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DISH always in good taste

SWEET TREATS

A peak at some of Madison’s sweetest destinations

BADGER BREAD Page 6

SLOW FOOD Page 18

WWW.THEDISHMADISON.COM

| SPRING 2014

HOME BREWS Page 23


THE DISH

TH E DI S H M A D I S O N . C O M


TABLE OF CONTENTS menu

02 A peek inside 03 The Dish Staff List 04 Editor-In-Chief Letter in the kitchen

06 Strawberry Spring Surprise 09 Badger Bread 11 Creole Cooking Up North Grits & Grillades

14 Warm Spiced Comfort Food,

no reservations

food for thought

15 Instagram

26 Home Brewing Guide

17 Madison’s Best Unknown

29 The Terrace:

Breakfast: Manna Café and Bakery

The Tried and True Place For You

19 Greenbusch Bakery’s

31 Wine Notes 101

Kosher Donuts

21 Lunch on Wednesday’s

33 America’s Dairyland, Madison’s Dairy

Belongs to Slow Food

23 Gail Ambrosius Chocolaier: The Secret to Happiness

Made Easy

THE DISH | SPRING 2014

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THE DISH editors

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Sarah Dreifke

COPY

Chapin Blanchard

IN THE KITCHEN Noelle Lebow

NO RESERVATIONS Jane Roberts

FOOD FOR THOUGHT Jane Milne

MARKETING Taylor Laabs L - R: Jane Milne, Chapin Blanchard, Noelle Lebow, Jane Roberts, Sarah Dreifke. Not pictured: Taylor Laabs

STAFF In The Kitchen Writers: Jenni Wolf, Amelia Long, Josie Hopkins, Rachel Laseke, Jennifer Dillon, Chelsea Peters, Alexander Kalyniuk, Maria Novak No Reservations Writers: Katie Unger, Sam Smith, Sam Zipper, Colin Terwelp, Meghan Horvath, Lexie Winieke, Bri Moritz Food For Thought Writers: Nathaniel Scharping, Jordan Peschek, Alice Walker, Elyse Guizzetti, Corinne Lake Marketing Assistants: Josie Hopkins, Rachel Laseke Layout: Jesse Tovar, Corinne Lake, Sarah Dreifke

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THE DISH | SPRING 2014


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Dear Foodies, As a senior, nostalgia surrounds me every day: thinking back on my first Badger game day, the sights and smells of the Dane County Farmers Market, the excitement and curiosity of exploring State Street for the first time... As my four years in this great city come to a close, I look back on these found memories and can’t help but feel sentimental. And yet, going into my final semester, I found that there are so many places I left unexplored – so many restaurants I never tried, events I never attended. As my friends started compiling their “senior bucket lists” – chalk full of everything from sledding down Bascom on lunch trays to an evening out at Picnic Point – it got me thinking. Foodies can have bucket lists too. Whether it’s exploring that one bakery I always passed but never stepped in, or experimenting with new flavors and recipes in the kitchen – this last semester is all about exploration. Make a mess in the kitchen. Those recipes you’ve been pinning on Pinterest? It’s time to make something of them. Stock up on ingredients and go to town! Try a new restaurant. Instead of going to your “go-to” on a Thursday night, mix things up and try somewhere you’ve never been before. Simply, explore. The possibilities of things to do, see and taste in Madison are endless – get out there and start discovering! This spring issue of The Dish brings you a few classics as well as a few newcomers to the Madison food scene – all poised to get your bucket list underway. Whether it’s a trip to the Terrace or an afternoon of classic creole cuisine – we’ve got any foodie covered. Ultimately, my advice is simple. Take advantage of the time you have in this great city – whether it be a semester or otherwise. Try that new restaurant. Tackle that new recipe. Madison is a foodie’s paradise – savor it! On Wisconsin,

SARAH DREIFKE Editor-In-Chief

THE DISH | SPRING 2014

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IN THE KITCHEN

Dear Readers,

{

“A man may be a pessimistic determinist before lunch and an optimistic believer in the will’s freedom after it,” - Aldous Huxley

}

As Aldous Huxley elegantly stated, meal time is a time for pleasure. Not only does eating generate happiness, cooking does too. There is no better way to enjoy a meal than sitting down with a dish that required your blood, sweat, and tears (figuratively speaking, of course!). The problem is that students live a fast, busy life with little time to cook extravagant meals or bake their grandmother’s secret recipes. In the Kitchen is a section devoted to finding the best recipes for time-constrained students living on a budget. Whether you are preparing for an elegant dinner with your significant other or planning a cozy night in with a couple of textbooks, you will find a joy in generating the dishes provided. Speaking for the In the Kitchen staff, we hope your home-cooked meal will relieve some school stress, and hey, maybe even that optimistic believer in you will appear.

NOELLE LEBOW In The Kitchen Editor

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THE DISH | SPRING 2014


STRAWBERRY SPRING SURPRISE By Jennifer Dillon

I

t’s that time of year again. Birds are chirping, and baseball season is right around the corner.

In an effort to trick our minds into believing that spring really is coming soon, I highly recommend whipping up a batch of these Strawberry Surprise Cupcakes.

And yet, spring is…still not here. I’m sad to admit that even after all of the wicked Wisconsin winter weather we have suffered through this year, we are still returning to campus from Spring Break in our parkas. I think the question that is haunting most of us Badgers as we embark on the last leg of our “Spring” Semester this year is, “How could this be?” What makes this even more difficult to comprehend is that a few short days ago, a large portion of us were sporting shorts and tank tops while enjoying temperatures above 60 degrees for the first time in the past four months. I’d love to answer this puzzling phenomenon, but because I am no longer pursuing a science major, I’m going to refrain from attempting to actually respond to that question.

