheesecake recipe from Paula Deen. If you don’t want to make your own crust, just buy a premade one! Makes 8 servings Time: 5 hours 30 minutes (only 15 minutes active prep) Ingredients Crust: • 1 3/4 cups graham cracker crumbs • 3 tablespoons light brown sugar • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon • 1 stick melted salted butter Filling: • 3 (8-ounce) packages cream cheese, at room temperature • 1 (15-ounce) can pureed pumpkin • 3 eggs plus 1 egg yolk • 1/4 cup sour cream • 1 1/2 cups sugar • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon • 1/8 teaspoon fresh ground nutmeg • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves • 2 tablespoon all-purpose flour • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Directions Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. For crust: In medium bowl, combine crumbs, sugar and cinnamon. Add melted butter. Press down flat into a 9-inch springform pan. Set aside. For filling: Beat cream cheese until smooth. Add pumpkin puree, eggs, egg yolk, sour cream, sugar and the spices. Add flour and vanilla. Beat together until well combined. Pour into crust. Spread out evenly and place in oven for 1 hour. Remove from the oven and let sit for 15 minutes. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 4 hours.

Spiced Pumpkin Cider This yummy addition to traditional cider will make a fall flavored cider, similar to Starbucks’ pumpkin latte. *Note, this comes out thicker than traditional cider since it's made with pumpkin puree. For a thinner beverage, add more apple cider or water while you prepare it. Makes ~ 2 cups Time: 25 minutes Ingredients: • 1 cup pumpkin puree (not pumpkin pie mix) • 2 1/2 cups apple cider

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• 1-1/2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice • Cinnamon stick Directions: In a large pot, mix together the pumpkin puree, apple cider, pumpkin pie spice and the cinnamon stick. Bring mixture to a boil then reduce heat to low and simmer for at least 20 minutes. If mixture is too thick, add additional cider or water to thin it out. Strain the mixture through a mesh strainer to remove clumps and cinnamon stick. Add rum and mix. Serve warm. Add some spiced rum for a delicious over-21 treat! (Recipe from Yahoo)

Pumpkin Soup This vegetarian dish is creamy and under 150 calories per serving! Makes 6 servings Time: 25 minutes Ingredients • 2 tablespoons finely chopped onion • ½ teaspoon curry powder • ¼ teaspoon ground cumin • ¼ teaspoon ground coriander • ¼ teaspoon salt • 1 tablespoon butter or margarine • 2 15 ounce cans pumpkin • 2 14 ounce cans chicken broth • 1 tablespoon packed brown sugar or maple syrup (optional) • 1 cup half and half, light cream or milk • Dairy sour cream (optional) • Fresh sage leaves (optional) Directions In a large saucepan, cook onion, curry powder, cumin, coriander, and salt in hot butter until onion is tender. Whisk in pumpkin, chicken broth, and brown sugar or maple syrup, if desired, until well combined. Bring mixture just to boiling; reduce heat. Stir in half and half and heat through. If desired, garnish with sour cream and sage leaves. Makes 6 to 8 servings. (Recipe from Better Homes and Gardens)

5 November Movies You Don’t Want to Miss »

ANNA KIM, STAFF REPORTER

1. Life of Pi For fans of Yann Martel’s staple high school novel, the movie trailer encourages venturing into theaters November 21st. Although literary adaptations are usually a miss rather than a hit, director Ang Lee’s Life of Pi promises at the very least to be visually spectacular in 3D, and it had a favorable response at a showing in the New York Film Festival. 2. Silver Linings Playbook For those of us looking to relax over Thanksgiving Break with a strong and enjoyable “dramedy”, check out Silver Linings Playbook, which also releases on November 21st. Reviewers praise performances by Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence, remarking a “delightful” chemistry and “quirky” humor with a strong supporting cast.

STYLE

Top Tech Gifts for the Holiday Season »

CHRISTINE SHEN, DSJ STYLE EDITOR

Blurb Instagram Book Love Instagram? Then you’ll love this custom-made book from Blurb that lets you add Instagram photos taken by you or your friends. It’s a great way to capture the year’s past memories in a truly thoughtful gift. The square 7” book starts at only $11 for a 20-page version and has a variety of layouts to choose from. The only problem is you’ll need the giftee’s Instagram log-in info to get their pictures! Roku HD This little device is pretty impressive. With little to no set-up, it connects directly to your TV and WiFi network, allowing you to access your existing subscription services (like Netflix), hundreds of channels, and provides additional access to free movies and TV shows without any monthly fees after purchasing the product – all in at least 720 pixels HD. The lowest priced model starts at $50. Nook HD This little device is in a realm of its own. Not quite like the iPad or Kindle Fire, the Nook is designed with reading in mind. Starting at $199 for 8GB, it’s a smart alternative to the iPad mini, which starts at $329. It has a 7-inch HD display with a higher resolution than the iPad mini and comes in two colors, black and white. It runs on a modified Android OS and has double the RAM of the iPad mini.

