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The Denisonian Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012

In this issue: Sassy Gay Friend comes to Denison See page 9

Volume 159, No. 1

Established in 1857

Denison recognizes Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Denison ITS changes e-mail provider By Sarah Wiley News Editor

Andrew Hessler/The Denisonian

Convocation speaker Donald Whitehead, Jr. led this year’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Day celebration.. He gave a talk on the impact of homelessness, and coming together as a community to combat these social issues. For more on MLK Day, see page 3.

Denison Moot Court takes competition to the next level By Hillary Webb News Editor The American Collegiate Moot Court Association’s (ACMA) 2012 Midwest Regional Tournament was co-sponsored by the Wayne County Bar Association and occurred on November 18 and 19, 2011 at The College of Wooster. According to Wooster.edu, the top 20 percent of teams from each regional competition are invited to the national tournament. In order to qualify for the national tournament, teams must first compete in an ACMAsanctioned regional tournament. In addition to Denison, schools that participated in the Midwest Regional Tournament were Aquinas College, Austin Peay State University, Carroll University, Marian University, Middle Tennessee State University, Ohio Wesleyan University, Saginaw Valley State University, Saginaw Valley State University, The College of Wooster, and Youngstown State University with 58 total two-person teams competing. Denison had the three two-person teams of Lee Matheson, 2013 & Andy Gordon, 2012, Chelsea Glassman, 2012 & Haley Hudler, 2013 and Mallory Hinz, 2014 & Patrick Kolehouse, 2013 advance to the second day of the regional compe-

tition. Matheson and Gordon made it to the Round of 16 [teams], with Hudler and Glassman being Quarterfinalists and Hinz and Kolehouse being Semifinalists. The American Collegiate Moot Court Association’s 2012 National Tournament was held at Chapman University Law School in Orange County, Calif. on January 13 and 14. The team is coached by professor Eric Boehme. There are about 30 students total on the team, and this year there were four captains. The team is comprised of students in Boehme’s Constitutional Law and Practice course and students who choose to join the team as an extracurricular. Both the traveling and the success of Denison’s Moot Court team acted as a bonding experience for the competitors. “I would say there was a feeling of camaraderie amongst the Moot Court team. Everyone spen[t] so much time together preparing during the semester that [we] really got to know each other well,” says Hinz, “I was so proud of how everyone did.” Christina Bazak, 2012, is the Teaching Assistant for the Constitutional Law class as well as captain of the team and former competitor. On top of the camaraderie, “traveling with your team is so much fun,” says Bazak, “I mean, driving with

your Moot Court coach in a large white van through South Beach Florida rocking conservative lawyer attire. Priceless.” “Our team this year demonstrated that students were engaged with the material and serious about competing which was so wonderful,” she says. “I was so happy I was a part of it. It made me proud to be a Moot Court captain.” Bazak attributes much of their success to practice which she says is “key to doing well at competition.” A sense of achievement comes with both the preparation and competitive success, “You feel so accomplished after several hours of practice and research,” says Bazak. Hinz focuses on the competitive aspect, “It is a huge accomplishment to qualify for Nationals,” she says, “and an even bigger accomplishment when all three of our teams broke through to the second day of competition.” This advancement put all three of Denison’s teams in the top 40 teams in the country. The Hudler/Glassman team finished in the “Thrilling 32” with the Matheson/Gordon team finishing in the “Sweet 16.” Because Moot Court is a fairly new team at Denison, Hinz says, “we are all excited at the success we have [had] as a school [during] the past few years.”

Over the past eight years, Denison students have become accustomed to checking their mail on Webmail, a basic and dated email interface. However, over the past few weeks, that familiar backdrop disappeared as Denison switched from Legacy, the existing system to Google Apps as an e-mail provider. Over winter break, Denison students received an e-mail notifying them that in the coming days, their e-mail would be transferred to a new account. During the following days, many students found themselves confused by, or even struggling with, the transition to their new Google Apps account. Lisa Bazley, the chief information officer and Director of Information Technology Services at Denison (ITS) explained that this change has been a long time coming. A survey was put out to the Denison community on the possibility of finding an new server in November 2010, and the decision was made in May of 2011. “We started the exploration process (looking at the possibilities for upgrading email to the Google Apps for Education platform) in November of 2010, when a survey was distributed to faculty, staff, and students. The results were overwhelmingly in favor of exploring the possibilities of using Google. I read many of the student comments and they were just so excited to hear about the possibility of a transition in this direction,” said Bazley. “It’s a shame if there are students irritated by a change in email service,” she said “I suspect those concerns would be focused on the change itself which is short term pain until a level of comfort sets in with the platform.” Denison implemented the Legacy program in 2004 and Bazley explained that the system is outdated. It had a good deal of spam problems and was not integrated with anything other than e-mail. Legacy was also difficult to integrate with smart phones. Denison’s new system, on the other hand, is much improved. “Google’s spam controls may be the best in the industry. Additionally, our email users are now able to easily mark unwanted emails as ‘spam’ or filter out particular emails they do not want to receive.” Also, the Google platform is integrated with other programs, most notably Calendar and Google Documents. “There are many plug-ins also that can be adopted by individuals such as those available in Google Labs - these are personal choices that can enhance one’s own use of the platform,” said Bazley. In addition, this switch has had cost saving implications. Previously, Denison had Continues on page 2


NEWS

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Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012

Denison switches to Google Campaign season 2012 arrives on Denison’s campus Apps as e-mail provider Continued from page 1.

to employ someone just to monitor e-mail. With Google, that is no longer necessary. “The change leads to reduced costs in hardware and software of at least $80,000 a year. We also expect a significant reduction in personnel resources that are currently dedicated to our Legacy system. I’m hoping that we will reap the benefit there by shifting these resources to more critical network operations.” Bazley said that once the school decided to find a new e-mail server, they looked at several options, including Microsoft Exchange (a program similar to Legacy), Microsoft Live! (more like Google Apps), and Zimbra (which could go either way). Zimbra was ruled out due to a subpar calender application. “During the exploration period, we considered several different email platforms. Microsoft Live! is probably the closest competitor to Google Apps for Education and has very similar functionality. Google Apps is far more popular in colleges and universities. One of the reasons we chose Google Apps over Microsoft Live! is because historically Denison ITS has not been a Microsoft-centric school.” Before taking the final plunge with Google Apps, Denison implemented a pilot program this past September. The program included approximately 50 uses, composed

of ITS staff, students, and about a dozen faculty members. When the pilot went over well, the decision was made to expand it to the entire school. The decision was not universally approved; about 24 faculty members said they would prefer not to move their e-mail, and therefore ITS will leave the old system up and running for a while. “Because there is so much going on in our lives, when we have something that works we don’t want to replace it; we don’t want to take the time to learn something new,” said Bazley. In addition, some people have had concerns about security after transferring to a ‘cloud’ program, though Bazley explains that measures have been taken to secure emails, and it should be considered safe. “The one thing that is inevitable is change - technology moves at such an alarming rate now that IT departments are challenged with providing more service and functionality while holding budgets and staffing levels flat. When opportunities arise, like Google Apps for Education, that allow us to provide ‘more’ with ‘less’, we would be foolish to not seriously consider all the benefits and risks, if any, of adoption. We did this.” ITS will be hosting training sessions in Higley 325 during common hour for the next 18 weeks.

