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THE DISH TWENT Y

F OOD

NINE T E E N

&

FILM


&

Contributors Editor-in-Chief LAUREN ANDERS

Deputy GRETCHEN POSTON

Community Editor M A R I S S A B E AT Y

Features Editor K AT I E B R U N N E R

Photography Director GABRIELLE BRUNS

Layout & Design Director

Layout J A C K PA I R I N ISABELLA ROBINSON E VA L O C A I T LY N G U E R T S M AYA F I D Z I U K I E W I C Z KYI PHYU KHAING

Photographers GABRIELLE BRUNS S E B A S T I A N WA L D V O G E L G E N E V I E V E VA H L KYI PHYU KHAING

JACK PAIRIN

Marketing Directors SAM BURLAGE KENNEDY SEIBOLD

Writers YA N Q I L I ABBY FEHLER SAM BURLAGE M AYA F I D Z I U K I E W I C Z

Publications Committee Director CARLO ROMAGNOLO

Publications Committee Advisor J E N FA R L E Y

Publications Committee Mission Statement “Through the publishing of our six student-run journals

WILL OLSON

and magazines, the Publications Committee of the

G R E TA K E L LY

Wisconsin Union Directorate provides a creative outlet

GRETCHEN BLOHM

for UW–Madison students interested in creating poetry

G E N E V I E V E VA H L

and prose, reporting on music and fashion, or delving

OL A BORYZIEWICZ

into research in science and public policy. We celebrate

GABRIELLE BRUNS

creativity on campus by providing hands-on experience

GRETCHEN POSTON

in publishing, editing, writing, and artmaking.”

1 | FOOD & FILM

Contents 3

BAKING TO FEED THE MIND

5

A G O O D PA S T R Y I S A L L Y O U N E E D

7

FROM INDIA TO FRANCE IN A HUNDRED FEET

9

“ I ' L L H AV E W H AT S H E ' S H AV I N G ! ”

11

D A N C I N G W I T H F L AV O R S

13

MASTERING THE ART OF BOEUF BOURGUIGNON

17

P O T S & PA N S

19

H AVA N A G O O D T I M E

21

M O R E T H A N PA S TA

23

T H E G R E AT O U T D O O R S

25

IMPERFECT PERFECTIONS

27

B I G FA M I L I E S & S A C R E D R E C I P E S

29

Q&A


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

A

nything that is considered a “classic” will always be cool​.​Like, Ferris Bueller cool. Fascinatingly enough, our culture has always found it enthralling to dwell

on the past to create memories and accentuate prior spirit to refine our own future. As my dad would put it, ​“ there ain’t no school like the old school.” ​I think this was his way of telling me to never settle for any movie that was made after 2006, or to hint that cooking with your dad will always be perpetual.

Either way, I agree.

Maybe it's because as chaotic as the world becomes, we crave familiarity, searching for those crumbs of comfort, emotion, and flavor.” Besides a fork and knife in hand, the most quintessential pairing are the meals served through the screen. A scene that

Recently, there’s been a surge of bringing back​​old school

makes you salivate or recall a film by the restaurant it takes

trends, especially in food, drink, and film. Because I’m always

place in. W ​ hen Harry Met Sally, Chef, No Reservations​, J​ ulie

hunting for the new and the next, I keep bumping into mod-

& Julia, The Great Outdoors,​and many more have captivated

ernized versions of the past that are exceptional: new designs

movie buffs and food-lovers like myself through a beautifully

with throwback concepts that have flavors and techniques

plated storyline.

of the present. That could be chic steakhouse remodels, to name one, Rare Steakhouse born out of Wisconsin, 2005’s fea-

So, why do we love throwbacks? Maybe it’s because as cha-

ture film ​Roll Bounce​that takes place in the summer of 1978, or

otic as the world becomes, we crave familiarity, searching for

a perennial Manhattan served ‘on the rocks’ in grandma’s old

those crumbs of comfort, emotion, and flavor. As we watch

crystal glasses.

a movie we’ve seen one thousand times or to crave a homecooked meal, we reminisce because we want to savor those morsels of bittersweet moments that come and go. Reliving the past allows us to smile at previous experiences and triumph forward knowing there are good times to come. No matter what, reveling in each and every moment served.

I am honored to publish the first edition of The Dish that has emphasized a pairing like no other: Food & Film. Thank you to my incredible team, Grace Miller, and all of my family near and far. Life with all of you is like cheese and wine: classic.

Cheers,

Lauren Anders | Editor-in-Chief

THE DISH | 2


Baking to Feed the Mind


CURING YOUR CRUMBL ING SPIRIT S By Ola Borysiewicz As the cold encroaches on Madison, few things are as comforting as the radiative warmth of a preheated oven. As the days get shorter and temperatures fall, so can our spirits.

Recently, my roommates and I spent a rainy night in watching Bridesmaids’ main character Annie struggle with friendships, flings, and other fiascos. To no surprise, Annie’s frustrations eventually culminate in a breaking point. As everything seems to fall apart, we witness a moment where she resorts to the comforts of baking to lift her spirits. Annie’s solo baking scene, in which she sculpts a single, flawless cupcake, teaches a lesson in self-care we all deserve. Stepping away from responsibilities, hauling out a bag of flour, and adding some butter and sugar into our days is an underrated form of therapy. As students, we rarely give our brains a break. Between classes and clubs, some days we hardly even have time for a microwaved meal. On days when we have an hour or two to spare, however, nothing relieves stress like getting creative in the kitchen and kneading pie dough, sifting flour, or whisking eggs.

Just as for Annie, baking is a rewarding escape from reality with immediate—not to mention delicious—results. One of these days, treat yourself to this warm, apple hazelnut crisp certain to shed some much-needed light on any gloomy day.

Ingredients (makes 6 servings) Topping:

Filling:

¾ cup all purpose flour

¾ cup white sugar

¾ cup old fashioned oats

3 tbsp all purpose flour

½ cup golden brown sugar

1 tbsp grated lemon peel

2 tsp ground cinnamon

1 ½ tsp ground cinnamon

6 tbsp chilled salted butter, cut into ½-inch cubes

¾ tsp ground nutmeg

1 cup crushed hazelnuts (I pulsed mine in a blender)

7-8 small or 5-6 large apples of choice cubed (granny smith or honeycrisp work well) 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 tsp almond extract (optional)

Directions Butter a 2-quart capacity baking dish and preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a medium bowl, thoroughly whisk the flour, oats, brown sugar, and cinnamon. Add in the cubed butter and combine until the mixture crumbles to the touch. Fold in the crushed hazelnuts and set aside until the filling is ready.

Whisk the sugar, flour, lemon peel, cinnamon, and nutmeg until combined. Mix in the apples, vanilla extract, and almond extract. Transfer the prepared apples into your baking dish, sprinkling the oat crumble over them. Let the crumble bake for 60-75 minutes (or until golden brown) before serving warm with a generous dollop of vanilla bean ice cream or homemade maple whipped cream.

