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The Denisonian Established in 1857

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

In this issue: Learn about the Homestead’s upcoming new cabin. See pages 6-7

Volume 159, No. 14

Acapella groups kick off Big Red Weekend

Hung Tran /The Denisonian

Police allowed to accompany EMTs on campus Sarah Wiley News Editor Denison students requiring emergency services have become so violent that the Granville Township Fire Department has requested police presence for EMT runs. As a result, a new standing order allows for police to accompany EMTs on emergency runs on campus. This, however, does not mean that medical amnesty policies will change. Historically, when EMTs have come onto campus to provide emergency services, they have brought police. However, the lack of police presence at Denison is

the exception, not the rule. When EMTs are called to other areas in Licking County, they are accompanied by the police as a matter of procedure. The new standing order “standardizes operating procedures for Granville Township Fire Department trips to campus [and] made campus like everywhere else,” explained Laurel Kennedy, vice president of student development. The policy change comes as the result of violence EMTs have faced when coming on campus. In approximately 25 percent of emergency calls, “the EMTs received bad treatment either from impaired students or other community members,” including hitting, kicking and spitting, said Kennedy. At

one point last year, students went as far as dropping full beer cans on EMTs from the third floor of a residential building. The EMTs have always gotten “great support from security, but if patients or bystanders get too disorderly, sometimes we need someone to take them into custody,” explained chief of security Garret Moore. Taking students into custody is not security policy, but it serves to ensure that patients get the necessary medical care, said Moore. The police presence also helps with crowd control. “It is important to note that this policy is consistent with the same joint response policy that occurs in the entire Granville

community, and is in fact, a standard response in the EMS industry throughout the country. The intent of the joint response is to ensure the safety of EMS responders, the patient and bystanders,” said Granville Township fire chief Jeff Hussey. The police presence is not intended to penalize students. Historically, “there are certain misdemeanors that [the Granville Police Department] has allowed Denison to manage,” said Kennedy, which the standing order will not change. The policy of medical amnesty, which says that impaired students who call for help will not be penalized, will still stand. Continues on page 2

This week in pictures

Sarah Wiley/ The Denisonian

Hung Tran /The Denisonian

mon.

Hung Tran/The Denisonian


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“O What a Career” with Abbe Wright EMT policy Debbie Gillum Arts and Life Editor It’s always encouraging to see Denison alumni who have made it in the real world. Abbe Wright ‘07 is the Assistant Editor at O magazine and came back to campus Friday Sept. 28 to give students advice. She spoke with students at 12:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. along with appearing at the Big Red Networking Event at 4 p.m on the third floor of Slayter. Her talk was titled, “O What A Career: Going From English Major to Employment by way of Internship and Networking.” Her talk was more like an older sister giving advice, rather than a stranger telling young students how to live their lives. It took place in a classroom setting, Burton Morgan 219, which gave it an intimate feel. Wright started out explaining where she has worked and what she has experienced in the magazine publishing business. She first interned at Philadelphia magazine the summer of 2006, which was near her hometown. Here, she assisted writers and did fact checking. During her senior year at Denison, she was an editorial intern for the Denison magazine. She helped interview alumni and write articles. After graduation, Wright helped to create her own magazine called “1/2 Way to Spring Break” which included planning tips for spring break. The magazine came out in November, the halfway point to

spring break for college students. Wright decided where the magazine would be distributed and developed marketing strategies. She took this magazine with her to interviews and noticed how impressed employers were upon learning she started her own magazine. In January 2008, Wright was a closet intern for TeenVogue. The unpaid internship only lasted a month but Wright made the most of her time. When she was not steaming clothes or assisting on photo shoots she approached editors on her own and ask to help them. Her persistence helped her become Assistant to Editor in Chief for Modern Bride, Your Prom, and Elegant Bride in 2008. She wrote her own column called “Real Wedding Real Beauty” and pitched story ideas. All three magazines were later shut down by Conde Naste. Due to Wright’s effective networking and determination, she was only unemployed for a month. In November 2009, Wright was hired by O as the Assistant to Creative Director. In May 2009, she was promot- Abbe Wright ed to Assistant Editor. She told students how at O magazine, they had just finished the December issue and she was starting to work on the iPad edition for the January issue. Despite still looking and dressing like a typical Denison student, she gave advice that only an experienced professional could give. She repeatedly advised students during her talk, “You never get what you

You never get what you don’t ask for.

Safety fair takes over Slayter

Corrections The Denisonian strives to publish information that is factually accurate. Factual errors should be brought to the attention of the editorial staff immediately. Corrections will be published in the space below.

Continued from page 1

denisoneverywhere.com

ternship and get started in the magazine

don’t ask for.” The majority of Wright’s success came from the internships she did both during her time at Denison and after Denison. She encouraged all of the students to start internships as soon as possible in their college career and to do many different internships in order to realize what you do and don’t want to do. Wright said how she quickly learned that she didn’t want to pursue a career in marketing because of an internship she completed. Wright also suggested students start a blog, be vocal about their goals, be over prepared for interviews, and send a handwritten holiday card to previous employers. She told students to never gossip in the office place because it’s an “easy way to get fired.” Students asked questions about what living in New York was like and she described it as being “cut-throat” but that she still enjoyed residing in such a vibrant city. Students also asked about the differences between book and magazine publishing, since Wright has experience in both fields. She explained how the two areas require similar but different skills. Wright was very honest about her advice. She called it “tough love” and told students it was better to hear it from her than an employer. The majority of students who attended the two talks by Wright were female english majors interested in book or magazine publishing. In the end, Wright helped show Denisonians how determination and networking can land you your dream job.

There were some hiccups with the policy in the first week, with several students being cited even though they were cooperative. “We were thrown by that, because we understood that GPD wouldn’t cite under those circumstances. I think all of us agree that we have to preserve the medical amnesty policy, but things went awry,” said Kennedy. The fire department has proposed withdrawing the standing order if the police arrest or charge students with underage drinking/ substance use, and Kennedy said the police have offered to not cite underage consumption given that the university complies with the medical amnesty policy. “This policy is not intended to target cooperative, compliant overdose patients who are in need of medical attention. Patient safety and care will always be our first priority,” said Hussey.

Medical Amnesty Quick facts - Denison’s Medical Amnesty (MA) policy offers to exempt students from the disciplinary process when they seek medical help for themselves and/ or another impaired student. - The first responders on most MA calls are Denison’s own Security & Safety officers. If the situation is very serious, they will call for medical assistance from GTFD/GPD. - The “standing order” was written to balance preservation of Denison’s MA policy and ensure the safety of medical responders. It indicates that students will not be cited unless they are behaving aggressively toward GTFD staff. - The MA policy does not and cannot exempt students from criminal or civil consequences of their actions. Denison doesn’t have the legal authority to grant such exemptions. The policy only affects the Denison disciplinary process. - While students granted amnesty do not experience conduct action for underage consumption, students are expected to learn from the experience, and not repeat it. Students undergoing MA engage in educational activities to achieve those goals. Some are required to undergo a substance abuse assessment. Information courtesy of student development

Interested in writing news stories? Focused on improving your journalism skills?

Corrections should be submitted to denisonian@denison.edu.