By Hillary Webb News Editor Primary election candidates are followed very closely by the media this time of year, and this time of the year is merely qualifying them for the general election. Denison’s campus is bipartisan in that both Democratic and Republican clubs are represented on campus – the Denison Democrats and Denison’s College Republicans. Although the President, Treasurer, and Faculty Advisor of Denison’s College Republicans could not be reached for comment, the Denison Democrats shared their focuses on campus. The Denison Democrats “is a political organization on campus that works to educate the campus about relevant political issues as well as participate in local, state and national political campaigns,” according to its statement of purpose. The group’s president, Chelsea Eastman, 2014, says that group is currently “working on a small voter registration drive on campus” which they usually do several times annually. With focus on freshman and sophomore dorms, members of the group help students fill out appropriate forms and deliver them to the Licking Country Board of Elections. With regard to Obama’s campaign, “[they] focus on campaigning on Denison’s

campus and in the surrounding Granville area,” but with help from Licking County’s campaign field consultants, they will find out how far from campus they will go to campaign for Obama. This consulting will occur closer to the general election in the fall. The Denison Democrats have approximately 15 active members, but the number can vary depending on whether or not it is campaign season. Students can easily get involved in the organization because they have contacts who give them guidance as well as things like phones for phone banking. “We try to make it easier for students to get involved,” says Eastman, “so that they will be more willing to do so on a regular basis.” Focuses of the club are raising awareness about both political issues and voter registration – they want to emphasize the importance of voting and exercising the privilege to do so.

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NEWS

Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012

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MLK Service Challenge leads to community activism By Sarah Wiley News Editor Students across Denison’s campus spent the long weekend engaging in service, participating in “teach-ins,” and attending a convocation featuring guest speaker Donald Whitehead, Jr. The campus community came out in multitudes to commemorate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. One of Denison’s more unique traditions surrounds the celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Denison recognizes the event, but does so a week after the official day. This is done to allow the campus to truly immerse themselves in the event. Since the official MLK Day occurs on the tail end of winter break, timing would not allow the campus to fully participate in celebrations. Waiting a week allows students to get back into the swing of things before participating in the campus wide service challenge, and attending meaningful events. Not celebrating MLK Day on the actual day also makes it easier for Denison to get a higher class of speakers. The theme of this year’s celebration was Defying the Distance: Toward Solidarity with the Disinherited. Monday’s speaker, Donald Whitehead, Jr., is one of the nations premiere authorities on homelessness, and gave a meaningful speech on the problem.

Using quotes from Martin Luther King, Jr. himself, as well as statistics and personal experiences, Whitehead proved to be an engaging speaker. The convocation opened with a “Lamban Processional,” a drum routine which woke up the room. Next, Tehillah led the assembled in “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” a song which is widely considered the African-American national anthem. The opening was moving and powerful. The convocation, which took place in Swasey Chapel, filled up, with students, faculty and members of the Granville community. In addition to the convocation, Denison held an annual service challenge. Mentioned at the beginning of the convocation, over the weekend, students went into Newark to participate in voter education and registration. Maddison Paule, a sophomore from Moon Township, Pa. led one of the service challenge events with fellow Denison Community Association (DCA) member Mary Zhu. They presented an assembly on Monday morning at Granville Middle School in keeping with the tradition of Martin Luther King, Jr. She explained “we are taking a different approach to teaching Dr. Martin Luther King’s message of “I have a dream...” by

talking to the students about taking action now and discussing what they “can’t wait to...” do in their community. The group of Denison students working with us have been doing research and composing short speeches that will be presented to the middle school students as a part of our presentation.” First-year student Megan Worden of Pittsburgh also participated. This DCA member worked to help local students increase their understanding of civil and human rights. “We had a kickoff presentation [Saturday]with some information about human and civil rights to put our actions in context. There were two service opportunities [Sunday] (voter registration and helping at a nursing home) and three [Monday] (teaching in a Granville Middle School and Newark High School and working with MR-DD patients). There is also a collection taking place all weekend for the Humane Society that our volunteers are taking part in.” On Monday, Denison hosted a series of “teach-ins,” the the program from the convocation described as “a tool of social change used to share information and educate communities.” They included events discussing the Occupy movement and the way the media has

represented Martin Luther King, Jr. The convocation speaker led an event titled “How Far Have We Ventured from the Beloved Community?” and Worden mentioned that DCA would be hosting a teachin to discuss the service projects that took place over the weekend. The MLK event leaders intended to leave students with a series of questions: “Does your liberal arts education at Denison awaken and prepare you to engage with the complex social problems of our time? How do we reduce our distance from issues such as healthcare, homelessness, and hunger? Are you ready to commit yourself to critique and action?” The events that took place over the weekend worked to help students prepare to answer these questions and engage the community, and the continuing MLK events through the semester will help to further this cause. As the semester continues, Denison will continue to recognize theaccomplishments of Martin Luther King, Jr. Events will include an exhibit titled “Civil Rights. Human Rights. Our Rights.” which will fun from January 23- February 2 and a “Defying the Distance” Celebration on April 26.