THE DISH | 4


A Good Pastry is All You Need H AV E YOU E V ER H A D B REAKFAST AT TI FFANY ’ S? B EC AU SE I S UR E H AV EN ’ T. By Will Olson

feelings in such a subtle way. Even better, the foreshadowing is done with my two favorite things: pastries and coffee. The

I do have to say though, Audrey Hepburn, who plays Holly

scene tells you that Holly desires the finer things in life, so

Golightly in the ever so famous movie Breakfast at Tiffany’s,

much so that she spends her early mornings looking at ex-

sure makes it seem like a delightful experience. For those

pensive jewelry while dressed in expensive “looking” clothing.

who haven’t seen the movie, Holly Golightly is a young wom-

But the fact is, she doesn’t have the means to live this way. The

an who lives in New York City. At a young age, unhappy with

generic pastry and coffee tell us she doesn’t have a defined

living in the country and being married, Holly moved to New

life path for herself and that she is in search of who she is on

York City in search of happiness. Holly believes that happiness

the inside.

will be found with money and material goods but learns over the course of the movie that this is not the case. She begins

As I finish up my college degree, I find myself resonating with

to realize what truly makes her happy, which doesn’t need to

Holly’s desire to find what truly makes her happy. With so many

include being rich and having a lot of things but rather simply,

career paths out there in the world, how does one decide to com-

just having people that love you, including yourself.

mit to just one? And I have to admit after four and a half years of college, I still do not have an answer to that question, which has

The movie begins at daybreak in the empty streets of New York

caused some anxiety within. So, to ground myself from this anx-

City as a yellow checkered cab pulls to the curb to drop Holly

iety, I’ve started to fill my life with simple but effective routines,

Golightly off in front of Tiffany & Co. She steps out of the cab

kind of like Holly’s frequent breakfast at Tiffany & Co.

wearing a beautiful black dress, a white pearl necklace and a sophisticated up-do. At this point, it only seems fitting she is ar-

One of the cherished routines that has grounded me, is working

riving at a Tiffany & Co. Holly slowly walks up to the glass show-

every Saturday morning at Graze, a local restaurant on the Capitol

case and pulls out a pastry and coffee from a generic white

Square. I help source local produce for the Deja Food Restaurant

paper bag, something you could buy at any corner store. Holly

Group in Madison. Instead of window cases of expensive jewelry,

seems content with snacking on the pastry and sipping the

I make my way through stand after stand of fresh produce.

coffee as she moves from window display to window display. Once we are done shopping, we head back to the restaurant I have always loved this scene as it foreshadows Holly’s inner

5 | FOOD & FILM

to bring the fresh produce inside. Walking into the back, I can’t


help but smell the sweet bakery aroma that wafts through the

down and enjoy my breakfast. Over this past summer, I’ve

kitchen. As I take a moment to take it all in, I am reminded of

grown keen to a bench just down the way from the restau-

the best part of my Saturday mornings: the pastries.

rant where I can listen to the sounds of the market in solitude.

Once we finish bringing all the food into the kitchen and the

pastry and sipping coffee, my anxieties about what to do with

wagons are put away, I have the difficult decision of what pastry

my life are seemingly nonexistent. This small weekly routine

to get. I usually have a sweet tooth but this fall season, I’ve been

the past few months has helped me realize some important

Luckily, during the first few minutes of munching on my warm

enticed by the savory side of life. My favorite pastry on the menu

things. And although my routine has been quite different than

right now is the Everything Croissant. The dough filled pastry is

Holly Golightly’s, we have come to a similar conclusion. Sim-

filled with herbed cream cheese, smoked trout, and topped with

ply, if you fill your life with good pastries, self appreciation and

everything bagel seasoning and garnished with chopped dill.

people that love you, happiness is sure to follow no matter where you are or what you have.

With a content heart and a croissant and coffee to go in a brown paper bag, I head out to find a pleasant place to sit


FROM INDIA TO FRANCE IN A HUNDRED FEET


A F IL M T H AT L E AV E S YOU MOU T H -WAT ER ING A ND S MIL ING AT T HE S A ME T IME By Gretchen Poston fabulous food and human connection. Inspired by the new, rich I saw The Hundred Foot Journey for the first time in London, and

traditions around him, Hassan beautifully masters French cooking

was left with a mouth watering craving for curry and the urge to hit

and merges his new skill with traditional Indian flavors. His fusion

the kitchen. Luckily I lived down the street from an especially de-

food does more than dazzle everyone who tastes it, it symbolizes

licious Indian restaurant called Dishoom to satisfy my craving with

his family’s acceptance and newfound comfort in France. This cul-

lamb biryani, vegetable samosas, and ruby chicken. The Hundred

minates as he asks to prove his culinary worth to Mdm. Mallory by

Foot Journey is an original take on the increasingly common story

making her a classic French dish: an omelette. He twists the simple

of people opening their hearts and minds to the rest of the world. A

recipe by using his mother’s spices to flavor it, leaving Mdm. Mallory

refreshing movie experience, it takes you on a beautiful food jour-

speechless and me adding cardamom to my grocery list. Her icy

ney to the heart of two different cultures with its charming cast and

exterior melts with each tantalizing bite and she begins to see him

delicious subjects.

not as culinary competition, but as a true chef.

The film follows the story of two seemingly unrelated cuisines,

But food loses its taste of life for Hassan when he makes it big as

French and Indian, that mingle and clash as the Kadam family

a young celebrity chef in Paris. While trying another chef’s home

seeks refuge in a small corner of Southern France to escape vio-

cooked meal, he noticed the lack of soul in his own food now, with

lent riots and personal tragedy in India. They boldly open an Indian

its embellishments and meticulous detail. He’s overwhelmed by the

restaurant in this small French town, just a hundred feet from the

life he tastes in the traditional meal and realizes “every bite takes you

very competitive Madame Mallory’s Michelin-approved tradition-

home.” It can’t be a coincidence that after he tastes genuine food

al French restaurant. Both cuisines represent the life and style of

again he goes back to the small French village his family made home.

the traditions from which they hale, but more importantly serve as physical (and edible!) reminders of the characters roots. Hassan,

If you’re feeling inspired by the vivacious food dancing across the

the star cook of the Kadam family, learns his craft from his late moth-

screen as you watch The Hundred Foot Journey, Madison is home to

er. The film opens with the two preparing sea urchin. Mama Kadam

fabulous French and Indian options. For a hearty cheese plate that

tells Hassan, “the sea urchins taste of life. Life has its own flavor,” as-

rivals Marguerites head to Fromag Nation for an extensive array

serting food and its endless flavors and combinations as the source

of soft and hard, stinky and moderate cheeses, jams, and breads.

