Page 1

September 2013

Activities Fair 2013 >> Lauren Su, DSJ Photo Editor


The DoG Street Journal EDITORIAL STAFF

Editorial

Editors-in-Chief Jeffrey Knox Christine Shen

Glad to be Back Sept. 16, 18, 21, 23, and 25

Managing Editor Molly Michie News Editor Eliza Scheibe Associate News Editor Sydni Scrofani

11

The West Virginia marching band performs on the field at Milan Puskar Stadium before the opening kick-off of their game against William & Mary. Despite holding a 10-point halftime lead, the Tribe couldn’t hold on, losing to the Mountaineers by a score of 24-17. See pages 20-21 for more. Photo by Linda Morse.

September 2013, Volume 11 Issue 1 www.dogstreetjournal.com

Style Editor Molly Earner Associate Style Editor Chelsea Pittman Opinions Editor Sean Sweeney Sports Editor Alex Cook Associate Sports Editor Scott Guinn Photo Editor Lauren Su

What’s Inside?

The DSJ is a monthly student magazine and online multimedia outlet which strives to provide an entertaining, thought-provoking and interactive resource for the William and Mary community.

3

Editorial > Welcome Back

6-7

News

>McAuliffe and Cuccinelli on Google Hangout

OUR MISSION

Style

12-13

>A Look Inside the New Sadler Center

COVER IMAGE

Mother Nature failed to cooperate during opening convocation, forcing the eager students lined up in the Wren Courtyard to break out their umbrellas. Photo by Lauren Su.

Talk to us! The DoG Street Journal The College of William & Mary Campus Center Basement Office 12B Williamsburg, Virginia 23185 757.221.7851 dogstreetjournal@wm.edu

2

T H E

D S J

-

Save the Date

se p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

18

Opinions >The Rise of Heroin Use

Sports

20-21

>Tribe Football Drops Season Opener to WVU

Welcome class of 2017! And welcome back to everyone else. After a long summer break, we’ve returned with our September issue. Many of us have gained new experiences and lasting memories, along with a plethora of Facebook photos, maybe an added sun-tan or a new haircut. This time of year is one of optimism: with the warm rays and nostalgia for summer at your back and the as-of-yet-undetermined fall semester at your feet (during which, you have decided, you will most definitely improve your GPA). As the warm weather fades, we brace ourselves for the stacks of homework and winter ahead. Hopefully, you’ll lose yourselves in the pages of our magazine during a study break or two. First of all, we’d like to apologize for the tardiness of this issue. After a few weeks of hard work on our stories, we were ready to put together our print edition. Somehow we lost access to the G drive, to which we usually upload our stories and photos. Without this, we had no way to collaboratively work on our layout. In times like these we remember how helpless we are to the power of technology and the gods that are the IT staff. We hope you’ll enjoy the stories we have for you this month. Read about the ongoing gubernatorial debate on higher education through the unique experience of our students who spoke to the candidates in a Google Hangout. Check out our exclusive interview with Spencer Perry, son of Kris Perry, a crusader in the Proposition 8 lawsuit. In opinions: despite the rising costs of healthcare, Northern Neck Free Health Clinic provides affordable and excellent health care to many in the Hampton Roads region. Finally, the sports section covers the Tribe’s season opening football game at West Virginia, and takes a sneak peek into the basketball team’s new recruiting class. Despite the short setback, we are more hopeful than ever that this year will be a great transitional period for the DSJ. We have ideas for getting our online presence back and to possibly start releasing every two weeks! Along with a new look for the magazine, we’re hoping to unveil a lot of major changes in the months ahead. In the coming months, the DSJ will be very busy. We’re hoping to bring back functionality to our website (dogstreetjournal.com). Our Facebook and Twitter accounts will be much more active. Print stories will continue to inform and entertain the W&M community. The magazine layout will be continually updated and perfected. Plus, we plan on looking into the possibility of making the magazine a bi-weekly publication. As EICs, our promise is to make the DoG Street Journal the best it can possibly be, both now and in the future. We’re sure you’ll be as excited as we are to see it all unfold. Here’s to a great semester!

What: Glenn Close Film Festival Where: Swem Library, Botetourt Theatre When: 3:30 & 7 p.m. for all except 21st @ 2 p.m. Why: Free movie screenings, including 101 Dalmatians!

Sept. 21

What: Study Abroad Fair Where: Trinkle Hall When: noon - 3 p.m. Why: To learn about study abroad opportunities

Sept. 27

What: William & Mary Busch Gardens Day (Howl-o-Scream) Where: Busch Gardens When: 10 a.m. - 10 p.m. Why: Cheap tickets and stress relief

- Jeffrey Knox and Christine Shen

DSJ Co-Editors-in-Chief TH E

D S J

-

se p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

3 3


The DoG Street Journal EDITORIAL STAFF

Editorial

Editors-in-Chief Jeffrey Knox Christine Shen

Glad to be Back Sept. 16, 18, 21, 23, and 25

Managing Editor Molly Michie News Editor Eliza Scheibe Associate News Editor Sydni Scrofani

11

The West Virginia marching band performs on the field at Milan Puskar Stadium before the opening kick-off of their game against William & Mary. Despite holding a 10-point halftime lead, the Tribe couldn’t hold on, losing to the Mountaineers by a score of 24-17. See pages 20-21 for more. Photo by Linda Morse.

September 2013, Volume 11 Issue 1 www.dogstreetjournal.com

Style Editor Molly Earner Associate Style Editor Chelsea Pittman Opinions Editor Sean Sweeney Sports Editor Alex Cook Associate Sports Editor Scott Guinn Photo Editor Lauren Su

What’s Inside?

The DSJ is a monthly student magazine and online multimedia outlet which strives to provide an entertaining, thought-provoking and interactive resource for the William and Mary community.

3

Editorial > Welcome Back

6-7

News

>McAuliffe and Cuccinelli on Google Hangout

OUR MISSION

Style

12-13

>A Look Inside the New Sadler Center

COVER IMAGE

Mother Nature failed to cooperate during opening convocation, forcing the eager students lined up in the Wren Courtyard to break out their umbrellas. Photo by Lauren Su.

Talk to us! The DoG Street Journal The College of William & Mary Campus Center Basement Office 12B Williamsburg, Virginia 23185 757.221.7851 dogstreetjournal@wm.edu

2

T H E

D S J

-

Save the Date

se p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

18

Opinions >The Rise of Heroin Use

Sports

20-21

>Tribe Football Drops Season Opener to WVU

Welcome class of 2017! And welcome back to everyone else. After a long summer break, we’ve returned with our September issue. Many of us have gained new experiences and lasting memories, along with a plethora of Facebook photos, maybe an added sun-tan or a new haircut. This time of year is one of optimism: with the warm rays and nostalgia for summer at your back and the as-of-yet-undetermined fall semester at your feet (during which, you have decided, you will most definitely improve your GPA). As the warm weather fades, we brace ourselves for the stacks of homework and winter ahead. Hopefully, you’ll lose yourselves in the pages of our magazine during a study break or two. First of all, we’d like to apologize for the tardiness of this issue. After a few weeks of hard work on our stories, we were ready to put together our print edition. Somehow we lost access to the G drive, to which we usually upload our stories and photos. Without this, we had no way to collaboratively work on our layout. In times like these we remember how helpless we are to the power of technology and the gods that are the IT staff. We hope you’ll enjoy the stories we have for you this month. Read about the ongoing gubernatorial debate on higher education through the unique experience of our students who spoke to the candidates in a Google Hangout. Check out our exclusive interview with Spencer Perry, son of Kris Perry, a crusader in the Proposition 8 lawsuit. In opinions: despite the rising costs of healthcare, Northern Neck Free Health Clinic provides affordable and excellent health care to many in the Hampton Roads region. Finally, the sports section covers the Tribe’s season opening football game at West Virginia, and takes a sneak peek into the basketball team’s new recruiting class. Despite the short setback, we are more hopeful than ever that this year will be a great transitional period for the DSJ. We have ideas for getting our online presence back and to possibly start releasing every two weeks! Along with a new look for the magazine, we’re hoping to unveil a lot of major changes in the months ahead. In the coming months, the DSJ will be very busy. We’re hoping to bring back functionality to our website (dogstreetjournal.com). Our Facebook and Twitter accounts will be much more active. Print stories will continue to inform and entertain the W&M community. The magazine layout will be continually updated and perfected. Plus, we plan on looking into the possibility of making the magazine a bi-weekly publication. As EICs, our promise is to make the DoG Street Journal the best it can possibly be, both now and in the future. We’re sure you’ll be as excited as we are to see it all unfold. Here’s to a great semester!

What: Glenn Close Film Festival Where: Swem Library, Botetourt Theatre When: 3:30 & 7 p.m. for all except 21st @ 2 p.m. Why: Free movie screenings, including 101 Dalmatians!

Sept. 21

What: Study Abroad Fair Where: Trinkle Hall When: noon - 3 p.m. Why: To learn about study abroad opportunities

Sept. 27

What: William & Mary Busch Gardens Day (Howl-o-Scream) Where: Busch Gardens When: 10 a.m. - 10 p.m. Why: Cheap tickets and stress relief

- Jeffrey Knox and Christine Shen

DSJ Co-Editors-in-Chief TH E

D S J

-

se p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

3 3


» NEWS

Same Love: A Personal Supreme Court Journey »

tyler brent, dsj staff reporter

In June of 2010, I ascended Black Mountain, North Carolina with YMCA Model United Nations to participate in the Conference on National Affairs (CONA). Students from 38 different states convened to debate issues ranging from legalizing prostitution and statutory rape laws, to gay marriage. For some students, however, the hypothetical proposals being debated were much more personal. A delegate that I met at my final CONA conference, Spencer Perry, had witnessed the fight for gay marriage hands-on. In 2008, California’s Proposition 8 ballot initiative threatened to forbid his mothers from ever marrying in their home state. Spencer and his family would continue to fight for national marriage equality until the Supreme Court’s five-to-four decision on June 26, 2013 that declared Prop 8 unconstitutional. Spencer recounted to me the process that unfolded in his family’s five-year journey to the Supreme Court. He was only 13 years old when his mothers Kris Perry and Sandy Stier sat him down to ask him if it would be okay to sue the state of California over Proposition 8. This ballot initiative would have added the clause, “only marriage between a man and a woman is valid or recognized in California,” to the state’s constitution. This constitutional amendment was initiated by ProtectMarriage.com, which helped put Proposition 8 on the ballot.

4

T H E D S J - S e p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

Other main supporters included the Roman Catholic Church, the National Organization for Marriage, and the American Family Association. Both Senator John McCain and Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich released statements supporting Prop 8, yet both stated it would be against the will of the people. Kris Perry was approached by producer and director Rob Reiner, one of the cofounders of the American Foundation for Equal Rights, and Chad Griffin, President of the Human Rights Campaign, to take up the fight for recognition of same-sex marriage. From that point on, this California couple would be one of two same-sex couples to be plaintiffs in this case. The lawsuit against Proposition 8 was originally filed in county court in Berkeley, California. The case was immediately bumped up to the District Court of the Northern District of California, presided over by Judge Vaughn Walker. I asked Spencer if there was any time in the progression of this case that he felt it had the potential to go to the Supreme Court. “After I sat and watched the arguments in District Court, a lawyer in the case mentioned that it had the possibility of going all the way to the Supreme Court,” said Perry. This was a critical moment for Spencer and his family, as they had just realized that their fight could have a broad impact on the entire country. Their lawsuit was victorious on August 4,

2010 when Judge Walker found Proposition 8 unconstitutional under both the Due Process and Equal Protection clauses of the 14th Amendment, and stated there was “no rational basis for refusing marriage licenses to same-sex couples.” On April 11, 2011, proponents of Proposition 8 filed a motion in district court after the decision, citing a post-trial statement by Judge Walker that he had been in a long-term relationship with another man. They claimed that this gave him “a direct personal interest in the outcome of the case.” District Court Judge James Ware heard the arguments on June 13, 2011, and denied Prop 8 supporters’ claim about Judge Walker the next day. Judge Ware wrote that “the presumption that Judge Walker, by virtue of being in a same-sex relationship, had a desire to be married that rendered him incapable of making an impartial decision, is as warrantless as the presumption that a female judge is incapable of being impartial in a case in which women seek legal relief.” The Prop 8 proponents went on to appeal to the Ninth District Court of Appeals and eventually all the way up to the Supreme Court. The feelings in Spencer’s family leading up to the oral arguments were “overwhelming and inconceivable at the same time.” Spencer and his twin brother Elliot originally did not have seats to listen to the oral arguments, but two members of the American Foundation for Equal Rights gave up their seats so that Spencer and his

brother could accompany their mothers Supreme Court noted that this was not a legally cognizable harm to advocates against into court. On the day of the trial hearing, Spencer same-sex marriage. “This case also offered those familiar with noted, “Each side has 30 minutes to present [its] case, but what a lot of people don’t constitutional law a refined explanation of know is that the judges can interrupt at any the standing doctrine. In order to bring suit in federal court, you must have a particular time to ask questions.” Kris and Sandy’s lawyer, Ted Olsen, harm, not just a general grievance. Here, the spent 20 minutes presenting his case and court said that proponents against same-sex then delegated the last 10 to the Attorney marriage did not have a cognizable harm, General of California to add closing remarks. but a grievance. This case helped refine the Spencer, stating his utmost respect for all requirements for standing in federal courts of the justices, noted some of the comments and gave a clearer view of who can bring that stood out to him. Justice Antonin such suits.” Just two days after the decision, Kris Scalia’s questioning of the consequences of children being raised by a same-sex couple and Sandy were married by California’s really hit home because Spencer knows Attorney General. Since Spencer was from personal experience that his mothers on the other side of the country, he was have done an amazing job. Spencer also FaceTiming on his iPhone with his twin noted that he was surprised to hear Justice brother during the ceremony. At the end Clarence Thomas comment during the case, of the ceremony, the Attorney General’s because he is known to remain silent during intern held up the iPhone so that Spencer could see his mothers be wed. He recalled oral arguments. After the arguments came the waiting having “excitement and pride in [his] family game. Starting at the beginning of June, yet shear remorse for not being able to both Kris and Sandy would go to the airport attend [his] mothers’ wedding.” Spencer noted that both of his mothers in Oakland and wait to see if there was a decision made on the Supreme Court case. will be lifelong advocates for LGBT equality, Otherwise, the couple would go just go to but they are still processing the events that work that day. The day that their decision unfolded over the last five years. For now, finally came, Spencer was away from his Spencer is starting his freshman year in the family in South Carolina on a pretrip with the California CONA delegation. When asked about his immediate feelings following the announcement, Spencer said he felt “overwhelmed, exuberant, and happy... however, a little skeptical.” “Not that many people know that there is a 25-day grace period after a Supreme Court decision for it to be appealed,” said Spencer. To get a better understanding of the legal ramifications of this case, I asked third-year William and Mary Law Student Bryan Charles Moore for his thoughts. “Hollingsworth v. Perry was a very interesting case from both social and legal standpoints,” said Moore. “While it did not offer a sweeping win to same-sex marriage advocates, the outcome nonetheless advanced the samesex marriage argument. The Kris Perry (left) and Sandy Stier (right) celebrate nation’s largest state (California) the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down now has same-sex marriage... The Proposition 8. Photo courtesy of people.com.

» NEWS

city where his family made history, studying at the George Washington University. He stated that he and his mothers will always be advocates for LGBT rights and hope to see more progress in the near future.

When asked about their thoughts on the case, William and Mary students displayed hope and optimism for the future: “Although the Hollingsworth decision did not go as far as we had hoped in recognizing the full equality of gay and lesbian couples on the state level, we are pleased to see gay marriages resuming in California.” - Zach Woodward (‘14), President of William and Mary Young Democrats

“As an immigrant I grew up viewing America as truly being the land of the free. As a gay immigrant I was hit with the reality that, equality in the US is still a fight. Seeing the ruling on Prop 8 inspired me and showed me that we are actually working towards being a more united, strong, diverse, and inclusive country where we live by the principles our country was founded on.” - Jonathan Schouten-Salazer (‘14) T H E D S J - S e p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

5


» NEWS

Same Love: A Personal Supreme Court Journey »

tyler brent, dsj staff reporter

In June of 2010, I ascended Black Mountain, North Carolina with YMCA Model United Nations to participate in the Conference on National Affairs (CONA). Students from 38 different states convened to debate issues ranging from legalizing prostitution and statutory rape laws, to gay marriage. For some students, however, the hypothetical proposals being debated were much more personal. A delegate that I met at my final CONA conference, Spencer Perry, had witnessed the fight for gay marriage hands-on. In 2008, California’s Proposition 8 ballot initiative threatened to forbid his mothers from ever marrying in their home state. Spencer and his family would continue to fight for national marriage equality until the Supreme Court’s five-to-four decision on June 26, 2013 that declared Prop 8 unconstitutional. Spencer recounted to me the process that unfolded in his family’s five-year journey to the Supreme Court. He was only 13 years old when his mothers Kris Perry and Sandy Stier sat him down to ask him if it would be okay to sue the state of California over Proposition 8. This ballot initiative would have added the clause, “only marriage between a man and a woman is valid or recognized in California,” to the state’s constitution. This constitutional amendment was initiated by ProtectMarriage.com, which helped put Proposition 8 on the ballot.