Campus Calendar The Denisonian gives you a quick peak at upcoming events on the hill. Tuesday, 1/24/12

Wednesday, 1/25/12

Thursday, 1/26/12

Friday, 1/27/12

Saturday, 1/28/12

Sunday, 1/29/12

12:30 p.m.: Tuesday Faculty Lunch: Jeremy King

1:30 p.m.: Yoga

10:30 a.m.: Yoga

11:30 p.m.: Yoga

10:00 a.m.: Quaker Friends Meeting

2:30 p.m.: Chi Time

8:00 p.m.: Young Life

7:00 p.m.: “How to Study the Bible”

6:00 p.m.: Ecclesia Christian Group

5:00 p.m.: Denison Museum Opening Recpetion for two new exhibitions

4:30 p.m.: Catholic Mass

8:00 p.m.: Denison Christian Community

6:00 p.m.: Newman Club

6:00 p.m.: Hillel

8:00 p.m.: Buddhist Meditation

Monday, 1/30/12 11:30 a.m.: Yoga 5:00 p.m.: Denison Religious Understanding 6:00 p.m.: Global Studies Seminar: Peggy Wang, Art History 8:00 p.m.: Buddhist Meditation

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EDITORIAL

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Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012

Our Voice Equality and Greek Recruitment Anybody who has signed up for sorority recruitment can tell you that the process is stressful. There are so many rules to follow and if you accidentally break one, you are withdrawn from recruitment. Guys, however, have a much more laid back recruitment. While fraternity recruitment rules do exist, they are nowhere near as strict as sororities’ rules. What ever happened to equality of the sexes? For men, the rules that apply are common sense: no hazing, no staying at an event past midnight, and no drinking with pledges. Each fraternity hosts its own events, independent of other fraternities and recruits are allowed to go to however many events they want and can determine roughly how long they stay. For women, sorority recruitment at Denison has a plethora of nit-picky rules. A girl who is rushing may not be seen partying, cannot be in the dorm room or car of an affiliated woman, and cannot accept Facebook friend requests from affiliated women. In order to rush, a woman must sign up during late fall semester and attend a meeting where all the rules are explained, T-shirts are handed out (they must be worn during the first round) and a fashion show is put on, demonstrating what not to wear to the three different rounds. During the first round, girls are split up into groups and travel around in herds to all five of the houses. After that, the girls visit

Cartoon By Joyce Lindsey

Start Here

1

only the houses they are most interested in. Women going through formal recruitment must attend all of the sponsored events and stay the entire time. While we understand that these rules are in place to keep the process fair, they are almost impossible to follow with a campus the size of Denison’s. Nearly a third of the campus is Greek. Since everybody lives on campus, it is ridiculous to be told not to go hang out in a female friend’s room because they are Greek and you are rushing. Not only are the rules during sorority recruitment way too strict, the regulations during the rounds themselves are just as stringent. Girls who are rushing must wait outside the individual Greek houses, shivering in the cold, for ten to fifteen minutes. They may only be in the house for very specific time slots (such as one hour) and so they are stuck waiting outside on the street. Additionally, girls are required to pay a small fee to go through formal recruitment. This money supposedly goes towards buying the T-shirt that is worn on the first night and other “necessary” supplies. Whereas, guys do not have to pay to go through formal recruitment. We are not sure of the origins of the recruitment policies, but it is clear that women interested in joining sororities at Denison face a major double standard.

Editor’s Corner

Staying on top from overseas

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By Andrew Luftglass Editor-in-Chief Just because you’re living in Europe does not necessarily mean that your life and responsibilities back home go away. That’s something that I forced myself to understand before my plane took off from Newark, N.J. this past August. I was preparing for a semester in Austria and Germany, but knew that I wanted to get a jump-start on applying for a couple of jobs and internships back in the states. In fact, I had to apply for this very position from my dorm room in Germany. Now, it may seem like concentrating on American responsibilities overseas is near impossible with all the potential distractions. If you’re going abroad and have the same concerns that I did, here are some things that I wish I knew. Connect with Skype Originally, I was concerned that my only means of communicating with potential employers would be over email. Frankly, email scares me. When I send something important to somebody who I don’t know, I don’t 100 percent trust them to email me

back. To avoid all of that unnecessary stress, download Skype or a similar program. Personally, I bought the Skype plan that allows you to call landlines and cell phones in the U.S. and Canada. It cost me $20 for three months and was well worth it. Of course, if you can’t or don’t want to purchase the service, a quality alternative is regular Skype. You can always email employers asking for a personal Skype conversation. Be mindful of the time difference For me, it was six hours from my dorm room back to the Eastern Time Zone. That means that you will have to schedule your calls in conjunction with the time zones of the people you want to hire you. For example, when applying for this position, I set up a Skype chat with The Denisonian staff at 1 a.m. German time. It’s definitely not ideal, but people will appreciate you conforming to their schedules. Seriously, relax It was pretty easy for me to find time to relax and enjoy my time abroad. I had a four day weekend every week and my earliest class was at 2 p.m. But, my relaxing schedule isn’t universal. To contradict the beginning of this column, just because your real life is back in the United States, doesn’t mean that you shoud forget your current life wherever else you may be.


FORUM

Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012

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Your Voice The many problems with Abroad housing anxiety: SOPA and why it won’t work supposedly something ‘great’ for my Denison education

By Peter Hurford Special to The Denisonian On January 18, many websites – ranging from Wikipedia and Google to Reddit and Dinosaur Comics – decided to shut down in some way to protest the Stop Online Piracy Act, “SOPA”. Given this shut down, we have to wonder – what’s up? Why is the Internet coming out in droves to oppose this legislation, as opposed to some other legislation, or no legislation at all? What’s so terrible about this bill? Here are a few of the big problems with SOPA that have led the Internet to staunch opposition: Big problem #1: SOPA places an unfair burden on websites Under the current law, the Digitial Millenium Copyright Act (DMCA), when a person uploads something to a website that violates copyright, the owner of the copyright can have the court order that site to take down the material. Provided the website in question complies with this request and is not knowingly perpetrating copyright violations, the website is what DMCA calls a “safe harbor” and will not get further penalty – even if it is served with repeated violations. SOPA will change this by greatly reducing the “safe harbor” provision seen in the DMCA and greatly increasing the responsibility of sites to combat copyright infringement themselves through the scanning and regulating of their own material, rather than wait for take-down requests. SOPA would allow an entire site to be blocked because its users engage in copyright theft on their own accord. This is why websites such as Reddit could be shut down. Reddit contains many original, legal posts; yet still are bogged down with a tiny minority trying to violate copyright. Under SOPA, they will find themselves having to patrol the millions of posts with filters to find and remove all copyrighted material and then put in place methods to block that material from ever being posted again. Big problem #2: SOPA will not actually stop intellectual theft This burden to websites seems strict, but maybe it’s necessary to stop Internet piracy? However, it turns out that SOPA doesn’t even accomplish what it sets out to do. SOPA is going to be like the Digital Rights Management (DRM) of the Internet – the annoying thing that is supposed to prevent people from duplicating DVDs, but in reality just annoys those who buy the DVDs legally by making them unable to skip the previews. This has to do with how SOPA plans on handling pirated content that comes from outside the US, such as on ThePirateBay. Since many sites outside of the US are out-