Contact the news editor at denisonian.news@gmail.com


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Ishmael Beah shares wartime story Sarah Wiley News Editor Living in the relative security of The Hill it is easy to lose sight of the bigger issues in the world around us. Various campus organizations work to keep us grounded and in touch with the outside world through events featuring speakers who have suffered in ways most students cannot imagine. Wednesday’s event with former child soldier Ishmael Beah, sponsored by UPC and Invisible Children, was one such event. Beah, the author of “A Long Way Gone,” is a survivor of the civil war in Sierra Leone in the early 1990s. He was born in 1980 to a very poor family with divorced parents who emphasized the importance of education. His father worked for an American mining company and he was exposed to American pop culture from an early age, especially hip-hop music. He was swept into the war as a preteen, began running for his life at 12 and fighting at 13. Beah explained that when the conflict reached his town, “everyone was just running for their lives and you continued running because you had no choice.” Everything in his world changed; the rivers were floating with bodies. Child soldiers were recruited and forced to inflict violence on their own communities, so as a child on the run, people were either terrified of you or trying to recruit you. Beah eventually went to a military base looking for safety and got recruited. He was then forced to fight for everything he had. “At the beginning it was difficult, but

eventually you adapted and got used to violence,” Beah explained. He was in the army for two and a half years before he was taken to a United Nations shelter where he stayed for eight months before moving in with his uncle. Later he was invited to go to New York to talk about his experience and he eventually ended up living in the United States long term. Beah’s talk took place in Swasey and was well attended. UPC lecture series codirector Amelie Colwell, a senior communications major from Westport, Conn. Said UPC was pleased with turnout with over 200 people attending. Junior psychology major Hana DuBois of Kent, Ohio, the other series co-director, explained that Beah’s talk was the first of three events UPC will be sponsoring this year and was done in collaboration with Invisible Children and the soc/anth department. Colwell explained the selection of Beah as a speaker saying “in light of the Kony2012 video which shone light on the issue of child soldiers […] we thought we should educate the Denison community on the issue.” In addition, Invisible Children had been hoping to bring Beah to campus, and UPC was eager to collaborate, DuBois explained. Beah was very generous with his time, Colwell said, and stayed long enough for pictures and autographs for everyone who wanted one. Later this year, UPC will help bring a speaker for MLK Day and in March will bring Jerry Greenfield of Ben & Jerry’s.

Courtesy of Jennifer Goodwin

Denisonians learn to swing

Hung Tran/The Denisonian

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EDITORIAL

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Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Our Voice Democracy is 365 days With the presidential elections right around the corner, partisan and nonpartisan groups alike are urging Americans to plunk down their votes on Nov. 6. While voting is obviously a worthy means to engage in the democartic process, it’s not the only way. But perhaps we should actually focus on voting first. In 2008, only 64% of eligible Americans voted in the presidential elections. That’s a little more than half of potential voters deciding the next four years of our country’s trajectory. It’s even less if you factor in the electoral college, but we won’t get into that now. Not only is voting a primary way to participate in the democratic system, but it gives you a decent foothold for other ways to exercise your red, white and blue freedoms. Let’s say for example, that you vote in the upcoming elections, but your friend doesn’t. Then let’s say that the candidate who you voted for does not win. Then let’s say that the president makes decisions you don’t like about issues that personally affect you.

When your non-voting friend complains about certain policies, you can say “Don’t blame me. I voted for the other guy.” You shouldn’t vote just so you can smugly fold your arms whenever your more apathetic friends lament America’s problems. However, a tangible engagement in democracy (e.g. deciding our next president) adds validity to any future arguments you make about the progress (or lack thereof) on Capitol Hill. Of course, there are other ways to speak your voice besides voting for the president and then whining to your friends. We’d recommend writing a blog, but we already lied to several friends promising we would read theirs. There’s the cliché option to write letters to your congressional representatives, which is still a possibility, but participating in democracy can happen on a much more organic level. Read the news. Stay informed. Know your values, and then fight for them. Genuine passion is always the first step.

Spice up a Friday night with free entertainment How many times have students sat around with their friends and complained about the lack of stuff to do on campus? Sure, students are capable of creating their own entertainment. But Xbox, movies, drinking and tours through the same few local bars get repetitive after a while. Conveniently enough, Denison hosts a parade of professional performers, along with student-produced entertainment, that bring a unique cultural experience to campus. We don’t mean to sound like a public service announcement, and sometimes we editors ourselves are guilty of missing out on these events. However, a quick look at the campus calender offers tons of options to change up the otherwise mundane night. On Friday, Sept. 14, Denison’s Vail Series welcomed A Far Cry with cellist Matt Haimovitz. The pioneering classical music group performed songs that made all of Swasey Chapel swoon. Not every school is privileged to have an organization like The Vail Series that brings in top-shelf performers at no added cost to students. Despite this unique opportunity,

Swasey still contained a considerable number of empty benches. We’re not accusing students of willingly dismissing all the performers brought to their doorsteps, but the options afforded by the Vail Series are something to consider. Even if classical music is not everyone’s cup of tea, Denison provides enough events to ensure that at the range of performers and speakers appeals to a spectrum of interests. Denison students themselves are also providing some great entertainment on campus. This Thursday, Oct. 4, Denison Theatre is presenting “A Streetcar Named Desire.” Students will be performing the Tennessee Williams classic through Oct. 11. Even students who aren’t theater fans should at least consider supporting their friends on stage. Groups like the University Programming Council (UPC) are committed to bringing in comedians and other entertainers to give students something different to do on a weekend night. Those still concerned with making cameos at parties need not worry. Most of these events are over before the ragers begin.

The Denisonian Denison University‘s Oldest Student Organization - Established 1857 Andrew Luftglass Nick Garafola Sarah Wiley Joyce Lindsey Eric Evans Natalie Olivo Debbie Gillum Tristan Eden Ruby Montes De Oca David Allen Jessie Mack Katherine Palms Hung Tran

Editor-in-Chief Editor-in-Chief News Editor Cartoonist Features Editor Forum Editor Arts & Life Editor Arts & Life Editor Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor Web Editor Layout, Photo Editor Asst. Web Editor, Photo Editor

The opinions expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of Denison University, nor any of its constituents. Unsigned editorials represent the majority view of the editorial board, consisting of the Editor-inChief, section editors and assistants. Columns, letters and Forum pieces represent the views of their authors. Letters to the editor of reasonable length will be accepted prior to 12 p.m. the Saturday before publishing. Letters may be edited for length or content. The Editor-in-Chief reserves the right to refuse the printing of submissions. Remaining dates of publication: 10/9 11/6 10/23 11/13 10/30 12/4

108 Knapp t Denison University tGranville, Ohio 43023

denisonian@denison.edu www.denisonian.com

Cartoon by Joyce Lindsey

Editor’s Corner Surviving media cutbacks, pushing toward the future Denison, thankfully, does not have such a problem. As news organizations across the country fold or cut back, Denison supports (primarily) three print publications, one solely online print publication and a radio station. This is for a population that adds up to fewer than 2,500 people between students and full-time faculty. What’s more, our organizations have thrived while supporting the shift toward online media. The Denisonian has emBy Andrew Luftglass braced the move to online media despite Editor-in-Chief being a predominantly print publication If our lifetimes have taught us anything, for 155 years. We have been online at it is that nothing is safe from the hammer TheDenisonian.com for over five years of obsolescence. Institutions that have and strive to improve and expand online been staples for over 100 years have fallen without sacrificing our print roots. In because they do not do the jobs as well as addition, The Doobie (WDUB) should be their up-and-coming opponents. commended for its active online presence. Such was the case for The Times-PicaThe roughly 50-year old radio station alyune, a major newspaper in New Orleans. lows listeners to stream radio content on The publication had operated as a daily 911wdub.com. newspaper for 175 years, but printed its As fellow newsmakers, we lament the final issue as a daily on Saturday night. fate that has befell media organizations The Times-Picayune’s parent company, across America. Change has proved tragic Newhouse Media, needed to make for publications like The Times-Picayune. It cutbacks and felt the newspaper could is because of those sad truths that we feel operate at a lower cost with fewer print fortunate to bring the Denison commupublications and more online media. nity its news. Whether in print or online, Consequently, New Orleans became the we appreciate the voice we are afforded at largest metropolitan area in the United Denison and the abundance of organizaStates without a daily newspaper. tions that share our ability to report.


FORUM

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

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Your Voice Take advantage of online resources to avoid stress

Quotables @ Denison

Google-ing for dummies

...toothpicks you can’t vacuum...