4

T H E D S J - S e p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

Other main supporters included the Roman Catholic Church, the National Organization for Marriage, and the American Family Association. Both Senator John McCain and Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich released statements supporting Prop 8, yet both stated it would be against the will of the people. Kris Perry was approached by producer and director Rob Reiner, one of the cofounders of the American Foundation for Equal Rights, and Chad Griffin, President of the Human Rights Campaign, to take up the fight for recognition of same-sex marriage. From that point on, this California couple would be one of two same-sex couples to be plaintiffs in this case. The lawsuit against Proposition 8 was originally filed in county court in Berkeley, California. The case was immediately bumped up to the District Court of the Northern District of California, presided over by Judge Vaughn Walker. I asked Spencer if there was any time in the progression of this case that he felt it had the potential to go to the Supreme Court. “After I sat and watched the arguments in District Court, a lawyer in the case mentioned that it had the possibility of going all the way to the Supreme Court,” said Perry. This was a critical moment for Spencer and his family, as they had just realized that their fight could have a broad impact on the entire country. Their lawsuit was victorious on August 4,

2010 when Judge Walker found Proposition 8 unconstitutional under both the Due Process and Equal Protection clauses of the 14th Amendment, and stated there was “no rational basis for refusing marriage licenses to same-sex couples.” On April 11, 2011, proponents of Proposition 8 filed a motion in district court after the decision, citing a post-trial statement by Judge Walker that he had been in a long-term relationship with another man. They claimed that this gave him “a direct personal interest in the outcome of the case.” District Court Judge James Ware heard the arguments on June 13, 2011, and denied Prop 8 supporters’ claim about Judge Walker the next day. Judge Ware wrote that “the presumption that Judge Walker, by virtue of being in a same-sex relationship, had a desire to be married that rendered him incapable of making an impartial decision, is as warrantless as the presumption that a female judge is incapable of being impartial in a case in which women seek legal relief.” The Prop 8 proponents went on to appeal to the Ninth District Court of Appeals and eventually all the way up to the Supreme Court. The feelings in Spencer’s family leading up to the oral arguments were “overwhelming and inconceivable at the same time.” Spencer and his twin brother Elliot originally did not have seats to listen to the oral arguments, but two members of the American Foundation for Equal Rights gave up their seats so that Spencer and his

brother could accompany their mothers Supreme Court noted that this was not a legally cognizable harm to advocates against into court. On the day of the trial hearing, Spencer same-sex marriage. “This case also offered those familiar with noted, “Each side has 30 minutes to present [its] case, but what a lot of people don’t constitutional law a refined explanation of know is that the judges can interrupt at any the standing doctrine. In order to bring suit in federal court, you must have a particular time to ask questions.” Kris and Sandy’s lawyer, Ted Olsen, harm, not just a general grievance. Here, the spent 20 minutes presenting his case and court said that proponents against same-sex then delegated the last 10 to the Attorney marriage did not have a cognizable harm, General of California to add closing remarks. but a grievance. This case helped refine the Spencer, stating his utmost respect for all requirements for standing in federal courts of the justices, noted some of the comments and gave a clearer view of who can bring that stood out to him. Justice Antonin such suits.” Just two days after the decision, Kris Scalia’s questioning of the consequences of children being raised by a same-sex couple and Sandy were married by California’s really hit home because Spencer knows Attorney General. Since Spencer was from personal experience that his mothers on the other side of the country, he was have done an amazing job. Spencer also FaceTiming on his iPhone with his twin noted that he was surprised to hear Justice brother during the ceremony. At the end Clarence Thomas comment during the case, of the ceremony, the Attorney General’s because he is known to remain silent during intern held up the iPhone so that Spencer could see his mothers be wed. He recalled oral arguments. After the arguments came the waiting having “excitement and pride in [his] family game. Starting at the beginning of June, yet shear remorse for not being able to both Kris and Sandy would go to the airport attend [his] mothers’ wedding.” Spencer noted that both of his mothers in Oakland and wait to see if there was a decision made on the Supreme Court case. will be lifelong advocates for LGBT equality, Otherwise, the couple would go just go to but they are still processing the events that work that day. The day that their decision unfolded over the last five years. For now, finally came, Spencer was away from his Spencer is starting his freshman year in the family in South Carolina on a pretrip with the California CONA delegation. When asked about his immediate feelings following the announcement, Spencer said he felt “overwhelmed, exuberant, and happy... however, a little skeptical.” “Not that many people know that there is a 25-day grace period after a Supreme Court decision for it to be appealed,” said Spencer. To get a better understanding of the legal ramifications of this case, I asked third-year William and Mary Law Student Bryan Charles Moore for his thoughts. “Hollingsworth v. Perry was a very interesting case from both social and legal standpoints,” said Moore. “While it did not offer a sweeping win to same-sex marriage advocates, the outcome nonetheless advanced the samesex marriage argument. The Kris Perry (left) and Sandy Stier (right) celebrate nation’s largest state (California) the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down now has same-sex marriage... The Proposition 8. Photo courtesy of people.com.

» NEWS

city where his family made history, studying at the George Washington University. He stated that he and his mothers will always be advocates for LGBT rights and hope to see more progress in the near future.

When asked about their thoughts on the case, William and Mary students displayed hope and optimism for the future: “Although the Hollingsworth decision did not go as far as we had hoped in recognizing the full equality of gay and lesbian couples on the state level, we are pleased to see gay marriages resuming in California.” - Zach Woodward (‘14), President of William and Mary Young Democrats

“As an immigrant I grew up viewing America as truly being the land of the free. As a gay immigrant I was hit with the reality that, equality in the US is still a fight. Seeing the ruling on Prop 8 inspired me and showed me that we are actually working towards being a more united, strong, diverse, and inclusive country where we live by the principles our country was founded on.” - Jonathan Schouten-Salazer (‘14) T H E D S J - S e p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

5


» NEWS

Hangout for Higher Education

Google Hangout offers a new medium for students and public officials to connect

»

eliza scheibe, dsj news editor

On Wednesday, July 10, students from across the Commonwealth tuned in to their computer screens to watch Virginia21’s first-ever live Google Hangout, featuring the Republican and Democratic candidates for governor, Ken Cuccinelli and Terry McAuliffe. This unique event, titled “Hangout for Higher Education,” allowed a select group of Virginia21 student officers from across the state to video chat live with the gubernatorial candidates and discuss their concerns about the future of higher education and the job market in Virginia. Founded in 2002 at William and Mary, Virginia21 is a statewide, non-profit, nonpartisan advocacy group for students at Virginia’s public colleges and universities. Each chapter’s main goal is to help the state government recognize the interests of young voters, organizing events like Hangout for Higher Ed to allow direct communication between students and legislators. Unfortunately, due to some technical difficulties with Google’s servers, the candidates’ appearance on the program was postponed for more than 20 minutes at the beginning of the program. Despite his calm exterior, Virginia21’s Executive Director and host of the Hangout, Tom Kramer, couldn’t help but voice his apprehension about the delay. “The goal was for this to work and make candidates more comfortable using [Google Hangout] in the future,” said Kramer. “We’ll have to have a chat with Google about that.” On the bright side, the delay—which, surprisingly, did not cause the program to lose any of its viewers—allowed the student officers to elaborate on their concerns about Virginia’s education system. William and Mary’s representative, Meg Schwenzfeier (’14), VP of Virginia21’s Richmond Oversight, said that she is hoping for a better redistribution of financial aid, particularly by allotting more aid to middleclass families who receive less aid than poorer families, but do not make enough income to avoid thousands of dollars of debt in the future. “Debt determines future success,” said Schwenzfeier—and she has a point. The more debt students amass over their time in college, the longer they will have to work to pay it off before they can start accumulating their own wealth.

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As the delay continued, the other students expressed anxiety about financial aid, as well. They also addressed their concerns about the quality of education in Virginia, hoping that future budget cuts will not be aimed at lowering educators’ salaries. Once Google’s support team finally came to the rescue, the first candidate, Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli, was able to answer some of the students’ questions. Having received degrees from both the University of Virginia and George Mason

University, and his wife and children also having attended Virginia universities, Cuccinelli has a personal investment in Virginia’s higher education system. When asked how he plans to pursue efficiency while still keeping quality a top priority, the Attorney General responded that his main priority will be to cut costs without lowering educators’ salaries. In order to keep tuition from rising so much faster than inflation, he hopes to focus on gaining efficiency outside of teaching costs.

Ken Cuccinelli, current Attorney General and a Republican Candidate for Governor of Virginia, made an appearance on Google Hangout to chat with members of Virginia21 about his platform and relevant issues pertaining to college students. All photos courtesy of Meg Schwenzfeier.

Cuccinelli also believes that, as governor, it will be important to appoint Boards of Visitors who ask questions and create budgets that “relate to the direction the university wants to go.” This will help maintain efficiency without sacrificing the quality of education offered at each university, he argued. When asked by Schwenzfeier how he, as a conservative Republican, plans to gain the youth vote, Cuccinelli avoided addressing his stances on social issues and, instead, elaborated on his plans for job creation and workforce development through education. A patent lawyer himself, he hopes to help universities generate intellectual property to create job opportunities, if elected governor. He also proposes to alleviate the “middleclass squeeze” by offering middle-income families more work/study and internship opportunities. Before signing off, the Attorney General stressed that, if nothing else, students should look at his four previous elections and terms in office to assess his credibility as a candidate. “What I ran on is what I pursued,” said Cuccinelli. Next up was Terry McAuliffe, the Democratic nominee. Before answering the students’ questions, McAuliffe took a few moments to talk about his background as a businessman and an investor. He emphasized that his previous business experience will enable him to create jobs for future graduates, if elected governor.

“I view education as an investment. I do not view it as an expense,” said McAuliffe. When asked about whether his previous experience in politics would hinder his ability to reach across the aisle in government, McAuliffe reassured the participants that his previous political experience would do just the opposite for him in government. He then cited Mark Warner as an example of a previous governor who was able to take his passion for business and politics, and redirect it toward a more efficient, “fresh approach” in government. When asked by Schwenzfeier how he plans to maintain both efficiency and quality in Virginia’s education system, McAuliffe said he plans to give more autonomy to Boards of Visitors. Like Cuccinelli, he believes that an active Board of Visitors will foster both efficiency and quality in university budgets, if they are appointed based on their dedication to the university. McAuliffe used his last few moments on the program to talk about his pro-business plans to improve transportation, as well as his liberal stance on women’s healthcare decisions—a stance that would resonate with a large number of young voters. After the broadcast was over, Schwenzfeier had a few words to say about the candidates’ responses to her questions. “I think that the Attorney General did a good job describing his business philosophy and how his focus on job creation could

» NEWS

help young people... but I would have liked him to have provided more specifics on how much attention he plans to pay to social issues if he is elected governor,” said Schwenzfeier. “His party had problems with social issues and young voters in the 2012 elections, and the amount of time and energy devoted to social issues like ultrasound legislation.” “Both candidates got the efficiency versus quality question,” Schwenzfeier continued, “but neither candidate really discussed how they would work to ensure that schools get enough funding to maintain quality without increasing tuition. The state government continues to underfund financial aid and cut funding to other parts of school budgets, and if the money to make up the difference doesn’t come from tuition increases, things end up getting cut. Neither candidate really talked about that.” On the whole, though, Schwenzfeier was pleased with the Hangout for Higher Ed.  “Technical difficulties aside, I think this forum was a success,” said Schwenzfeier. “Virginia21 will keep working to engage candidates through social media events like the Hangout for Higher Ed in the future.” In Schwenzfeier’s opinion, this event serves as a testament to Virginia21’s ability to provide students a chance to connect with public officials. “Virginia21 offers a incredible opportunities, like this Hangout, for students to be active in political issues that matter most to them,” said Keenan Kelley (’14), president of the William and Mary chapter. The Hangout for Higher Ed not only provided a public forum on vital issues, but it was also broadcast through a medium that was accessible to any student with an Internet connection. For those who were unable to watch the program live at the scheduled time, the Hangout is posted on the front page of the Virginia21 website. Students interested in getting involved with William and Mary’s chapter of Virginia21 should visit its website at http://wmpeople.wm.edu/ site/page/virginia21/home, or send its officers an email at virginia21@email.wm.edu.

Members of Virginia21 got to meet exclusively with current Governor of Virginia Bob McDonnell over the summer to discuss higher education funding in the state budget.

T H E D S J - S e p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

7


» NEWS

Hangout for Higher Education

Google Hangout offers a new medium for students and public officials to connect

»

eliza scheibe, dsj news editor

On Wednesday, July 10, students from across the Commonwealth tuned in to their computer screens to watch Virginia21’s first-ever live Google Hangout, featuring the Republican and Democratic candidates for governor, Ken Cuccinelli and Terry McAuliffe. This unique event, titled “Hangout for Higher Education,” allowed a select group of Virginia21 student officers from across the state to video chat live with the gubernatorial candidates and discuss their concerns about the future of higher education and the job market in Virginia. Founded in 2002 at William and Mary, Virginia21 is a statewide, non-profit, nonpartisan advocacy group for students at Virginia’s public colleges and universities. Each chapter’s main goal is to help the state government recognize the interests of young voters, organizing events like Hangout for Higher Ed to allow direct communication between students and legislators. Unfortunately, due to some technical difficulties with Google’s servers, the candidates’ appearance on the program was postponed for more than 20 minutes at the beginning of the program. Despite his calm exterior, Virginia21’s Executive Director and host of the Hangout, Tom Kramer, couldn’t help but voice his apprehension about the delay. “The goal was for this to work and make candidates more comfortable using [Google Hangout] in the future,” said Kramer. “We’ll have to have a chat with Google about that.” On the bright side, the delay—which, surprisingly, did not cause the program to lose any of its viewers—allowed the student officers to elaborate on their concerns about Virginia’s education system. William and Mary’s representative, Meg Schwenzfeier (’14), VP of Virginia21’s Richmond Oversight, said that she is hoping for a better redistribution of financial aid, particularly by allotting more aid to middleclass families who receive less aid than poorer families, but do not make enough income to avoid thousands of dollars of debt in the future. “Debt determines future success,” said Schwenzfeier—and she has a point. The more debt students amass over their time in college, the longer they will have to work to pay it off before they can start accumulating their own wealth.

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As the delay continued, the other students expressed anxiety about financial aid, as well. They also addressed their concerns about the quality of education in Virginia, hoping that future budget cuts will not be aimed at lowering educators’ salaries. Once Google’s support team finally came to the rescue, the first candidate, Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli, was able to answer some of the students’ questions. Having received degrees from both the University of Virginia and George Mason

University, and his wife and children also having attended Virginia universities, Cuccinelli has a personal investment in Virginia’s higher education system. When asked how he plans to pursue efficiency while still keeping quality a top priority, the Attorney General responded that his main priority will be to cut costs without lowering educators’ salaries. In order to keep tuition from rising so much faster than inflation, he hopes to focus on gaining efficiency outside of teaching costs.

Ken Cuccinelli, current Attorney General and a Republican Candidate for Governor of Virginia, made an appearance on Google Hangout to chat with members of Virginia21 about his platform and relevant issues pertaining to college students. All photos courtesy of Meg Schwenzfeier.

Cuccinelli also believes that, as governor, it will be important to appoint Boards of Visitors who ask questions and create budgets that “relate to the direction the university wants to go.” This will help maintain efficiency without sacrificing the quality of education offered at each university, he argued. When asked by Schwenzfeier how he, as a conservative Republican, plans to gain the youth vote, Cuccinelli avoided addressing his stances on social issues and, instead, elaborated on his plans for job creation and workforce development through education. A patent lawyer himself, he hopes to help universities generate intellectual property to create job opportunities, if elected governor. He also proposes to alleviate the “middleclass squeeze” by offering middle-income families more work/study and internship opportunities. Before signing off, the Attorney General stressed that, if nothing else, students should look at his four previous elections and terms in office to assess his credibility as a candidate. “What I ran on is what I pursued,” said Cuccinelli. Next up was Terry McAuliffe, the Democratic nominee. Before answering the students’ questions, McAuliffe took a few moments to talk about his background as a businessman and an investor. He emphasized that his previous business experience will enable him to create jobs for future graduates, if elected governor.