side the jurisdiction of the US to directly shut down, the government will instead have their websites delisted from the Domain Name Registrar. The way this works is that, in reality, sites exist as a series of numbers like 163.129.308.417 which are connected to domain names like www.example.com. The government could then sever this connection, so that going to www.example. com won’t direct you to 163.129.308.417 and thus not get you the content. But pirates who are in the know could just access 163.129.308.417 directly and circumvent this block. Thus, as this argument goes, all the government has done is put the tiniest of hurdles in front of the pirate, while severely inconveniencing all of the legal users. Big problem #3: SOPA contains vague language that will allow it to be abused Another complaint about SOPA is that people will stretch vague language to shut down what is, in reality, innocent. For instance, I could personally try to shut down a site I don’t like by posting copyrighted works from multiple anonymous accounts and then reporting that site to the Department of Justice. Initially, claims of abuse seem exaggerated. But copyright holders do have a stunning history of overreaching in exactly this fashion. Recently, Viacom was accused by Google of uploading its own copyrighted content to YouTube and then suing Google, the owner of YouTube, for damages — with Viacom employees even going as far as uploading content from Kinkos and doctoring it to look stolen. Another company, Universal, was caught taking down material on YouTube under a copyright claim for a copyright they didn’t even own. Lastly, there have been cases of companies going after YouTube videos of children solely because they were singing along to copyrighted songs. Conclusion SOPA seems well intentioned, and we as a nation definitely need to do something more serious about intellectual property theft. However, SOPA is simply not the answer – it is the equivalent of stopping the Mafia by bombing New York City. Just look at MegaUpload. This was the exact kind of website the government wants to shut down – the kind of site that directly profits off of copyright infringement. This site could be shut down purely through the use of the DMCA, without requiring SOPA at all. If the government already can do what it wants to do, why do we need the marginal benefits of SOPA at the large costs to Internet users and providers? SOPA puts major financial costs on websites to somehow come up with filters that will remove and prevent all copyright infringement on their site, and contain vague language that will make websites even easier to abuse. This is an impossible task for websites to handle, and comes at very little benefit. No wonder everyone is up in arms against SOPA. Peter Hurford is a sophomore from Cincinnati, Ohio.

By Emily Sferra Special to The Denisonian It is the fear of every Denison student who goes abroad. Not being able to live with the friends that you have made over the last two years due to a lack of rooms in the lottery, and thus being forced to live in an isolated single on North Quad. Having to walk across campus in the unshoveled snow and sleet just to grab dinner in Huffman with your lucky friends living on East Quad. While studying in Rome for the last four months of 2011, this is the nightmare that haunted my subconscious at least once a week. In all seriousness, the housing issue at Denison has plagued me from the very beginning of my Off-Campus study experience. Prone to anxiety anyway, I found myself upset many times from last spring until January about housing. After various arrangements with friends had fallen through, I found myself having to go through the spring lottery, which inconveniently started at midnight Rome-time. I entered the lottery with a number in the bottom ten, but still hoped that a friend with what I thought was a relatively good number could pull me up. Unfortunately, what would be a good number in the fall lottery was not even close to getting a double in the spring lottery. The night ended for me with tears and no bed on campus. It was truly disheartening to return to America with no idea where I was going to live in the spring. Throughout winter break I logged onto Webmail every single day, hoping for any email from Denison, and experienced many a sleepless night. It wasn’t until after the New Year that I heard from Residential Education and Housing. And then, I played the waiting game for five more days until I finally found out that I would be living in Crawford with a student whose roommate had transferred. Some people reading this may say that my anxiety was unfounded, and that I knew all

along that Denison would provide housing, in fact, that they had to. To those people I say, our campus may be small but the location of a student’s housing does matter. It seems silly after living in a city with an hour commute to and from class that the walk across campus is daunting, but for some it is. If I had ended up on North or South Quad, I seriously doubt that I would interact with my friends as often as I do now. A walk up or down the Hill always has been and will always be easily discouraged by wind, weather, or too heavy of a backpack. I believe that if Denison truly wants to encourage its students to go abroad, the spring housing process must be transformed. I don’t posit myself as a higher education administration expert in any sense, but I do not think that I should have been subjected to the stress of not knowing where I was going to live until a week before my return, simply because I had the motivation to leave our little bubble and get real world experience. While abroad, I was never truly able to get Denison out of my head because of my uncertainty over housing. The transition back to campus is rough enough for many of us abroad students (reverting back to Sodexo and the cornfields of Ohio) even without the fear that we may be living in the basement of “horny Shorney.” I consider myself very fortunate for landing a spot on East Quad, but I know there are other students who were not as lucky. Although I hope it is not intentional, it seems as if the administration is almost punishing students who go abroad for the loss of one semester’s tuition with anxiety, stress, and the possibility of living in an isolated dorm. I call for the administration to review the process of the spring housing lottery immediately, in hopes of making the return to campus less stressful and even a bit more exciting for students who enrich their liberal arts education through study abroad experience. Emily Sferra is a junior from Toledo, Ohio.