Within a specific site: Include the site’s web address in the Google search bar. An exact phrase: Put it in quotation marks. By Chris Herman Special to The Denisonian

Related words: Attach them with a “~”

Hello again my fellow Denisonians. Welcome to another edition of my advice column. Here are some more tips to help you get through college and life. Having trouble getting in the studying mindset? Try throwing on some music. You can listen to your own, or check out one of the countless playlists online that are specifically made for studying. Try some out and you’ll be bound to find one you like. Plan everything with about 20 to 30 minutes of buffer time. Anything can happen on your way to a scheduled event, and doing this will significantly increase your chances of being on time. Being early definitely doesn’t hurt either. Dropbox and Google Drive are going to be your best friend throughout college. These programs allow you to upload any of your files to “the cloud,” where they will forever stay. No more worrying about losing your flash drive and the priceless files it contains. I’d highly suggest downloading these files on every electronic device you have. The internet has been a great tool, but it is also responsible for many modern day misconceptions. You can trust facts on the internet as much as you can trust a guy in a dark alleyway. Anyone can write them, and that’s something to keepinmindwhenspreadingthenewestfactoid.

Exclude a term: Separate it with a “-” Show all results within a designated time range: Use an ellipses between the dates.

- Overheard outside of Slayter Quotables @ Denison features weekly quotes oveheard on campus. If you hear something worth sharing, e-mail the quote and location to denisonian.forum@gmail.com

This week on campus

Information courtesy of HackCollege.com

Google is full of wonderful secrets. Check out the box below for a few tricks on how it can help you with online research. Video games are an easy way to soak up a lot of time. Like anything else, they’re great in moderation, but if you’re finding yourself falling back on your studies, I’m going to offer you a challenge. Go one month without playing any, and see what happens. You may be surprised with the results. Trying to stay awake, but want to cut that caffeine addiction? Try eating apples. They’ve been shown to be keep you awake just as well as a cup of coffee. Chris Herman is a political science major from Oswego, Ill.

What: Food and Culture Colloquium When: Wednesday, Oct. 3 at 4:30 p.m. Where: Slayter Auditorium What: Pop philosophy series When: Wednesday, Oct. 3 at 7 p.m. Where: Knapp 308 What: Queer Night screening of “Beautiful Thing” When: Wednesday, Oct. 3 at 6:30 p.m. Where: Higley Auditorium What: DUwop mini-concert When: Thursday, Oct. 4 at 1 p.m. Where: Doane Library atrium What: Andy Carlson CD Release Concert When: Saturday, Oct. 6 at 8 p.m. Where: Burke Black Box

The unexamined show is not worth watching Pop Philosophy Series Wed Oct. 3 in Knapp 308 at 7 p.m.

Irate? Make your voice heard Submit your ideas to:

denisonian. forum@ gmail.com Courtesy of South Park Studios


Tuesday, 11, 2011 Tuesday, Oct. Oct. 02, 2012

INSIDE STORY

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INSIDE STORY

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Homestead plans updated cabin renovation History of The Homestead Founded in 1977 by a group of students led by Dr. Bob Alrutz The Homestead was intended to be an agriculturally based self-reliant democratic movement The cabins were meant to be replaced every three to five years In the winter of 2000, Cabin two burned down. Residents lost all of their possessions In 2005, the Cabin Phoenix project was started to replace what was lost in the fire

Courtesy of homstead.denison.edu Denisonwill DRC One of the objectives of the Homestead renovation is to remodelCourtesy Cabin 3,ofwhich be renamed C2. Above, the original Cabin 3 is seen under construction in 1977. Right, Cabin 3 as it stands today.

By Julie Hoagland-Sorensen Special to The Denisonian Denison’s sustainable living community, The Homestead, has plans for a major construction project. Initiated by Dr. Bob Alrutz in 1977, The Homestead originally had three studentbuilt cabins that housed 12 students. These cabins held the expectation that they would be demolished and new cabins would be built every three to five years as new modern innovative sustainable methods were discovered throughout the years. Though The Homestead has rebuilt and been revitalized throughout the years and added on several features such as Bob, The Homestead community cabin named after Alrutz, it will undergo another significant transformation in the summer of 2013. Many Denison students know of The Homestead, but few have ventured out to it, and even fewer in daylight. When students picture The Homestead, they may think of log cabins and students who live like Henry David Thoreau without any modern luxuries, such as electricity. However, these views are generally misconceptions. The Homestead actually does have electricity and has have had it for a while, thanks to solar panels. They also have clean, running water from their own well and pump. Dubbed “Homesteaders,” 12 residents choose to live an off-the-grid, environmentally friendly and sustainable lifestyle on the 10 acres off-campus reserve due to political, social, environmental or personal preferences. Their members come from all walks of life with a diverse variety of interests, backgrounds and majors, yet they all hold true to the original mission put forth by the first Homesteaders and Alrutz, one of the original founders: To create an agriculturally-based, self-reliant democratic community. Alrutz's 1977 experiment grew into a part of the Denison University culture. The Homestead was and still is an all studentrun democratic community with the goal of

Courtesy of homstead.denison.edu

New Features Solar water heating panels Winter and Summer Solar panels Cabin 1 is being turned into a workshop for homestead student’s - projects on its ground floor - loft is going to be used for storage. Renovating Cabin 3

Hung Tran/The Denisonian

The Homestead was founded in 1977 by Dr. Bob Alrutz as an environmentally safe and

Fun Facts At one point The Homestead was home to nine cats. They have four cats right now: Blanket, Gandalf the Grey, Raja and The Count Duku. The first Homestead cat ever was named Icky Pootang Zip Bong. Four of the members of the Denison band Osage are Homesteaders. Had the first solar panels to be installed in Ohio. They have nine chickens and one rooster. A goat lived under the floorboards 10 years ago.

alternative housing option.

true ecological sustainability, holding true to its "home-grown" roots. Each of the 12 residents of The Homestead are obligated to complete a seminar project that allows the “residents to continually evaluate the community’s degree of success and failure with regard to the concept of sustainability.” Every project explores new ways in which to better The Homestead, whether it be through governance, shelter, energy, food, waste, education or community. An example of these projects is the solar powered shower built in 1993 or the solar array built in 1997, which was used to pump water. At this moment The Homestead has Bob, the “hanging out” cabin, the tool shed, a bathroom (nicknamed “The Kissing Booth”) and three cabins: Cabin 1, Phoenix and Cabin 3. The Homestead has not held to the rebuilding of cabins every 3 to 5 years, leading to the community's announcement of a rebuilding project that is to take place this summer. The Homesteaders plan to tear down Cabin 3 and the tool shed to build a large, entirely new cabin tentatively named C2.

“We build every cabin to be as environmentally friendly as possible, and this new cabin is no different,” said Homestead Junior Ryan Culligan, an environmental studies and biology double major. Even though this new cabin, C2, will be able to house nine homesteaders and features toilets, showers, and a laundry room, all of it will be operated through sustainable and ecologically friendly methods. With C2, Cabin 1 will be turned into a workshop for Homestead student’s projects and the loft will be used for storage. “The new cabin is going to be a modified stick frame,” said Culligan. Modfiied stick frame is a sustainable construction technique that conserve lumber. "The new cabin will have solar panels set up to face the south for passive solar heating, Every cabin is built to retain heat so there is no need for electrical heating,” said Culligan. Speaking of heat the new Homestead cabin will also have new solar water heating panels to provide hot water. The new cabin will also contain a tromb wall, which is type of thermal storage system used in passive

solar design. It is essentially a high-mass wall that stores heat from solar gain during the day and slowly radiates the heat back into the living space at night. Finally, there will be a new solar panel array located on the south side of C2's roof that will catch more sunlight in both summer and winter seasons harnessing enough energy to power a large house, all through the manipulation of surface area. Though still in the planning stages, the new Homestead cabin seems to be a very promising endevor and example of modernized sustainability. The Homesteaders welcome any volunteers in the 2013 summer construction of C2.

When you go...

If you are interested in volunteering or even applying to live at The Homestead, contact The Homestead at Homestead@denison.edu. The Homestead holds a weekly breakfast and work party every Saturday from 10:30 am to 3:00 p.m.