3. Killing Them Softly Those craving action but unwilling to buy into the next James Bond film can see Killing Them Softly for an alternative. Grittier and darker, this film directed by Andrew Dominik features a compelling and charismatic Brad Pitt as a “professional enforcer who investigates a heist that went down during a mob-protected poker game.” Despite being a not-so-subtle allegory for the current economic crisis, the film will certainly appeal to fans of gangster and crime films. 4. Flight Denzel Washington makes a strong showing in Flight as a pilot who saves everybody on a plane with an emergency landing, only to face possible jail time as it’s discovered that he had alcohol in his system at the time. Directed by Robert Zemeckis of Forrest Gump and Cast Away fame, Flight is a dramatic, complex, and even psychological thriller that releases on November 2nd.

Samsung Galaxy S III This super slick and thin (less than 9mm thick) phone runs on Android and is a great alternative to the iPhone. It has a larger and more beautiful AMOLED screen than its predecessor and has a resolution of 1280 by 720 pixels. The phone even has a smart display that tracks your eyes so the display won’t dim or turn off whenever you’re looking at it. It also has an 8 megapixel camera and a S-voice recognition system comparable to the iPhone’s Siri. This is the phone you should wish for this holiday season! Microsoft Surface Tablet If you haven’t jumped on the tablet bandwagon already, try out the Microsoft Surface tablet, starting at $499 for the 32GB model. It comes with a 3 milimeter Touch Cover that doubles as a cover and keyboard. It runs Windows 8, Microsoft’s new operating system designed specifically for the tablet environment.

5. Hitchcock Described “as a love story between influential filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock and wife Alma Reville during the filming of Psycho in 1959,” Hitchcock has yet to be reviewed by film critics. However, with a strong supporting cast and Anthony Hopkins leading as the titular character, this film is more than worth seeing in theaters for fans of Hopkins and/or one of the greatest auteurs in film history. TH E

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Tribe Basketball Season Previews Fresh Faces on Men’s Side Bring Renewed Spirit; Women Hoping to Build Off Previous Year’s Successes »

CHARLES LAMPKINS, DSJ STAFF REPORTER

Men The men’s basketball team opens up their season in three weeks with a game at home against Hampton University. The Tribe hopes to improve on their 6-26 record from last year, and they start with a tough task. Last year’s team dropped their game vs. HU by 15 points. But the team has more than enough talent to avenge the loss, and compete in the Colonial Athletic Association this year. Having lost leading scorer Quinn McDowell from last season’s unit, as well as fellow starter Kendrix Brown, the Tribe is relying on their returning starters to contribute to the production gap. Those starters include 6-9 forward Tim Rusthoven, who averaged ten points and almost seven rebounds a game. Also returning is sophomore Marcus Thornton, who served as the team’s second highest scorer last year as a freshman, and was also named to the CAA All-Freshman team. Junior Kyle Gaillard returns after a redshirt year in the 2011-2012 season, and hopes to contribute right away. Two years ago he was a consistent member of the team, playing in all 32 games and At preseason practice, Tribe Freshman Guard Terry Tarpey drives against fellow starting in 19, so his presence should help solidify newcomer Brett Goodloe, a former pitcher on the Tribe baseball team who joined the team’s frontcourt. Gaillard shared that one of the basketball squad this fall. All Photos Courtesy of Tribe Athletics. the team’s main focuses this preseason has been stopping other teams, saying that, “…our biggest area of emphasis lenging games will be some of our big away games. They are all would be on defense. We weren’t very good defensively last sea- great teams and they’ll be an exciting challenge for us.” Tough son and to be a great team you have to defend well.” With a lot of competition should help the Tribe improve from their areas of strong competition this year, a stingy defense will almost have to weakness last season. be a necessity. The team has several tough away games this year The Tribe averaged around 4 rebounds less than their oppofacing teams like Richmond, Wake Forest, Purdue, and Vander- nents last year, and with an average scoring margin of minus 9 bilt. But Gaillard revealed the team’s anticipation: “The most chal- points, every possession counts. The 6’9’’ incoming freshman Sean Sheldon should help in that area. He hails from Traverse City, Michigan, where he attended Saint Francis Catholic High School. There, Sheldon averaged 19 points and 12 rebounds as a junior, and also set the school scoring record in a game against Benzie Central High school, when he amassed 46 points. Hopefully, Sheldon can transition some of that scoring prowess to the CAA. The team hopes to capitalize again this year on their three-point efficiency, having four returning players who shot over 33% from line last year. For the sixth year in a row, the team has made over 200 three-point field goals, and hopefully they can continue their long range success this year. One of the players Coach Tony Shaver hopes can continue this trend is newcomer Brett Goodloe. Goodloe is a walk-on senior who actually spent his first three years at William and Mary on the school baseball team. Highlights of his career include a freshman year outing that ended up in a comHead Coach Tony Shaver chats with guards Matt Rum and Brandon Britt dur- plete game shutout against Quinnipiac, as well as last ing the Drexel game. year’s season, where Goodloe notched an ERA of 0.00