INSIDE STORY

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Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012

Are you protected on the Internet? King keeps data safe By Eric Evans Features Editor

Things to Remember: 1. Review your privacy settings on social media sites 2. Separate your personal and professional life 3. Check for online public information about yourself 4. Don’t post unsuitable content 5. Keep your computer and devices secure 6. Avoid public WiFi networks Courtesy of Eric Evans/ Denisonian

With thousands of web-based and credit card transactions made each day, the security of our personal and financial information should be a major concern when it comes to ensuring our overall safety on the Internet. Data privacy is a growing concern and is critical to the safety of one’s online presence. Last June, Denison University recognized the need for an Information security officer to ensure that information stored on Denison’s servers is kept secure. This is a new position at Denison– one that other “Ohio Five” schools have yet to adopt. Information security officer Kent King started at Denison in June, 2011, only months before the school switched its email network from Webmail to Google Apps. King’s position in the Information Technology Services (ITS) department comes at a time when, according to King, over 50 percent of prospective employers will check online media before hiring a new employee. In response to the growing importance of online media, King says that students need to be mindful of what they choose to post on social media outlets. Data privacy is a growing concern for our generation, and Denison has recognized this need not just through the addition of an information security officer to the ITS staff, but through the development of a series of procedures to prepare for any number of possible cyber threats to our campus. With the help of King, the ITS department is now prepared for a variety of potential threats that may face Denison’s infrastructure. Although King says that the majority of concern results from the possibility of physical destruction of Denison’s hardware, he has ensured that the campus is prepared for the threat of possible software hacking attempts. In fact, King says that his daily operations at Denison are divided equally between crisis planning and information security. Even though it is King’s first time working in higher education, he has over 25 years of relevant experience working for a range of business entities varying from an insurance agency to an energy company. However, working at Denison will be a completely new experience for King. He says the big difference between working for Denison and his previous employers in the commercial sector is that at Denison, much of the hardware being dealt with is owned by student users. At many businesses, the hardware is the business’s own property. Even though much of what King does is associated with risk management, many of

Image courtesy of Kent King

Kent King (left), was hired as an Informawill give a presentation at 7:30 p.m. in the Burton-Morgan Lecture Hall on Thursday, Jan. 26 in recognition of Data Privacy Day. At the presentation, King will fully introduce his position and talk to students about how they can become more aware about the issue of data privacy.

the risks Denison and its student body face can be reduced through educating students about the consequences their online actions can have later in life. Whether they have pictures on Facebook or videos on Youtube, King encourages students to consider their future when posting on the Internet. With King and his new position, students can feel safer having virtually all of their personal and financial information securely stored on Denison’s servers. While no cyber-based transaction is guaranteed to be safe, Denison students can now be assured that the University has adequately addressed the need for an information security officer and that their records and information are safely stored on secure servers. Despite King’s recent employment at Denison, student awareness of the issue of data privacy has remained low. In order to fully introduce the position of Information security officer and further emphasize this point, King has decided to present and discuss how data privacy affects Denison students. This presentation is for any students who would like to know what further steps can be taken to promote online safety. King’s presentation will be given at 7:30 p.m. in the BurtonMorgan Lecture Hall on Thursday, Jan. 26 in recognition of Data Privacy Day. Data Privacy Day is an internationally celebrated holiday which commemorates the signing of Convention 108. The treaty, signed on Jan. 28, 1981 in Strasbourg, France, was one of the first international data privacy treaties ever signed.

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Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012

INSIDE STORY

Page 7

Denison enjoys close ties with Granville By Jared Liston Special to the Denisonian As Denison students know, Granville is peacefully quiet for a good chunk of the year. When setting foot inside the small village, one can instantly feel an almost otherworldly change of pace, a quality that its residents consider a welcome difference from the rest of the world. Although Granville always retains its peaceful charm, it receives a jolt of life whenever Denison students come back for the school year. Like almost every college town across the nation, Denison students and Granville residents have, over time, come to both appreciate and dislike certain aspects of life with each other. Denison University and Granville, with their shady sidewalks, perfectly trimmed lawns, and quaint buildings, are posterchildren of small town Americana. They have shared a unique and ongoing relationship that began almost 181 years ago. According to the Granville Historical Society, Granville was founded in 1805 by settlers from Granville, Mass., and Granby, Conn. Seeking to mirror their past homes, the settlers planned Granville so that it would reflect the demeanor of a sleepy New England town. In 1831, through efforts to increase the influence of education in the village, the Granville Literary and Theological Institution was founded on a farm just outside of town. In 1853, the school was renamed Denison University and moved to its current home, within the village on the hill. Over the years, as Denison and Granville have grown together, differences between the quiet village atmosphere and the speed of college life have been apparent on occasion. "It’s a quiet town, so if you're out, awake, and being noisy at 2:30 in the morning, someone's going to hear you," said Steve Gauger, director of risk management at Denison. Kale Hills, a senior from Kansas City, Mo., said that he has spoken with Granville residents who have had less than good sentiments about Denison students. "Just in my conversations with villagers while I'm out running errands, I've heard some of them say somewhat disparaging things about Denisonians and people our age in general," said Hills. " They didn't say anything extreme, just that students can be a little [too] much at times." Some students think that these interactions go both ways, and that villagers can be at fault for questionable behavior, as well. "I've definitely had a few experiences where Granville residents have acted out in inappropriate ways; saying or attempting to make inappropriate advances on female friends of mine, things like that," said Jason Swanson, a 2011 graduate of Denison who now resides in Columbus. Despite the contrast of pace sometimes present between the two, Gauger feels that any stereotypes that Denison students and Granville residents might have about each other are most likely misconceptions, and that the few negative interactions that occur along the walk from the bars to the hill don't correctly characterize the relationship. "The few Granville residents that might be disgruntled about that noisy walk are not representative of the entire community,

Courtesy of Denison.edu

During the class of 2013’s opening convocation, associate professor of English James Davis described Granville as “aggressively quaint.” Indeed, the town often mimics a Norman Rockwell painting. With water fountains just for dogs and hand painted signs, Granville offers a glimpse into a long forgotten Americana. Of course, no place is perfect. Granville still has its pockets of rowdy residents, just as hooligans from the hill have been known to trickle into town in the past. Denison has long shared a mostly congenial relationshp with this town, and both Denisonians and Granville residents often appreciate this subtle bond.