Water heater panels

Tromb Wall Courtesy of homstead.denison.edu

Pictured here are the blueprint plans for the remodeling of Cabin 3. The structure, which will be called "C2," is planned to house nine Homestead students. New features include: water heater panels, a tromb wall, composting toiletl, laundry room. A tromb wall is a thick thermal wall that faces south and is painted black. A pane of glass is installed in front of the wall and assists in absorbing heat inside the cabin.

Hung Tran/The Denisonian


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ARTS & LIFE

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Hal Holbrook happily returns to Denison

Courtesy of University Communications

On left: Actor Hal Holbrook ‘48 addresses the crowd in Herrick Hall. On right: Senior Alex Walling speaks with Holbrook one-on-one after the Q&A session

By Courtney Vinopal & Debbie Gillum Staff Writer and Arts and Life Editor On an early Friday evening, Denison students and members of the Granville community were fortunate enough to have the opportunity to connect with one of the University’s most famous alumni—the indelible Hal Holbrook. An Emmy-winner, a Tony-winner and an Academy Award nomine, Holbrook, 87, has starred in over one hundred films and television series, including Into the Wild and All the President’s Men. Holbrook is respected for his work both on the screen and the stage. With remarkable humility and ease, Holbrook conversed with an enraptured audience about his humble beginnings as an amateur actor at Denison University. Holbrook spoke with deep affection of Ed Wright, the head of the theater department at the time he studied at Denison, a man to whom Hal owes his success. When Holbrook returned to Denison after several years at war, Wright allowed Holbrook and his wife, Ruby, to stay at his house. “That’s the kind of man Ed Wright was,” Holbrook reflected. Holbrook studied under Wright, who “taught by example,” and offered the actor valuable lessons about the history of theater and the profession of acting.

Through Wright, Holbrook was offered the role of Mark Twain in a show that was just beginning production at the time that he was finishing his education at Denison called Mark Twain Tonight. Holbrook began touring with this show right out of college, despite his initial reservations about the material, which he noted was “really cornball.” The actor performed shows throughout the Newark and Columbus area, and eventually Mark Twain became one of Holbrook’s most famous roles. Holbrook learned a lot playing Mark Twain. “My work with Mark Twain has taught me how useful it is to ask questions,” he said. He passionately explained to the audience, using his booming and commanding voice, the real meaning of Huckleberry Finn, and why Mark Twain is still relevant in politics today. “I’ve learned a great deal about my country and the way people think, by working with Mark Twain,” he said. The lecture took on a more serious tone when Holbrooke repeatedly shouted, “We are not independent. We are trapped.” He emphasized how if anyone picked up a newspaper today they too would realize that, “What’s important now is money. Economics is ruling us.” The audience grew quieter as Holbrook

continued, “We don’t have the money to go to war. We blew it on two questionable wars.” The actor also answered numerous questions from the audience and mused upon his career and his time at Denison, recalling details of his past with remarkable ease and precision. As he told humorous stories of performing at school assemblies and even in the suicide ward of a veterans’ hospital, it was not hard to see why Holbrook is so adored by his fans: he is a remarkable storyteller. It is clear that he remains deeply connected with his ties to Denison and Granville. At one point, he was shown a picture of the house he had lived in as a college student at Denison and immediately began to reflect upon his time there and describe with poignancy the moment at which he left the house with his wife and son to move to New York City. Such a combination of specificity and openness kept audience members entranced for the duration of the session. In discussing the method of acting itself, Holbrook offered important advice to aspiring artists, noting that one should “always look for the human being inside,” when playing a role. Holbrook told a story about an acting class he took in New York. In the class, the teacher asked a student named Charlie who his character was.

Charlie couldn’t answer it. The teacher told Charlie to just be himself. That “Charlie” was actually Charles Nelson Reilly. Holbrook told the audience that that was the best acting advice he ever heard. And expanded on it, saying, “You have to try to be comfortable with who you are... I feel comfortable up here. I used to be afraid to talk in front of people, I didn’t know what to say... I gave that up one day.” The level of comfort and expertise that Holbrook enjoys as an actor is apparent when he speaks about his work. After years of experience in the field, the actor no longer needs to prepare for movies and shows, instead he embraces an improvisational style in his roles. Although Holbrook is well into his eighties, he clearly has no intention of slowing down anytime soon, as he has a number of upcoming projects, including Steven Spielberg’s Abraham Lincoln biopic, Lincoln. The evening ended with Holbrook joking, “Well, I guess I’ve worn out my welcome. Thank you.” and the audience gave him a standing ovation. No matter how much success Holbrook attains as an actor, it is clear that Denison will always hold a unique place in his heart, and remain the sight where all of his successes began.

Pam Houston ‘83 kicks off 50th Beck Lecture Series By Tristan Eden Arts & Life Editor Pam Houston walked onto the Herrick Hall stage on Wednesday, Sept. 19, looking excited and deeply moved––and with good reason. Houston graduated from Denison in 1983 and also briefly taught English here. The good energy was palpable. And Houston was not merely reading at her alma mater on any old night––reason enough to feel touched––she was reading at her alma mater on the opening night of the Harriet Ewens Beck Lecture Series’ 50th anniversary. The Beck Lecture Series, which has been bringing talented writers to campus for fifty years now, is one of Denison’s best-loved and most valuable resources. After a very warm welcome by her friend and fellow English professor Ann Townsend, Houston talked briefly about how good it felt to be back on Denison’s campus. She loved the new swimming pool and recommended that everyone make use of it.

Since graduating Denison, Houston has written five books––her first, the short story collection Cowboys Are My Weakness, was published in 1993. Houston is now the Director of Creative Writing at U.C. Davis, teaches the Pacific University’s MFA program and teaches at numerous writer’s conferences around the world. She lives on a ranch in Colorado. Houston said she would be reading from her most recent book, Contents May Have Shifted. She said the novel began as a simple last-minute project for a writer’s contest in Wisconsin. The contest rules stipulated the work being read must be new and “untested.” Houston joked that she took these rules very seriously and didn’t begin writing until she was on the plane to Wisconsin. Always an autobiographical writer, Houston wrote twelve short pieces depicting things she’d seen on the plane and her Wisconsin hotel. After she read the pieces, she said, writer Richard Bausch told her “write a hundred of those and you’ve got your next book.” She took his advice, and wrote 144 tiny

sections––she calls them “glimmers”–– which she compiled and rearranged until they formed Contents May Have Shifted. After telling us this, she began to read. She read several seemingly completely unconnected glimmers from the novel. They were engaging, sharp and funny. Running through each of these seemingly non-sequitur microsections (I have not read the whole novel) was an odd view of the world, manifesting itself in a biting and consistent sense of humor. The stories were fun to listen to. Each section could not have been more than a page or maybe two. One, entitled, I believe, “Portland, Oregon,” was just a couple of sentences. (The title of each section was the name of a city or place; the style of the writing was very much akin to that of a travelogue.) Houston read for about forty minutes and the packed audience seemed to really enjoy it, laughing and gasping often. After Houston was finished, an announcement was made inviting everyone to a small reception in Burton Morgan to

Debbie Gillum / The Denisonian

Pam Houston ‘83 reads from her most recent novel, Contents May Have Shifted.

celebrate both Houston’s reading and the anniversary of the Beck Lecture Series. It was a wonderful night and a great start to the rest of this year’s Beck Lecture Series.