The juicy in-season California strawberries hide, like spring in Madison, within the faultlessly sweet vanilla cupcake and are covered up, much like the Madison landscape is by snow, with a heavenly white cream cheese whipped cream frosting. And yes, for all of you Wisconsinites out there, I did just say “cheese.” That word alone should spark your interest. Nevertheless, cheese-lover or not, these cupcakes are sure to bring the joy of spring to anyone who bites into them. With just one bite, the surprising burst of fresh fruit amidst the snowy white cake and frosting will awaken you to the sense of spring that we are all so desperately in need of.

So, go ahead. Bake up these cupcakes and bring on the spring. Instead, I will offer you an alternative (superior) solution: Cupcakes.

THE DISH | SPRING 2014

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IN THE KITCHEN

These cupcakes are sure to bring the joy of spring to anyone who bites into them.

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THE DISH | SPRING 2014


Strawberry Cupcakes For the cupcakes: 1 1/2 C all-purpose flour 1 C granulated sugar 1 1/2 TSP baking powder 1/4 TSP salt 3 large eggs 1 C butter, softened 1/4 C milk 1 TSP vanilla extract 24 whole strawberries For the whipped cream frosting: 8 OZ cream cheese 1/2 C granulated sugar 1 TSP vanilla extract 1/2 TSP almond extract 2C heavy cream

1.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line two cupcake tins with 24 cupcake liners.

2.

In a large bowl combine flour, sugar, baking powder and salt.

3.

In a large mixing bowl blend butter until light and fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time until well combined. Add milk and vanilla. Add the dry ingredients. Mix until batter is light and fluffy.

4.

full.

Fill cupcake liners 1/2

5.

Bake 20 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Cool completely in the cupcake pans.

6. While

they bake, whip the cream cheese, sugar and extracts until well combined. Slowly pour in the heavy cream while whipping. Stop and scrape the bottom of the bowl if necessary. Whip until the cream makes peaks like mini mountaintops.

7. Once

cupcakes have cooled, hollow out some of the center of the cupcake, cut the tops off the strawberries and insert into the hollow area. Cover with frosting.

THE DISH | SPRING 2014

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IN THE KITCHEN


BADGER BREAD

By Noelle Lebow

T

here is a secret weapon to surviving the polar vortex: Badger bread. Badger bread, also commonly called beer bread, is a meltin-your-mouth luxury that makes the winter bearable and allows breakfast to include beer. The idea of toasting a warm, soft slice of bread and finishing with a drizzle of icing gets me out of bed even on the earliest mornings.

As someone that typically chooses sweet, sugary recipes, I was hesitant to try beer bread. When I came across orange beer bread, my curiosity outweighed my fear. I was highly skeptical of the fact that this recipe calls for only 1/3 tablespoon of sugar, and yet this bread is somehow supposed to taste good. It sounds impossible, right? Well, I was wrong. Because this beer bread is flavored with orange juice and orange zest, the fruitiness compensates for the lack of sugar (and the icing helps, too). To complement the orange flavor, I followed the recommendation of using beer from the Blue Moon Brewing Company, although I think any wheat beer should work. While this bread is delicious fresh out of the oven, it tastes just as good, or better, toasted in the fry pan. The icing caramelizes onto the bread, creating a hot and crunchy coating. You can even top it with a little butter.

3 C

all-purpose flour

1/3 TBS

granulated sugar

2 TSP

baking powder

3. In a small bowl, whisk together vanilla, 3/4 of orange zest, 3 tablespoons of orange juice, and 3 tablespoons of butter.

1/4 TSP

salt

1/2 TSP

ground cinnamon

4. Make a welll in the middle of the flour mixture and pour orange mixture and beer. Using a spatula or wooden spoon, mix together until just combined. Do not over mix.

2 TSP

vanilla

1

orange, zest (divided)

5. Pour into loaf pan and press into the corners of the pan. Do not smooth the dough. Pour the remaining butter over the top of the dough. Bake until cooked through about 35 minutes.

1/4 C

orange juice (divided)

12 OZ

blue moon beer

4 TBS

butter, melted (divided)

1/2 C

powdered sugar

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees and spray a loaf pan with non-stick spray. 2. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, baking powder, cinnamon and salt.

6. For the glaze, combine remaining orange zest, orange juice and powdered sugar. Whisk together until smooth and pour over warm bread. Slice and serve.

[recipe originated from countrycleaver.com]