nor are the few noisy students that cause those incidents anywhere near representative of the entire student population," said Gauger. "Many people start to have these misconceptions because those very few incidents get more press and attention than the majority of the great interactions that the two communities have." When misconceptions are put aside, it is clear that Denison and Granville give back to each other in ways that far outweigh any negative aspects of life together. Gauger commented that events within the Granville community, such as the downtown farmer's market and the holiday festivities, are well attended by Denison students who represent the student body in an extremely positive light. Eric Liebl is an associate professor of biology at Denison and has been a resident of Granville since 1994, when he moved here with his wife, Birgit and their two daughters. Liebl said that he has also had the pleasure of observing the clearly positive impacts that the Denison and Granville communities have on one another from a bipartisan viewpoint. "Granville is a really amazing town, and the village residents recognize and appreciate the participation and representation that Denison students have at community events," said Liebl. "While students frequently attend village events, Denison is also a hub of cultural events for the residents of Granville," he said. "These events are extremely attractive and welcomed by current Granville residents, as well to those that are considering retiring here," he said. "The students also bring an undeniable economic boost to the village." After years of having hands in both the Denison and Granville communities, Liebl said that he feels that the two help balance

each other socially, as well. "Granville is a relatively homogeneous, conservative place; having things like the Homestead, and the more politically and socially progressive side of the faculty and student body at Denison help the two balance and create cohesion within the entire community," said Liebl. Kelly Folkers, 21, a senior from Bethesda, Md., said that her interactions with Granville residents have only strengthened the bond she feels to the village, as well as showed her the ties that villagers feel to Denison. "I've spoken with residents of Granville on several occasions, and they've all said that they really like the vibrancy and youth Denison brings to Granville," she said. "They don't feel the village would be the same without it." On crisp fall days in Granville, walking down the Broadway stretch in the center of the small village is a unique experience. While walking past the old-school store fronts, one is sure to see a menagerie of persons, young and old, of many ethnicities

and backgrounds, all going about their daily business. This scene, cast on the backdrop of a small rural settlement in Ohio, may seem out of place to some people. For the students at Denison and the residents of the surrounding Granville community, this scene is what makes Granville a truly unique place to call home. "I enjoy Granville because it’s so different from where I grew up. Being in a suburb of D.C. is interesting, but it doesn't always feel that friendly," said Folkers. "Here, even if you don't really know somebody, you still share the common connection of this community." Despite small differences, the constant interaction between Denison University and Granville help define and make one another something that they could not be on their own. The two have coexisted and made each other unique for so long that it is clear their fates are bound to each other, and that the two communities are truly one. Jared Liston is a junior from Blacklick, Ohio.

The Denison University sign that greets students as they come up the hill was erected in 2006 in order to commemorate the school’s 175th year of existence.


Page 8

Review

ARTS & LIFE

Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012

By Madeline Skaggs Arts & Life Editor For many of us, January is a time of renewal and resolutions, often revolving around hopes to eat better and lose weight in the coming year. In one French cooking class, however, ideas of slimming down are quickly lost. Mark Anthony Arceno, the Program Coordinator for the Office of Multi-Cultural Affairs, instead wants us to enjoy learning about, making, and best of all, eating, French food this January. After running a successful “Farm to Table Cooking Class” this past fall, Arceno has taken his passion for food one step further by creating the Community Culture Kitchen (CCK). The program held its first event this past Thursday evening at the Open House, coming together with members of the French department to teach students and faculty alike about french culinary culture. At the event, Arceno worked closely in the kitchen with Dr. Christine Armstrong, a professor of French at Denison, who shared many of her own experiences growing up in France. The focus of the event was the connection between French Catholic culture and French food. Consequently the two demonstrated desserts with a lot of Catholic history, like galettes des Rois (Kings’ Cake) and Candlemas crepes. Both desserts are staples in French kitchens throughout the month of January, in celebration of the Epiphany, celebrated Jan. 6. The desserts were surprisingly simple to make, and yet so uncommonly delicious. The highlight? A lemon juice and lavender sugar crepe that had everyone drooling. Not only did the event teach attendees some great new recipes to try at home, it also brought to light many of the interesting connections between food, religion and culture. A change from the larger Farm to Table Cooking Class in the fall, this event was confined to only fifteen attendees and focused more time and attention on demonstration and conversation. The new layout helped to streamline the event, while still offering attendees the chance to step up to the stove and make their own crepe. Ellen Pucke, a senior from West Chester, Ohio, attended both events. “I thought the event was very different from the Farm to Table cooking experience. This event was especially interesting in the way they tied both religious sym-

-

bolism and regional French culture into the food,” she said. “It was neat to see an academic department work with the center for religious and spiritual life and the office of multi-cultural student affairs in order to produce the meal experience,” she added. Other attendees shared their excitement for both the event and the creation of CCK, as it is becoming more and more clear that our campus is lacking an outlet for foodies. Two first year students who attended, Alex Lloyd and Gena Grant of Upper Arlington, Ohio, spoke of their desire to start a cooking group on campus. In an email, the two explained, “Our goal for this group is to create a fun space where students who love food and enjoy cooking can interact with each other while cooking a variety of different dishes. We want members to be able to put forth their own ideas about what they want to make. We don’t just want to be the teachers, we want everyone to be able to teach each other what they know,” the two explained in an email. The best part of these events, aside from eating great food, of course, is getting together with other foodies from around campus. Arceno is creating the space and opportunity for students who love cooking and food to come together, leave the Food Network behind, and start a culinary adventure of their own. Arceno already has plans for the next Community Culture Kitchen event, for which he will team up with the Spectrum Series to create a migrations themed class. Recipes from the event are on Arceno’s blog,ndihluthi.blogspot.com/2012/01/ community-culture-kitchen-french.html

Tristan Eden/ The Denisonian

French professor Christine Armstrong demonstrates how to make a galette de Rois, or

Tristan’s Tracks By Tristan Eden Arts & Life Editor While there is seemingly a never ending supply of pretty good music coming out all the time these days, four upcoming albums in particular are really, really worth getting excited about. Clear Heart Full Eyes by Craig Finn, Old Ideas by Leonard Cohen, Love at the Bottom of the Sea by the Magnetic Fields, and Port of Morrow by the Shins are worth your time because, above all, they are by well-established lifetime artists who do not release bad music. Craig Finn was the frontman and genuis behind the mid-90s post-punk band Lifter Puller and now leads the even better Hold Steady. Clear Heart Full Eyes is his first ever

solo record, and, from what I’ve heard, it’s going to be good. Like Lifter Puller and the Hold Steady, Finn’s solo songs are wordy, intelligent affairs, each one crammed with line after line of the sort of sentiments lesser songwriters would devote an entire song to. Finn’s solo songs sound like the work of one man: they are somehow slower, lonelier, sadder. Perhaps more timeless as well. Clear Heart Full Eyes is out Jan. 24, on Vagrant Records. Leonard Cohen, that great old gravelvoiced poet, the man responsible for writing a little song called “Hallelujah,” is blessing us again with his first album in eight years. Based on nothing more than the downright transcendent and heavy piano-led first single “Show Me the Place,” Old Ideas could very