of life for the film, and more importantly for their family. Though

If you can’t stop thinking about samosas, curry or any other Indian

they leave India for France, Hassan nostalgically knows that “food

dish, Maharani is my go to Madison Indian spot. While they won’t

is memories” and reconnects the Kadams with what they have lost

have Marguerite’s home baked bread or Mama Kadam’s personal

and brings the comfort of culture and tradition to their new home.

spices, they will leave you satisfied. The Hundred Foot Journey left my mouth watering and smiling at the same time with its portray-

While food connects the Kadams to India, it also allows them to

al of food as both delicious and as an important source of family,

forge new connections as they make their way through Europe in

love, and passion. Food drives the plot, delights the characters, and

search of a new home. The serendipitous breaking down of their

teaches important lessons of open mindedness, acceptance, and

car stops them in the hills of Southern France. Marguerite, a young

forgiveness. Food heals and loves, bringing the Kadams and Mdm.

french woman takes them in and prepares a simple, yet elegant

Mallory new flavors, dishes, and relationships. In an age of so many

classic French cheese platter with sundried tomatoes, local oil,

sequels and dark films, The Hundred Foot Journey is a wholesome

sardines, and freshly baked bread. The Kadams are in awe of the

and happy relief to any movie goer or foodie looking to wet their

effortlessly delicious spread, and Papa Kadam exclaims, “forgive

appetites and remember the simple pleasures of home, family, and

the silence Marguerite. I think my family is afraid that they died in

food. Hassan knows food is memory when Papa Kadam gifts him

an accident and now we are in heaven.” Marguerite’s hospitality

his mama’s salvaged spices and he smells the times he had with her

and the outstanding cuisine intrigues and inspires Papa Kadam to

and with Mumbai. I was particularly moved by the silence Hassan

settle the family there. The Kadam’s connection to the town and its

and Papa share as he smells the scent of tradition and his former

people is intertwined in the food they share and eat.

life, only broken by Papa telling him “mama wants you to have it.”

The difference in French and Indian cuisines is initially divisive for

Luckily, Madison is home to plenty of delicious Indian restaurants,

the Kadams and Mdm. Mallory, but as they learn and taste each

Maharani being my favorite, if the cravy for some warm, spicy Indian

other’s cultures, common ground is found and embraced through

food strikes your fancy.

THE DISH | 8


“


“I’ll Have What She’s Having!” WH EN HARRY M ET SALLY A C C OMPA NIED BY K AT Z DEL IC AT E S SEN M A K E S F OR A N EP IC T HR EE MINU T E S OF F IL M

As a complete “rom-com” fanatic myself, When Harry Met Sally is By Sam Burlage

definitely in my top three favorites (right up there with Twenty Seven Dresses and The Proposal—if you were curious). Though this movie

“I’ll have what she’s having.” A line that, to this day, makes anyone

was definitely one my mother wouldn't allow me to watch when I

who has seen the 1989 film When Harry Met Sally laugh to them-

was little (most likely because of the “I’ll have what she’s having”

selves or crack a smile. The iconic line comes from (what has to be)

scene), when I finally saw the film, it instantly became a classic to

the most memorable and comedic moment in the film: Meg Ryan’s

me as it did with the rest of the world before me. This movie is truly

legendary fake orgasm scene. This scene, which is famous for all

everything one could ask for in a good rom-com, and more. The

the right reasons, show’s Ryan’s character, Sally, and her best friend

movie, bursting with wholesome raciness, from the “f-bombs” all

and love interest, Harry (played by Billy Crystal), having a friend-

the way to the “orgasm” scene, is truly a work of comedic genius.

ly argument about sex. The argument takes place over turkey and

What I admire most about this movie is that, although it is comedic

pastrami sandwiches at Katz Delicatessen, an actual deli located

and witty, it also shows that a love story, no matter how complicated

in New York City. The argument, like most disputes in the film, in-

and lengthy that love story may be, is a love story nonetheless.

volved Sally questioning Harry’s, for lack of a better word, intelligence. Harry, in all his arrogant glory, claims to always show wom-

Though Katz Deli is the most iconic of scenes, there is something

en a good time in bed, which entices Sally to stray from her usual

about food's role in developing the relationship in the film that

high-strung self in order to prove Harry wrong, like any good wom-

makes a foodie like myself, truly love this film. Very early in the

an would. Sally then proceeds to show Harry what a fake orgasm

movie we see the newly acquainted Harry and Sally stop for some

looks like in front of everyone in the deli, making for a hilariously

food on their trip to New York. There, Sally takes an extraordinarily

uncomfortable three minutes, proving that women can indeed fake

long time to complexly order a salad and apple pie, and when Harry

“a good time,” and therefore, leaving Harry speechless and trium-

gives her grief she simply responds, “I just like it how I like it.” But

phantly dismounted from his high horse.

by the very end of the movie, Harry confesses that he has grown to love Sally and all her quirks, even how abnormally long it takes

The scene, widely known for its feminist nature and killer punchline,

her to order her meal. Towards the closing of the film we see Harry

may be lesser known for something just as iconic and important:

and Sally in an interview gushing over the details of their wedding

the food and the deli itself. Katz Delicatessen, located in the lower

and the coconut layered wedding cake with chocolate sauce on the

east side of New York City is a family-owned and run kosher-style

side, just how Sally would prefer it, cleverly bringing the story full

restaurant that has been proudly serving the same pastrami and

circle, with some food scenes to thank. But the scene that remains

turkey sandwiches in When Harry Met Sally since 1888. The notori-

the most iconic and essential to the movie and their relationship, is

ous restaurant didn’t gain its impressive reputation just through the

none other than Katz Deli.

iconic film feature, rather through over a hundred years of service and mouth-watering food. More specifically, turkey and pastrami

Bursting with comedy and class, the scene could make any viewer

sandwiches. Any lower east side native, and general New Yorker for

smile cheek to cheek. When you think of When Harry Met Sally, you

that matter, would recognize the diner in When Harry Met Sally as

think of Katz Deli, and the most awkwardly hilarious three minutes

Katz in a heartbeat. Over the years, their food and presence have

you have ever seen. A classic example of a woman putting a man

become a staple in New York history and culture; The movie just

into his place. Meg Ryan’s performance in Katz Delicatessen, price-

helped to shed some more light on it. Now people from all over the

less and trailblazing, will forever be a loved classic. A scene that will,

world travel to eat the same turkey and pastrami sandwiches seen in

and has gone down in history. Who would've thought an argument

this classic film. Katz, being a complete New York staple itself, nicely

over a delicious turkey and pastrami sandwich would be adored by

compliments and shapes, When Harry Met Sally into its own classic.

so many, and for goodness sakes, “I’ll have what she’s having.”