THE DISH | SPRING 2014

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IN THE KITCHEN

CREOLE COOKING UP NORTH By Alexander Kalyniuk I’m not a stranger to New Orleans. I was 8 years old when I first visited the famous Jazz Fest in the Crescent City. I still remember being frightened by a surprisingly realistic human statue near Café du Monde, enjoying a muffuletta at Central Grocery and riding the streetcar towards the Garden District. Yearly visits to the city have become common ever since. My fondest memory in The Big Easy occurred during a Sunday jazz brunch at Commander’s Palace restaurant, the epicenter of Creole cuisine. This was my first encounter with American luxury dining, and I’ve revisited the establishment several times during my lifetime. To say the cuisine is outstanding would be an understatement. Paul Prudhomme and Emeril Lagasse are two of its most famous alumni, and current chef Tory McPhail was just named a James Beard award winner for his work in the kitchen. Creole cooking is America’s answer to haute French cuisine (i.e. it’s really fancy and complicated). It’s a unique American cuisine that draws from French, Spanish, Italian, African and Caribbean influences amongst others. Don’t confuse Creole with Cajun; they are different cuisines. Creole food is typically considered more high-brow and “aristocratic” compared to Cajun. Creole recipes typically involve more ingredients, flavor and preparation time. Although Creole food draws from several cooking traditions, it’s exclusively found in America and it deserves our patriotic praise. Due to the fact that we live in the upper Midwest, many Creole ingredients are not readily available (e.g. fresh Gulf seafood). However, that doesn’t mean we have to deprive ourselves of this spectacular aspect of American gastronomic culture. Below I have included a classic Creole recipe: grits and grillades (pronounced “gree-yahdz”). Think of this as the Creole version of the Italian dish brasato con polenta (i.e. braised beef and polenta). It is commonly served during breakfast or brunch; however this savory dish can easily be enjoyed as a main course for dinner. I’ve modified the recipe keeping the Creole essence intact, while adding some key Wisconsin foodstuffs. The excellent dairy products of our state are perfect for a creamy, cheesy grits recipe. Additionally, the various farms in the area provide us with a variety of fresh cuts of beef, pork and veal that are perfect for grillades. I’ve made this dish a number of times as a main course and all attempts resulted in full stomachs and convivial satisfaction. So heat up those sauté pans, uncork a bottle of cooking wine (the wine you drink while cooking of course) and try this New Orleans classic.

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For the grillades:

For the grits: 2 1/2 C

chicken stock

2 1/2 C

half & half, heavy cream or milk

salt, pepper & paprika

2 TBS

butter

olive oil

1/2 TSP

salt

6

green onions, sliced

1/2 TSP

pepper

1

medium onion, diced

1C

wisconsin white cheddar or

1

green pepper, diced

other sharp cheese, grated

1

stalk celery, diced

3

cloves garlic, minced

3

cloves of garlic, minced

2C

quick grits

2

tomatoes, seeded & diced

1 1/2 TBS

fresh tarragon, chopped

3/4 TBS

fresh thyme leaves

2C

beef stock

1/2 C

red wine

1 TBS

worcestershire sauce

1 1/2 TSP

hot sauce

2 TSP

creole seasoning (tony

chachere’s or emeril’s)

2 LBS

pork, beef, or veal sliced into

1-inch pieces

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IN THE KITCHEN For the grillades: 1. Place meat between pieces of plastic wrap and beat lightly with tenderizing hammer or rolling pin until Âź thick. Season with a little bit of oil, salt, pepper and paprika and set aside. 2. In a large skillet, heat 2 tablespoons bacon fat or olive oil. Brown meat in batches, about 1 minute per side, adding tablespoons of fat or oil if needed. Transfer meat to a plate and set aside. 3. In same skillet, over medium-low heat add 2 tablespoons bacon fat or olive oil and add flour until deep brown (approximately 8 minutes). Add onions, bell peppers, celery and garlic. Raise heat to medium-high and cook for 3 minutes, until vegetables are soft.

For the grits: 1. Bring chicken stock, half and half to a boil in a medium pot. Add butter, salt and pepper. 2. Slowly whisk in grits, cheese and garlic. Cook for 5 minutes over low heat while stirring frequently. Add more half and half, heavy cream or milk if you want creamier grits.

Wine pairings: Beaujolais, Pinot Noir, Oaked Chardonnay, Dry Riesling, sparklers Photo by Jerry Kalyniuk

4. Add tomatoes, tarragon, thyme and cook for 3 minutes. Add beef stock and red wine, stir and scrape up browned bits at bottom of skillet. 5. Return meat to skillet and add Worcestershire, hot sauce and Creole seasoning. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 1 hour. Remove from heat and cover.

[Modified grits recipe from Emeril Lagasse, former executive chief at Commander’s Palace in New Orleans, Louisiana] [Modified grillades recipe from John Currence, executive chief at City Grocery in Oxford, Mississippi]

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THE DISH | SPRING 2014


Warm Spiced Comfort Food, Made Easy By Chelsea Peters

Well, winter break is officially over and spring semester is really starting to kick it into high gear. Midterms, projects and more are filling up every free moment of the day, and cooking delicious warm meals is falling to the wayside. Fortunately, there are ways to still have homemade comfort foods without sacrificing study time. It sounds too good to be true, right? Wrong—this recipe is warm and filled with spices, and some winter veggies, especially squash, can easily be added to create a healthy, well-rounded meal. The best part of this recipe, the part that makes this recipe so easy, is that you really just have to throw all the ingredients into a crockpot and leave it; with minimal chopping and mixing, everything just melds together slowly as it cooks. There are cook times for low heat, if you want to throw everything in when you get up in the morning and have it ready for dinner; or, you can toss everything into the crockpot after class and have it ready for dinner by cooking at high temperature. While studying for midterms, I find it best to curl up in a big fuzzy blanket, with a nice warm bowl of this on top of a bit of brown rice, and forget (even if only for a few moments) about all of the work I’ll have to do later.

Chicken Tikki Masala: 1 LB

boneless, skinless chicken breast

1

medium onion

15 OZ

canned light coconut milk

2. Whisk together coconut milk, yogurt, tomato paste, ginger, garlic, garam masala, cornstarch, salt and cayenne.

1C

plain low-fat yogurt

3.