“I view education as an investment. I do not view it as an expense,” said McAuliffe. When asked about whether his previous experience in politics would hinder his ability to reach across the aisle in government, McAuliffe reassured the participants that his previous political experience would do just the opposite for him in government. He then cited Mark Warner as an example of a previous governor who was able to take his passion for business and politics, and redirect it toward a more efficient, “fresh approach” in government. When asked by Schwenzfeier how he plans to maintain both efficiency and quality in Virginia’s education system, McAuliffe said he plans to give more autonomy to Boards of Visitors. Like Cuccinelli, he believes that an active Board of Visitors will foster both efficiency and quality in university budgets, if they are appointed based on their dedication to the university. McAuliffe used his last few moments on the program to talk about his pro-business plans to improve transportation, as well as his liberal stance on women’s healthcare decisions—a stance that would resonate with a large number of young voters. After the broadcast was over, Schwenzfeier had a few words to say about the candidates’ responses to her questions. “I think that the Attorney General did a good job describing his business philosophy and how his focus on job creation could

» NEWS

help young people... but I would have liked him to have provided more specifics on how much attention he plans to pay to social issues if he is elected governor,” said Schwenzfeier. “His party had problems with social issues and young voters in the 2012 elections, and the amount of time and energy devoted to social issues like ultrasound legislation.” “Both candidates got the efficiency versus quality question,” Schwenzfeier continued, “but neither candidate really discussed how they would work to ensure that schools get enough funding to maintain quality without increasing tuition. The state government continues to underfund financial aid and cut funding to other parts of school budgets, and if the money to make up the difference doesn’t come from tuition increases, things end up getting cut. Neither candidate really talked about that.” On the whole, though, Schwenzfeier was pleased with the Hangout for Higher Ed.  “Technical difficulties aside, I think this forum was a success,” said Schwenzfeier. “Virginia21 will keep working to engage candidates through social media events like the Hangout for Higher Ed in the future.” In Schwenzfeier’s opinion, this event serves as a testament to Virginia21’s ability to provide students a chance to connect with public officials. “Virginia21 offers a incredible opportunities, like this Hangout, for students to be active in political issues that matter most to them,” said Keenan Kelley (’14), president of the William and Mary chapter. The Hangout for Higher Ed not only provided a public forum on vital issues, but it was also broadcast through a medium that was accessible to any student with an Internet connection. For those who were unable to watch the program live at the scheduled time, the Hangout is posted on the front page of the Virginia21 website. Students interested in getting involved with William and Mary’s chapter of Virginia21 should visit its website at http://wmpeople.wm.edu/ site/page/virginia21/home, or send its officers an email at virginia21@email.wm.edu.

Members of Virginia21 got to meet exclusively with current Governor of Virginia Bob McDonnell over the summer to discuss higher education funding in the state budget.

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» NEWS

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One Tribe. One Family. Orientation 2013.

sydni scrofani, dsj associate news editor

Each year, orientation confirms that William and Mary really is a family and this year was no exception. An immense amount of thought and planning goes into orientation to make the experience helpful and memorable for new students. The Orientation Aides volunteer a great deal of their time to “welcome the new students and help acclimate them to their new home,” says Maddie Kaplan, one of this year’s 200 OAs. W&M is indeed a home and orientation seeks to draw the new students into the community and make them feel like an integral part of the College. According to OA Greg Skipworth, orientation was “really great.” He worked with the transfer students who are a special and important addition to the W&M family. Skipworth, a past transfer student, understands the challenges of transferring to the College. Transfer students often get lost in the crowd because they are so few in number compared with the incoming freshman. Skipworth spends a lot of time engaging with the transfer students and drawing them into the W&M community. “As the week went on [his transfer group] came together as a whole and embraced the W&M family.” Kaplan also considered orientation to be a success: “I thought Orientation went really well this year,” she says. “The new students were enthusiastic about arriving at W&M. After convocation, the transfer students in my group confided in me that initially they had doubts about the whole orientation business, but they said they actually really enjoyed themselves and already felt a connection to the College and to each other.” This is Kaplan’s second year as an OA. Both Skipworth and Kaplan enjoyed getting to know individual students, spending time with them, and learning about their pasts. “I enjoyed talking with the new students and hearing the different perspectives each person brought,” says Kaplan. W&M is special in that it is filled with individuals like Skipworth and Kaplan who really take an interest in other people. They create the wonderful community that we have here at W&M and they desire to instill the same sense of community and family in new students. “I truly love W&M,” says Kaplan. “When I first came here as a freshman, I thought I was going to be really homesick, but orientation threw me right into the thick of all things William & Mary, and I loved it! I wanted to give back to the College and provide a similar experience for incoming students.” The highlight of orientation for many of the OAs was Sunday night at the W&M Night of Entertainment. “The cheer-offs between all the dorms are always entertaining… and the illusionist performs here and he’s always mind-blowing!” says Kaplan. For Skipworth, a major highlight was seeing the more shy students get involved in all the activities and begin to embrace the W&M community. “There were lots of good things going on, so it’s hard to pick out

8

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highlights,” he says. The Orientation Aide Directors and the Orientation Aides arrive more than a week before orientation starts to begin prep work for the incoming students. Once the students arrive, the OAs are basically working around the clock to ensure that each student transitions smoothly into W&M. Physical exhaustion is definitely a challenge for the OAs during orientation week. “Regardless of how you feel, when you’re with students you’re a positive influence,” Skipworth commented. Families do anything for one another and the OAs exhibit the same sentiment by their commitment and devotion to the new students. For me, nothing says family like convocation does when all the new students walk through the Wren Building and are greeted by a seemingly endless line of smiling W&M students excited to welcome their newest family members to the Tribe. Even with this year’s rainy weather, students lined the Wren courtyard, spilling into the Sunken Gardens, with undimmed enthusiasm. As the Wren bell ushered in the academic year, old students and new were united as one family.

Adventure Dub

» NEWS Clockwise from top left: the crowd at the concert at Matoaka Amphitheater; artist Le1f; the duo behind Adventure Club; (from left to right) students Steven Arquieta (‘14), Christine Shen ( ‘14), and Jinri Hong (‘14), who managed to snag a photo with one of the members of Adventure Club after the concert.

A review of the Adventure Club concert at Lake Matoaka Amphitheater »

christine shen, dsj co-editor-in-chief

Magenta lights cast an eerie glow on the shores of Lake Matoaka as loud, heavy bass notes throbbed out across the water. A pulsing mosh pit of students, full of sweat, energy and excitement were crowded before the stage. This was the scene at the recent Welcome Back concert, organized by Alma Mater Productions, on the night of September 7th. The concert started at 7:30, opening with rap artist Le1f who hails from New York. “I’m in Williamsburg, VA serving collegiate realness. knee high socks with the stripes, and all,” tweeted Le1f on the night of the concert. He began as a producer for hip-hop group Das Racist and made his solo debut with the mixtape “Dark York”. Le1f He released his first EP titled “Liquid” in 2012 and his second mixtape, “Fly Zone” in January of this year. His most popular songs include “Wut” and most recently “Damn Son”. Le1f stirred up a bit of controversy in the hip-hop community by being openly gay. In his music video for “Wut”, he raps while

“sitting on the knee of a mostly naked, oiled-down, Pikachu maskwearing white guy,” as the Daily Beast puts it. But his confidence and swagger is apparent not only in his appearance but in his lyrics as well. “This yuppie’s talking blah blah, he wants to Bink my Jar-Jar / He’s twinked out / I’m like nuh-uh. I’m laughing at ‘im like haha / I’m an emperor,” he raps in “Wut”. Adventure Club started their set at 8:30. The dubstep duo of producers/DJs Christian Srigley and Leighton James are based out of Montreal, Canada. The group formed in high school, originally starting as a punk rock band and later transitioned to electronic music. The duo rose to fame through social media networks, making their big break by getting their remix of “Everything to Me” by Lips featured on UKF Dubstep’s Youtube channel in 2011, which has reached close to two million views. The group has since produced several dubstep favorites, including “Do I See Color” and “Rise and Fall” featuring recently popular American electronic dance music group Krewella. “I was very happy with the venue, turnout, and atmosphere,” says Nathaniel Chen (‘16). “The show was very well done and was much improved over last year’s opening concert with White Panda in the campus center. I hope AMP and the Student Assembly can bring in more well known DJ’s and electronic producers on a more frequent basis!”

A group of OAs getting pumped in front of Botetourt. Photo courtesy of Hope Thompson (‘16).

T H E D S J - S e p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

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» NEWS

»

One Tribe. One Family. Orientation 2013.

sydni scrofani, dsj associate news editor

Each year, orientation confirms that William and Mary really is a family and this year was no exception. An immense amount of thought and planning goes into orientation to make the experience helpful and memorable for new students. The Orientation Aides volunteer a great deal of their time to “welcome the new students and help acclimate them to their new home,” says Maddie Kaplan, one of this year’s 200 OAs. W&M is indeed a home and orientation seeks to draw the new students into the community and make them feel like an integral part of the College. According to OA Greg Skipworth, orientation was “really great.” He worked with the transfer students who are a special and important addition to the W&M family. Skipworth, a past transfer student, understands the challenges of transferring to the College. Transfer students often get lost in the crowd because they are so few in number compared with the incoming freshman. Skipworth spends a lot of time engaging with the transfer students and drawing them into the W&M community. “As the week went on [his transfer group] came together as a whole and embraced the W&M family.” Kaplan also considered orientation to be a success: “I thought Orientation went really well this year,” she says. “The new students were enthusiastic about arriving at W&M. After convocation, the transfer students in my group confided in me that initially they had doubts about the whole orientation business, but they said they actually really enjoyed themselves and already felt a connection to the College and to each other.” This is Kaplan’s second year as an OA. Both Skipworth and Kaplan enjoyed getting to know individual students, spending time with them, and learning about their pasts. “I enjoyed talking with the new students and hearing the different perspectives each person brought,” says Kaplan. W&M is special in that it is filled with individuals like Skipworth and Kaplan who really take an interest in other people. They create the wonderful community that we have here at W&M and they desire to instill the same sense of community and family in new students. “I truly love W&M,” says Kaplan. “When I first came here as a freshman, I thought I was going to be really homesick, but orientation threw me right into the thick of all things William & Mary, and I loved it! I wanted to give back to the College and provide a similar experience for incoming students.” The highlight of orientation for many of the OAs was Sunday night at the W&M Night of Entertainment. “The cheer-offs between all the dorms are always entertaining… and the illusionist performs here and he’s always mind-blowing!” says Kaplan. For Skipworth, a major highlight was seeing the more shy students get involved in all the activities and begin to embrace the W&M community. “There were lots of good things going on, so it’s hard to pick out

8

T H E D S J - S e p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

highlights,” he says. The Orientation Aide Directors and the Orientation Aides arrive more than a week before orientation starts to begin prep work for the incoming students. Once the students arrive, the OAs are basically working around the clock to ensure that each student transitions smoothly into W&M. Physical exhaustion is definitely a challenge for the OAs during orientation week. “Regardless of how you feel, when you’re with students you’re a positive influence,” Skipworth commented. Families do anything for one another and the OAs exhibit the same sentiment by their commitment and devotion to the new students. For me, nothing says family like convocation does when all the new students walk through the Wren Building and are greeted by a seemingly endless line of smiling W&M students excited to welcome their newest family members to the Tribe. Even with this year’s rainy weather, students lined the Wren courtyard, spilling into the Sunken Gardens, with undimmed enthusiasm. As the Wren bell ushered in the academic year, old students and new were united as one family.

Adventure Dub

» NEWS Clockwise from top left: the crowd at the concert at Matoaka Amphitheater; artist Le1f; the duo behind Adventure Club; (from left to right) students Steven Arquieta (‘14), Christine Shen ( ‘14), and Jinri Hong (‘14), who managed to snag a photo with one of the members of Adventure Club after the concert.

A review of the Adventure Club concert at Lake Matoaka Amphitheater »

christine shen, dsj co-editor-in-chief

Magenta lights cast an eerie glow on the shores of Lake Matoaka as loud, heavy bass notes throbbed out across the water. A pulsing mosh pit of students, full of sweat, energy and excitement were crowded before the stage. This was the scene at the recent Welcome Back concert, organized by Alma Mater Productions, on the night of September 7th. The concert started at 7:30, opening with rap artist Le1f who hails from New York. “I’m in Williamsburg, VA serving collegiate realness. knee high socks with the stripes, and all,” tweeted Le1f on the night of the concert. He began as a producer for hip-hop group Das Racist and made his solo debut with the mixtape “Dark York”. Le1f He released his first EP titled “Liquid” in 2012 and his second mixtape, “Fly Zone” in January of this year. His most popular songs include “Wut” and most recently “Damn Son”. Le1f stirred up a bit of controversy in the hip-hop community by being openly gay. In his music video for “Wut”, he raps while

“sitting on the knee of a mostly naked, oiled-down, Pikachu maskwearing white guy,” as the Daily Beast puts it. But his confidence and swagger is apparent not only in his appearance but in his lyrics as well. “This yuppie’s talking blah blah, he wants to Bink my Jar-Jar / He’s twinked out / I’m like nuh-uh. I’m laughing at ‘im like haha / I’m an emperor,” he raps in “Wut”. Adventure Club started their set at 8:30. The dubstep duo of producers/DJs Christian Srigley and Leighton James are based out of Montreal, Canada. The group formed in high school, originally starting as a punk rock band and later transitioned to electronic music. The duo rose to fame through social media networks, making their big break by getting their remix of “Everything to Me” by Lips featured on UKF Dubstep’s Youtube channel in 2011, which has reached close to two million views. The group has since produced several dubstep favorites, including “Do I See Color” and “Rise and Fall” featuring recently popular American electronic dance music group Krewella. “I was very happy with the venue, turnout, and atmosphere,” says Nathaniel Chen (‘16). “The show was very well done and was much improved over last year’s opening concert with White Panda in the campus center. I hope AMP and the Student Assembly can bring in more well known DJ’s and electronic producers on a more frequent basis!”

A group of OAs getting pumped in front of Botetourt. Photo courtesy of Hope Thompson (‘16).

T H E D S J - S e p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

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»

style

Notes from a Transfer on Convocation

Notes from a Student’s Second Convocation »abigail

»molly

earner, dsj style editor

Last year I was a freshman, and I still remember the heady rush of first exiting the Wren building into the sights and sounds beyond. I remember passing down the steps into a tunnel of outstretched hands and shouting faces. I remember half jogging in my pumps, slapping hands and smiling wide enough to make my face ache. It had been a quick, two-minute event. It was over too soon, a kaleidoscope of colors and sounds and giddy emotion. Now that I am a returning sophomore, Convocation looked a bit different when approached from the other side of Wren. There was still the excitement, the anticipation… but for the new students who were going emerge. It was an

Above: Convocation speaker Nancy Gunn (‘88) awaits her turn to take the podium. Right: College President Taylor Reveley makes a pithy address to the crowd. All photos by Sam Girdzis.