well be the best album of the year. Old Ideas is out Jan. 31, on Columbia Records. New York City’s Magnetic Fields, led by the dour, witty, and weird Stephin Merritt, has released hundreds of songs since its formation in the very early 1990s. And out of those hundreds of songs, there are approximately zero bad ones. The Magnetic Fields is an astonishing and lovable band, the sort of band that will stick with you for your entire life. Love at the Bottom of the Sea, the ‘Field’s 11th album, then, is one more much-anticipated addition to an already-loved discography. It’s not going to be bad, but it’ll be fun to hear just how good it is. Love at the Bottom of the Sea is out March 6, on Merge Records. Finally, the Shins. What a band. The Shins, too, are, for our generation at least,

another lifetime band. You probably heard them first via Natalie Portman’s headphones in the film Garden State. Then you did your research and bought the rest of their songs. Then you eagerly anticipated Wincing the Night Away, which came out in the throes of high school, in 2007 (arguably the best year for music of our lives). You loved Wincing the Night Away. Then the Shins went silent. Now, James “The Voice” Mercer and his band are back with their fourth album, the stately-sounding Port of Morrow. The first single, “Simple Song,” is as Shins as it gets. Port of Morrow is out March 20, on Mercer’s own Aural Apothecary label. It looks like 2012 is off to a great start.


Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012

ARTS & LIFE

Page 9

Review By Gus Stout Special to The Denisonian The Golden Globes is the youngest sibling in the family of entertainment industry award ceremonies behind the Emmys and the Oscars. Despite the shadow of its elders, the early ceremony is often a revealing preview for the results of the award ceremonies to come. For the most part, however, the Golden Globes is usually forgettable. Save for last year, when Ricky Gervais hosted, and barraged the audience with uncomfortable jokes that were directed at celebrities with harsh punch lines. His jokes were met with negative reviews, and the uncomfortable silences that resulted from his jokes were not forgotten. This year the Hollywood Foreign Press decided to give him another chance or something like that, and Gervais agreed. Everyone was on the edge of their seats when he walked out on stage.

Courtesy goldenglobes.com

This year, however, Gervais was disappointingly tame. I was hoping that he would outdo himself with dry, heartbreaking wit that would leave celebrities and au-

Review

diences devastated. But it seemed that the Foreign Press was able to curb his enthusiasm (yeah, I just said that). There were one or two wise cracks that pushed the envelope, but overall his material was a mild salsa. Like every year, the awards were full of snubs and disappointments. Mostly, though, they seemed accurate. There were two questions that were left on everyone’s minds after the awards: “What the hell is Enlightened?” and, “Does anyone have Homeland on DVD?” Homeland won Best Television Series, and Laura Dern won Best Actress in the comedy series Enlightened, over a number of other talented actresses like Tina Fey and Amy Poehler. That one was a little out of left field–Fey or Poehler should have won. Another surprise was Matt Leblanc winning for the ridiculous Showtime show Episodes. Somewhat awkwardly, even Leblanc himself seemed surprised he won.

As usual, Meryl Streep and Kate Winslet walked away with more mantle pieces for performances in The Iron Lady and Mildred Piece, respectively. Many expected the silent film The Artist to take Best Picture, but it was categorized in Best Comedy or Musical, allowing The Descendants to take Best Picture. And George Clooney won for Best Actor for his performance in The Descendants. In my opinion, the snub of the night went to Brendan Gleeson for not receiving an award for his performance in The Guard, which, apart from Bridesmaids, was the best comedy of the year. All in all, the Golden Globes is nothing more than a great place for beautiful people to get drunk, and for Ricky Gervais to rag on the rich. Each year the Globes is completely forgotten once the Oscars roll around, where big names like Streep and Winslet parade their merchandise to all the nominees around them.

Sassy Gay Friend

By Sam Heyman Special to The Denisonian When a performer introduces his show as being “splatter-the-walls gay,” regularly calls audience participants and their friends “stupid bitches” and has the uncanny ability of interacting with troubled women of literature and history without seeming anachronistic, there’s really only one explanation: it’s Sassy Gay Friend. Since Saturday (Jan. 21) night, the praises of Sassy Gay Friend have been sung via a cascade of Facebook statuses and Tweets from which no Denison student can altogether escape. Sassy Gay Friend is a character of YouTube notoriety created by Brian Gallivan in conjunction with The Second City Network. When Gallivan performs live, he switches personas between Sassy Gay Friend and himself. Gallivan and Sassy drew a substantial crowd to the third floor of Slayter on Saturday evening, and the performance did not disappoint. Though some bits of his routine were directly grabbed from his YouTube videos, which much of his audience likely knew quite well, Gallivan managed to embellish his Sassy skits and keep them fresh by throwing in more gags and biting quips. He even re-enacted one of his more recent videos, “Othello”, with the help of an audience member. Oh the wonders of live entertainment. Audience participation was not something I had been expecting from Sassy Gay Friend. Some of the best comedians and entertainers are so because they directly interact with their audience. And Gallivan is no different. As Sassy Gay Friend, Gallivan wisely chose to incorporate the audience

Katherine Palms/ The Denisonian

Sassy Gay Friend character in the crowded Roost this past Saturday night. Sassy Gay Friend

into his performance, giving eager students advice about their love lives. Even so, as is the case when scripted comedy becomes improv, the parts of the show where audience members were invited to the stage sometimes caused lulls in the comedy. Not because Gallivan was off his game (though he did tend to swear more), but because control had been partially taken out of his immaculately groomed hands. Also experiencing lulls, though in a different form and for different reasons, were

the sequences featuring Brian Gallivan as himself–as opposed to Brian Gallivan as Sassy Gay Friend. Gallivan’s segments ran more like a conventional comedy routine– if such a thing can even be said about anything related to Sassy Gay Friend–but even they came with their own surprises and moments of sublime hilarity. It took some time for the audience to get used to Gallivan as himself, but once they got to know him, his bits garnered about as many laughs as his Sassy counterpart,

Want to write for Arts and Life? E-mail us at

and even a few sympathetic “awws” from those spectators who could appreciate the relationship ups and downs he had gone through. By the time he reached his closing musical number, there didn’t appear to be a soul in the room who was itching to see Gallivanw (or Sassy) go, but I don’t see a more perfect way for the performance to have ended. Well, except maybe with Sassy tossing his scarf and calling us all “stupid bitches.” But this, I dare say, was pretty close.