1/4 C

tomato paste

4. Cook on low 8 hours, or high 4 hours. Curl up and enjoy!

2 TBS

grated ginger

2

garlic cloves

2 TBS

garam masala

1 TBS

cornstarch

1. Cube the chicken breasts into bite-size pieces and dice the onion; place both ingredients into a slow cooker.

Pour mixture over chicken and onion and stir well.

[Original recipe adapted from Liz Della Croce at “The Lemon Bowl”, found at:

1 TSP

salt

1/2 TSP

cayenne

http://thelemonbowl.com]

THE DISH | SPRING 2014

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NO RESERVATIONS

@TheDishMadison 15

THE DISH | SPRING 2014


Dear Dish readers, We all thought it would never happen, but spring has finally arrived in Madison! Sure, the temperature may drop down to 20 degrees every now and then, but living in Wisconsin, we have to take what we can get. And what better way to celebrate the arrival of this glorious season than by checking out some delicious new foodie spots. Writer Meghan Horvath takes us on a mouth-watering journey to Gail Ambrosius Chocolatier, where she conducts a Q&A with Gail herself and reveals that the secret to happiness is, not surprisingly, chocolate. Corinne Lake advises us to follow our hearts-er I mean nosesdown to Regent Street’s Greenbush Bakery. Whether you’re up early for work or out late after a night of fun, a doughnut from Greenbush is sure to satisfy. Last, but certainly not least, Colin Terwelp does double duty, shedding some light on what Slow Food UW is doing each week down there in the basement of the Crossing (hint: sign up for a Family Dinner Night or check out the Wednesday Café to find out) and inviting us to try out Manna Café on Sherman Avenue. Whatever your weakness, Madison’s got something for you. I for one, already somewhat of a Slow Food and Greenbush connoisseur, will definitely be checking out those amazing chocolates in the near future.

JANE ROBERTS

No Reservations Editor

THE DISH | SPRING 2014

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NO RESERVATIONS

Madison’s BEST UNKNOWN BREAKFAST

BY COLIN TERWELP

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THE DISH | SPRING 2014


W

hen traveling, I have two conditions I try to stick to when choosing a spot to sit down and eat. My number one rule is to follow the locals. A restaurant that cannot even attract repeat business from the surrounding community is simply not going to be worth your while. The other is to steer clear from the tourist trap establishments governed by corporate restaurant groups. While some will disagree and argue that these types of places do indeed serve a quality meal, from my experience restaurants like this often lack a defining ingredient. Locked in a production and bottom line-oriented mindset, they lose sight on food’s unique capability to reflect the character and personality of the surrounding environment and bring the community closer. Wishing I were back on spring break in Arizona, I decided to apply these rules to my search for the subject of this article. Upon the recommendation of a friend, I looked up Manna Café and after a quick glimpse at their website I knew this was a spot that I would certainly enjoy. It was a cold, grey Thursday morning and the place was buzzing. The crowd, families, older couples and friends, was a breath of fresh air from the student-laden breakfast spots around campus. Turning away from the dining area, I was greeted by an immense display case stocked full of baked goods that looked like they belonged in a French patisserie. I immediately had a good feeling about Manna Café. It’s not your typical food establishment with waiters and waitresses running around collecting orders, serving dishes or bussing tables. Instead, you order at the counter with the cashier, find yourself a table and then they will bring the food out to you. Once finished, it is your responsibility to take your dishes to their bussing station. I’ve always loved this practice and wish more cafés and restaurants would start to use it. It adds to the sense of community by helping one another and promotes the home feel that Manna Café tries to create. Moving onto the food, I was impressed with their menu. They serve a few different options for each of their categories (pancakes, quiches, omelets, etc.). This approach, as opposed to your typical diner serving eggs a million different ways, demonstrates the thought and care that went into the dish and Manna’s admirable focus on quality, not quantity. Their preparations are what I like to call “humble food,” which is food without frills that is well crafted and tastes damn good. I ordered their daily quiche special of broccoli, sun-dried tomato and cheddar cheese with a side of fruit (grapes, a few strawberries and a couple orange wedges). I can easily say it was one of the best pieces of quiche I’ve had in my life. The egg custard melted right when it hit my mouth. I really enjoyed the acidity from the tomato and the cheddar gave it a little bite. Without a doubt, I would order that again in a heartbeat. The fruit was what anyone would expect it to be: fresh and satisfying. Reflecting back on my meal, Manna Café is a model most restaurants should start to emulate. They are not trying to reinvent the wheel, just make a solid one. The café has a genuine community focus which came through loud and clear during my 45 minutes visit. Looking back at my two travel rules above, I realize that what I am truly searching for is a place to feel at home. Whether you are a local or just a visitor to Madison, Manna Café can be that home.

Whether you are a local or just a visitor, Manna Café can be that home.

” THE DISH | SPRING 2014

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NO RESERVATIONS

GREENBUSH BAKERY’S KOSHER DONUTS By Corrine Lake


W

ithin a block from Greenbush Bakery, it is hard to ignore that you are close, as the wafting smell of freshly baked doughnuts lures you out of the blustery cold and into a warm delicious doughnut wonderland.