ARTS & LIFE

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Review

Page 9

Five useful apps to help organize your college life By Arden Kozeny Staff Writer

It’s no secret Denison students are super chic and savvy, so why should your study aids be any different? Here are five sleek apps for all your Apple gadgets that will not only keep you organized and productive, but may possibly entice you to study. iProcrastinate You can have all the study apps you want, but when it comes down to it you’ll need to prioritize assignments to do well. iProcrastinate helps you keep track of upcoming due dates and remind you if one is past due. It will also help you keep track of your weekly meetings and workouts. Create a “group” for each class to keep assignments organized and assign a “star” to the ones for the upcoming week. Have a long research paper? iProcrastinate will help you breakdown the essay writing process into step-by-step todos. Better yet, you can link any of your assignments with related documents on your hard drive. Sync with your iPhone, iPod Touch, or iPad. Free for Mac, $0.99 for iOS, iTunes. ByWord Minimize distractions and get in the writing zone with ByWord, an app that brings your writing page to the forefront by viewing your document in full screen. Formatting buttons fade away as you type so you can focus on your next sentence rather then procrastinating with spacing options. Sync with your iPhone or iPod Touch and continue to make progress on your paper by writing a paragraph or two during that awkward 30min break. Also compatible with the iPad and Dropbox. Simplicity and productivity at their

Courtesy www.circusponies.com and www.mentalcaseapp.com © 2012 Wolfram Alpha LLC—A Wolfram Research Company

-

finest. $4.99 for Mac, $2.99 for iOS via iTunes. Circus Ponies Possibly named for all of its tricks? The Circus Ponies app allows you to create a virtual spiral bound notebook complete with unlimited dividers. Fill each binder with your notes on ruled paper, your lab answers on graph paper, and your essay on plain paper. A paper template in the format of the Cornell Note-Taking Method is also available. Have you said cool yet? It gets even cooler when you know that you can embed Blackboard images within your notes, PDF files of referenced research within your outline, and even a voice annotation of your prof explaining a complex idea within your study guide (should you get permission to do so beforehand). Highlight in six colors and add sticky notes as necessary. Save time flipping through your notes to find a specific

explanation by using the multidex, which automatically categorizes your every word into an alphabetized index. $59.99 for mac, $29.99 for iPad on iTunes. WolframAlpha Where does Siri find the answers to all of your questions? She’s programmed with part of the extensive database of Wolfram Alpha. Should you ever stump Siri, or want to reference the sources of her answer for your bibliography, search your question via the WolframAlpha app. You’ll find step by step solutions that will help you learn how to solve a difficult equation (just type it in the search bar), visual aids, and thorough background and statistical research. Visit their website and you can upload a specific image or PDF file to find more information and resources relating to it. Free at WolframAlpha. com or $1.99 on iTunes

Mental Case A multifaceted virtual flash card creator and organizer. Forget the traditional twosided flashcard, this app enables you to keep the dynamic information of a particular subject on multiple respective sides of one card. Include text, photos, and audio. You can also import and access unlimited flashcards, or the ones you have already created, from Quizlet and FlashcardExchange. Turn on “Lesson Scheduling” to calculate your success. Your stats will not only give you a sense of your progress, but also help the Mental Case app to prioritize what flash cards you need to review in order to ensure that you know it not only for the test but that it is also in your long-term memory. Sync with your iPhone and iPad and you’ll be set to study at the ready. $29.99 for Mac, $4.99 for iOS via iTunes.

Lots of fun at UPC’s Harry Potter Trivia Night

Chris Herman / The Denisonian

Harry Potter. The rules were simple: answer the questions and win the most points for your team. Students were asked to sign up ahead of time to be placed in a house.

things that every Harry Potter fan would know, some were facts from the books, and others were pieces of obscure trivia that only a die-hard Harry Potter fan would be


Page 8

ARTS & LIFE

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Hal Holbrook happily returns to Denison

Courtesy of University Communications

On left: Actor Hal Holbrook ‘48 addresses the crowd in Herrick Hall. On right: Senior Alex Walling speaks with Holbrook one-on-one after the Q&A session

By Courtney Vinopal & Debbie Gillum Staff Writer and Arts and Life Editor On an early Friday evening, Denison students and members of the Granville community were fortunate enough to have the opportunity to connect with one of the University’s most famous alumni—the indelible Hal Holbrook. An Emmy-winner, a Tony-winner and an Academy Award nomine, Holbrook, 87, has starred in over one hundred films and television series, including Into the Wild and All the President’s Men. Holbrook is respected for his work both on the screen and the stage. With remarkable humility and ease, Holbrook conversed with an enraptured audience about his humble beginnings as an amateur actor at Denison University. Holbrook spoke with deep affection of Ed Wright, the head of the theater department at the time he studied at Denison, a man to whom Hal owes his success. When Holbrook returned to Denison after several years at war, Wright allowed Holbrook and his wife, Ruby, to stay at his house. “That’s the kind of man Ed Wright was,” Holbrook reflected. Holbrook studied under Wright, who “taught by example,” and offered the actor valuable lessons about the history of theater and the profession of acting.

Through Wright, Holbrook was offered the role of Mark Twain in a show that was just beginning production at the time that he was finishing his education at Denison called Mark Twain Tonight. Holbrook began touring with this show right out of college, despite his initial reservations about the material, which he noted was “really cornball.” The actor performed shows throughout the Newark and Columbus area, and eventually Mark Twain became one of Holbrook’s most famous roles. Holbrook learned a lot playing Mark Twain. “My work with Mark Twain has taught me how useful it is to ask questions,” he said. He passionately explained to the audience, using his booming and commanding voice, the real meaning of Huckleberry Finn, and why Mark Twain is still relevant in politics today. “I’ve learned a great deal about my country and the way people think, by working with Mark Twain,” he said. The lecture took on a more serious tone when Holbrooke repeatedly shouted, “We are not independent. We are trapped.” He emphasized how if anyone picked up a newspaper today they too would realize that, “What’s important now is money. Economics is ruling us.” The audience grew quieter as Holbrook

continued, “We don’t have the money to go to war. We blew it on two questionable wars.” The actor also answered numerous questions from the audience and mused upon his career and his time at Denison, recalling details of his past with remarkable ease and precision. As he told humorous stories of performing at school assemblies and even in the suicide ward of a veterans’ hospital, it was not hard to see why Holbrook is so adored by his fans: he is a remarkable storyteller. It is clear that he remains deeply connected with his ties to Denison and Granville. At one point, he was shown a picture of the house he had lived in as a college student at Denison and immediately began to reflect upon his time there and describe with poignancy the moment at which he left the house with his wife and son to move to New York City. Such a combination of specificity and openness kept audience members entranced for the duration of the session. In discussing the method of acting itself, Holbrook offered important advice to aspiring artists, noting that one should “always look for the human being inside,” when playing a role. Holbrook told a story about an acting class he took in New York. In the class, the teacher asked a student named Charlie who his character was.

Charlie couldn’t answer it. The teacher told Charlie to just be himself. That “Charlie” was actually Charles Nelson Reilly. Holbrook told the audience that that was the best acting advice he ever heard. And expanded on it, saying, “You have to try to be comfortable with who you are... I feel comfortable up here. I used to be afraid to talk in front of people, I didn’t know what to say... I gave that up one day.” The level of comfort and expertise that Holbrook enjoys as an actor is apparent when he speaks about his work. After years of experience in the field, the actor no longer needs to prepare for movies and shows, instead he embraces an improvisational style in his roles. Although Holbrook is well into his eighties, he clearly has no intention of slowing down anytime soon, as he has a number of upcoming projects, including Steven Spielberg’s Abraham Lincoln biopic, Lincoln. The evening ended with Holbrook joking, “Well, I guess I’ve worn out my welcome. Thank you.” and the audience gave him a standing ovation. No matter how much success Holbrook attains as an actor, it is clear that Denison will always hold a unique place in his heart, and remain the sight where all of his successes began.

Pam Houston ‘83 kicks off 50th Beck Lecture Series By Tristan Eden Arts & Life Editor Pam Houston walked onto the Herrick Hall stage on Wednesday, Sept. 19, looking excited and deeply moved––and with good reason. Houston graduated from Denison in 1983 and also briefly taught English here. The good energy was palpable. And Houston was not merely reading at her alma mater on any old night––reason enough to feel touched––she was reading at her alma mater on the opening night of the Harriet Ewens Beck Lecture Series’ 50th anniversary. The Beck Lecture Series, which has been bringing talented writers to campus for fifty years now, is one of Denison’s best-loved and most valuable resources. After a very warm welcome by her friend and fellow English professor Ann Townsend, Houston talked briefly about how good it felt to be back on Denison’s campus. She loved the new swimming pool and recommended that everyone make use of it.