FOOD & FILM | 10


Dancing with Flavors

T ONY M A NER O IN SATU RDAY N I GHT FEVER

By Yanqi Li Mrs. Manero provides the pork chops, chicken, and bread at dinner Living in Brooklyn, New York with his family and Grandma, Tony

to create a comforting environment for the family. Although the

Manero entertains himself with friends at a disco while working at a

Maneros are going through hardship, they still sit around the din-

paint shop on the weekdays. On the dance floor, Tony’s confidence

ner table every night to have supper together. The family’s dinner

flourishes, and he attracts all eyes to him. Throughout the film, Tony

tradition grounds Tony in staying close to his loved ones. Everyone

compliments his life with different flavors of food. Outside of Tony’s

has problems they have to conquer in life, yet when we go through

home life, fast food spices up his routine, yet inside of Tony’s home,

those problems with the people that are close to us, the issues seem

comfort food grounds his heart and family. At the beginning of the

much lighter than before.

film, Tony buys two slices of pizza from a restaurant window on his way back from another paint shop. The pizza resembles the free

Towards the end of the film, Tony starts to find himself through

spirit in Tony’s life, and he forgets his troubles on the dance floor

guidance. After Tony, his friends, and the girl of his dreams go out

and bounces away from his issues. Pizza is a fun food: people who

for burgers, Tony realizes he does not belong to their group, and

eat pizza can put any kind of toppings on the dough, such as pep-

he eventually leaves. At the end of the film, he gives up his first

peroni, sausage, and even pineapples. Oftentimes, friends and fam-

place prize from his dance competition to another pair of dancers

ilies eat pizza at a hangout while everyone enjoys each other’s com-

he thinks genuinely deserve the award. Like the layers to a burger,

pany. We all love pizza for the many different ways we can have it.

Tony’s personality develops through layers. He starts with the beef,

And like Tony, we can groove through life with some fun in our steps.

wild with sauces. Then Tony starts to become simpler, like tomato slices that are thin yet juicy. By the end, Tony finds his purpose

Tony Manero’s family are Catholics with traditional morals, and

and become the lettuce of the burger, fresh and green. Through

having dinner together is a norm for them. Through the food the

his transition, his family traditions and love for dancing are the

family shares, we can see how Tony gets through his problems

buns of the burger, comforting him while grounding him to his true

and grounds his heart with the comfort foods he eats. At the first

self. Saturday Night Fever shows the way food can spice up some-

dinner in the film, the family has pork chops and bread. These are

one’s life by providing different flavors. These flavors help a person

both comfort foods, and they contrast with the problems the family

through not only hard times, but also different stages of his or her

faces together. The Manero family is dealing with their son leaving

life. Comfort food can remind you of your safe bubble, street food

the church, and their father who was just fired. In addition, Tony

can brighten up your spirit, and fancy entrées can liven up the fight

has a hard time finding his true self and his purpose in life. Perhaps

within you.

FOOD & FILM | 12


A RECIPE-TUR NED -A R T F OR M IN ONE TINY, SERVA NTL E S S A PA R TMENT K ITCHEN By Gabrielle Bruns

amateur cook feel like they’ve graduated from Le Cordon Bleu, just

From its rich flavor to meticulous preparation, boeuf bourguignon is

ents into one decadent stew can be characterized as an art form.

truly the pièce de resistance of French cuisine. The savory, aromatic

Who knew a braised beef stew had the power to excite people

stew graced in red wine is well worth its extensive cooking time.

about the art of cooking.

like Julia. The beauty that comes from combining diverse ingredi-

While there are many methods to arrive at the perfect beef bourguignon, Julia Child’s recipe stands out amongst the rest.

Julie continuously put unnecessary, self-inflicted stress on herself to cook through the entire book in 365 days, inevitability attempting

Known for her charismatic television program The French Chef, Ju-

two to three recipes per day. She thought that the smell of a dec-

lia Child founded her career on the desire to bring state-of-the-art

adent crѐme Anglaise would motivate her, but she was met with

French cooking to American’s kitchen tables. Wanting to make the

hurdles and distractions from her real-life that made the task rath-

joy of cooking accessible to everyone, Julia transformed intricately

er daunting. But through trial and error, Julie Powell arrived at the

detailed French recipes into a simple set of instructions with ingre-

perfect boeuf bourguignon. It didn’t happen overnight or within the

dients that can be found in virtually every American grocery store.

six hours of prep and cooking time. But she got there, one way or

The cookbook provided American housewives with a simplistic

another. Through the process of preparing boeuf bourguignon, you

guide to proper cooking and quickly became adored by all.

also acquire a multitude of cooking skills. In Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Julia Child explains that one can learn how to properly brown

Based on two true stories, Julie & Julia is a story about patience,

meat, braze onions, and sautée mushrooms all within the six-some

diligence, and an abundance of butter. Beaten down by her

hours preparing the dish. After the challenge was complete, Julie did

negative mother and accomplished friends, Julie Powell believed

not merely learn how to be a proper cook, she also gained a sense of

that the mundaneness of her thirties was here to stay. Searching

patience, grit, and the ability to follow her passions sans self-doubt.

for a distraction from her cobb-salad mode de vie, she decides to blog her way through Julia Child’s cookbook: 524 recipes, 365

Julie’s pursuit of joy is reflected in the boeuf bourguignon. Julia

days. From failed aspics to tantrums overstuffed chickens, Julie

Child wanted her readers to explore the true passion behind cook-

endures a multitude of difficulties throughout the year, and Boeuf

ing rather than treating it as a mechanically performed task. Julie

Bourguignon is no exception.

Powell approached this challenge with structured intentions, but soon let Julia take the reigns and help her find pride in her imperfec-

In the film, boeuf bourguignon epitomizes the classic phrase “good

tions. The cookbook ignited new passions and led Julie on a journey

things take time” (this classic dish requires at least three hours in

of self-discovery. While it didn’t always turn out perfect, she refused

the oven!). To avoid a bitter aftertaste and unpleasantly stiff vegeta-

to accept the cards she was dealt and cook her way to a new life.

bles, slow-cooking the stew creates intense flavors and allows the beef to slowly tenderize as it cooks. Julia Child specifically states

Julie & Julia’s message extends beyond the walls of the kitchen. Ju-

in her cookbook that patience is key for preparing a dish like this in

lia Child said, “find something you’re passionate about, and stay tre-

order to arrive at the perfect, savory boeuf bourguignon. The longer

mendously interested in it”. Whether that’s painting, exercising, or

the stew rests, the better the flavor (just be sure to plan ahead, or

mastering the perfect boeuf bourguignon, stay curious in your craft

else you might be eating dinner after 10:00 pm).

and do not let the limits of time and age prevent you from pursuing your passions. It is never too late.

With the initial sear of the beef to the final dash of parsley, this time-honored dish is a feast for the senses. The heavenly aroma from the red wine as it cooks with the beef is enough to make any

13 | FOOD & FILM

P.S. Julia says don’t crowd the pan... the beef won’t brown. Bon Appétit!