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over six appearances. But his basketball background is impressive as well. At St. Anne’s Belfield in Charlottesville, where Goodloe attended high school, he has had his number 33 jersey retired by the school. He earned two first team All-Prep honors in his career, as well as being named to the first team All-State list during his senior year. His addition to the team gives the frontcourt a little more size on the perimeter, as well as stretch out defenses with his long range shooting ability. Another new player on the team that brings size to the perimeter is freshman Terry Tarpey from Connecticut. A 6’5’’ guard with a 6’10’’ wingspan, the Tribe hopes that Tarpey will be able to use his length and athleticism to guard multiple positions on the floor. The New England Recruiting Report named him one of the top 10 basketball players in the state of Connecticut, and one of the top 25 in the entire New England Region. Coach Shaver raves about his toughness and determination, characteristics that should help the Tribe increase the number of wins from last year’s 4-14 CAA record. The CAA should be a tough road again this year for the Tribe, with last year’s regular season champion Drexel (29-7) only losing one player from the 2011-2012 squad. Another team to watch is Delaware, coming off of their first post-season appearance in a decade. Both teams feature two players selected to the All-CAA Preseason First Team. The Tribe will be challenged within the CAA, but with the team’s returning contributors, as well as critical additions in perimeter defense, scoring, and athleticism, William and Mary looks to surprise some fans this year. Women The Tribe women’s basketball team is coming off of a 10-20 season last year that ended in a 9-point CAA Tournament loss against VCU. But with 4 starting seniors returning from last year’s team, including preseason All-CAA second team member Emily Correal, the Tribe looks to surprise a conference that has them ranked 9th in the preseason polls. The team retains their leading scorer from last year in Correal, as well as their second leading scorer in redshirt senior guard Janine Aldridge. Aldridge connected on a school record 92 threepointers last year, and hopefully the Tribe will be able to keep incorporating that aspect of the offensive into the gameplan. With five players who shot over 33% from distance last year, opposing teams will definitely have to factor in the Tribe’s long range ability into their defensive strategy. The team’s post presence, however, might be their most intimidating weapon. The frontcourt includes Correal, 6’3’’ senior center Jaclyn McKenna, 6’4’’ sophomore MacKenzie Morrison, and 6’2’’ junior forward Kaitlyn Matthieu. Their size in the post should help the Tribe establish dominance in the paint on both sides of the ball this year. Other returners include sophomore guard Kyla Kerstetter, who played in all thirty games last year. She was extremely efficient from the field, shooting 56%. Senior Taylor Hilton also exhibited her offensive skills last year, shooting 54%. But the Tribe’s defense is a factor of their game that most teams will have to gameplan for. Coach Taylor’s high pressure, up-tempo style of play keeps opposing teams on their toes, and for good reason. Six returning players from last year’s team had at least 15 steals, with guard Janine Aldridge leading the way with a whopping 79 takeaways. Matthieu, Kerstetter, and sophomore Jazmen Boone all played less than 300 minutes last year, but managed to each grab at least 15 steals. Matthieu also made her defensive presence known under the basket as well, accumulating 8 blocks. Last year’s squad recorded 82 blocks in total, with a majority of those coming from Correal, who had 27 swats, and McKenna, who totaled 28.