Since graduating Denison, Houston has written five books––her first, the short story collection Cowboys Are My Weakness, was published in 1993. Houston is now the Director of Creative Writing at U.C. Davis, teaches the Pacific University’s MFA program and teaches at numerous writer’s conferences around the world. She lives on a ranch in Colorado. Houston said she would be reading from her most recent book, Contents May Have Shifted. She said the novel began as a simple last-minute project for a writer’s contest in Wisconsin. The contest rules stipulated the work being read must be new and “untested.” Houston joked that she took these rules very seriously and didn’t begin writing until she was on the plane to Wisconsin. Always an autobiographical writer, Houston wrote twelve short pieces depicting things she’d seen on the plane and her Wisconsin hotel. After she read the pieces, she said, writer Richard Bausch told her “write a hundred of those and you’ve got your next book.” She took his advice, and wrote 144 tiny

sections––she calls them “glimmers”–– which she compiled and rearranged until they formed Contents May Have Shifted. After telling us this, she began to read. She read several seemingly completely unconnected glimmers from the novel. They were engaging, sharp and funny. Running through each of these seemingly non-sequitur microsections (I have not read the whole novel) was an odd view of the world, manifesting itself in a biting and consistent sense of humor. The stories were fun to listen to. Each section could not have been more than a page or maybe two. One, entitled, I believe, “Portland, Oregon,” was just a couple of sentences. (The title of each section was the name of a city or place; the style of the writing was very much akin to that of a travelogue.) Houston read for about forty minutes and the packed audience seemed to really enjoy it, laughing and gasping often. After Houston was finished, an announcement was made inviting everyone to a small reception in Burton Morgan to

Debbie Gillum / The Denisonian

Pam Houston ‘83 reads from her most recent novel, Contents May Have Shifted.

celebrate both Houston’s reading and the anniversary of the Beck Lecture Series. It was a wonderful night and a great start to the rest of this year’s Beck Lecture Series.


ARTS & LIFE

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Review

Page 9

Five useful apps to help organize your college life By Arden Kozeny Staff Writer

It’s no secret Denison students are super chic and savvy, so why should your study aids be any different? Here are five sleek apps for all your Apple gadgets that will not only keep you organized and productive, but may possibly entice you to study. iProcrastinate You can have all the study apps you want, but when it comes down to it you’ll need to prioritize assignments to do well. iProcrastinate helps you keep track of upcoming due dates and remind you if one is past due. It will also help you keep track of your weekly meetings and workouts. Create a “group” for each class to keep assignments organized and assign a “star” to the ones for the upcoming week. Have a long research paper? iProcrastinate will help you breakdown the essay writing process into step-by-step todos. Better yet, you can link any of your assignments with related documents on your hard drive. Sync with your iPhone, iPod Touch, or iPad. Free for Mac, $0.99 for iOS, iTunes. ByWord Minimize distractions and get in the writing zone with ByWord, an app that brings your writing page to the forefront by viewing your document in full screen. Formatting buttons fade away as you type so you can focus on your next sentence rather then procrastinating with spacing options. Sync with your iPhone or iPod Touch and continue to make progress on your paper by writing a paragraph or two during that awkward 30min break. Also compatible with the iPad and Dropbox. Simplicity and productivity at their

Courtesy www.circusponies.com and www.mentalcaseapp.com © 2012 Wolfram Alpha LLC—A Wolfram Research Company

-

finest. $4.99 for Mac, $2.99 for iOS via iTunes. Circus Ponies Possibly named for all of its tricks? The Circus Ponies app allows you to create a virtual spiral bound notebook complete with unlimited dividers. Fill each binder with your notes on ruled paper, your lab answers on graph paper, and your essay on plain paper. A paper template in the format of the Cornell Note-Taking Method is also available. Have you said cool yet? It gets even cooler when you know that you can embed Blackboard images within your notes, PDF files of referenced research within your outline, and even a voice annotation of your prof explaining a complex idea within your study guide (should you get permission to do so beforehand). Highlight in six colors and add sticky notes as necessary. Save time flipping through your notes to find a specific

explanation by using the multidex, which automatically categorizes your every word into an alphabetized index. $59.99 for mac, $29.99 for iPad on iTunes. WolframAlpha Where does Siri find the answers to all of your questions? She’s programmed with part of the extensive database of Wolfram Alpha. Should you ever stump Siri, or want to reference the sources of her answer for your bibliography, search your question via the WolframAlpha app. You’ll find step by step solutions that will help you learn how to solve a difficult equation (just type it in the search bar), visual aids, and thorough background and statistical research. Visit their website and you can upload a specific image or PDF file to find more information and resources relating to it. Free at WolframAlpha. com or $1.99 on iTunes

Mental Case A multifaceted virtual flash card creator and organizer. Forget the traditional twosided flashcard, this app enables you to keep the dynamic information of a particular subject on multiple respective sides of one card. Include text, photos, and audio. You can also import and access unlimited flashcards, or the ones you have already created, from Quizlet and FlashcardExchange. Turn on “Lesson Scheduling” to calculate your success. Your stats will not only give you a sense of your progress, but also help the Mental Case app to prioritize what flash cards you need to review in order to ensure that you know it not only for the test but that it is also in your long-term memory. Sync with your iPhone and iPad and you’ll be set to study at the ready. $29.99 for Mac, $4.99 for iOS via iTunes.

Lots of fun at UPC’s Harry Potter Trivia Night

Chris Herman / The Denisonian

Harry Potter. The rules were simple: answer the questions and win the most points for your team. Students were asked to sign up ahead of time to be placed in a house.

things that every Harry Potter fan would know, some were facts from the books, and others were pieces of obscure trivia that only a die-hard Harry Potter fan would be


SPORTS

Page 10

Weekly Round-up

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Women’s soccer improves to 2-0 in NCAC play

Bringing you the box scores from the past week in Big Red athletics. For game recaps, visit: www.denisonbigred.com

Women’s Soccer Sept. 26 Denison Earlham

0 1

Field Hockey Sept. 26 Wittenberg Denison

1 6

Volleyball Sept. 26 Denison Oberlin

3 1

Women’s Cross Country Sept. 29 All-Ohio Championship 5th Place

Ruby Montes De Oca/ The Denisonian

Sophomore defender Allison Scartlott has been a standout of the Denison back-line since arriving last year. Scarlott started all 10 games this season and was part of Gail Murphy’s starting 11 for 16 of 18 contests in 2011.

By Ben Hearn Staff Writer

Men’s Cross Country Sept. 29 All-Ohio Championship 6th Place Field Hockey Sept. 29 Denison at Earlham

7 1

Football Sept. 29 Wooster at Denison

22 30

Men’s Soccer Sept. 29 Alleghany at Denison

2 0

1 2

Volleyball Sept. 29 La Roche vs. Denison

0 3

Volleyball Sept. 29 Denison at Hiram

0 3

percentage to 73% for the 2012 season. For the rest of the second half the Big Red hung on to the lead. Now 2-0 in the NCAC division, the women’s soccer team has established themselves as front-runners within the conference. The women’s soccer team has a week off before playing their next game. “The week break is great timing because we still have some injuries, so it will give players time to heal,” said Coach Murphy. With a 3-6-1 overall record, the Big Red has six regular season games left, with five out of the six remaining games being conference match ups. On Saturday, October 6th the Big Red will look to build their conference record against Wooster at 1:00 P.M.