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excitement born out my memories of the first Convocation. I was determined to give the dazed new freshmen and transfers a welcome they wouldn’t forget. As the freshmen came down the long chute of hands, I watched each new face, intrigued by every expression. “Go Tribe! Go Tribe! Welcome to the Tribe! Welcome! Welcome!” I tried to make each new phrase as energetic as the last, trying valiantly to escape monotony. Slapping hands was cathartic, a touch of skin sometimes awkward, sometimes joy-inspiring, as I watched some freshmen’s grins grow in proportion to my enthusiasm. The line of new students would sometimes thin, other times slow down. Some new students had slack-jawed expressions, of either surprise

or disinterest. Others had a determined look on their faces, as they purposefully aimed and slapped every single hand offered. Still others had a casual smirk plastered across their faces. My favorites were the students whose faces were lit up, whose mouths were open in a stupid grin of excitement. This was when I felt it was all worth it, standing in the rain with my arm aching and palm smarting. I checked off my list the freshmen and transfers I knew who came down the line. I switched in and out only once, for a short rest. I came for the very beginning, and stayed till the very end. I was soaked and hungry and proud. It was a good way to spend the end of the first day of classes. Go Tribe!

style

kahler, dsj staff reporter

I’m a sophomore transfer from the University of Richmond, so I thought I had the whole college orientation thing down. And I got a lot of what I expected: diversity talks, alcohol education and the period of adjustment necessary to become (re)accustomed to dining hall food. What I wasn’t entirely prepared for, despite all the flyers and signs advertising it, was a little something I’ve heard called Tribe Pride. Now, I’m not the type that goes crazy at pep rallies, or even the type that dutifully memorizes group cheers. I consider myself to be more of an observer. I didn’t feel I was fully a member of the William and Mary family until I went through the first day of classes and an event called Convocation. Rewind to the night before classes start. It had already been a few days since we started the strange fusion of summer camp and spirit week that was orientation. The nervous tension had deflated just enough to remind us new folk that we had totally forgotten to get at least two of our textbooks and a calculator. That Tuesday, transfers and freshmen alike said goodbye to their orientation groups, made multiple rush trips to the bookstore, and set alarm clocks for 8:00, 7:00, and even 5:30 AM, in excited anticipation for their first classes on the William and Mary campus. As a transfer, the magic might have been a little lost on me, but even I was a little sad to see my orientation group go. The freshmen crazies definitely rubbed off on me more than I realized. That night in my dorm, as I tried to keep myself from sweating in the non-air conditioned room through the combined powers of Jedi mind magic and a tiny yet valiant desktop fan, I mentally walked the paths to my classes, tried to remember my professors’ names and imagined myself sitting down in a room full of people I’d never met before. I have to admit, Convocation was the last thing on my mind. Then, on Wednesday, in the

A line of freshman make their way through the Wren Courtyard, unperturbed by scattered raindrops and cheered on by their fellow Tribesmen. afterglow of labs and discussions, I remembered! (A text from my friend may have done the trick.) The rest of the transfers and I got a little dressed up and a little excited. We hoped that, for a few hours at least, Williamsburg would forget to rain or engulf us in heat waves. Sadly, Williamsburg decided to remind us where we were, and we had a wet Convocation ceremony, which has probably (definitely) happened before. Despite this, every seat was filled, and the show went on. And though we’d been on this campus only five days, a few things were already familiar: the unsurprisingly unexpected rain, President Reveley’s droll tone, and the school song. Good old Williamsburg weather. Good old Reveley. We had a few Good Olds. And we were reminded that while we were here, we would find even more – not only in the buildings and history surrounding us, but in the friends who (as we’ve been told countless times by cheesy movies, our parents, and our OAs) will last a lifetime. Sadly, due to the capricious wrath of the weather gods, things were skipped. President Reveley had to cut his speech short. Nancy Gunn, successful producer and alum, gave us the five-act story of her life, but reminded us that the

finale is oftentimes much quieter and more fulfilling than we could ever imagine. And, in a fitting end to a quietly fulfilling day, we made our first walk through the Wren building as William and Mary students. Some of us (myself included) wondered how any of the upperclassmen could ever stand outside in the mud and rain with no ulterior motive but sheer school pride. Standing near the back of the unbelievably long line that was winding its way through Wren’s short hall, I was sure that by the time I emerged onto the opposite side I would be met with a dwindling crowd and some weakened high-fives. My expectations were surpassed beyond anything I thought, and I emerged from the ancient Wren building into the overwhelming sight and sound of the wildly enthusiastic and welcoming Tribe family. There’s nothing like walking through the crowd of students who were even wetter than I was, who had waited so long for me to emerge, and realizing that I was in the right place. Go Tribe!

T H E D S J - S e p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

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»

»

style

Notes from a Transfer on Convocation

Notes from a Student’s Second Convocation »abigail

»molly

earner, dsj style editor

Last year I was a freshman, and I still remember the heady rush of first exiting the Wren building into the sights and sounds beyond. I remember passing down the steps into a tunnel of outstretched hands and shouting faces. I remember half jogging in my pumps, slapping hands and smiling wide enough to make my face ache. It had been a quick, two-minute event. It was over too soon, a kaleidoscope of colors and sounds and giddy emotion. Now that I am a returning sophomore, Convocation looked a bit different when approached from the other side of Wren. There was still the excitement, the anticipation… but for the new students who were going emerge. It was an

Above: Convocation speaker Nancy Gunn (‘88) awaits her turn to take the podium. Right: College President Taylor Reveley makes a pithy address to the crowd. All photos by Sam Girdzis.

10

T H E D S J - S e p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

excitement born out my memories of the first Convocation. I was determined to give the dazed new freshmen and transfers a welcome they wouldn’t forget. As the freshmen came down the long chute of hands, I watched each new face, intrigued by every expression. “Go Tribe! Go Tribe! Welcome to the Tribe! Welcome! Welcome!” I tried to make each new phrase as energetic as the last, trying valiantly to escape monotony. Slapping hands was cathartic, a touch of skin sometimes awkward, sometimes joy-inspiring, as I watched some freshmen’s grins grow in proportion to my enthusiasm. The line of new students would sometimes thin, other times slow down. Some new students had slack-jawed expressions, of either surprise

or disinterest. Others had a determined look on their faces, as they purposefully aimed and slapped every single hand offered. Still others had a casual smirk plastered across their faces. My favorites were the students whose faces were lit up, whose mouths were open in a stupid grin of excitement. This was when I felt it was all worth it, standing in the rain with my arm aching and palm smarting. I checked off my list the freshmen and transfers I knew who came down the line. I switched in and out only once, for a short rest. I came for the very beginning, and stayed till the very end. I was soaked and hungry and proud. It was a good way to spend the end of the first day of classes. Go Tribe!

style

kahler, dsj staff reporter

I’m a sophomore transfer from the University of Richmond, so I thought I had the whole college orientation thing down. And I got a lot of what I expected: diversity talks, alcohol education and the period of adjustment necessary to become (re)accustomed to dining hall food. What I wasn’t entirely prepared for, despite all the flyers and signs advertising it, was a little something I’ve heard called Tribe Pride. Now, I’m not the type that goes crazy at pep rallies, or even the type that dutifully memorizes group cheers. I consider myself to be more of an observer. I didn’t feel I was fully a member of the William and Mary family until I went through the first day of classes and an event called Convocation. Rewind to the night before classes start. It had already been a few days since we started the strange fusion of summer camp and spirit week that was orientation. The nervous tension had deflated just enough to remind us new folk that we had totally forgotten to get at least two of our textbooks and a calculator. That Tuesday, transfers and freshmen alike said goodbye to their orientation groups, made multiple rush trips to the bookstore, and set alarm clocks for 8:00, 7:00, and even 5:30 AM, in excited anticipation for their first classes on the William and Mary campus. As a transfer, the magic might have been a little lost on me, but even I was a little sad to see my orientation group go. The freshmen crazies definitely rubbed off on me more than I realized. That night in my dorm, as I tried to keep myself from sweating in the non-air conditioned room through the combined powers of Jedi mind magic and a tiny yet valiant desktop fan, I mentally walked the paths to my classes, tried to remember my professors’ names and imagined myself sitting down in a room full of people I’d never met before. I have to admit, Convocation was the last thing on my mind. Then, on Wednesday, in the

A line of freshman make their way through the Wren Courtyard, unperturbed by scattered raindrops and cheered on by their fellow Tribesmen. afterglow of labs and discussions, I remembered! (A text from my friend may have done the trick.) The rest of the transfers and I got a little dressed up and a little excited. We hoped that, for a few hours at least, Williamsburg would forget to rain or engulf us in heat waves. Sadly, Williamsburg decided to remind us where we were, and we had a wet Convocation ceremony, which has probably (definitely) happened before. Despite this, every seat was filled, and the show went on. And though we’d been on this campus only five days, a few things were already familiar: the unsurprisingly unexpected rain, President Reveley’s droll tone, and the school song. Good old Williamsburg weather. Good old Reveley. We had a few Good Olds. And we were reminded that while we were here, we would find even more – not only in the buildings and history surrounding us, but in the friends who (as we’ve been told countless times by cheesy movies, our parents, and our OAs) will last a lifetime. Sadly, due to the capricious wrath of the weather gods, things were skipped. President Reveley had to cut his speech short. Nancy Gunn, successful producer and alum, gave us the five-act story of her life, but reminded us that the

finale is oftentimes much quieter and more fulfilling than we could ever imagine. And, in a fitting end to a quietly fulfilling day, we made our first walk through the Wren building as William and Mary students. Some of us (myself included) wondered how any of the upperclassmen could ever stand outside in the mud and rain with no ulterior motive but sheer school pride. Standing near the back of the unbelievably long line that was winding its way through Wren’s short hall, I was sure that by the time I emerged onto the opposite side I would be met with a dwindling crowd and some weakened high-fives. My expectations were surpassed beyond anything I thought, and I emerged from the ancient Wren building into the overwhelming sight and sound of the wildly enthusiastic and welcoming Tribe family. There’s nothing like walking through the crowd of students who were even wetter than I was, who had waited so long for me to emerge, and realizing that I was in the right place. Go Tribe!

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style

Old Sadler vs. New Sadler

style

Increased Food Options, Space, and Time Creates a New and Improved Sadler Dining Experience »

chelsea pittman, dsj associate style editor

At the end of the spring 2013 semester, construction had already begun in the Sadler lobby for what was soon to be a new and improved Sadler dining room. Students were able to keep up with the progress via updates on the Overheard at William and Mary Facebook group page, and those updates caused much anticipation and excitement from returning students as well as a little jealousy from those students who had already graduated. The changes to Sadler also sparked questions and skepticism as to whether or not those changes were simply aesthetic or if the food served was also going to get an upgrade. Well, now that those changes have been made and the new Sadler has been up and running, it is obvious that the new Sadler consists of both an upgraded physical appearance as well as an improvement in what is served. In previous years, the Sadler Center Cafeteria, or Real Food On Campus (RFoC), could be characterized by its painfully long lines and crowds during peak eating hours and its lack of food options; however, all that has changed for the better with this school year’s new and improved RFoC dining hall. The first thing you notice as you walk into the dining hall and stand upon the signature William and Mary monogram is the size. The expanded and more open dining room eliminates the issue of space and combats the previous routine of weaving in and out of crowds of people just to get from the salad

bar to the drinks. The seating area has also been greatly expanded, so there is no longer an issue of seating during those times where Sadler can be particularly crowded. Also, the dining stations themselves have undergone a major makeover with the addition of multiple stations where students have the pleasure to go back for seconds, thirds, or fourths without the added hassle of waiting in a long line each time, while those students with special dietary needs, such as vegetarian options and gluten free foods, now have the luxury of having an entire station dedicated to serving those foods. Where at one time your choices in Sadler were to eat either the pasta of the day, pizza of the day, sandwiches, salad, or the main course served in the center, now students can enjoy a new Mongolian grill station and a station that serves grilled chicken and burgers all day, every day. Another major change that has taken place in Sadler is the late night food option that is now available in the dining hall. Previously, Sadler closed at 9 p.m., the latest out of the other dining areas, the Commons and the Marketplace Café, leaving students limited in their oncampus eating options during the late night hours. However, Sadler has now expanded their hours to midnight every night of the week, including weekends.

The student reception to the changes in Sadler has been positive overall. “Students have been really happy with all of the changes,” said Matthew Moss, the Resident District Manager of William and Mary Dining Services. Edith Amponsah (’16) recalled that the added space had a major impact on her experience in Sadler. “It’s bigger and prettier” than old Sadler, but the food in her opinion tasted roughly the same, she said: “It’s a nice experience to see it [Mongolian grill] get done right in front of you, but it tastes all the same.” On the other hand, Nadia Ilunga (’15) felt that in addition to the size, the food options were what enhanced her dining experience: “I think the food tastes a little better, but I just think that the layout and the food options were very different than what they used to be and I like that…I feel like they are making a better effort as far as what they’re giving us and the different options for different food preferences.” Moss also gave an in depth explanation of the alterations that have occurred. In regards to space, he explained that “nearly 300 seats were added, and dining stations were extended into the dining room to create a grazing environment.” He also mentioned that additional changes besides the layout and added space also took place in where the staff prepares the food. “The changes included a full kitchen renovation as well which now provides dining services with some great tools to enhance the dining program,” said Moss.

Also, he explained that the purpose of these changes was to “create a complete dining experience…The old Sadler struggled with the volume of students at peak times.” The money that the school has received through the mandated meal plan from students living on campus to update the Sadler Center, an eight million dollar project, has shown to not be in vain. The new Sadler Center has more food options for all students, stays open later for that late-night studying hunger and accommodates large volumes of students without the overcrowding that was so prominent in old Sadler. William and Mary Dining Services addressed many of the issues and complaints dealing with the dining hall, and as a result, new and returning students have a much improved dining experience. “There is no comparison,” said Moss when asked how he felt about the old Sadler versus the new Sadler. “We have a fully functional modern facility that enhances the food we serve.” And the new Sadler Center certainly lives up to its expectations.

Above: New Sadler’s Center Court seating area provides over 300 additional seats. Below: A computerized view of the new Sadler addition from outside. Bottom: Students getting food from the new deli station.

Above: Old Sadler’s snacking buffet line and those colorful plates! Right: Sadler construction during the summer. New Sadler photo by Lauren Su, others courtesy of www.wm.edu

12

T H E D S J - S e p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

T H E D S J - S e p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

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style

Old Sadler vs. New Sadler

style

Increased Food Options, Space, and Time Creates a New and Improved Sadler Dining Experience »

chelsea pittman, dsj associate style editor

At the end of the spring 2013 semester, construction had already begun in the Sadler lobby for what was soon to be a new and improved Sadler dining room. Students were able to keep up with the progress via updates on the Overheard at William and Mary Facebook group page, and those updates caused much anticipation and excitement from returning students as well as a little jealousy from those students who had already graduated. The changes to Sadler also sparked questions and skepticism as to whether or not those changes were simply aesthetic or if the food served was also going to get an upgrade. Well, now that those changes have been made and the new Sadler has been up and running, it is obvious that the new Sadler consists of both an upgraded physical appearance as well as an improvement in what is served. In previous years, the Sadler Center Cafeteria, or Real Food On Campus (RFoC), could be characterized by its painfully long lines and crowds during peak eating hours and its lack of food options; however, all that has changed for the better with this school year’s new and improved RFoC dining hall. The first thing you notice as you walk into the dining hall and stand upon the signature William and Mary monogram is the size. The expanded and more open dining room eliminates the issue of space and combats the previous routine of weaving in and out of crowds of people just to get from the salad

bar to the drinks. The seating area has also been greatly expanded, so there is no longer an issue of seating during those times where Sadler can be particularly crowded. Also, the dining stations themselves have undergone a major makeover with the addition of multiple stations where students have the pleasure to go back for seconds, thirds, or fourths without the added hassle of waiting in a long line each time, while those students with special dietary needs, such as vegetarian options and gluten free foods, now have the luxury of having an entire station dedicated to serving those foods. Where at one time your choices in Sadler were to eat either the pasta of the day, pizza of the day, sandwiches, salad, or the main course served in the center, now students can enjoy a new Mongolian grill station and a station that serves grilled chicken and burgers all day, every day. Another major change that has taken place in Sadler is the late night food option that is now available in the dining hall. Previously, Sadler closed at 9 p.m., the latest out of the other dining areas, the Commons and the Marketplace Café, leaving students limited in their oncampus eating options during the late night hours. However, Sadler has now expanded their hours to midnight every night of the week, including weekends.

The student reception to the changes in Sadler has been positive overall. “Students have been really happy with all of the changes,” said Matthew Moss, the Resident District Manager of William and Mary Dining Services. Edith Amponsah (’16) recalled that the added space had a major impact on her experience in Sadler. “It’s bigger and prettier” than old Sadler, but the food in her opinion tasted roughly the same, she said: “It’s a nice experience to see it [Mongolian grill] get done right in front of you, but it tastes all the same.” On the other hand, Nadia Ilunga (’15) felt that in addition to the size, the food options were what enhanced her dining experience: “I think the food tastes a little better, but I just think that the layout and the food options were very different than what they used to be and I like that…I feel like they are making a better effort as far as what they’re giving us and the different options for different food preferences.” Moss also gave an in depth explanation of the alterations that have occurred. In regards to space, he explained that “nearly 300 seats were added, and dining stations were extended into the dining room to create a grazing environment.” He also mentioned that additional changes besides the layout and added space also took place in where the staff prepares the food. “The changes included a full kitchen renovation as well which now provides dining services with some great tools to enhance the dining program,” said Moss.