Guard Janine Aldridge sneaks past an ODU defender. She averaged 13 points per game last year, good for third on the team. The team adds to newcomers to its roster this year with freshman Jamie Revels and Brooke Stewart. Revels is a 6’1’’ forward from Aurora, CO who Coach Debbie Taylor hopes will bring her toughness and competitive spirit to the team. She played for Regis Jesuit’s varsity squad for three years, a team that is ranked top-50 in the country. Stewart is a 6’0’’ guard who was last year’s Cape Ann League player of the year. She also was named MVP of the Gordon College Summer League in 2010. She has been recognized as a great athletic player, with a great passing skills and a great competitive spirit. In terms of the Colonial Athletic Conference, the competition looks tough again this year. Last year’s CAA champion Delaware Blue Hens keep all five starters from last year’s team that only lost two games in the regular season, and they have been named the preseason pick to win the CAA Women’s title this year. That team beat the Tribe twice last year by an average of 21 points. One player to watch on Delaware’s team is senior Elena Donne, who led the entire NCAA in scoring last year and is currently on track to break the CAA’s career scoring record. Another team in the CAA that the Tribe will have to watch out for is the James Madison Dukes, last year’s Women’s National Invitational Tournament runner-up. They have four starters returning from last year’s 32-8 team, including the CAA’s 2012 Defensive Player of the Year in Nikki Newman. The Dukes also have their leading scorer returning in Tarik Haslop, who not only averaged 14.8 points per game last year, but also 3.5 assists, which was another team high. In all, it will be a hard road to a CAA championship this year with a significant amount of returning players on good teams. But the Tribe has a solid returning core as well as some freshman who look to step in and contribute. They have looked great in practice so far, and they expect to have a great season should be entertaining for any Tribe hoops fan. THE DSJ -NOVEMBER 2012

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Bringing People Together

together. What is the club’s main goal in promoting interactions between students and alumni?

Stoehr: One of the club’s main purposes is to connect students with the Tribe Athletics community and provide them with network» ASHELY CHANEY, DSJ STAFF REPORTER ing opportunities. W&M A pair of Ambassadors get to wait inside the ropes while the Tribe footYou may not have heard of the Tribe alumni and do- ball team warms up. Photos Courtesy of Christa Stoehr. Club Ambassadors, but the 23 members nors make up the Ambassadors. In general, I recruit Amof this student-run organization are some the majority of of the hardest working people on campus. people who attend these events, and many bassadors to volunteer at athletic events and Their job is to offer support for William of these people have connections across the arrange details including scheduling, duties and Mary Athletics in a multitude of ways, nation in various job industries. Several of and responsibilities, dress attire, etc. I also including volunteering at sporting events our Ambassadors, myself included, have introduce Ambassadors to different people and forming connections with alumni at received job offers and internship oppor- at the events and to people in our athletic special occasions hosted by the Athletics tunities from meeting people and having department, among other things. We are Department. These Ambassadors have a conversations while volunteering. It’s clear constantly trying to promote our group and hand in fundraisers, auctions, marketing that the W&M Athletics community really recruit new members so we can tell people promotions and administrative duties for cares about the success of our Ambassadors about what we do and get them involved. William and Mary’s Tribe Club. It is their and are more than willing to help students DSJ: What inspires you to work for the goal to bring students, athletes and the in any way they can. TCA, and how has your experience with this alumni community together by providing DSJ: Do you all work with student- group affected you personally? networking opportunities and all-around support for our athletic program. I sat down athletes as well as alumni? Stoehr: I have always had this intense with the club’s President Christa Stoehr to Stoehr: We do also work the athletes love of sports, and it really runs in the family talk about the club and its goals. themselves. At some events, Ambassadors for me. My uncle played basketball at the DSJ: Tribe Club Ambassadors is about work alongside the athletes to support Tribe College, and he is still very involved with bringing groups of the W&M community Athletics. This gives our members the op- Tribe Athletics. He introduced me to Bobby portunity to connect with Dwyer, the Senior Associate Athletic Direcathletes on a personal level tor, and I told him I wanted to get involved and show them support by in some way with W&M Athletics. He told attending and volunteering me about Tribe Club Ambassadors, I went to at their games. We believe their info session, and I joined immediately. our organization holds This group combines two of my greatest great value to both our passions – a love for sports and a desire to students and athletes, as help others. well as to our supporting My involvement with Tribe Club Amcommunity of alumni and bassadors is one of my favorite aspects of donors. my W&M experience. I have met a lot of DSJ: What is your role as members of our community and have made President of the Tribe Club connections on a personal and career-based level. I thoroughly enjoy volunteering my Ambassadors? time alongside other students that share my Stoehr: As President, I passion for working with Tribe Athletics Tribe Athletics paraphernalia, like shirts and cups, often get am the liaison between the and supporting our athletes and alumni in handed out by Ambassadors after football games for free. athletic department and any way we can.