MA S TERING THE A RT OF

Boeuf Bourguignon


FOOD &


FILM &


POTS & PANS


By Maya Fidziukiewicz

room for improvement, and it often takes a

prepare a family dinner for Miranda’s new

couple tries to nail that recipe we have been

boyfriend. Unfortunately, Daniel’s cooking

Home cooked meals have a special place

perfecting. Even if you “whisk” it for the bis-

abilities are not nearly as up-to-par as his

in the hearts of humankind. In my case, I

cuit and try something new, the results are

acting skills. After completely sabotaging a

am lucky enough to have an extraordinary

never guaranteed to turn out flawlessly.

homemade meal, the kitchen floor, and his

mom who doubles as a fantastic chef. Each meal she crafts is seasoned with love and served with a smile, no matter how good or bad her day went. Yet, there are days where her schedule literally eats up all of her time, and she must compromise with the frozen pizzas saved only for “special” occasions.

body suit, he resorts to plan “B”: take out.

“Sometimes it is also nice to appreciate the work that was crafted in someone else’s pots & pans...”

Watching this scene from my most treasured film gives me a sense of reassurance. When it feels like everything is going wrong, in the kitchen or even in life, a warm imaginary hug from Mrs. Doubtfire assures me that delivery is sometimes the best op-

We

cooking

Unlike most characters from our favorite

tion. This is not simply admitting defeat—it

fantasies—myself included. The recipes

all

have

those

Pinterest

childhood movies, Mrs. Doubtfire shows us

is adhering to the strength inside of every

look great on the photos, but sometimes

the realities of cooking in the span of less

home chef to problem solve when entrust-

we fail at replicating the dish we attempted

than three minutes. In the movie, recently

ed with the responsibility of feeding others,

to create. So many steps went wrong: The

separated actor Daniel Hilard, played by

whether it’s just yourself, or the 5,000.

bread did not rise properly; the recipe

Robin Williams, is so determined to spend

called for too much sugar for anyone’s

more time with his children that he goes

Sometimes it is also nice to appreciate the

taste; the eggs were too cold to mix with

through the trouble of taking on the body

work that was crafted in someone else’s

the freshly melted butter; or maybe some

of a British elderly woman to nanny his chil-

pots and pans, outside the comfort of our

cruel jokester switched out the white sugar

dren during the week.

own dorms, apartments, or homes. W.S.

Becoming Mrs. Euphegina Doubtfire hum-

what’s on the table that counts, it’s who is

with kosher salt (true story).

Gilbert once said it well, “It’s not so much

However glorious our mishaps may be, it is

bled Daniel in his role as a father as he

in the chairs.” In the end, the details cease

always very discouraging to see hours of

learned to perform basic household tasks

to matter, as long as there is something to share with those you love.

hard work and handfuls of ingredients go to

such as cleaning and preparing meals. Mi-

waste. These are just some results of cook-

randa, Daniel’s ex-wife, builds trust in Mrs.

ing and experimentation. There is always

Doubtfire— enough to have Mrs. Doubtfire

THE DISH | 18


Havana Good Time

ยก


¡oye! CH EF TA K E S CR AV ING “ U N SAN DWI CH DE CUBANO ” TO THE NE X T L E V EL By Lauren Anders Celia Cruz. Rum. Cigars.

Three staples that make the 90 mile island off the coast of

the end of the film, Favreau, Vergara, and Leguizamo opened

Florida the place time forgot about; Cuba, rich in history, cul-

their own restaurant filled with Cuban music, spirit, and lots of

ture, and food. But what pairs best with all three things? An

rice with black beans.

ambrosial Cuban sandwich that puts some salsa music in your soul. It’s simple; from the crispy Cuban bread, nutty swiss,

But why does one sandwich mean so much? Not only to Carl

sweet ham, tender pork, salty pickle, and tangy yellow mus-

Capser but to me? Who would have thought something so

tard, this sandwich will be forever unchanged to any Cuban

simple - a sandwich - is able to create a spark to find your-

man, woman, or child that grew up in Havana, Miami, or like

self again. Nada más. Cooking for Casper was his passion, his

me, Washington D.C.. If someone decides to tell me otherwise,

art, but didn’t feel that way when life got in the way of him

no me digas. Cuba has always had half of my heart; my grand-

living. Losing touch with the important things in life: his rela-

parents immigrating from the island, instilled in my family to

tionship with his son and why he started cooking in the first

be proud of the loud, slang-speaking, guayabera-wearing cul-

place, seemed burnt to a crisp. Once a bland, flavorless pres-

ture that I have grown to love and cherish. So when there was a

ent needed a little seasoning for a bolder, brighter future to

film that was made about cooking a Cuban classic, I grabbed a

wake up his mind, body, and soul. It seems that in Chef, a Cu-

hefty bag of plantain chips and mojo sauce eager to learn and

ban sandwich was a metaphor for his well being: no change.

relate to what I’ve known all my life.

However, a variation of scenery, ambiance, and ambition has

In the movie Chef (2014), director and actor, Jon Favreau makes

who wants a bite of paradise.

the power to make a classic Cubano into a craving for anyone

quite the entrance. The movie uncovers his background as an executive chef, Carl Casper, in a prestigious Los Angeles

Besides Cuban sandwiches, Favreau shows his character

restaurant. Passion gets the best of him and unleashes the fury

creating other meals that are succulent. A grilled cheese

against a food critic who judges his dishes with a heavy hand

sandwich that quite honestly, made me consider whether

and bitter arrogance. Long story short, Chef Casper leaves the

or not I really have a dairy allergy and a pasta dish that can

restaurant scene to embark on a journey that comes to life

give anyone the confidence to say “hell, I can make that too.”

with a blank canvas: an empty, rundown food truck. With the

This movie not only makes me hungrier than ever, makes me

support of his ex-wife (Sofia Vergara), best friend (John Legui-

want to get up and cook, but reminds me that you can’t know

zamo), and son (Emjay Anthony), Casper ignites an inner flame

where you’re going until you know where you’ve been. So, mis

as he serves Cuban sandwiches to hungry laborers nearby.

amigos, whether you’re eating a Cuban sandwich, drinking a

Eventually, Chef Casper finds a craving to serve more to the

mojito, or waking up con un cafecito, let’s cook.

people of Los Angeles, resulting in a cross-country culinary journey to revive his passion for cooking and zest for life. At

¡Cuba Libre!

FOOD & FILM | 20


MORE THAN PASTA. W H AT A R E YOU R E A L LY HUNGRY F OR ? By Greta Kelly Trying to engage her niece in something, anything, Kate brings Zoe to Comfort food. We all know and love it even though it’s different for every-

her restaurant. There, Zoe meets the lighthearted chef, Nick, who, when

one. Invoking feelings of familiarity, safety, and satisfaction, it tastes like

made aware of her refusal to eat, takes matters into his own hands.

home. As college students very well know having recently made the jump to living away from home, comfort food can root you in place, even if you’re no longer sure exactly where your roots lie.