The all-consuming smell that pulled you off the sidewalk is now even more overwhelming and in front of you are Madison’s famous sugary sweets. Racks on racks of doughnuts fight for space in the glass display case that almost reaches the entire length of the store. Shelves of doughnuts line the wall behind the counter as well. From pumpkin spice donuts to apple fritters, Greenbush has got it all. Owner Marv Miller, nick-named The Donut Man, utilized his many self-taught skills and experiences to create this thriving niche business. After eighteen years, Greenbush is still a hit today. No matter if the economy is good or bad, costumers continue to line up at 2:00 a.m., before a football game, on a Sunday morning or even after a shift at the hospital for this highly gratifying, high quality comfort food. Along with its family charm and appeal, Greenbush has a unique quality that sets it apart from surrounding doughnut shops. Everything is kosher. According to Miller, Greenbush has set a high standard by specializing in the doughnut marketplace and “is what someone can not readily be.” Miller opened in 1996 and was approached by the Jewish community with the idea of baking kosher doughnuts. With his respectable sanitation and cleanliness habits, Miller thought this would be a wise business move. The kosher label guarantees a product safe to consume, as it is manufactured in a clean environment. When a product is seen fit for a rabbi, consumers know that it is not touched with meat or other sources of contamination. All things kosher, no exception. Product control and consistency are also important factors Miller takes into account when his business produces donuts. Keeping kosher since 1998 has proved to be a hit. The Donut Man’s catchy and well-known slogan “kosher means quality” rings true. Greenbush has created a specialty line of donuts called Rabbi’s Delite. Rabbi’s Delite comes in chocolate with raspberry filling, chocolate with caramel filling, chocolate with chocolate filling, and white icing with strawberry filling. It is not uncommon to hear people asking for a “strawberry rabbi” along with their orders of glazed crullers or chocolate iced donuts. While Miller is catholic, he has embraced the Jewish culture along with serving a kosher product. During the holiday season, Greenbush proudly displays a Hanukkah bush wrapped with blue lights and a menorah in the window along with their multiple neon signs. With its quirky personality and scrumptious treats, it is worth stopping into Greenbush Bakery. The business relies on word of mouth and its fresh delicious donuts. Never will you walk into Greenbush Bakery and experience a day old donut. Maybe you will even be lucky enough to get some free samples and a friendly conversation with the Donut Man ringmaster himself.

THE DISH | SPRING 2014

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NO RESERVATIONS

LUNCH ON WEDNESDAYS BELONGS TO SLOW FOOD Photos by Kristin Korevec


By Collin Terwelp

There’s a movement taking the campus by storm: the Slow Food Movement. Given Wisconsin’s history and connection to agriculture, it’s easy to see how such an idea would flourish here in Madison. For those unfamiliar with Slow Food, here is a brief history of the idea and movement that started it all. The Slow Food Movement began in Italy in 1989 by journalist Carlo Petrini as a response to the growth of the fast food industry. His vision was to encourage people to reconnect with traditional, regional cuisine and reject the concept of “Fast Life” that had infected society and the culinary world. To do so, he looked to bridge the gap between environment and food culture; thus the “ecogastronomic” Slow Food Movement was born. Today, Slow Food has grown to include over 150,000 members stretching across 150 countries. In the U.S. alone, there are 170 active chapters. On the university level, the University of Wisconsin-Madison has the largest and most active chapter. Established in 2007 by graduate student Genya Erling, Slow Food UW has since grown to operate five projects that reach nearly 500 people around the community each week. The Slow Food UW project with the largest following is the Slow Food Café. Every Wednesday from 11:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. in the basement of The Crossing, a team of 11 students comes together to prepare and serve a meal that embodies the Slow Food motto of “good, clean, fair” food (especially the good). The ingredients for each cafe are sourced from farmers in the Madison area and reflect seasonal changes that happen in Wisconsin. The cafe’s commitment to fresh, local and sustainable foods expose “food as a transformative and interconnected process,” something that is often overlooked in today’s society. The menu typically includes two choices of sandwiches, two choices of sides, a soup, and a dessert, catering for vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free customers as well. NessAlla Kombucha, Wisco Pop and coffee from Just Coffee Cooperative are always available, unique to Slow Food UW. The sandwiches are regularly priced around $5 and the sides and soup are generally $1.50, depending on the day’s ingredient. The average meal will cost roughly $7, a steal considering the quality of the ingredients and dishes served at the cafe. When customers arrive, they place an order and pay at the front desk (both cash and credit are accepted). The order is then sent into the kitchen to be filled by a group of volunteers and café project interns. An intern or volunteer brings the meal out when ready. After the customer finishes their meal, they are asked to bus place their dishes in a bin and ensure any compost makes it into the correct container. The structure and atmosphere Slow Food UW has established at its cafe emphasizes and celebrates the Madison community and its volunteers. With a team-oriented approach that symbolizes Madison’s local food network and greater global network tha Petrini aimed to restablish all those years ago, it’s safe to say he would be very proud of Slow Food UW’s work and dedication to the original Slow Food values.

THE DISH | SPRING 2014

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NO RESERVATIONS

GAIL AMBROSIUS CHOCOLATIER—THE SECRET TO HAPPINESS By Megan Horvath

C

hocolate. The mere word evokes lustful sentiments and feelings of intense desire. Chocolate is more than just a form of sugary sustenance; it is an encapsulation of all that is good in the world. Chocolate can no longer be classified as a type of food, but rather a delicious manifestation of human emotion, a symbol of contentment. Lucky for us, a select number of individuals were placed on this earth to spread this embodiment of delectation. One such contributor performs her mouthwatering magic right here in Madison, concocting gourmet chocolates at one of the tastiest shops in town: Gail Ambrosius Chocolatier. Gail Ambrosius, founder of the shop, has been sharing her passion for chocolate with the Madison community since 2004, when she opened Gail Ambrosius Chocolatier. Ambrosius loves what she does so much that she was willing to respond to a few questions I was itching to ask about her chocolate-centric life:

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THE DISH | SPRING 2014


Q:

What was it like learning about chocolate in France from the esteemed Valhrona and Cluizel chocolatiers?