Tribe Club Ambassadors Connect Students, Athletes, and Alums

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William and Mary Athletic RIVALS Do They Even Exist?

What is lacking, however, is a deeper connection between » JEFFREY KNOX, DSJ SPORTS EDITOR the schools. Besides the obvious academic Nearly every single Division I athdifferences, there letic program in the nation has one, if are few instances in not multiple. Duke and UNC. UVa and which teams have Virginia Tech. USC and UCLA. Auburn butted heads in and Alabama. Rivalries amongst schools, The Tribe Men’s Football team will host the Richmond important games. whether cross-town foes or conference Spiders at 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, November 19th at Zable A matchup in the opponents, contribute a special ingrediStadium. It will be the 122nd meeting between the two teams. CAA tournament ent to the recipe of college athletics. championship game for basketball could last year’s conference switch-up now They motivate players, hype-up fans for turn the tables. The most significant has both teams in the A10 and off most big games and help build a competitive contest in recent memory came from the William and Mary teams’ schedules. tradition between the schools. Unfortuwomen’s basketball teams last season, Shaka Smart can be blamed for that. nately for William and Mary, there is only when the Tribe took down ODU to snap However, most Tribe and Rams fans one school that could even remotely be a 52-game losing streak. On a similar would have had trouble confi rming the considered an athletic rival. Still worse, note, neither school has a significant existence of much animosity between Old Dominion University is set to leave following. Fans are generally few and far the schools. VCU has no football team the Colonial Athletic Association after between, and rarely manage to fill Zable and they consistently gave us a beatthis year and head to Conference USA, Stadium or the lower level of Kaplan down on the basketball court. The only just like VCU did this year in joining the Arena. real competition took place on the men’s Atlantic 10. The future outlook for the Tribe is tennis court and women’s soccer fi eld. As for the Tribe, despite having one bleak. JMU may soon be regarded as The Rams would have relegated William of the oldest athletic traditions in the the Tribe’s biggest rival. On the football and Mary to their 3rd biggest rival slot nation, our rivalry well is running dry. field, the annual Capital Cup game anyways, behind Richmond and Old William and Mary maintains a legitimate against Richmond, deemed the “Oldest Dominion. academic rivalry with UVa, but the size Football Rivalry in the South,” will still The Monarchs counter that position discrepancy and different conferences reign. The problem lies, in fact, in Wiltoo, and the Tribe sat as ODU’s secondmakes it implausible athletically. Still, the liam and Mary’s uniqueness. There just ary rival for years. Only now that VCU Tribe and Cavaliers manage to square off aren’t very many schools that are similar is gone can the rivalry come into its annually in sports like field hockey, tennis to William and Mary and thus establishown, but it will only endure one measly and track & field, along with a renewed ing a competitive atmosphere with an year. William and Mary’s daughter semi-annual, season-opening matchup in opponent is difficult. Furthermore, the school has all the makings of being a football. In the state capital there are two big sports (basketball and football) have good rival (at least athletically) – same schools –VCU and Richmond – which never had much success, making it hard conference, long history, good competiboth have the appropriate athletic prowto rally the troops. On this point, it’s a tion in a variety of sports, and proximess, location, and history to be rivals. But travesty for the fans when the football ity. Old Dominion games for parents weekend and homerepresents one coming feature Georgia State and Maine, of the Tribe’s respectively. Sure, William and Mary top opponents has garnered the most CAA titles at 84. in a lot of sports. But most come from the cross-country In field hockey, and track & field teams, where two they’re a top ten schools never face off directly. team. In football So what’s in the cards for William and basketball, and Mary? It’s not likely that increased they have athletic athletic performance will be gracing the squads, dangerous campus anytime soon. The CAA will offenses, and are consist of even more foreign teams startusually near the ing in 2013. Tribe fans need someone to top of the CAA. direct all their pent-up anger towards! In lacrosse, socThe unfortunate truth comes in the cer, tennis, and form of the JMU Dukes or the George baseball, they’re Mason Patriots, and yet again William on a similar level and Mary will have to settle for the The Tribe’s Cortlyn Bristol, a senior midfielder, attempts to penwith William backseat, as those schools already have a etrate the ODU back line on October 24th. W&M won 3-0. Photo and Mary on rivalry running. Courtesy of Sam Girdzis/DSJ. an annual basis. THE DSJ -NOVEMBER 2012

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The DoG Street Journal November 2012 Photo by Lauren Su

2012 COLOR RUN »

LAUREN SU, DSJ PHOTO EDITOR

www.dogstreetjournal.com

November 2012  

November 2012 issue of the DoG Street Journal

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