Nick doesn’t offer her food as would be expected. Instead, he sits next to her and starts pruning basil leaves for pasta. He holds out a sprig to Zoe, patiently waving the herbs at her until she finally shrugs and takes

This untethered feeling is just a small glimpse of what Zoe goes through

up the peace offering. Nick then makes spaghetti, garnishing it with the

in the film No Reservations. Played by a melancholic Abigail Breslin, Zoe is

basil they prepared and takes a break to eat. He still doesn’t offer any

sent to live with her aunt, Kate, after the passing of her mother. Much like

food to Zoe but instead exclaims over just how delicious the pasta is and

anyone in this situation, she struggles to find a sense of normalcy in her

slyly leaves it sitting next to her unfinished. After a few longing glances,

new and terribly difficult situation. Kate is a famous chef in New York City

she snags the bowl and shovels the noodles into her mouth. Success!

working at the renowned restaurant 22 Bleecker Street and, unsurprisingly, she tries to comfort Zoe with what she knows best. Kate attempts every-

The ferocity with which Zoe attacks the spaghetti reveals a hunger deep-

thing from duck to an entire roasted fish. It’s the food you would find at a

er than an empty stomach; something that Kate’s food couldn’t satisfy.

five-star restaurant, and Zoe refuses to eat any of it. Kate is at a loss. She

Zoe isn’t hungry for food because what she really craves is home and

spends her days creating some of the most beloved food in New York, but

familiarity. Having come from a mother who favored take out over lavish

the one person who matters won’t take a bite.

dinners, Kate’s extravagant meals are foreign to Zoe. Spaghetti may not

21 | FOOD & FILM


have been something she ate frequently at home, but by incorporating Zoe in

Every week I visit the farmer’s market and try out a new dish with whatever I

the process, Nick offered her friendship and a positive memory. From now on,

find. This has resulted in burnt rice, dry chicken, and a few other fiascos, but

spaghetti will be imbued with a sense of familiarity because of that friendship

I also have a growing list of meals I’d like to make again. On top of this, cook-

and memory, making it one of many new roots Zoe starts to put down as she

ing requires time in the kitchen which is a shared space in my apartment. I

explores her new life.

usually run into a roommate or two and end up having great conversations,

From pancakes to pizza, Zoe continues to enjoy cooking and eating her own

sire to cook is driven by more than just a simple need to eat. For me, trying

food. By creating fun memories around this activity, Zoe is physically mak-

new recipes has provided connections and a routine. These food adven-

ing something positive in a world of chaos she didn’t ask for. She’s finding

tures have created a sense of familiarity, and isn’t that what home is? A place

familiarity within the friendship between her, Nick, and Kate that arises out

that feels familiar and comfortable.

both while I’m cooking and at the table. While I really do love food, my de-

of their cooking routines. Comfort food is supposed to invoke feelings of home. In the process of finding familiarity with new recipes, she’s finding

The spaghetti in No Reservations offered Zoe these things. She found friend-

her new comfort food.

ship in Nick, and a fun routine in helping out at the restaurant—things that

While I am fortunate enough to still have my family, I can attest to Zoe’s method

something more than food, I encourage you to explore the ways cooking

of building a home out of food. As a transfer student, this is my first year in Madi-

can satisfy that craving. Your experiments may not always be edible, but in

son, and I’m currently in the process of making it feel like a place I can call home

the end, it’s not really about the food. Burnt rice tastes a lot better when you

for the next few years. As it turns out, cooking has been integral to this process.

eat it with friends!

her Aunt’s food couldn’t provide. Next time you find yourself hungry for

THE DISH | 22


THE STE A KS A RE HIGH:

The Great Outdoors


HOW A S M A L L R E S TAUR A NT IN T E X A S, A N 8 0 s MOV IE , A ND A GI A NT S T E A K L ED T O T HE CULT UR E OF C OMP E T IT I V E E AT ING W E K NOW T ODAY. By Abby Fehler

restaurants who rounded out their menus with a giant steak of their own, the 72 oz Steak Challenge influenced food culture far beyond

In the age of DVD, Blockbuster, and now Netflix, parents are capa-

what anyone could have ima2gined. Food challenges at restau-

ble of sharing their favorite childhood films with their kids, some-

rants now don’t only revolve around steaks, but pizza, ice cream,

times to the point where children grow up and identify more with

hot wings, burritos and more. Slowly rising in popularity since the

the movies of their parents’ generation compared to the films of

60s, the food challenge craze hit its peak with the hit Travel Chan-

their own. I was certainly one of those kids, and therefore my

nel show Man vs Food. The show’s host, Adam Richman, travelled

childhood was thoroughly defined by 80s classic comedies. Such

around the country participating in intense food challenges every

classic films include the 1988 movie The Great Outdoors, which my

week, for viewers’ entertainment, and for restaurants’ lucrative free

family has watched together every summer for about ten years.

publicity. Milwaukee restaurant, the Red Rock Saloon, was able to expand to a Madison location after the exposure generated by their

Anyone who has been ‘up north’, can see the humor in many of the

appearance on Man vs Food. Their challenge, known as the “Unfor-

characters’ experiences, such as the grimy cabins terrorized by rac-

given Challenge”, consists of sandwich with two half pound ham-

coons, the unsuccessful attempts at watersports, and the numerous

burger patties, a deep-fried chicken breast, bacon, cheddar cheese,

lumberjack style restaurants, such as Paul Bunyan’s in the Wisconsin

an egg, alongside an order of six ghost pepper wings. Most people,

Dells. In The Great Outdoors, the characters dine at a classic lumber-

however, according to the restaurant’s general manager, take upon

jack restaurant, where Chet Ripley takes up the restaurant’s chal-

the challenge without the goal of finishing. To many, it is simply fun

lenge of consuming a 96 ounce steak.

to feel a part of the experience. Similarly to how people love seeing

So how did screenwriters conjure up such an outrageous challenge?

ers achieved through the challenge or the film. Through both food

a popular movie, it’s more so about the shared experience with oth-

An extremely similar challenge actually exists in Amarillo, Texas, at

and film, we can build that human connection that is so essential.

a restaurant called the Big Texan Steak Ranch. There, contestants

After all, the movie The Great Outdoors brought my family together

must consume a 72 oz steak, along with a baked potato, a side sal-

every summer, and I am sure anyone could think of a film that dom-

ad, a shrimp cocktail, and a dinner roll in under an hour. Twenty-six

inated their childhood so heavily. And, when Chet Ripley is about to

years later, the challenge was no longer only copied in other restau-

finish the challenge, one can easily see how food can unite people,

rants, but in a film starring two of the biggest names in comedy in

as everyone in the restaurant cheers him on, for something as sim-

that decade. Through the film, and of course through the numerous

ple as eating a huge steak.