A:

Both were very educational. Valrhona taught me about the science of chocolate production as well as the art and craft. It was only a weeklong course but very dense and insightful. Cluizel, was only a daylong tour and opportunity to work with their chocolatier, Vincent. It was a good opportunity to see how two outstanding chocolate makers approach their craft.

Q: A:

What would you consider your most useful tool for making chocolates and why?

A tempering machine is key, when you are working with larger volumes of product it is necessary to have your machine keep the chocolate in temper all day long, rather than hand tempering constantly.

Q: A:

What inspires you as far as coming up with new flavor combinations?

Tasting lots of great foods and thinking about how those flavors may pair with chocolate. Traveling inspires me, trying new foods and spices.

Q:

Your chocolates are widely acclaimed. A great achievement was your earning the title of America’s “Best Little Box of Chocolates” on the Food Network. What was it like meeting celebrity chef Alton Brown for this television appearance?

A:

Alton Brown did not come to my shop unfortunately, but his film crew was here for a whole day making the segment for the show. It is an honor and I thank all my customers for their support over the years, we couldn’t do what we do without them.

Q:

What is one piece of advice you would give to someone with a similar passion of starting their own chocolatier? Would you have done anything differently yourself?

A:

Have faith in yourself and your abilities, do lots of research and homework, know your craft and work very hard.

As expressed, chocolate is way of life for Ambrosius. Over the years, her shop has become a beloved installment in Madison’s Atwood neighborhood, earning praise for its innovative flavor combinations and its commitment to artfully crafted chocolates. Ambrosius has melded outlandish ingredients with fresh chocolate in her acclaimed truffle collection, some of which include: Sweet Curry with Saffron, Lemongrass with Ginger, Shiitake Mushroom, Rose, and Earl Grey. A few of her most popular flavors—Lucille’s Vanilla and Caramel Sprinkled with Grey Salt—are similarly transporting, albeit a bit more traditional. Whether it’s exotic or conventional chocolates you seek, know that Gail Ambrosius is here to satisfy.

THE DISH | SPRING 2014

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FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Dearest readers, As I find the days until graduation creeping closer and closer, I have become the epitome of a college senior. I am reflecting on the past and worrying about the future, all while trying to fully live in the moment and soak in everything the final days of college-life have to offer. All this reminiscing has led to one undeniable realization: what has made Madison more than just a sports-loving, Midwestern, college town, but a city that has truly become home, is the memories I have created here. As I delve deeper into my best moments in Madison, I discovered the common theme that runs through them all is Madison’s unique food culture. In this issue, we want to inspire readers to discover new aspects of Madison’s rich food culture and also to revisit their all-time favorites. Knowing that an evening or sunny afternoon at the Memorial Union Terrace is an activity that never disappoints, writer Jordan Peschek looks into the little-known history of the Terrace. Looking for a drink after a day at the terrace? Nathaniel Scharping writes about the flourishing trend of home brewing and the niche it has found in Madison, while Alexander Kalyniuk provides students with a basic wine tutorial. Peschek also writes about one of the aspects of Wisconsin’s food culture that generates the most pride: dairy. Take advantage of these opportunities, explore new ones, enjoy the warmer weather and start making memories! Happy eating!

JANE MILNE

Food For Thought Editor

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A STUDENT’S GUIDE TO:

HOME BREWING

By Scharping THE Nathaniel DISH | SPRING 2014 23


FOOD FOR THOUGHT

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ired of drinking the same beer every weekend? Want to try something more adventurous than college beverage staples like Natural Light and Keystone, but can’t afford to indulge in craft beer? There’s a way around these problems and it’s easier than you think. Some students on campus have begun to bypass the liquor store, and make their own beer from the comfort of their homes. The process is surprisingly simple, and the equipment easily fits in a closet or corner for the few weeks to few months necessary for the beer to ferment. Home brew starter kits can be obtained for as little as $60 dollars from the Wine and Hop Shop in Madison or online. Most shops also offer classes and tutorials on brewing, in addition to the ingredients for making just about any beer. Don’t worry about making Spotted Cow the first time around. Charlie Coogan, president of the Badger Brewing Association, said that his first beer fell flat. It’s a common problem, he said, adding “I don’t think anyone makes a good beer their first time.” That first failure turned into startling success however. Coogan and a friend entered their second beer, a Cascade Pale Ale, into the Madison-based Wine and Hop Shop’s Hoptoberfest contest and ended up taking third place in the Pale Ale category. He says that he prefers Indian Pale Ales and Stouts, but has experimented with other styles and ingredients, including an attempt at making pumpkin beer that failed spectacularly. “It was the worst beer ever made,” he said with a laugh. Every great beer started as an experiment, however. Coogan attributed the recent surge in craft breweries’ tendencies towards making interesting and inventive beers to an increased interest in home brewing. “Everyone opening a brewery now was a home brewer,” he said. Brewing beer is a process influenced by many variables, nearly all of which can be varied to yield different tastes and bodies. Something as seemingly insignificant as water temperature can create vast differences in the final product. At its most basic level, beer requires only a few ingredients. Grains are milled and mixed with hot water, known as ‘mashing.’ This breaks starches in the wheat into sugars, which is where much of the beer’s taste comes from. Hops, yeast and water are added to the mixture, and the fermentation process begins.