Also, he explained that the purpose of these changes was to “create a complete dining experience…The old Sadler struggled with the volume of students at peak times.” The money that the school has received through the mandated meal plan from students living on campus to update the Sadler Center, an eight million dollar project, has shown to not be in vain. The new Sadler Center has more food options for all students, stays open later for that late-night studying hunger and accommodates large volumes of students without the overcrowding that was so prominent in old Sadler. William and Mary Dining Services addressed many of the issues and complaints dealing with the dining hall, and as a result, new and returning students have a much improved dining experience. “There is no comparison,” said Moss when asked how he felt about the old Sadler versus the new Sadler. “We have a fully functional modern facility that enhances the food we serve.” And the new Sadler Center certainly lives up to its expectations.

Above: New Sadler’s Center Court seating area provides over 300 additional seats. Below: A computerized view of the new Sadler addition from outside. Bottom: Students getting food from the new deli station.

Above: Old Sadler’s snacking buffet line and those colorful plates! Right: Sadler construction during the summer. New Sadler photo by Lauren Su, others courtesy of www.wm.edu

12

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T H E D S J - S e p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

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Best Of’s:

An Assortment of the Five Best (or Worst) Things

best of apocalyptic movies (that leave you smiling) »molly

earner, dsj style editor

So the world didn’t end in 2012, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t still time for the world to go out with a bang. As the movie industry likes to remind us every summer, there’s the constant possibility of an alien invasion, zombie virus outbreak, or nuclear winter from the moment you roll out of bed to – well, it could happen while you are sleeping as well (just think of 28 Days Later), so, any time. But despite all that gloom and doom you can still leave the theater laughing. Here’s my list of the top five best (funny) movies depicting the end times, so study up and maybe you can be prepared for the real deal. Or just be highly entertained. It’s however you want to cope with the inevitability of the End. 5. Warm Bodies (2013) Romeo and Juliet… with zombies! And a happy ending! It doesn’t even matter if this makes no sense whatsoever; it’s just a cute, funny movie that tells us maybe the key to surviving the zombie apocalypse is opening up our hearts to love. Which is a cheesy and wonderful way to enjoy the idea of the end times. It’s got a kickass soundtrack, too, if you’re into that. 4. The World’s End (2013) The latest from the classic team of Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost tells the story of a group of aging friends from high school who reunite twenty years later to re-attempt their last derailed pub crawl. In lieu of giving anything away, I’ll just say that this movie manages to combine a drunken buddy comedy with an alien invasion and coming-of-middle-age pathos to create anenjoyable and ultimately idealistic end-of-the world scenario. Not to mention that the scenes in which the friends bash in the blue-blooded heads of the alien robots are extremely cathartic.

14

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style

T H E D S J - S e p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

3. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) An oldie but a goody! This is definitely a darker comedy regarding the constant nuclear threat of the Cold War era, but it’s also a genius study in the MAD world of the arms race. (Mutually Assured Destruction; see what I did there?) Sure, it all ends in a nuclear holocaust, but what a way to go out! “We’ll meet again, don’t know where, don’t know wheeeen/ But we’ll meet again, some sunny day…” 2. Shaun of the Dead (2004) This original cinematic team-up between Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost (we’re not counting the TV series Spaced, though I highly recommend that as well) features two 30-something slackers who can barely distinguish the living from the dead. Set in London following an overnight zombie virus outbreak, the story follows our hero, Shaun, as he leads his rag-tag group of friends to The Winchester Pub to wait out the apocalypse with beer and pretzels. How that all turns out is hilarious, gory and surprisingly optimistic. This movie began a loosely related series called the Cornetto trilogy that recently ended with the aforementioned The World’s End. 1. Wall-E (2008) Okay, so the earth is completely uninhabited by anything but a spunky little janitorial robot and some resilient roaches. The apocalypse has basically already happened, and in the lamest way possible – pollution. (Let’s please not end the world with pollution, guys. Hold out for a zombie apocalypse: recycle!) Yet the reason I made this movie number one on my list of happy apocalypse movies is that, let’s face it, nothing can put a smile on your face like the sweet, romantic scenes between the rusty Wall-E and the shiny, futuristic Eve. This movie has a happy ending with a finale that leaves you feeling warm and fuzzy inside. Not many post-apocalyptic movies can do that!

worst of moving in »charlotte

alan, dsj style writer

We all become excited at the end of the summer about the beginning of the school year and reuniting with old friends (and meeting some new ones). But you have to admit there are some bumps and hurdles along the way to getting back in the groove of college life. 1. Packing We all know the feeling. You’ve finally found a place for all your earthly belongings back at home when suddenly it’s time again to put everything back into boxes and stuff those boxes into the car that you could have sworn you unpacked yesterday. If you pack too early you wont have anything to wear for the remaining days of summer break, but if you wait too long to pack, you will be stressing to get it all done before official move out. The struggle is real. Time to wander around in the same grungy shirt and shorts combo for a day or so. 2. Traveling No matter how close or far you live, the drive to get back to William and Mary takes forever. If you live close by in NOVA, you hit major traffic that can double the normal time it takes to get here. However, NOVA movers get no sympathy from students living in more remote areas of Virginia, other states, or even other countries who travel for hours upon hours to get back to school safely and on time. 3. Unpacking You’ve finally made it to school! Praise the Lord. But now comes the task of hauling your fridge, cleaning supplies and mountains of clothing up what is bound to be a hot and muggy staircase. You try to stay cheery because you are back at your second home, but your parents keep making comments about the heat and the lack of A/C and your tendency to over-pack. When your parents finally leave, you relax a bit… until you look back at your overwhelmingly cluttered room and realize that the battle is only halfway over.

style

4. The Dorm Room Your room is a blank canvas! You brought decorating supplies and cute furniture! Everything is perfect. Except that the A/C still isn’t working, your desk drawers squeak, and there are wires hanging out of a wall. By the end of the day you’ve sent in 5 work orders and are contemplating baking the wonderful maintenance crew some cupcakes for all their hard work. Which is when you remember that you didn’t pack your baking supplies…

5. No Meal Plan Okay, so this only applies to upperclassmen, but freshmen will experience this pain soon enough. The excitement of college was so overwhelming that you got here the first day of move in. What you did not realize was that the college wouldn’t let you use meal swipes until the first day of classes. That’s four days of no meals. You decide this could be a fresh start on your plan to save money this year and you buy a 6 pack of ramen for a buck and some change. Then your friends start making plans and by Wednesday you’ve spent $50 on food at local restaurants and you still have 5 ramen blocks left.

T H E D S J - S e p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

15


»

Best Of’s:

An Assortment of the Five Best (or Worst) Things

best of apocalyptic movies (that leave you smiling) »molly

earner, dsj style editor

So the world didn’t end in 2012, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t still time for the world to go out with a bang. As the movie industry likes to remind us every summer, there’s the constant possibility of an alien invasion, zombie virus outbreak, or nuclear winter from the moment you roll out of bed to – well, it could happen while you are sleeping as well (just think of 28 Days Later), so, any time. But despite all that gloom and doom you can still leave the theater laughing. Here’s my list of the top five best (funny) movies depicting the end times, so study up and maybe you can be prepared for the real deal. Or just be highly entertained. It’s however you want to cope with the inevitability of the End. 5. Warm Bodies (2013) Romeo and Juliet… with zombies! And a happy ending! It doesn’t even matter if this makes no sense whatsoever; it’s just a cute, funny movie that tells us maybe the key to surviving the zombie apocalypse is opening up our hearts to love. Which is a cheesy and wonderful way to enjoy the idea of the end times. It’s got a kickass soundtrack, too, if you’re into that. 4. The World’s End (2013) The latest from the classic team of Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost tells the story of a group of aging friends from high school who reunite twenty years later to re-attempt their last derailed pub crawl. In lieu of giving anything away, I’ll just say that this movie manages to combine a drunken buddy comedy with an alien invasion and coming-of-middle-age pathos to create anenjoyable and ultimately idealistic end-of-the world scenario. Not to mention that the scenes in which the friends bash in the blue-blooded heads of the alien robots are extremely cathartic.

14

»

style

T H E D S J - S e p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

3. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) An oldie but a goody! This is definitely a darker comedy regarding the constant nuclear threat of the Cold War era, but it’s also a genius study in the MAD world of the arms race. (Mutually Assured Destruction; see what I did there?) Sure, it all ends in a nuclear holocaust, but what a way to go out! “We’ll meet again, don’t know where, don’t know wheeeen/ But we’ll meet again, some sunny day…” 2. Shaun of the Dead (2004) This original cinematic team-up between Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost (we’re not counting the TV series Spaced, though I highly recommend that as well) features two 30-something slackers who can barely distinguish the living from the dead. Set in London following an overnight zombie virus outbreak, the story follows our hero, Shaun, as he leads his rag-tag group of friends to The Winchester Pub to wait out the apocalypse with beer and pretzels. How that all turns out is hilarious, gory and surprisingly optimistic. This movie began a loosely related series called the Cornetto trilogy that recently ended with the aforementioned The World’s End. 1. Wall-E (2008) Okay, so the earth is completely uninhabited by anything but a spunky little janitorial robot and some resilient roaches. The apocalypse has basically already happened, and in the lamest way possible – pollution. (Let’s please not end the world with pollution, guys. Hold out for a zombie apocalypse: recycle!) Yet the reason I made this movie number one on my list of happy apocalypse movies is that, let’s face it, nothing can put a smile on your face like the sweet, romantic scenes between the rusty Wall-E and the shiny, futuristic Eve. This movie has a happy ending with a finale that leaves you feeling warm and fuzzy inside. Not many post-apocalyptic movies can do that!

worst of moving in »charlotte

alan, dsj style writer

We all become excited at the end of the summer about the beginning of the school year and reuniting with old friends (and meeting some new ones). But you have to admit there are some bumps and hurdles along the way to getting back in the groove of college life. 1. Packing We all know the feeling. You’ve finally found a place for all your earthly belongings back at home when suddenly it’s time again to put everything back into boxes and stuff those boxes into the car that you could have sworn you unpacked yesterday. If you pack too early you wont have anything to wear for the remaining days of summer break, but if you wait too long to pack, you will be stressing to get it all done before official move out. The struggle is real. Time to wander around in the same grungy shirt and shorts combo for a day or so. 2. Traveling No matter how close or far you live, the drive to get back to William and Mary takes forever. If you live close by in NOVA, you hit major traffic that can double the normal time it takes to get here. However, NOVA movers get no sympathy from students living in more remote areas of Virginia, other states, or even other countries who travel for hours upon hours to get back to school safely and on time. 3. Unpacking You’ve finally made it to school! Praise the Lord. But now comes the task of hauling your fridge, cleaning supplies and mountains of clothing up what is bound to be a hot and muggy staircase. You try to stay cheery because you are back at your second home, but your parents keep making comments about the heat and the lack of A/C and your tendency to over-pack. When your parents finally leave, you relax a bit… until you look back at your overwhelmingly cluttered room and realize that the battle is only halfway over.

style

4. The Dorm Room Your room is a blank canvas! You brought decorating supplies and cute furniture! Everything is perfect. Except that the A/C still isn’t working, your desk drawers squeak, and there are wires hanging out of a wall. By the end of the day you’ve sent in 5 work orders and are contemplating baking the wonderful maintenance crew some cupcakes for all their hard work. Which is when you remember that you didn’t pack your baking supplies…

5. No Meal Plan Okay, so this only applies to upperclassmen, but freshmen will experience this pain soon enough. The excitement of college was so overwhelming that you got here the first day of move in. What you did not realize was that the college wouldn’t let you use meal swipes until the first day of classes. That’s four days of no meals. You decide this could be a fresh start on your plan to save money this year and you buy a 6 pack of ramen for a buck and some change. Then your friends start making plans and by Wednesday you’ve spent $50 on food at local restaurants and you still have 5 ramen blocks left.

T H E D S J - S e p te m b e r 2 0 1 3

15


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opinion

The Changing Face »

sharon hartzell, dsj staff columnist

A Student’s Experience at the

In Virginia’s Northern Neck, it isn’t always easy to get to the doctor or dentist. In this area beset by large financial disparities, low health insurance rates and a geographically far-flung population, the Northern Neck Free Health Clinic (NNFHC), located in Kilmarnock, VA, bridges the gap between sickness and health for many members of the community. In March of this year, I had the opportunity to volunteer at the NNFHC with 10 other William and Mary students during an alternative spring break trip. During our week at the NNFHC, we filed papers, audited charts, assisted with exams and met a number of patients who depend on the clinic for health and dental care. We also left the Clinic with a greater understanding of the issues facing free and charitable clinics, and health care in general, in the wake of the Affordable Care Act.

Patients may have more freedom to choose where to go to the doctor after the implementation of the ACA. One patient, Elizabeth, had trouble finding dental care she could afford once she retired. Before coming to the clinic, she simply didn’t go to the dentist, because the cost was prohibitively high. “They want you to pay so much up front…when you’re on a fixed income, you don’t have so much up front,” said Elizabeth. Mindy, age 28, had attended the medical clinic for three years before she came to the dental clinic last year to have all her teeth pulled. She lives in Westmoreland County, an area without affordable dental services, and she hadn’t been to the dentist in years. Without insurance, her options were limited, and without the clinic, she probably wouldn’t go to the dentist at all. The Northern Neck Free Health Clinic was formed in 1992 in response to needs like these. It was created by area doctors, the NNFHC website explains, to serve the needs of those without insurance who cannot afford costs associated with basic medical care. The clinic is staffed by volunteers and runs entirely on donations. The NNFHC is able to offer pharmacy services to patients, as well as medical and dental appointments for 25 dollars a visit. Because appointments are not completely free, the NNFHC is technically a “charitable clinic,” despite its name. However, the patients seem to feel the price is worthwhile. One patient, who preferred to remain anonymous, said, “I think it’s a very good facility, especially for those people who don’t have money to go to a normal dental clinic and pay 150 dollars for doing an x-ray. Here, I pay 25 dollars for an hour and fifteen

16

THE DSJ -

SEPTEMBER 2013

minutes, but I feel it pays for itself.” Not only do patients struggle to afford health care in the Northern Neck; they also must travel great distances to access care. Larry first came to the medical clinic in 2004. “It’s hard to find doctors,” said Larry, in the area where he lives. Before using the clinic, he had to go all the way to Richmond for medical care. The medical clinic helped him to lower his blood pressure in preparation for a tooth extraction at the dental clinic. What would happen if the clinic did not exist? “I guess everyone here would have to go to Richmond,” said Larry. Many patients still face long commutes, which can interfere with their access to care and exacerbate the financial problems they face. The clinic serves five counties comprising a large geographical area of Northern Neck. The commute from Westmoreland County to Lancaster County, where the Clinic is located, takes over an hour. For patients without their own vehicles, this is often a prohibitive barrier to receiving health care. For patients who use Bay Transit, a local shuttle service, going to and from the Clinic can require taking a full day off of work. Elizabeth travels over an hour to reach the clinic, but she says the care she receives is well worth the commute. As the United States health care system adjusts to the Affordable Care Act, many are wondering what impact this legislation will have on free and charitable clinics. The National Association of Free Clinics discusses some of these changes on its website. A widespread misconception, they say, is that free clinics will no longer be necessary after the ACA implementation. However, according to the Congressional Budget Office, as many as 29

Cartoon by Michael Le.

opinion

of H ealth C are

Northern Neck Free Health Clinic million people, including undocumented workers and those eligible for Medicaid who reside in states that choose to not expand the program, will still be without health care. “Free and Charitable Clinics will remain an important part of the country’s safety net,” the NAFC writes, “even after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.” Free and charitable clinics like the NNFHC will still be necessary, and the patients they serve recognize this fact. “I think it would be a world of letdown if it were closed,” said one patient. The ACA will also accelerate the need for primary care physicians. This is especially relevant in rural, low-income areas like the Northern Neck, which rely most heavily on primary care providers. Peter D. Jacobson and Shelley A. Jazowski, in a 2001 study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, predicted that “expanded access to primary care for millions of new patients” would result in increased pressure to resolve our primary care shortage. A recent study by Dr. Karen Hauer, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, reported that fewer than two percent of medical students were interested in general internal medicine. This disparity between

“I have received better care at the clinic than I did when I was going to a regular doctor’s office.” doctors who practice general medicine and those who choose to specialize is easy to explain. Specializing can result in salary increases of several hundred thousand dollars, and the promise of paying off medical school debt more quickly leads many students towards the specialties. In the wake of the Affordable Care Act, general practitioners will be even more crucial to providing health care to low-income, rural areas, whether doctors practice at paid, charitable or free clinics. Patients may have more freedom to choose where to go to the doctor after the implementation of the ACA. However, it is likely that many will still choose to go to free and charitable clinics due to the quality of care they offer and the difference in attitude of doctors who choose to volunteer their time at free clinics. Robin, a patient of the NNFHC, had health insurance until 2007, when her husband’s job ended. When her husband left her, she found herself a single mom working two jobs, neither of which had benefits. She has been astounded by the kindness, the professionalism, the quality of care at the clinic and the interest the doctors show in their patients. “I have received better care at the clinic than I did when I was going to a regular doctor’s office,” said Robin. She explains that the focus and attitude of the clinic is different from other doctors’ offices. “If you have someone who’s willing to volunteer their time, they’re

The Northern Neck Free Health Clinic is located in Kilmarnock, Virginia, about an hour and a half northeast of Williamsburg. Photo courtesy of NNFHC. gonna care,” said Robin. “They’re giving of themselves, they’re sacrificing for others, and you can’t ask for anything more.” Robin says she wouldn’t be able to go to the doctor without the clinic: “It’s a gift, it’s a huge blessing. I believe that this is one of the ways God is blessing us, through these people.” Elizabeth has heard many people in the waiting room say they wouldn’t go anywhere else. As for herself, Elizabeth said, “I wouldn’t ask for anything better.” Sharon Hartzell is a staff columnist for the DSJ. Her views do not necessarily represent those of the entire staff.