THE DISH | 24


Imperfect Perfections H AV E A SE AT, HOL IDAY T R U T HS A R E B EING SERV ED By Genevieve Vahl

Holidays are built on tradition, spanning religion, cultures,

us outsiders a fly on the wall angle into their family dynamic.

ethnicities, our spiritual identities. The habitual actions to celebrate, in our own capacity, a significant day to our identity. Di-

A well-balanced, war-influenced meal of mashed potatoes, red

rector Jean Shepherd challenges the idea of a perfect holiday

cabbage and meatloaf is served for dinner. Darren McGavin

experience in his 1940s staged A Christmas Story. Shepherd

plays a cranky, always-working, alpha father who needs break-

makes his most salient messages in the movie manifest in his

fast, lunch and dinner from his wife, every day. While pestering

iconic food scenes.

kid brother Randy to eat his food, mother Melinda Dillon gets

It is December of the 1940s and Christmas is approaching. The

it for himself. “My mother hasn’t had a hot meal to herself in

Parker family pursues their holiday festivities, building momen-

over 15 years,” says an adult Ralphie voice over, referencing the

tum into their high Christmas expectations. Tree lots, shopping

submissive woman syndrome of the 1940s. She devotes her-

malls with Santa and his elves, wafts of people at department

self to her kids, rising above her husband’s invalidation. “My kid

her husband more red cabbage because he can’t seem to do

stores. Tinsel strung about the firs in living rooms. The spirit of

brother had not eaten voluntarily in over three years,” Shepherd

the air is rapidly changing to holiday cheer.

narrates again. To get Randy to eat, she found a way that made sense to Randy, working with him rather than above him.

The feast accompanying a ‘traditional’ holiday celebration is cast as one of the main tenets of celebration. But when the

“Randy, how do the little piggies go? Show me how the piggies

herd of neighboring bloodhounds broke into the Parker’s

eat. Go on, show mommy how the piggies eat!” Randy dives

house and trampled down their holiday feast, the crux of their

nose first into his plate. Dad peaks over his newspaper in dis-

family celebration is gone in an instant. The hounds gobbled

gust as Ralphie sits frozen, jaw agape. An intimate scene rep-

up every last piece of meat off those bones, leaving the Parkers

resenting the family in their most natural environment: family

in a holiday pickle. Rather than idealized images of holidays,

dinner. Another example where Shepherd imbues food with

Shepherd showcases the difficult hiccups often excluded

highly relatable, raw realities most can find themselves in.

from holiday scenes. He depicts the moments often too embarrassed or ashamed to share. He challenges the glorified

A dramatic yet ironically accurate representation of holi-

idea of a ‘perfect holiday experience,’ going as far to question

days’ unromanticized reality. How things do not always go as

if it even exists. Expectations hold holidays on a pedestal often

planned; how we have to roll with the punches like the Park-

not met, yet rarely discussed. Shepherd implemented ironic

ers. Ralphie and his family get Chinese food as a solution to

accuracy to actual families, making the imperfect normal;

their holiday catastrophe, ending the film with an emphasis on

showing an un-romanticised holiday experience.

food’s powers and its everyday role. Such high expectations of fulfilling a glorified experience puts pressure on holidays.

Even beyond the most iconic scene of the movie, the imagery

Christmas only happens once a year, so anything but a won-

of the most mundane yet tender instances between the Park-

derful, gleeful experience is ungrateful? Seeing the Parker’s

er family is set over family meals. Food bringing out the most

imperfect Christmas is refreshing, reminding us all holidays

intimate and everyday interactions between the family give

are really just any other day.

25 | FOOD & FILM


Big Families

&

Sacred Recipes 27 | FOOD & FILM


HOW TH E GODFATH ER M A K E S TR A DITIONS YOU C A N ’ T R EF U SE By Gretchen Blohm

The Godfather, 1972. This film is director Francis Coppola’s famous

where we sit and spend time together. Outsiders of the family are

saga about an aging New York patriarch’s (Marlon Brando) family

not allowed—unless, that is, you are planning on marrying the guy/

mob-based crime business and the effects it has on his family and

girl, so (much like the Corleone’s) it’s a big deal when you get to sit

children. Acclaimed as one of the greatest movies of all time, The

down at a Blohm family dinner. Food has always been a big part of

Godfather is a film that captivates its audience with its developing

our family traditions and has always brought us together no matter

characters and intense plotline. Watching this film, you see how im-

the circumstances. The Godfather stands as a classic relation to my

portant family really is to the Corleone’s. The Godfather (Don Vito Cor-

family, not because we are mobsters, but because we have an unde-

leone) does everything in his power to protect those who are close to

niable relatability of family having one another’s back, and the dinner

him. Don Vito works hard to keep those he loves in line as to not hurt

table—the tomato sauce—as being the backbone.

the family name. He is a man with many connections and friends, and he uses his tight network of powerful friends to create a successful

Watching the film, I realized how much it relates to my big family; the

family business in gambling and grant those close to him favors. On

Corleone’s are real people and they take care and provide for one an-

the surface it seems like Don Vito has everything under control, but

other, much like my family does, and sharing meals together is one of

in reality his family is constantly in danger. Among all the commotion

the most cohesive family bonds. Sharing a meal is not always appre-

and bad times, it’s obvious that food and family values always brings

ciated and sometimes I find myself forgetting how important family

them together. There’s one food that stands out among the rest: the

really is. The son of The Godfather, Michael wants nothing to do with

family tomato sauce.

the family business. Michael has just come back from fighting in the war and has a life set out for himself, this life having nothing to do with

As head of a mafia, it is important to Don Vito that his ‘guys’ are taken

working for his father. However, when Don Vito gets shot Michael has

care of this tomato sauce is one of the many ways he provides for his

to step up. As viewers, we see Michael transition from an indepen-

business partners and family. To sit and eat with Don Vito at his ta-

dent man to becoming a lead man in the family business. At this point

ble is an honor. The dinner table was the only place where the family

in the film, Sonny is managing the family business, but as Clemenza

business was not talked about and where problems were set aside.

makes tomato sauce to feed all the guys, he hints at Michael that he

Viewers see how the family’s famous Italian tomato sauce is the one

will need to learn to cook for twenty guys someday. This can be taken

thing that can distract them from all the hectic and terrible times

literally, or as a foreshadow of Michael eventually being in charge of

going on, the one thing that separates the family from reality. Family

the family business. As the head of the family, it is important to take

values are set by Don Vito and it is clear that protecting his family and

care of the guys’ livelihood, and Michael will eventually be in charge

being together at the dinner table is important to him.

of supporting (and feeding!) the family. It is obvious in The Godfather

Much like the Corleone’s, I come from a big family myself, and I know

ner table with them.

that they value their family values and the people that sit at the din-

the importance and value of family dinners and family recipes. I was born and raised in Seattle, Washington. My family is German and

I believe that food brings people together. This film was a major con-

throughout the year we have family dinners that entail a variety of our

nection between Madison and home for me because I realized that

sacred family recipes—in October we make Lefse, in early December

a central part of finding my new family is sharing a meal with those

we make curry, on Christmas Eve we all go to Pike Place Market and

that I love, like in The Godfather. The Godfather, while it has its ups and

get German sausages/shrimp/cheese that we eat later that night,

downs, is a family movie, and touches on the important values of fam-

Fourth of July we make my Grandma’s famous Neiner Beans, and

ily that I grew up with. These values, like The Godfather’s, taught me

throughout the year we have birthday dinners where we eat more

that it is important to have a break from reality and engross yourself

meat than necessary. My dad is one of four, so dinners are always

in friends and food. Something as little as tomato sauce can bring a

hectic and loud, but despite the chaos, dinners are always a place

whole variety of people together, leaving problems at the door.