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This simple recipe can be embellished upon in countless ways however, limited only by the brewer’s creativity and willingness to experiment. Different flavors and styles of beer come from different kinds of grain, different water temperatures and durations in the mashing process, different kinds of hops, different styles of brewing and many additional variables. With all of these variables, making your first beer seems like a daunting task. However, local organizations such as the Madison Homebrewers and Tasters Guild or the Badger Brewing Association offer budding brewers a community of likeminded enthusiasts with a range of experiences. In addition to hosting speakers from the brewing industry and holding socials, the BBA conducts group brews each semester using equipment in the Food Application Lab at Babcock Hall, Coogan said. Students divide into small groups and craft their own beer recipes under the supervision of local brew masters. This semester the group will be brewing pale ales, porters and wheat beers with the help of the head brew master from Mobcraft, a local craft brewery, according to Coogan. Another way to learn more about brewing is to just take a class on it. Food Sciences 550, Fermented Foods and Beverages, teaches the science of brewing and fermentation. Taught by professor James Steele, the course is divided into three sections, focusing on general fermentation, dairy and beer brewing, Steele said. Think twice before adding it to your schedule however. The class focuses on the hard science behind the fun of making fermented foods and counts Biochemistry 501 as a prerequisite. However, most students probably take the class for the lab section, which is taught by a separate professor. Students brew their own beer every Friday using half-barrel brewing equipment donated by Miller-Coors, and work with a master cheese maker to make their own cheese, Steele said. Steele said that he encounters many students with a genuine interest in the subject material. “Second-semester seniors actually pay attention in class,” he said. It’s not hard to see why. The opportunity to turn late nights of studying into something tangible is an opportunity not often found in college. It doesn’t hurt that the something tangible is beer either. Students here at Madison combine studying and drinking all of the time—it’s about time we got a class that encourages it.


Photo by Francesca Bonifacio

Every great beer started as an experiment...

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FOOD FOR THOUGHT

THE TERRACE: THE TRIED AND TRUE PLACE FOR YOU STO RY B Y J O R DA N P E S C H E K

each year, thousands of UW alumni, students, staff and community members unite to feed their desire for brats, beer, sunsets and sunshine chairs at the Memorial Union Terrace.

The terrace is a place that suits an eclectic group of people. Every age, demographic, human and pet alike will enjoy the terrace experience. It is the perfect place to meet with friends and catch up over a pitcher of beer. Listen to any of the bands lined up five nights each week with the Terrace After Dark. Enjoy a brat while watching sailboats cruise past the setting sun. Through the years, the chairs have changed, the space has expanded and other assorted changes have added to the exceptional experiences offered at the terrace.

Considered one of the most beautiful student centers on a university campus, the Memorial Union Terrace, on the shore of Lake Mendota, has been an icon of the University of Wisconsin since its construction in 1928. It quickly became a hub for parents, alumni and students alike to gather, greet and grab some grub.

In addition to an unparalleled ambiance, the Wisconsin Union serves food and drink with a focus on sustainability. Initiatives include purchasing food from local farmers and bakers, composting, using biodegradable products and minimizing waste. By supporting the Union’s efforts to be environmentally friendly,

The chairs are out! You know what that means...

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Considered one of the most beautiful student centers on a university campus, the Memorial Union Terrace, on the shore of Lake Mendota, has been an icon of the University of Wisconsin since its construction in 1928.

Terrace-goers can also enjoy helping the earth one recyclable cup at a time. Just another reason to enjoy the terrace food and festivities! If you are looking for a cool, creamy treat to satisfy your sweet tooth, the Terrace Ice Cream Stand will scoop you up any of Babcock Dairy’s multitude of flavors, such as Union Utopia, Key Lime Pie or Chocolate Chip Frozen Yogurt. The treat is adored by all, from squirmy children, to studious college kids, to senior citizens. You can also enjoy the many offerings from the recently expanded Brat Stand, such as a juicy grilled burger, corn on the cob and Klements brats with any and all the fixings. My suggestion: overload the savory sausage with every condiment, and grab a cup of beer for a refreshing compliment. It is the perfect pair.

The Gazebo is another hot spot that was added to the Terrace last year; it serves fire-seared chicken, tender roasted pork, falafel, cheese curds and more. And of course, feel free to fill a pitcher with one of the many beers offered on tap at the Union. Other caddies, along with an outdoor concession stand on the upper level of the Terrace, provide additional beverages and snacks when open for the season. The terrace will be in full swing before we know it—the Gazebo and The Brat Stand are already open. So bring a friend, the relatives, the entire dorm floor or your new puppy and join in the fun. As the Wisconsin Union reassures us: You can’t “Terrace” anywhere else!

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WINE NOTES 101

There are no “correct” answers to how a wine tastes. If you think a particular pinot noir has a note similar to Fruity Pebble cereal, it is totally acceptable to label it as such.