Men’s soccer fall to Allegheny Gators By Ben Hearn Staff Writer

Women’s Soccer Sept. 29 Alleghany at Denison

BIG RED IN ACTION

This past Saturday, the women’s soccer team performed well under the pressure of Big Red weekend. Going into Saturday’s matchup the Big Red was 1-0 in conference play, while the Allegheny Gators were 0-1 within the NCAC. The Big Red was able to top the Gators in a 2-1 victory. Denison set the tone of the game early in the first half as sophomore defensemen Gen Eng-Surowiec crushed a ball past the Gator goalie after only eight minutes of play. Eng-Surowiec was assisted by junior forward Jocelyn Festle. “We had talked about getting more numbers in our attacking box and really pressing in there,” said head Coach

Gail Murphy. This method of attack proved to be effective for the Big Red. Twenty-two minutes later, Jocelyn Festle headed a ball over the Gator goalie to put Denison up 2-0 in the first half. EngSurowiec took a free kick that set Festle up for the goal. Both Festle and EngSurowiec managed an assist and a goal against Allegheny College. The remainder of the first half was scoreless on both sides. Throughout the second half, Denison found themselves protecting their lead. After back-and-forth ball movement for 21 minutes, the Gators were able to score. Initiated from a corner kick, Denison’s goalie Andrea Karl was unable to stop a header from Allegheny’s Jaymee Wallace. Despite this goal, Karl, the junior goalkeeper, recorded two saves and bolstered her save

The Denison men’s soccer squad took on the Allegheny College Gators in an afternoon matchup on Saturday. Denison was enthused by a big crowd cheering them on at Barclay-Thompsen field, during Big Red weekend, but the enthusiasm was not enough as the Gators shut them out 2-0. The men’s soccer team fell short to their conference opponent, Allegheny College. Despite losing 2-0, the Big Red fought for the entirety of the game. The Gators scored with a point blank shot early in the first half. The shot developed from a quick clear that caught Denison off guard. Rebounding after the initial score, the

Big Red pushed the pace. The DU men had multiple scoring opportunities throughout the remaining thirty five minutes of the first half. Junior Bob Casarona headed a ball inches over the net after receiving a high cross. These missed opportunities plagued the Big Red offensive pushes. “We struggled finishing within the final third. We created a lot of chances, but we weren’t able to finish,“ said sophomore Mark Waterman. The Big Red continued to attack aggressively throughout the second half, but still failed to shoot the ball past the Gator goalie. Sophomore midfielders Mark Waterman and Collin Hockenbury each had two shots but were unable to capitalize. Forward JJ Dix also had two scoring chances.

Denison put up 23 total shots throughout the game. On defense, Will and John Krentz helped stop most of the Allegheny scoring opportunities. Denison goalie Matt Wagner saved six of eight shots on goal. With five minutes left in the game, the Gators snuck a goal past Wagner to seal the win. “We need to keep composure in scoring opportunities,” said Waterman. The men’s soccer team has an overall record of 4-5-2 for the 2012 season. They have six remaining games, all of which are within the conference. Their conference record is 0-2-1, but the Big Red is still in contention for the conference tournament. Their next game will be Saturday at Wooster at 3:30 P.M.

Women’s Volleyball vs. Muskingum (Oct. 4) Come support Denison as they battle the Fighting Muskies. The match is set for 7 p.m. at Livingston Gymnasium.


Tuesday, October 2, 2012

SPORTS

Page 11

Denison University Varsity D Association announces 2012 Hall ofFame class By David Allen Assistant Sports Editor The stars illuminated Curtis Veggie’s seasoned walls on Friday Night, where six former Denison athletes and one outstanding athletic citation became immortalized in the well written pages of Big Red athletics’ history. John Rudisill ’69, Steve Hettrich ’98, Jaime Salay ’98, Laura Peace ’01, Mollie Parrish ’02, Courtney Zollars ’02, and 2012 Hall of Fame Citation honoree, Steve Mohr ’76, beamed proudly in front of the audience as a barrage of photo snaps cascaded around them while the night closed in. Before the final group shot and the glossy-eyed speeches, a multitude of presenters came on to ready the audience with the universal goals of the Denison athletics. Such as President Dale Knobel, who emphasized the idea of equality amongst all realms of athletics. Knobel said, “We take the values of our North Coast Athletic conference seriously. We pursue gender equity, between men and women’s teams, and we would avoid marquis sports and try to invest proportionally in all of our 23 men’s and women’s sports.” This theme of equal opportunities took on a life of its own throughout the gracious speeches of the honorees. Take swimmer and diver Mollie Parrish ‘02 for instance, who was introduced by male swimmer and teammate Brian Goldthorpe. Goldthorpe proudly stated, “This is likely one of the first times a member of the men’s team has done an introductory speech for a member of the women’s team. I think it is a testament to the precedent that Coach Perrini [Swimming Coach] set

David Allen/ The Denisonian

From left to right: the seven-member class includes Courtney Zollars ’02, Mollie Parrish ’02, John Rudisill ’69, Steve Hettrich ’98, Laura Peace ’01, 2012 Hall of Fame Citation honoree, Steve Mohr ’76 and Jaime Salay ’98, who was not able to attend the ceremony.

for working together as an entire team, as a unit across genders.” Parrish is an eight-time national champion who was named the 2001 NCAA Division III Swimmer of the Year. She took home one of the glittered Denison Hall of Fame induction plaques last Friday night. She is a 20-time All-American and a seven-time conference champion. While equitability was a clear sticking point for the inductees, the quality of the relationships formed during their time wearing the blazoned Red colors of DU resonated very highly amongst the athletes. For Dr. John Rudisell ‘69, the six-time all-conference honoree in track and field and cross-country, the most important time at DU was with his best friend, teammate, and presenter, Jim Kirk ’69. “I have always been honored by [Kirk’s] friendship with me. We were inseparable

in college…we dreamed together about what we could be,” Rudisell beamed through uncontrollable ear-to-ear smiles. Rudisell took first place in the Ohio Athletic Conference Cross Country Championship and was a six-time team most valuable player. Laura Peace ’01 had a similar experience with personal relationships. Peace’s introducers reminisced through tear-brimmed eyes about how spectacular a friend and athlete Peace was. Peace lovingly embraced her presenters, Emily Stevens ‘01 and Amy Patterson ’01, and reacted with admirable modesty to the praise, “That was great. You guys are my sisters.” Peace was a three-time All-American as a member of the women’s lacrosse team between 1998 and 2001. She was named to the NCAC’s 20th Anniversary team. Yes, these athletic achievements were

Big Red Athlete of the Week

astonishing, but the most important party favor of the night was the idea of a bigger picture. That, even after their incredible four years here, these student athletes will continue to alter the world in positive ways. While the spark of these Denison athletes has been out for a while, their lasting mark on DU can be found in the new Hall of Fame at the Lou Mitchell Athletic center. Denison may not breed million-dollar athletes, but it strives to create well-rounded student athletes. DU develops awe-inspiring individuals that impact any world they choose and then it pays homage to the ones stand out amidst the masses. The seven members of the 2012 Denison Hall of Fame Inductee class are enshrined for their excellence, on and off every possible field.

The Denisonian presents the Big Red Athlete of the Week to celebrate the accomplishments of the top performing athlete of the previous week and to learn more about the person behind the numbers.

Men’s Cross Country: senior Chad Kosanovich first five spots occupied by runners from Division II Ashland. Kosanvich’s sixth-place finish helped the Big Red total 82 points en route to a third-place finish in the team standings. The Denisonian named Kosanovich the Athlete of the Week for Oct. 2nd. We sat down with him to learn more about the man behind the numbers.

Courtesy of denisonbigred.com

By Cassidy Colston Special to The Denisonian This season has been short of inspiring for senior Chad Kosanovich. After finishing third at the Kenyon Quad last year, Kosanovich suffered a season-ending injury. Making a comeback in 2012, Kosanovich led Denison University in their first meet at Franklin Invitational by placing fourth over all, which allowed DU to take first place at the invite. Kosanvich was selected NCAC Player of the Week in men’s cross country on Sept. 18 after leading all NCAC runners at the Wooster Fighting Scot Invitational and finishing sixth overall with a time of 26:56.16. The senior distance runner was also the first Division III runner to cross the finish line, with the

Cassidy Colston: Do you have any good luck charms? Chad Kosanvich: I used to have a pair of lucky boxers that I would wear for races. That worked for a while until I got disqualified for wearing them. They were two colors and you can only wear solid colors in high school. Now I usually just wear an animal shirt to warm up in mostly dinosaur shirts. If I am going to beat someone, I want to do it with a smile on my face and an animal on my chest. CC: What’s your most embarrassing moment? CK: At a track meet last year I was trying to get a National qualifying time. I was very psyched up for the race and was going through a normal pre-race routine. After that a slow jog around the infield seemed to be a good idea. Unfortunately, my spike got caught on the turf and I face-planted it in front of everyone.