THE DISH | 28


QA &

EDI T OR- IN - CHIEF, L AUR EN A NDER S A ND DEP U T Y EDI T OR- IN - CHIEF, GR E T CHEN P O S T ON SI T DOW N A ND TA L K A B OU T HOW T HE SE T WO “ C OA S T IE S ” B EC A ME T R UE F OODIE S, ONE ME A L AT A T IME . WHERE ARE YOU FROM?

food goes way back. My parents are also

more than anywhere else. They have a

Poston: It’s actually a super funny story,

lifelong foodies. We look for every excuse

changing menu that’s different weekly but

Lauren and I are both from the suburbs of

to try new places and keep up with food

there’s usually a slider with a fresh sweet

[Washington] D.C. We had no idea until we

trends. Not to mention, a lifelong subscrip-

potato bun that is simply divine. It melts in your mouth. I always order a second serv-

met my junior, Lauren’s sophomore year at

tion to every culinary magazine.

The Dish.

Anders: Growing up, my family always ven-

ing for my dessert. It’s phenomenal.

Anders: I think we both realized that we

tured out to new restaurants whether it was

Anders: Anyone who knows me, they know

were from the same hometown when we

Italian, Spanish, Greek, Peruvian, French,

I’d say Le Diplomate. Any time I come

sent each other a text and had the same

the list goes on. So starting at a young age,

home from Madison, I always go to Logan

area code. 3-0-1 baby.

I never ordered off the kids menu, I would

Circle for my first dinner home. This sounds

Poston: I’m lucky that my partner-in-crime

eat what my parents ate for dinner. That

horrible but I starve myself all day on the

has as much of a hankering for Old Bay as

being said, if my family was cooking, my

plane looking forward to that meal. To me,

I do.

brother and I would never have a “substi-

Gregory Lloyd [the executive chef] is my

Anders: Couldn’t have said it better myself.

tute meal.” It was either what was on the

celebrity crush. It’s a must to get the Escar-

We are definitely huge Maryland girls at

table or cereal. I can easily say that I love

gots à la Bourguignonne. I met Chef Lloyd

heart.

my parents for doing that.

at the 2018 RAMMY’S and I fell to my knees

Poston: We both said we would blame our

in tears. It wasn’t my best moment but it

HOW DID YOU BECOME A FOODIE?

parents for giving us “pâté instead of PB&J”

was something I’ll never forget.

Poston: As a kindergartener, my favorite

as kids. We’re not mad about it.

food was Thai and I’ve always had a very

WHAT’S A FLAVOR YOU CAN’T GET ENOUGH OF?

walk down the street to our local grocery

WHEN YOU’RE BACK HOME, WHERE DO YOU LOVE TO EAT?

store with a handwritten list of ingredients

Poston: Definitely The Dabney. I’ve only

Anders: Great olive oil. I think that makes a

to make recipes that I would watch on the

been a few times but when I’m at school

dish go from good to great.

Barefoot Contessa. So my relationship with

I find myself thinking about this restaurant

open mind for international cuisine. I would

29 | FOOD & FILM

Poston: Truffle and shallots. Boujee, I know.


WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE FOOD MEMORY?

a paring knife. Now, I think I can mince any-

the rest. We’re very gourmet when it

Poston: Oh my gosh, when I was in eighth

thing faster than he can.

comes to movie snacks. On our charcuterie

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE CLASSIC MOVIE?

Spanish chorizo. However, if I’m at the mov-

grade I made my dad Lamb Tagine for his birthday. It was so awesome. I made such

board, I always love adding prosciutto and

a big deal out of it because I followed a

Poston: Gone With the Wind. I was always

ies with friends or my family, I always have

recipe from Bon Appétit. I was so excited

a fangirl for Scarlett O’Hara [Vivien Leigh].

to have popcorn. I mean, a movie without

I made something special and delicious

Anders: Sixteen Candles. Hands down, I can

popcorn is a crime in itself. I hate admitting

for him. That was probably when I knew I

quote every line from that movie.

might be the best cook in the family.

it but I am that person who eats all of it during the previews and then I sit through

THAT BEING SAID, WHAT IS YOUR GO-TO MOVIE SNACK?

the movie sad and popcorn-empty.

a class cookbook with all the other stu-

Poston: If I’m at a movie theater, I know

WHAT IS YOUR NEXT ~ON YOUR PLATE?~

dents. I think every kid in the class handed

it’s a little wild but I love putting Buncha

Poston: I’m graduating this spring and I’m

in a recipe for kid-friendly food: chocolate

Crunch in my popcorn. Crazy I know but

hopeful that I can write about food in New

chip cookies, chicken nuggets, or mac &

the chocolate melts into the popcorn! Well

York. But I don’t have a set plan. I’m kind

cheese. I brought in a recipe for an “Aru-

besides that, I love Raisinettes. But if Lau-

of taking things “course by course.” Pun in-

gula Salad with a Lemon Vinaigrette.” That

ren and I are watching a movie, we make

tended.

had to have been a proud moment for my

a huge charcuterie board. I’m literally ob-

Anders: For me, I’m going to live in France

parents. For cooking, I remember helping

sessed with all things cheese. In Madison, I

starting in January while I study communi-

my dad make this grilled shrimp salad and

love getting a wedge from Fromage Nation.

cations in Paris. I’m really excited to start a

Anders: When I was in second grade, I had to bring in a favorite recipe in order to make

he called it “Lauren’s Summer Salad.” I re-

I always have to have sliced apples, crack-

new journey for myself in one of the most

member my job was to mince chives with a

ers, brie, and Marcona almonds. Delish.

flavorful cities in the world.

butter knife because I was too little to use

Anders: She brings the cheese and I bring

THE DISH | 30


H U N G R Y

F O R

M O R E ?

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Profile for The Dish Wisconsin

Food & Film  

Feast your eyes on The Dish's Fall 2019 online magazine, Food & Film.

Food & Film  

Feast your eyes on The Dish's Fall 2019 online magazine, Food & Film.

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