THE DSJ -

SEPTEMBER 2013

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»

opinion

The Changing Face »

sharon hartzell, dsj staff columnist

A Student’s Experience at the

In Virginia’s Northern Neck, it isn’t always easy to get to the doctor or dentist. In this area beset by large financial disparities, low health insurance rates and a geographically far-flung population, the Northern Neck Free Health Clinic (NNFHC), located in Kilmarnock, VA, bridges the gap between sickness and health for many members of the community. In March of this year, I had the opportunity to volunteer at the NNFHC with 10 other William and Mary students during an alternative spring break trip. During our week at the NNFHC, we filed papers, audited charts, assisted with exams and met a number of patients who depend on the clinic for health and dental care. We also left the Clinic with a greater understanding of the issues facing free and charitable clinics, and health care in general, in the wake of the Affordable Care Act.

Patients may have more freedom to choose where to go to the doctor after the implementation of the ACA. One patient, Elizabeth, had trouble finding dental care she could afford once she retired. Before coming to the clinic, she simply didn’t go to the dentist, because the cost was prohibitively high. “They want you to pay so much up front…when you’re on a fixed income, you don’t have so much up front,” said Elizabeth. Mindy, age 28, had attended the medical clinic for three years before she came to the dental clinic last year to have all her teeth pulled. She lives in Westmoreland County, an area without affordable dental services, and she hadn’t been to the dentist in years. Without insurance, her options were limited, and without the clinic, she probably wouldn’t go to the dentist at all. The Northern Neck Free Health Clinic was formed in 1992 in response to needs like these. It was created by area doctors, the NNFHC website explains, to serve the needs of those without insurance who cannot afford costs associated with basic medical care. The clinic is staffed by volunteers and runs entirely on donations. The NNFHC is able to offer pharmacy services to patients, as well as medical and dental appointments for 25 dollars a visit. Because appointments are not completely free, the NNFHC is technically a “charitable clinic,” despite its name. However, the patients seem to feel the price is worthwhile. One patient, who preferred to remain anonymous, said, “I think it’s a very good facility, especially for those people who don’t have money to go to a normal dental clinic and pay 150 dollars for doing an x-ray. Here, I pay 25 dollars for an hour and fifteen

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minutes, but I feel it pays for itself.” Not only do patients struggle to afford health care in the Northern Neck; they also must travel great distances to access care. Larry first came to the medical clinic in 2004. “It’s hard to find doctors,” said Larry, in the area where he lives. Before using the clinic, he had to go all the way to Richmond for medical care. The medical clinic helped him to lower his blood pressure in preparation for a tooth extraction at the dental clinic. What would happen if the clinic did not exist? “I guess everyone here would have to go to Richmond,” said Larry. Many patients still face long commutes, which can interfere with their access to care and exacerbate the financial problems they face. The clinic serves five counties comprising a large geographical area of Northern Neck. The commute from Westmoreland County to Lancaster County, where the Clinic is located, takes over an hour. For patients without their own vehicles, this is often a prohibitive barrier to receiving health care. For patients who use Bay Transit, a local shuttle service, going to and from the Clinic can require taking a full day off of work. Elizabeth travels over an hour to reach the clinic, but she says the care she receives is well worth the commute. As the United States health care system adjusts to the Affordable Care Act, many are wondering what impact this legislation will have on free and charitable clinics. The National Association of Free Clinics discusses some of these changes on its website. A widespread misconception, they say, is that free clinics will no longer be necessary after the ACA implementation. However, according to the Congressional Budget Office, as many as 29

Cartoon by Michael Le.

opinion

of H ealth C are

Northern Neck Free Health Clinic million people, including undocumented workers and those eligible for Medicaid who reside in states that choose to not expand the program, will still be without health care. “Free and Charitable Clinics will remain an important part of the country’s safety net,” the NAFC writes, “even after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.” Free and charitable clinics like the NNFHC will still be necessary, and the patients they serve recognize this fact. “I think it would be a world of letdown if it were closed,” said one patient. The ACA will also accelerate the need for primary care physicians. This is especially relevant in rural, low-income areas like the Northern Neck, which rely most heavily on primary care providers. Peter D. Jacobson and Shelley A. Jazowski, in a 2001 study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, predicted that “expanded access to primary care for millions of new patients” would result in increased pressure to resolve our primary care shortage. A recent study by Dr. Karen Hauer, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, reported that fewer than two percent of medical students were interested in general internal medicine. This disparity between

“I have received better care at the clinic than I did when I was going to a regular doctor’s office.” doctors who practice general medicine and those who choose to specialize is easy to explain. Specializing can result in salary increases of several hundred thousand dollars, and the promise of paying off medical school debt more quickly leads many students towards the specialties. In the wake of the Affordable Care Act, general practitioners will be even more crucial to providing health care to low-income, rural areas, whether doctors practice at paid, charitable or free clinics. Patients may have more freedom to choose where to go to the doctor after the implementation of the ACA. However, it is likely that many will still choose to go to free and charitable clinics due to the quality of care they offer and the difference in attitude of doctors who choose to volunteer their time at free clinics. Robin, a patient of the NNFHC, had health insurance until 2007, when her husband’s job ended. When her husband left her, she found herself a single mom working two jobs, neither of which had benefits. She has been astounded by the kindness, the professionalism, the quality of care at the clinic and the interest the doctors show in their patients. “I have received better care at the clinic than I did when I was going to a regular doctor’s office,” said Robin. She explains that the focus and attitude of the clinic is different from other doctors’ offices. “If you have someone who’s willing to volunteer their time, they’re

The Northern Neck Free Health Clinic is located in Kilmarnock, Virginia, about an hour and a half northeast of Williamsburg. Photo courtesy of NNFHC. gonna care,” said Robin. “They’re giving of themselves, they’re sacrificing for others, and you can’t ask for anything more.” Robin says she wouldn’t be able to go to the doctor without the clinic: “It’s a gift, it’s a huge blessing. I believe that this is one of the ways God is blessing us, through these people.” Elizabeth has heard many people in the waiting room say they wouldn’t go anywhere else. As for herself, Elizabeth said, “I wouldn’t ask for anything better.” Sharon Hartzell is a staff columnist for the DSJ. Her views do not necessarily represent those of the entire staff.

THE DSJ -

SEPTEMBER 2013

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opinion

From Painkillers to Heroin

How Drug Policy and Reformulation Efforts Could Redefine the Social Landscape »

john snouffer, dsj staff columnist

On May 5, 2011, during a Republican primary debate, Ron Paul asked the audience, “If we legalize heroin tomorrow, is everyone going to use heroin? How many people here would use heroin if it were legal?” The short answer? Maybe around one percent. Two million people in 2010 reported that they had used prescription painkillers non-medically for the first time within the last year. About 16 percent of those using them non-medically are either addicted or dependent, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), while the New England Journal of Medicine found that around This graph reveals the proliferation of heroin use in the past few years. The two-thirds of such abusers switched to heroin most recent studies on heroin abuse and overdose deaths have fucused on the after trying to abuse the reformulated version local/state level. Source: The Wall Street Journal. of OxyContin in 2012. An alarmist estimate of This economic choice may be part of the reason that heroin those who could be enticed by that legality would be… 213,333 has started to appear in greater numbers in suburban and rural Americans, or about 0.7 percent of the people there. Convoluted math aside, recently there’ve been a smattering of areas, places not typically known for heroin use. For example, news stories from both major newspapers and local TV stations the Vermont Health Department reported that 914 people were indicating that heroin has never before been more widespread or treated for heroin abuse last year, up from 654 the year before, dangerous. This isn’t all overblown; heroin seizures by the Drug while in Washington state police are finding heroin in counties Enforcement Administration (DEA) have gone up from 1334 lbs where its use was much less visible a decade ago. Here in the in 2008 to 2059 lbs in 2012, while a branch of the US Department Virginia peninsula, 72 federal defendants and over 100 state of Health and Human Services (the Substance Abuse and Mental defendants have been charged with operating major heroin Health Services Administration) estimates that heroin use rose by trafficking rings since 2011, including street level dealers and 75 percent between 2007 and 2011, with about 600,000 people customers in Williamsburg. Meanwhile, heroin deaths in West Virginia have tripled from 2007 to 2012, with a 53 percent increase estimated to have used heroin in the past year. Since the spring of 2010, a reformulated version of OxyContin since 2011, according to the West Virginia Department of Health has gradually replaced the original version. The new version, and Human Resources Health Statistics Center. “Hillbilly heroin” infused with the polymer polyethylene oxide, is harder to crush is seemingly being replaced by actual heroin. A possible upside of this trend is that it might force the US to and snort, while trying to heat it results in jelly-like globs. While reevaluate its policy of drug abuse prevention and the treatment this doesn’t prevent anyone from popping a handful of them to get high, its extended-release mechanism makes the prospect less available to those who are addicted. Heroin has historically exciting. OxyContin isn’t the only drug following suit. Ever since been centered in urban areas but only recently has there been a the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) floated the specter of renewed media interest in heroin since its height of popularity in pulling off the opioids from the market that can’t be described as the mid 1990s. Dr. Bohdan Nosyk at Simon Fraser University in “abuse-deterrent,” a flood of new candidates have been starting to Burnaby, British Columbia succinctly criticizes the US’s emphasis emerge, one even made with the same plastic injection molding on short-term detoxification for all opioid treatment, which lasts from three to 12 weeks with the intent of total abstinence. The process used for Legos. On the enforcement side, Prescription Drug Monitoring dominant treatment in most of the developed world, maintenance Programs (PDMPs) at the state and federal level are already treatment with methadone “lasts indefinitely and is focused on starting to be used in an attempt to curtail prescription drug abuse. reducing the individual and social harms associated with opioid By collecting prescribing and dispensing data electronically, abuse, such as detox death, criminal activity and subsequent HIV law enforcement and regulatory boards can try to seek out and Hepatitis C infection,” said Nosyk. While it seems obvious prescription mills or doctor-shoppers. The databases aren’t why detoxification would be popular here, addicts are at highest without controversy, particularly Florida’s, which has been under risk of death in the first two weeks of treatment and in the two fire both from the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and weeks following discontinuation of treatment, making detox conservative legislators. However, they are already operational in regimens extremely high-risk for addicts. They’re also ineffective 42 states and seem to be relatively effective so far. While over- in actually keeping people off of opioids, even in those who don’t prescription of painkillers has been thought to be a “gateway” to inject or have little experience with opioids. However, if the face other drug abuse, a tightened supply of opioids can lead those who of heroin changes, we might find ourselves suddenly sympathetic are addicted to look for them from dealers. This then leads to an to what addicts are going through. economic choice: a $60 supply of pills or a $10-$40 bag of heroin. John Snouffer is a staff columnist for the DSJ. His views do not After a while, any consumer would be tempted towards heroin. necessarily represent those of the entire staff.

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Renewed Hope

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sports

Head Coach Tony Shaver addresses his team in the huddle during a break in play. Photo courtesy of Tribe Athletics. he can be developed into a perimeter scoring threat that stretches the opponent’s defense, opening up more driving opportunities for Thornton to exploit as well as some one-on-one post play from big man Tim Rusthoven (’14). Perhaps the brightest prospect is 6’6”, 180 lb Omar Prewitt (’17) out of Mount Sterling, Kentucky. In 2012-13, he led his team to the Kentucky State semifinals where he averaged 23 points, 8.8 rebounds, 2.3 assists, 2.2 steals and 3.2 blocked shots per game. “Omar is a very versatile player who is capable of playing multiple positions in our system,” said Head Coach Tony Shaver. The same word, “versatile,” was used to describe Thornton when he was entering his freshman season. While Prewitt is certainly a scoring threat, his biggest contribution to the team very well may be his ability to get back on defense, block some shots and generate some turnovers. It is no secret that Thornton struggles in this regard. Finally, at 6’9”, stands forward Jack Whitman (’17) out of Lexington, Kentucky. His size on the court is certainly his biggest asset, allowing him to record 81 blocked shots in his junior season at Lexington Catholic High School. He probably will see limited playing time his freshman year as he is mentored by starting center Tim Rusthoven, as well as senior Fred Heldring and sophomore Sean Sheldon – all of whom measure in at an impressive 6’9”. These four new faces alongside Britt, Thornton, Rusty, Gaillard and the rest of the Tribe have the potential to be a very powerful force within the CAA. Unfortunately, potential doesn’t win championships; hard work and dedication do. Come November, we will see what Shaver and the new Green and Gold bring to the hardwood. As always, expectations are high and our hopes are even higher.

The Tribe Men’s Basketball team has not had a winning season since 2009-2010. Here is their record since then: Freshman sharp-shooter Michael Schlotman comes to William & Mary from Indiana and will likely play point guard or shooting guard. Photo courtesy of the Post-Tribune.

Season

Overall (CAA)

2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013

10-22 (4-14) 6-26 (4-14) 13-17 (7-11) THE DSJ -SEPTEMBER 2013

Tribe Football Falls Short

»

scott guinn, dsj associate sports editor

Disappointing. That seems to be the word used when describing Tribe Basketball’s latest season. There were undoubtedly some exciting moments, including the flashy play and late game heroics by fan-favorite Marcus Thornton (’15), but at the end of the year many left feeling a little underwhelmed. A first-round loss in the CAA tournament is never easy to swallow, but one would think we’d grow accustomed to it after several seasons of lackluster performance. Nevertheless, every year, for whatever reason, Tribe fans come back with renewed hope. Perhaps this is our year to make the NCAA tournament. Everyone wants to see a Cinderella story come to life, but nobody wants it more than a Tribe Basketball fan. It may only be September, but it is never too early to speculate on the approaching season and take a look at some of the new faces. Four players have graduated since last spring, including starting shooting guard Matt Rum (’13). These four have been replaced by a group of freshmen who look to breathe life back into a struggling Tribe team. At 6’4”, Michael Schlotman (’17) is the smallest of the new recruits but certainly not small for a point guard. His credentials are extensive. He played for four years at Munster High School in Munster, Indiana, leading his team to an impressive record of 25-1 his senior year. In fact, ESPN rates Schlotman as the 14th best recruit in Indiana and the 89th best point guard in the country. It will be interesting to see how Schlotman fits in with guards Marcus Thornton (’15) and Brandon Britt (’14), who are both accustomed to running the point. Schlotman will undoubtedly provide relief off of the bench and hopefully help prevent the late-game comebacks that so often plague the Tribe. Daniel Dixon (’17) out of Great Falls, Virginia appears to be the perimeter replacement for graduated senior Matt Rum. At 6’5”, Dixon recorded 53 three-pointers and a free-throw percentage of 75.2 in his senior year at Langley High School. He then attended Fishburne Military School where he was averaging 8.7 points per game before a season-ending injury. As of now it is unclear how much of a presence Dixon will have on the team and whether he has fully recovered from his injury or not. Hopefully down the road

sports

Upset Bid Denied at West Virginia

A Look at Tribe Basketball’s New Recruits »

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19

jeffrey knox, dsj co-editor-in-chief

VS.