CC: What is your favorite place that you’ve been to so far? CK: The best race location came last outdoor season when Dee [Solukombo] and I went to NC State for a meet. I had just taken the MCAT the weekend before and was dying to shake that out of my system. After a very long car ride, we finally made it to the stadium. Not only was the campus beautiful, but also the level of competition and a great race capped off an amazing trip. CC: What is something that you’ve always wanted to do? CK: I have always wanted to qualify for Nationals. I have worked my way through some serious injuries, and I am finally healthy. Hopefully, it is all falling into place for a great senior year. CC: If you could be a character from any movie, who would you be? CK: Darth Vader without a doubt. Sure his story is tragic, but who wouldn’t want to be the badass of the galaxy, carry around a lightsaber, walk with a limp, and chase rebel scum? Sure you die at the end, but having the ability to use the force would be worth it. Plus, you have a built in bathroom in a cool black suit. CC: If you could be anywhere right now,

where would you be? CK: Last summer, I studied abroad in Costa Rica. I would give just about anything to go “critter hunting” again in the rain forest. I love animals and definitely need to get my frog catching skills back to their maximum level. CC: What’s your favorite song? CK: I have a few, but I will never skip Baba O’Riley by The Who if it comes on my iPod. It always puts me in a good mood. CC: If you discovered a new animal, what would you call it? CK: Well if I do ever discover an animal, I would hope it is a dinosaur. I usually call most of my pets Carl (or Carletta if it’s a girl!) so I would have to go with the Carlsaur. CC: Do you have any weird eating habits? CK: Bananas are my favorite food. Every time they are in the dining hall I grab about 5 to hoard in my room. Since freshman year, I always keep track of my banana volume by putting their stickers on my door. Its pretty fun, until the end of the year when you have to peel them all off!


Tuesday, October 2, 2012

SPORTS

Page 12

DU Football wins the Old Red Lantern second year in a row By David Allen Assistant Sports Editor You could almost hear the sighs expelling simultaneously from the Big Red Football coaching staff as the time ran out, labeling the game as a decisive ‘W’ versus Wooster in the 21st Old Red Lantern game. The victory leveled Denison’s season record at 2-2. Coming off a jaw-dropping 38-10 win at Hiram University, where it seemed like the Big Red could do no wrong, Denison entered this rivalry game in a slow gear. “Early in the game we tried to figure out their defensive tendencies and their game plan a little bit,” said senior quarterback Max Paulus. “We like to get into different formations and different sets; see what was working for us.” The first two DU offensive drives netted -1 yards and no first downs. Wooster also had very little success in the first quarter, totaling only 40 yards and two first downs. Yet Denison struck the scoreboard first with a 28-yard field goal by sophomore Matt Puracchio as the first quarter closed, giving Denison a slight 3-0 lead. The next quarter, after the DU defense forced a turnover on downs, an unfortunate roughing the passer call planted Wooster in vulnerable DU territory where they eventually punched the end zone with a threeyard run. While the Big Red offense showed some flashes of promise with three first downs and 60 yards, their final drive of the half ended in a Wooster interception deep in the Fighting Scots’s territory, where they kneeled the ball into the third quarter.

BY THE NUMBERS Denison 30, Wooster 22 192 - passing yards by senior quarterback Max Paulus. 127 - rushing yards by senior running back Sam Fioroni. 39:38 - total minutes the Big Red held the ball in 60 minutes of play. 2 - touchdown passes caught by wide receiver senior Braden Layer 2 - years in a row that the Big Red has beaten Wooster for the “Old Red Lantern” since 1995

“We didn’t get in the end zone. [It was] frustrating,” Third year coach, Jack Hatem said about the first half. Denison’s offensive ‘frustration’ didn’t last very long as the next offensive possession led to a 21-yard touchdown pass, with a declined pass interference penalty, from senior quarterback Max Paulus to fifth-year senior Braden Layer on the left hash mark, giving DU the lead 10-7. The Fighting Scots’ offense could only pull off two plays before DU senior Nate Schiedler forced a Wooster fumble into the welcome arms of senior teammate Alex Sycher, at the DU 39-yard line with 8:02 left in the third quarter. “[The fumble recovery] was a big momentum shift. To get a stop right there and get a turnover really helps. Our offense was really starting to click,” added Sycher, Denison began heating up as Paulus struck gold on a 49-yard touchdown to freshman DuShawn Brown just four plays after the fumble. In the blink of a Big Red faithful’s eye, the domninating Big Red had taken a 10-point lead over the Fighting Scots, 17-7. Just 40 seconds later, the Denison defense forced another turnover on downs. This stop led to a time-consuming fourth-quarter starting drive for the DU offense, ending in a three-yard touchdown run by the infallible senior star running back Sam Fioroni with 11:20 left in the game. This made the score 24-7. Fioroni had his third 100-yard game of the season on Saturday with 127 rushing yards and 36 carries, after netting his 2000th career yard against Hiram last week. “He is our workhorse,” Sycher emphasized about Fioroni, “We run him a lot.” Denison continued dominating as senior Lane Hartfield added a third-down sack and junior Joel Elliot led to a blocked Wooster punt by freshman Zach Pewitt, gluing the ball to the Wooster 21-yard line. Paulus capitalized on the short field with an eight-yard score to Braden Layer, completing Paulus and Layer’s second score of the second half. “I thought Max [Paulus] played his best half of football in his college career,” added Hatem. But the Fighting Scotts would quickly strike back, driving the ball 76 yards for a touchdown in a little over two minutes making it 30-15 with 4:58 left in the game. After the quick score, Wooster held the previously stout offense of DU to a rare three-and-out. The opportunistic Fighting Scots’ offense took advantage of the porous Denison defense again, this time planting the ball in the endzone with 1:16 left on the clock. DU seemed to be falling apart when they only needed a little bit of production on their last two offensive drives to close out the game indefinitely. Thankfully, the ensuing onside kick went out of bounds for Wooster with less than a minute in the game, resulting in a Big Red

Hung Tran/ The Denisonian

On Saturday, in his second straight win against wooster, number 17 senior quarterback Max Paulus threw for 192 passing yards. He threw 260 passing yards against Wooster last year in a 27-13 win. BACKGROUND BEHIND THE OLD RED LANTERN: The tradition began in 1989, when the two schools were commemorating the 100th anniversary of their (Nov. 23, 1889). The lantern represents the railroad light the teams used to travel by in their early meetings at the turn of the century. This marked the 81st meeting in the all-time series between DU and Wooster and the 21st time the two colleges have played for the lantern. Courtesy of denisonbigred.com

possession at midfield. And even with another three-and-out for DU, Wooster was unable to score due to the game-ending sack by seniors Charlie Baker and Hartfield. While the game was highlighted by the excellent play of senior leaders like Cale Garverick, who recorded ten tackles, and Hartfield, who notched two sacks, the unsung heroics of the game rest upon the stable shoulders of the pleasantly surprising freshmen. Freshmen Zach Tomi, Pewitt, and Brown

were integral to the Big Red success on Saturday. Tomi provided back-to-back pass break ups, which forced a punt for Wooster late in the third quarter. Pewitt blocked a crucial punt deep in Wooster territory at the beginning of the fourth quarter. Brown caught a 49-yard pass from Paulus late in the third quarter to give Denison a 10-point lead. Denison looks to carry their 2-game winning streak into Carnegie Mellon (4-1) next week. The game will begin at 1:00 pm.


Oct 2 2012  
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