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by Alexander Kalyniuk


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ou may see that wine labels will describe the contents of a bottle as fruity, floral or earthy, but what does it all mean? These descriptions offer a basic guide to how the wine tastes. Within each broad category there lies a variety of flavors that may sometimes be hard to discern. These specific flavors are referred to as wine notes, and some are common to certain varietals of wine. Many notes won’t be noticeable to the casual wine drinker, however with practice you will hone your nose and sense of taste. When you think about it, wine is simply fermented grape juice. Why then, does it contain all these flavors and scents? The answer is not so simple. The process of fermentation alongside the soil content, weather, altitude, climate, aging process, additives and harvest season all contribute to the final wine product. It is a very complicated science, which in turn has contributed to the rise of viticulture degree programs at some prominent universities. These programs essentially allow you to major in wine, which makes me rethink my decision to attend law school. But I digress; I enjoy wine for a number of reasons and the personalized nature of wine notes are one of them. There are no “correct” answers to how a wine tastes. If you think a particular pinot noir has a note similar to Fruity Pebble cereal, it is totally acceptable to label it as such. I own a wine notebook full of outlandish personalized wine notes, my current favorite being the banana Laffy Taffy note I tasted in certain Beaujolais a couple of weeks ago. The most dedicated wine lovers will even taste rock samples and rotting fruit so they can become accustomed to the most unusual flavors. I definitely do not advocate for those actions, but I do encourage anyone interested in wine to buy a notebook to jot down your descriptions. There are also numerous cell phone apps, such as Vivino, that allow you to record and comment on the wines you taste. Next time you uncork a bottle, try to pull as many flavors that you can and have fun with it. Below I cover some of the more basic wine descriptions and the notes associated with them that are used by industry professionals. I even included some of more unusual flavors/scents you wouldn’t expect to be lurking within your glass of wine.

Basic Descriptions and Wine Notes: The words on the left are broad wine industry descriptions that you may see on the label. The words to the right are specific wine notes that are harder to notice but may fall within the scope of the broad description.

Fruity – blackberry, raspberry, blueberry, cherry, orange, lemon, apple, melon Floral – rose, violet, lily, orchid Spicy – cinnamon, black pepper, licorice, clove Earthy – hay, mold, dry leaves, mushroom, “barnyard” Nutty – almond, coffee, hazelnut, walnut Smoky – barbeque, hickory, tobacco My favorite strange, yet not uncommon, wine notes:

Cat Urine – A quality Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand will smell like cat pee. This doesn’t mean that it will taste like cat pee, although I wouldn’t know because I’ve never tried it. Remember, wine is an acquired taste as they say.

Petrol – One of the most coveted qualities of a premium Riesling is the odor of petrol gas. If you buy a Riesling that initially smells like the outside of a BP Station then you are in for a treat, mark down that wine in your notebook and give it a couple of stars.

Butter – I assume this is Paula Deen’s favorite wine note. I never understood how a wine could taste like our coveted Wisconsin dairy product until I went to a tasting in Chicago and experienced a butter-bomb California chardonnay. It might sound weird but it is actually a very enjoyable quality to many people, including myself.

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AMERICA’S DAIRYLAND, MADISON’S DAIRY By Jordan Peschek

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ince 1848, Wisconsinites have been proud to call our home “America’s Dairyland,” and for a good reason. One of Wisconsin’s major industries, dairy production, has been a staple to our economy, our diets and our headwear. No other state can wear an oversized Swiss-shaped headpiece while consuming gourmet cheese at a tailgate, and know that their delicious dairy was produced locally. As a vacationer outside the United States, it was unexpectedly heartwarming to read on a high-class resort menu that their award-winning cheese was imported from Wisconsin. We all know Wisconsin’s dairy is delectable, so it is no surprise that the rest of the world does too. But let us take a step back to the local level of dairy production right here in Madison. In 1890, the first dairy school in the United States was established at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has continued to lead the industry in dairy manufacturing programs ever since. More than 13,000 students have been educated at the University in a variety of dairy manufacturing short courses at the Babcock Dairy Plant. Faculty, graduate students and industry clients utilize the plant to perform research and to manufacture cheese, ice cream, milk, yogurt and most fermented dairy products.

If you are looking for a tailgate-worthy treat, test out one of the many Babcock cheese samplers or gift boxes that include a variety of cheeses and sausage, such as Colby, Brick or sensational Wisconsin-style dill Havarti. What’s more, the dairy store serves locally made pastries for breakfast or a signature lunch sandwiches any time after 10:30 a.m. Menu specials include soups such as tomato basil ravioli, and sandwiches like the Mendota Club: turkey with brick, Monterey jack with chives, lettuce, tomato, guacamole and mayo on white bread. Madison is a dairy land in its own, and we have numerous opportunities to enjoy it without even leaving town. The Babcock Dairy Plant is one example of the University’s contributions to continue the state’s tradition as the dairy capital of the USA, and students and the community have easy access to its local dairy products at the Babcock Hall Dairy Store. Whether you are interested in ordering an ice cream cone, cheese, gifts or a full meal, you can find it right here on campus at 1605 Linden Drive. See what the Babcock Hall Dairy Store has in store for you.

Not only do the dairy school and Babcock Dairy Plant promote education, research and production, it also allows students and the community to enjoy the finished products by selling them at the Babcock Dairy Store located on campus. Their products are also easily accessible at ice cream shops in both Unions, as well as in many dining halls on. Whether you are a food science major whom may one day work in the dairy manufacturing business or a student with taste buds drawn to dairy, the University of Wisconsin has something to offer all of us. I highly recommend stopping in the Babcock Hall Dairy Store between 7:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, or on Saturday between 11:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. The store offers dozens of ice cream flavors including frozen yogurt and sherbet, so all sweet tooths can be satisfied. My personal favorite is Union Utopia, which truly is a creamy utopia of flavors consisting of peanut butter, caramel, and fudge swirled into the creamiest vanilla ice cream around.

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Spring 2014 Issue