a crowd of defenders, barely getting the ball to cross the plane before his knee touched the turf. The William and Mary defense, despite concerns about a lack of depth and a dangerous Mountaineer offense, remained sturdy throughout the second quarter. West Virginia never managed a first down in the quarter as Clint Trickett, a junior transfer from Florida State, got the call to replace starter Paul Millard at quarterback. He never completed a pass, and Millard returned to the game to start the second half. The Tribe wasn’t done scoring, however, as a fumble recovery by junior DT Jasper Coleman gave the offense the ball on the Mountaineer 34-yard line. One first down later, and kicker John Carpenter stepped in to connect on a field goal that put the Tribe up by a score of 17-7 at the end of the half. That’s not a bad outcome for a team that came in as a 30-point underdog. The second half was quite a different story, though, as the Tribe’s momentum ran out. West Virginia needed just two drives to even the score at 17-17. Their offense started finding a rhythm as senior running back Charles Sims proved tough to handle. Sims would end up with 120 yards on 23 carries. Millard also began finding his receivers, including a 69-yard game-breaker to Ronald Carswell, who streaked through the Tribe secondary on his way to the end zone. William and Mary had a chance to respond on its next drive, but a Carpenter field goal at the outset of the fourth quarter was pulled badly. The score remained tied midway through the fourth quarter, as neither team could mount an offensive charge. A three-andout followed by a short punt by Carpenter left the Mountaineer offense in good field position at midfield. An unrelenting rushing attack finally wore down the Tribe defensive front, as Sims and Dreamius Smith carried the team downfield before freshman Wendell Smallwood finally scored from two yards out, putting West Virginia up 24-17. William and Mary’s final drive began with just over three minutes remaining, and it concluded after just one play. Clearly sensing the urgency of the situation, Graham threw a wayward pass over the middle that was intended for Sean Ballard, but got intercepted by an opposing safety. West Virginia managed to run out the clock to conclude the game and take the hardfought victory. While certainly disappointing given the halftime lead and huge upset potential, Tribe supporters can’t help but be pleased with the team’s performance to open the season. A lot of question marks that existed just a few weeks ago were definitively answered. Coach Laycock stated: “There were a lot of positives that came out of [the game], The Tribe Football captains--(from L to R) offensive lineman Matt Crisafi, defensive even though we’re disappointed with the lineman George Beerhalter, and safety Jerome Couplin--await the coin toss before the loss.” packed stands at Mountaineer Field. All photos courtesy of Tribe Athletics. Coming into the game, junior

After the first five minutes of the Tribe’s season opener against West Virginia (WVU), a blowout loss appeared imminent. The offense had just gone three-and-out, and the Mountaineers responded with an efficient 8-play, 76-yard drive that culminated in a touchdown. William and Mary then struggled to another short possession, and at that point, the game result seemed decided. But for those who gave up on the Tribe prematurely, the remainder of the first half turned out to be a pleasant surprise. The team came alive after a missed 55-yard field goal by WVU gave the Tribe the ball in good field position. William and Mary proceeded to secure its initial first down of the game before the team’s star player, Tre McBride, made a leaping catch down the right sideline to move up the chains some 40 yards. McBride was easily the Tribe’s top performer as a sophomore last season, and the Georgia native was selected as a preseason third-team AllAmerican. After the amazing catch, the offense managed to punch the ball into the end zone from the three-yard line to even up the score. Another defensive stop brought an end to the first quarter, with the Tribe squarely in position to contend with its Big 12 foe. The second quarter was dominated by William and Mary, starting with an impressive 88-yard touchdown drive. During that 12-play sequence, head coach Jimmye Laycock employed an effective offensive scheme that included four running backs. Tre McBride also caught another long pass, this one for 28 yards, placing the ball on the WVU two-yard line. The Tribe’s second, and, unfortunately, final touchdown, was scored on a QB sneak as starting senior Mike Graham dove into the end zone amongst

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Renewed Hope

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sports

Head Coach Tony Shaver addresses his team in the huddle during a break in play. Photo courtesy of Tribe Athletics. he can be developed into a perimeter scoring threat that stretches the opponent’s defense, opening up more driving opportunities for Thornton to exploit as well as some one-on-one post play from big man Tim Rusthoven (’14). Perhaps the brightest prospect is 6’6”, 180 lb Omar Prewitt (’17) out of Mount Sterling, Kentucky. In 2012-13, he led his team to the Kentucky State semifinals where he averaged 23 points, 8.8 rebounds, 2.3 assists, 2.2 steals and 3.2 blocked shots per game. “Omar is a very versatile player who is capable of playing multiple positions in our system,” said Head Coach Tony Shaver. The same word, “versatile,” was used to describe Thornton when he was entering his freshman season. While Prewitt is certainly a scoring threat, his biggest contribution to the team very well may be his ability to get back on defense, block some shots and generate some turnovers. It is no secret that Thornton struggles in this regard. Finally, at 6’9”, stands forward Jack Whitman (’17) out of Lexington, Kentucky. His size on the court is certainly his biggest asset, allowing him to record 81 blocked shots in his junior season at Lexington Catholic High School. He probably will see limited playing time his freshman year as he is mentored by starting center Tim Rusthoven, as well as senior Fred Heldring and sophomore Sean Sheldon – all of whom measure in at an impressive 6’9”. These four new faces alongside Britt, Thornton, Rusty, Gaillard and the rest of the Tribe have the potential to be a very powerful force within the CAA. Unfortunately, potential doesn’t win championships; hard work and dedication do. Come November, we will see what Shaver and the new Green and Gold bring to the hardwood. As always, expectations are high and our hopes are even higher.

The Tribe Men’s Basketball team has not had a winning season since 2009-2010. Here is their record since then: Freshman sharp-shooter Michael Schlotman comes to William & Mary from Indiana and will likely play point guard or shooting guard. Photo courtesy of the Post-Tribune.

Season

Overall (CAA)

2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013

10-22 (4-14) 6-26 (4-14) 13-17 (7-11) THE DSJ -SEPTEMBER 2013

Tribe Football Falls Short

»

scott guinn, dsj associate sports editor

Disappointing. That seems to be the word used when describing Tribe Basketball’s latest season. There were undoubtedly some exciting moments, including the flashy play and late game heroics by fan-favorite Marcus Thornton (’15), but at the end of the year many left feeling a little underwhelmed. A first-round loss in the CAA tournament is never easy to swallow, but one would think we’d grow accustomed to it after several seasons of lackluster performance. Nevertheless, every year, for whatever reason, Tribe fans come back with renewed hope. Perhaps this is our year to make the NCAA tournament. Everyone wants to see a Cinderella story come to life, but nobody wants it more than a Tribe Basketball fan. It may only be September, but it is never too early to speculate on the approaching season and take a look at some of the new faces. Four players have graduated since last spring, including starting shooting guard Matt Rum (’13). These four have been replaced by a group of freshmen who look to breathe life back into a struggling Tribe team. At 6’4”, Michael Schlotman (’17) is the smallest of the new recruits but certainly not small for a point guard. His credentials are extensive. He played for four years at Munster High School in Munster, Indiana, leading his team to an impressive record of 25-1 his senior year. In fact, ESPN rates Schlotman as the 14th best recruit in Indiana and the 89th best point guard in the country. It will be interesting to see how Schlotman fits in with guards Marcus Thornton (’15) and Brandon Britt (’14), who are both accustomed to running the point. Schlotman will undoubtedly provide relief off of the bench and hopefully help prevent the late-game comebacks that so often plague the Tribe. Daniel Dixon (’17) out of Great Falls, Virginia appears to be the perimeter replacement for graduated senior Matt Rum. At 6’5”, Dixon recorded 53 three-pointers and a free-throw percentage of 75.2 in his senior year at Langley High School. He then attended Fishburne Military School where he was averaging 8.7 points per game before a season-ending injury. As of now it is unclear how much of a presence Dixon will have on the team and whether he has fully recovered from his injury or not. Hopefully down the road

sports

Upset Bid Denied at West Virginia

A Look at Tribe Basketball’s New Recruits »

»

19

jeffrey knox, dsj co-editor-in-chief

VS.

a crowd of defenders, barely getting the ball to cross the plane before his knee touched the turf. The William and Mary defense, despite concerns about a lack of depth and a dangerous Mountaineer offense, remained sturdy throughout the second quarter. West Virginia never managed a first down in the quarter as Clint Trickett, a junior transfer from Florida State, got the call to replace starter Paul Millard at quarterback. He never completed a pass, and Millard returned to the game to start the second half. The Tribe wasn’t done scoring, however, as a fumble recovery by junior DT Jasper Coleman gave the offense the ball on the Mountaineer 34-yard line. One first down later, and kicker John Carpenter stepped in to connect on a field goal that put the Tribe up by a score of 17-7 at the end of the half. That’s not a bad outcome for a team that came in as a 30-point underdog. The second half was quite a different story, though, as the Tribe’s momentum ran out. West Virginia needed just two drives to even the score at 17-17. Their offense started finding a rhythm as senior running back Charles Sims proved tough to handle. Sims would end up with 120 yards on 23 carries. Millard also began finding his receivers, including a 69-yard game-breaker to Ronald Carswell, who streaked through the Tribe secondary on his way to the end zone. William and Mary had a chance to respond on its next drive, but a Carpenter field goal at the outset of the fourth quarter was pulled badly. The score remained tied midway through the fourth quarter, as neither team could mount an offensive charge. A three-andout followed by a short punt by Carpenter left the Mountaineer offense in good field position at midfield. An unrelenting rushing attack finally wore down the Tribe defensive front, as Sims and Dreamius Smith carried the team downfield before freshman Wendell Smallwood finally scored from two yards out, putting West Virginia up 24-17. William and Mary’s final drive began with just over three minutes remaining, and it concluded after just one play. Clearly sensing the urgency of the situation, Graham threw a wayward pass over the middle that was intended for Sean Ballard, but got intercepted by an opposing safety. West Virginia managed to run out the clock to conclude the game and take the hardfought victory. While certainly disappointing given the halftime lead and huge upset potential, Tribe supporters can’t help but be pleased with the team’s performance to open the season. A lot of question marks that existed just a few weeks ago were definitively answered. Coach Laycock stated: “There were a lot of positives that came out of [the game], The Tribe Football captains--(from L to R) offensive lineman Matt Crisafi, defensive even though we’re disappointed with the lineman George Beerhalter, and safety Jerome Couplin--await the coin toss before the loss.” packed stands at Mountaineer Field. All photos courtesy of Tribe Athletics. Coming into the game, junior

After the first five minutes of the Tribe’s season opener against West Virginia (WVU), a blowout loss appeared imminent. The offense had just gone three-and-out, and the Mountaineers responded with an efficient 8-play, 76-yard drive that culminated in a touchdown. William and Mary then struggled to another short possession, and at that point, the game result seemed decided. But for those who gave up on the Tribe prematurely, the remainder of the first half turned out to be a pleasant surprise. The team came alive after a missed 55-yard field goal by WVU gave the Tribe the ball in good field position. William and Mary proceeded to secure its initial first down of the game before the team’s star player, Tre McBride, made a leaping catch down the right sideline to move up the chains some 40 yards. McBride was easily the Tribe’s top performer as a sophomore last season, and the Georgia native was selected as a preseason third-team AllAmerican. After the amazing catch, the offense managed to punch the ball into the end zone from the three-yard line to even up the score. Another defensive stop brought an end to the first quarter, with the Tribe squarely in position to contend with its Big 12 foe. The second quarter was dominated by William and Mary, starting with an impressive 88-yard touchdown drive. During that 12-play sequence, head coach Jimmye Laycock employed an effective offensive scheme that included four running backs. Tre McBride also caught another long pass, this one for 28 yards, placing the ball on the WVU two-yard line. The Tribe’s second, and, unfortunately, final touchdown, was scored on a QB sneak as starting senior Mike Graham dove into the end zone amongst

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sports

cornerback Frank Tamakloe said that the team was excited about the opportunity, but that he “didn’t approach the game any differently… it’s important to be ready no matter who you play.” West Virginia likely will not be much of a contender this year in the Big 12, but it is still a great team. Senior safety Jerome Couplin claimed that team members entered Saturday’s game with “a chip on their shoulder” due to the disregard given to FCS teams. He said: “Just because they’re in the BCS doesn’t mean we can’t play with them. It doesn’t mean we don’t belong on the field.” This marks the second year in a row that the Tribe has lost a close call to an FBS team in its season opener, having fallen to Maryland by a single point in 2012. Surely, had William and Mary defeated the Mountaineers, it would have been a huge deal, perhaps even Tre McBride elevates above a defender to haul in one of his three receptions of the game. more impressive than the 2009 victory job throughout training camp. Regardless of who takes over, the over Virginia. The season opener also provided good insight into the team’s quarterback will have to shoulder a lot of the load in keeping the personnel and personality that will be on display throughout William and Mary offense on the move. Although many may still be thinking “what if?” after the tough 2013. The defense put on a strong performance, only giving up one big play and keeping up with West Virginia’s high-octane loss to West Virginia, the team still has 10 games to look forward offense for most of the game. Key players will be Luke Rhodes and to. In fact, the remaining schedule for the Tribe should not be Quincy September, both linebackers who compiled nine and eight overly difficult. Hampton visits Zable Stadium on September 7 for tackles in the game, respectively, along with Couplin, a potential the Tribe’s first home game, and if there was ever a “cupcake” game NFL prospect, who led the team with 14 tackles. The Tribe could for William and Mary, this is it. The Pirates went 3-7 in the MEAC run into problems on the defensive line and in the secondary, as conference in 2012, including a 7-45 loss to Old Dominion, and both lack depth and game experience. Tamakloe, who tallied four more recently lost by over 30 points to Western Illinois. The other solo tackles in the game as a reserve, believes that the defense non-conference games include two teams from Pennsylvania. “played with a lot of effort but could do a better job of executing First, William and Mary will travel to play at Lafayette and then will host Penn in mid-October. CAA play begins on September our assignments.” On offense, Coach Laycock has a suite of solid running backs 21 for a matchup against Rhode Island for Family Weekend. The to choose from. Junior Keith McBride has a strong track record, toughest games in conference play will likely be away games as he led the Tribe’s rushing attack last season. As it turns out, against Delaware and Villanova, as well as an in-state “rivalry” Jarrell Cooper and Kendell Anderson both got more carries showdown with James Madison during Homecoming. Given the strong start to the season and a relatively weaker than McBride. Both players have little game experience and are of shorter stature, but were quite impressive against the schedule, the Tribe has all the tools and opportunities to make Mountaineers. All three running backs ended up with between 2013 a standout year. Tre McBride seemed poised to use the tough 28 and 45 yards on the ground, which amounts to a very balanced loss as motivation for the rest of the season, noting that “at the attack. Of notable absence was running back Mikal Abdul-Saboor, end of the day we still lost…but we’re going to work to smash everybody else on our schedule.” All the team has to do is go out who was McBride’s backup last season as a freshman. A fourth running back, redshirt junior Darnell Laws, got all of and make that happen. his yards through the air as he caught eight passes for 45 yards. Then there was the Tribe’s deep threat of Tre McBride (no relation Quick Game Stats to Keith), who had 108 yards after just three completions. Beyond that, however, QB Mike Graham had few other options in the W&M WVU passing game. Junior Sean Ballard will likely play wide receiver alongside McBride, and he has been a good contributor. The Tribe Time of Possession: 30:15 29:45 really could use another slot receiver, and needs its tight-end duo Rushing Yards (Attempts): 102 (31) 172 (44) of Bo Revell and Rob Asmar to step up as well. Passing Yards (Attempts): 207 (27) 237 (27) At quarterback, Graham will be the probable starter for the upcoming games before either Brent Caprio or Raphael Ortiz First Downs: 12 24 return from offseason injuries. The Tribe has had a significant Turnovers: 1 1 lack of production at the quarterback position in recent years, Third Down Conversions: 5 of 14 2 of 10 and all three players have been in competition for the starting THE DSJ -SEPTEMBER 2013

21

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sports

Twelve Straight Wins

U.S. Soccer Contends with the World’s Best »

alex cook, dsj sports editor

It’s no secret: the U.S. men’s national team has not been an historic power in the world soccer scene. As far as recent FIFA World Cup success goes, the red, white and blue did best under the command of Bruce Arena in 2002, reaching the quarterfinals in South Korea and Japan. Since then, the national team has either been eliminated in the group stages or made an early exit in the knockout stages. However, as we get closer to the opening matches of World Cup 2014 in Brazil, which is now less than 300 days away, Americans may finally have a team to root for in the late stages of the international competition. With a balance of experienced veterans in the most competitive professional leagues in Europe and energetic young guns making their mark in the MLS, head coach Jurgen Klinsmann has assembled a squad reminiscent of Arena’s historic 2002 team. With its latest win over a strong team in Bosnia-Herzegovina, the United States notched its twelfth straight victory in international competition, the longest current win streak in the world. The match, held in the capital city of Sarajevo, was a firecracker right from the start. Manchester City striker Edin Dzeko put the home Jozy Altidore, on his way to a hat trick, corrals the ball in the box side up a goal only eight minutes after the opening whistle. The while a Bosnian defender pursues. Photo courtesy of ISIphotos.com. Bosnians took advantage of ill-advised dribbling from veteran night, giving the United States the advantage of the lead over its U.S. forward Eddie Johnson, as Dzeko calmly collected the ball European opponents, who came into the match ranked 13th in on a steal, dribbled right, and fired a shot into the shin of U.S. the world. goalkeeper Tim Howard. Unfortunately for Howard, who earned Altidore finished off his hat trick just two minutes later. his 50th victory for the U.S., the shot rebounded directly back to Standout midfielder Michael Bradley poked a through pass behind Dzeko, who drilled the second-chance attempt into the net with the Bosnian central defenders to the streaking Altidore, who his left foot. slotted the ball home. That goal gave Altidore another record, as Though the Americans showed some positive play in the he became only the third U.S. player ever to have two hat tricks minutes that followed the early strike, with Jozy Altidore during his international campaign. Bosnia-Herzegovina would threatening to score on a few possessions, the home team scored score once more in the 90th minute of the friendly, but it was again before the end of the first half. After a well-directed corner too little, too late for the home squad. Bosnia faces Slovakia next kick from midfielder Zvjezdan Misimovic bounced directly back in a World Cup qualifying match, as it strives to stay on top of its to his feet, Misimovic sent a second cross into the box that Vedad qualifying table. Ibesivic struck well, sending the ball just past Howard and giving The United States has recorded 13 victories during the calendar Bosnia-Herzegovina a two-goal advantage going into the second year, which equals the most ever by the national team. With half. four matches still to go, the Americans have shown no sign of Klinsmann’s locker room pep talk must have been especially losing their momentum. Following the victory, the U.S. moved to inspiring. After halftime, the United States looked like a different 19th in FIFA’s international rankings, ahead of Mexico and other squad on offense: confident, clinical and deadly. In the 55th perennial contenders such as France and Ghana. minute, holding midfielder Michael Bradley sent a gorgeous ball Since losing to Belgium on May 29, the U.S. has toppled Gerover the Bosnian defense that landed at the foot of Jozy Altidore. many and gone undefeated in North American World Cup qualiWith one touch, Altidore slid a pass to his teammate Johnson on fying. Klinsmann’s squad now sits atop the qualifying table as it the right, who redirected the ball past the Bosnian goalie Asmir enters its final stretch of matches this year, as it will face Costa Begovic and into the open net from the top of the box. Rica, Mexico, Jamaica, and Panama in the next two months. Not Altidore took command after that. Just four minutes later, qualifying for the World Cup is basically a statistical impossibilwingback Fabian Johnson slipped a ball through the legs of a ity at this point for the United States, though that doesn’t mean defender to Altidore on the left side of the penalty area with only that the next few games won’t be significant challenges for the Begovic standing in his way. Jozy smashed the ball to the far post surging Americans. Though the U.S. defeated Costa Rica in its last with his left foot, giving the Stoke City keeper no chance to make meeting in the snow-swept Dick’s Sporting Goods Park in Coloa save. It marked his fifth goal in as many games, setting a U.S. rado, the American side has never won on Costa Rican turf. The record for goals in consecutive matches. With the score tied in marquis matchup for the U.S. will take place on September 10 the 84th minute, Altidore, who currently plays for Sunderland in against hard-nosed rival Mexico. If the national team can keep the Premier League, stood over a 25-yard free kick just left of the the train rolling through the rest of qualifying and into next year, center of the penalty area. With a picture-perfect strike to the top there is no reason why it shouldn’t strike fear into the hearts of the left corner of the goal, Altidore recorded his second goal of the world’s best come the World Cup next summer.

22

THE DSJ -SEPTEMBER 2013


»

sports

cornerback Frank Tamakloe said that the team was excited about the opportunity, but that he “didn’t approach the game any differently… it’s important to be ready no matter who you play.” West Virginia likely will not be much of a contender this year in the Big 12, but it is still a great team. Senior safety Jerome Couplin claimed that team members entered Saturday’s game with “a chip on their shoulder” due to the disregard given to FCS teams. He said: “Just because they’re in the BCS doesn’t mean we can’t play with them. It doesn’t mean we don’t belong on the field.” This marks the second year in a row that the Tribe has lost a close call to an FBS team in its season opener, having fallen to Maryland by a single point in 2012. Surely, had William and Mary defeated the Mountaineers, it would have been a huge deal, perhaps even Tre McBride elevates above a defender to haul in one of his three receptions of the game. more impressive than the 2009 victory job throughout training camp. Regardless of who takes over, the over Virginia. The season opener also provided good insight into the team’s quarterback will have to shoulder a lot of the load in keeping the personnel and personality that will be on display throughout William and Mary offense on the move. Although many may still be thinking “what if?” after the tough 2013. The defense put on a strong performance, only giving up one big play and keeping up with West Virginia’s high-octane loss to West Virginia, the team still has 10 games to look forward offense for most of the game. Key players will be Luke Rhodes and to. In fact, the remaining schedule for the Tribe should not be Quincy September, both linebackers who compiled nine and eight overly difficult. Hampton visits Zable Stadium on September 7 for tackles in the game, respectively, along with Couplin, a potential the Tribe’s first home game, and if there was ever a “cupcake” game NFL prospect, who led the team with 14 tackles. The Tribe could for William and Mary, this is it. The Pirates went 3-7 in the MEAC run into problems on the defensive line and in the secondary, as conference in 2012, including a 7-45 loss to Old Dominion, and both lack depth and game experience. Tamakloe, who tallied four more recently lost by over 30 points to Western Illinois. The other solo tackles in the game as a reserve, believes that the defense non-conference games include two teams from Pennsylvania. “played with a lot of effort but could do a better job of executing First, William and Mary will travel to play at Lafayette and then will host Penn in mid-October. CAA play begins on September our assignments.” On offense, Coach Laycock has a suite of solid running backs 21 for a matchup against Rhode Island for Family Weekend. The to choose from. Junior Keith McBride has a strong track record, toughest games in conference play will likely be away games as he led the Tribe’s rushing attack last season. As it turns out, against Delaware and Villanova, as well as an in-state “rivalry” Jarrell Cooper and Kendell Anderson both got more carries showdown with James Madison during Homecoming. Given the strong start to the season and a relatively weaker than McBride. Both players have little game experience and are of shorter stature, but were quite impressive against the schedule, the Tribe has all the tools and opportunities to make Mountaineers. All three running backs ended up with between 2013 a standout year. Tre McBride seemed poised to use the tough 28 and 45 yards on the ground, which amounts to a very balanced loss as motivation for the rest of the season, noting that “at the attack. Of notable absence was running back Mikal Abdul-Saboor, end of the day we still lost…but we’re going to work to smash everybody else on our schedule.” All the team has to do is go out who was McBride’s backup last season as a freshman. A fourth running back, redshirt junior Darnell Laws, got all of and make that happen. his yards through the air as he caught eight passes for 45 yards. Then there was the Tribe’s deep threat of Tre McBride (no relation Quick Game Stats to Keith), who had 108 yards after just three completions. Beyond that, however, QB Mike Graham had few other options in the W&M WVU passing game. Junior Sean Ballard will likely play wide receiver alongside McBride, and he has been a good contributor. The Tribe Time of Possession: 30:15 29:45 really could use another slot receiver, and needs its tight-end duo Rushing Yards (Attempts): 102 (31) 172 (44) of Bo Revell and Rob Asmar to step up as well. Passing Yards (Attempts): 207 (27) 237 (27) At quarterback, Graham will be the probable starter for the upcoming games before either Brent Caprio or Raphael Ortiz First Downs: 12 24 return from offseason injuries. The Tribe has had a significant Turnovers: 1 1 lack of production at the quarterback position in recent years, Third Down Conversions: 5 of 14 2 of 10 and all three players have been in competition for the starting THE DSJ -SEPTEMBER 2013

21

»

sports

Twelve Straight Wins

U.S. Soccer Contends with the World’s Best »

alex cook, dsj sports editor

It’s no secret: the U.S. men’s national team has not been an historic power in the world soccer scene. As far as recent FIFA World Cup success goes, the red, white and blue did best under the command of Bruce Arena in 2002, reaching the quarterfinals in South Korea and Japan. Since then, the national team has either been eliminated in the group stages or made an early exit in the knockout stages. However, as we get closer to the opening matches of World Cup 2014 in Brazil, which is now less than 300 days away, Americans may finally have a team to root for in the late stages of the international competition. With a balance of experienced veterans in the most competitive professional leagues in Europe and energetic young guns making their mark in the MLS, head coach Jurgen Klinsmann has assembled a squad reminiscent of Arena’s historic 2002 team. With its latest win over a strong team in Bosnia-Herzegovina, the United States notched its twelfth straight victory in international competition, the longest current win streak in the world. The match, held in the capital city of Sarajevo, was a firecracker right from the start. Manchester City striker Edin Dzeko put the home Jozy Altidore, on his way to a hat trick, corrals the ball in the box side up a goal only eight minutes after the opening whistle. The while a Bosnian defender pursues. Photo courtesy of ISIphotos.com. Bosnians took advantage of ill-advised dribbling from veteran night, giving the United States the advantage of the lead over its U.S. forward Eddie Johnson, as Dzeko calmly collected the ball European opponents, who came into the match ranked 13th in on a steal, dribbled right, and fired a shot into the shin of U.S. the world. goalkeeper Tim Howard. Unfortunately for Howard, who earned Altidore finished off his hat trick just two minutes later. his 50th victory for the U.S., the shot rebounded directly back to Standout midfielder Michael Bradley poked a through pass behind Dzeko, who drilled the second-chance attempt into the net with the Bosnian central defenders to the streaking Altidore, who his left foot. slotted the ball home. That goal gave Altidore another record, as Though the Americans showed some positive play in the he became only the third U.S. player ever to have two hat tricks minutes that followed the early strike, with Jozy Altidore during his international campaign. Bosnia-Herzegovina would threatening to score on a few possessions, the home team scored score once more in the 90th minute of the friendly, but it was again before the end of the first half. After a well-directed corner too little, too late for the home squad. Bosnia faces Slovakia next kick from midfielder Zvjezdan Misimovic bounced directly back in a World Cup qualifying match, as it strives to stay on top of its to his feet, Misimovic sent a second cross into the box that Vedad qualifying table. Ibesivic struck well, sending the ball just past Howard and giving The United States has recorded 13 victories during the calendar Bosnia-Herzegovina a two-goal advantage going into the second year, which equals the most ever by the national team. With half. four matches still to go, the Americans have shown no sign of Klinsmann’s locker room pep talk must have been especially losing their momentum. Following the victory, the U.S. moved to inspiring. After halftime, the United States looked like a different 19th in FIFA’s international rankings, ahead of Mexico and other squad on offense: confident, clinical and deadly. In the 55th perennial contenders such as France and Ghana. minute, holding midfielder Michael Bradley sent a gorgeous ball Since losing to Belgium on May 29, the U.S. has toppled Gerover the Bosnian defense that landed at the foot of Jozy Altidore. many and gone undefeated in North American World Cup qualiWith one touch, Altidore slid a pass to his teammate Johnson on fying. Klinsmann’s squad now sits atop the qualifying table as it the right, who redirected the ball past the Bosnian goalie Asmir enters its final stretch of matches this year, as it will face Costa Begovic and into the open net from the top of the box. Rica, Mexico, Jamaica, and Panama in the next two months. Not Altidore took command after that. Just four minutes later, qualifying for the World Cup is basically a statistical impossibilwingback Fabian Johnson slipped a ball through the legs of a ity at this point for the United States, though that doesn’t mean defender to Altidore on the left side of the penalty area with only that the next few games won’t be significant challenges for the Begovic standing in his way. Jozy smashed the ball to the far post surging Americans. Though the U.S. defeated Costa Rica in its last with his left foot, giving the Stoke City keeper no chance to make meeting in the snow-swept Dick’s Sporting Goods Park in Coloa save. It marked his fifth goal in as many games, setting a U.S. rado, the American side has never won on Costa Rican turf. The record for goals in consecutive matches. With the score tied in marquis matchup for the U.S. will take place on September 10 the 84th minute, Altidore, who currently plays for Sunderland in against hard-nosed rival Mexico. If the national team can keep the Premier League, stood over a 25-yard free kick just left of the the train rolling through the rest of qualifying and into next year, center of the penalty area. With a picture-perfect strike to the top there is no reason why it shouldn’t strike fear into the hearts of the left corner of the goal, Altidore recorded his second goal of the world’s best come the World Cup next summer.

22

THE DSJ -SEPTEMBER 2013


Ask a TWAMP

For the questions you need answered but don’t want shared Dear TWAMP:

Aloha TWAMP:

I think I’m in for a long semester. I’ve registered for 6 classes, am taking on a bunch of extracurriculars, will be working a part-time job, and am doing research in a science lab. Plus, there’s this half marathon that I’m signed up to run in later this fall. I just wish I had more time so that I could write or edit for the DoG Street Journal. So, I’ve committed a good bit of money and energy into this race. But how am I supposed to train sufficiently when I have little to no free time? I wish all my running around between classes and activities qualified as exercise. What advice do you have for me so that I can find time for the gym and the track? I really want to get into kick-ass shape come race time, because my goal is to set a PR!

That’s right--I came to William & Mary from Hawai’i. Honolulu to be exact. I’m a freshman and have already gotten lots of inquisitive looks and fielded a swath of questions about my origins from my peers. Basically, I wanted a change in my life, so I decided to come to a great school on the East Coast and give it a go for four years. Obviously I’m far away from home and know next to nobody around here, so I need your help. Now, I’ve got a bunch of questions. What’s the weather like? Why is Virginia for Lovers? Where’s the best place to go surfing or lie on the beach? What are some general fashion rules to abide by? Where did all the bricks come from? Where can I look to find any other Hawaiians that may have sojourned to Williamsburg?

Thanks! Running on Fumes

Sincerely, 5,000 Miles from Home

Dear Running on Fumes: This is not a unique problem by any means, especially here at William & Mary where there are TWAMPs galore. Most students feel like if they aren’t working extra hard, they’ll be left behind by their overachieving peers. My biggest advice is to start using a daily planner and work on your time management skills. Remember to never get stressed out and just approach things one at a time. But still do everything to the best of your ability--”carpe diem” as Horace might say. And finally, don’t lose out on sleep. The first step to finding more workout hours is minimizing your “wasted” time. That means less time behind the computer screen browsing Facebook or watching TV. Then you can get to bed earlier and feel more rested and energetic in the morning, which is the perfect time to get in a training run. After classes in the day, you should be able to find time during the afternoon to run or hit the gym. Look into joining the Running Club at W&M or Team Blitz, both of which offer a team setting for enthusiastic and competitive runners. Blitz will certainly get you into shape for the marathon. As the famous college triangle reveals, you have a choice between three competing interests: study, sleep, and social life. Make sure your priorities are straight, and I’m sure you’ll have a busy, but awesome, semester.

Dear 5,000 Miles from Home: Slow down! I’ll try to address your questions one at a time. The weather is fairly unpredictable. It’s generally hot and humid during summer and rainy during the fall and spring. I hope you don’t get too cold come November and December! Virginia is for Lovers is a slogan used by the state to attract tourists. While I can’t confirm its veracity (the poor TWAMP lives in solitude), I bet your parents hope you don’t find someone here and settle far away from them. As for beaches, you may be a bit disappointed. I recommend either Jamestown or Yorktown beach. Both can be accessed from the Colonial Parkway. For surfing, though, you’ll need to hit 64 and go down to Virginia Beach--and get there early! You’ll have to put away your flip-flops and Hawaiian shirts in the winter and do some cold weather shopping. But there’s nothing too strict fashion-wise, and usually comfortable clothing wins out. Bricks have been a staple at William & Mary since 1693. Jefferson strolled on them, as did Tyler, Gates, and Stewart. Now you are too. In fact, bricks are made from a mixture of sand, clay, lime, and iron-oxides. W&M has a student directory that is maintained by the Registrar, so I’d check with them in the Blow Hall basement. Or you can try starting your own Hawaiian culture club!

Run like the wind! TWAMP

Sincerely, TWAMP

The TWAMP is not a qualified advice columnist, please do not take her/him too seriously. The DSJ is not responsible for any consequence incurred from following the above advice. Looking for answers? Send your questions to the DSJ TWAMP at dogstreetjournal@gmail.com THE DSJ -SEPTEMBER 2013

23


September 2013

Activities Fair 2013 >> Lauren Su, DSJ Photo Editor


DoG Street Journal - September 2013  

A magazine by W&M students, for W&M students

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