denisonian.artsandlife@gmail.com


Page 8

Review

ARTS & LIFE

Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012

By Madeline Skaggs Arts & Life Editor For many of us, January is a time of renewal and resolutions, often revolving around hopes to eat better and lose weight in the coming year. In one French cooking class, however, ideas of slimming down are quickly lost. Mark Anthony Arceno, the Program Coordinator for the Office of Multi-Cultural Affairs, instead wants us to enjoy learning about, making, and best of all, eating, French food this January. After running a successful “Farm to Table Cooking Class” this past fall, Arceno has taken his passion for food one step further by creating the Community Culture Kitchen (CCK). The program held its first event this past Thursday evening at the Open House, coming together with members of the French department to teach students and faculty alike about french culinary culture. At the event, Arceno worked closely in the kitchen with Dr. Christine Armstrong, a professor of French at Denison, who shared many of her own experiences growing up in France. The focus of the event was the connection between French Catholic culture and French food. Consequently the two demonstrated desserts with a lot of Catholic history, like galettes des Rois (Kings’ Cake) and Candlemas crepes. Both desserts are staples in French kitchens throughout the month of January, in celebration of the Epiphany, celebrated Jan. 6. The desserts were surprisingly simple to make, and yet so uncommonly delicious. The highlight? A lemon juice and lavender sugar crepe that had everyone drooling. Not only did the event teach attendees some great new recipes to try at home, it also brought to light many of the interesting connections between food, religion and culture. A change from the larger Farm to Table Cooking Class in the fall, this event was confined to only fifteen attendees and focused more time and attention on demonstration and conversation. The new layout helped to streamline the event, while still offering attendees the chance to step up to the stove and make their own crepe. Ellen Pucke, a senior from West Chester, Ohio, attended both events. “I thought the event was very different from the Farm to Table cooking experience. This event was especially interesting in the way they tied both religious sym-

-

bolism and regional French culture into the food,” she said. “It was neat to see an academic department work with the center for religious and spiritual life and the office of multi-cultural student affairs in order to produce the meal experience,” she added. Other attendees shared their excitement for both the event and the creation of CCK, as it is becoming more and more clear that our campus is lacking an outlet for foodies. Two first year students who attended, Alex Lloyd and Gena Grant of Upper Arlington, Ohio, spoke of their desire to start a cooking group on campus. In an email, the two explained, “Our goal for this group is to create a fun space where students who love food and enjoy cooking can interact with each other while cooking a variety of different dishes. We want members to be able to put forth their own ideas about what they want to make. We don’t just want to be the teachers, we want everyone to be able to teach each other what they know,” the two explained in an email. The best part of these events, aside from eating great food, of course, is getting together with other foodies from around campus. Arceno is creating the space and opportunity for students who love cooking and food to come together, leave the Food Network behind, and start a culinary adventure of their own. Arceno already has plans for the next Community Culture Kitchen event, for which he will team up with the Spectrum Series to create a migrations themed class. Recipes from the event are on Arceno’s blog,ndihluthi.blogspot.com/2012/01/ community-culture-kitchen-french.html

Tristan Eden/ The Denisonian

French professor Christine Armstrong demonstrates how to make a galette de Rois, or

Tristan’s Tracks By Tristan Eden Arts & Life Editor While there is seemingly a never ending supply of pretty good music coming out all the time these days, four upcoming albums in particular are really, really worth getting excited about. Clear Heart Full Eyes by Craig Finn, Old Ideas by Leonard Cohen, Love at the Bottom of the Sea by the Magnetic Fields, and Port of Morrow by the Shins are worth your time because, above all, they are by well-established lifetime artists who do not release bad music. Craig Finn was the frontman and genuis behind the mid-90s post-punk band Lifter Puller and now leads the even better Hold Steady. Clear Heart Full Eyes is his first ever

solo record, and, from what I’ve heard, it’s going to be good. Like Lifter Puller and the Hold Steady, Finn’s solo songs are wordy, intelligent affairs, each one crammed with line after line of the sort of sentiments lesser songwriters would devote an entire song to. Finn’s solo songs sound like the work of one man: they are somehow slower, lonelier, sadder. Perhaps more timeless as well. Clear Heart Full Eyes is out Jan. 24, on Vagrant Records. Leonard Cohen, that great old gravelvoiced poet, the man responsible for writing a little song called “Hallelujah,” is blessing us again with his first album in eight years. Based on nothing more than the downright transcendent and heavy piano-led first single “Show Me the Place,” Old Ideas could very

well be the best album of the year. Old Ideas is out Jan. 31, on Columbia Records. New York City’s Magnetic Fields, led by the dour, witty, and weird Stephin Merritt, has released hundreds of songs since its formation in the very early 1990s. And out of those hundreds of songs, there are approximately zero bad ones. The Magnetic Fields is an astonishing and lovable band, the sort of band that will stick with you for your entire life. Love at the Bottom of the Sea, the ‘Field’s 11th album, then, is one more much-anticipated addition to an already-loved discography. It’s not going to be bad, but it’ll be fun to hear just how good it is. Love at the Bottom of the Sea is out March 6, on Merge Records. Finally, the Shins. What a band. The Shins, too, are, for our generation at least,

another lifetime band. You probably heard them first via Natalie Portman’s headphones in the film Garden State. Then you did your research and bought the rest of their songs. Then you eagerly anticipated Wincing the Night Away, which came out in the throes of high school, in 2007 (arguably the best year for music of our lives). You loved Wincing the Night Away. Then the Shins went silent. Now, James “The Voice” Mercer and his band are back with their fourth album, the stately-sounding Port of Morrow. The first single, “Simple Song,” is as Shins as it gets. Port of Morrow is out March 20, on Mercer’s own Aural Apothecary label. It looks like 2012 is off to a great start.


Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012

ARTS & LIFE

Page 9

Review By Gus Stout Special to The Denisonian The Golden Globes is the youngest sibling in the family of entertainment industry award ceremonies behind the Emmys and the Oscars. Despite the shadow of its elders, the early ceremony is often a revealing preview for the results of the award ceremonies to come. For the most part, however, the Golden Globes is usually forgettable. Save for last year, when Ricky Gervais hosted, and barraged the audience with uncomfortable jokes that were directed at celebrities with harsh punch lines. His jokes were met with negative reviews, and the uncomfortable silences that resulted from his jokes were not forgotten. This year the Hollywood Foreign Press decided to give him another chance or something like that, and Gervais agreed. Everyone was on the edge of their seats when he walked out on stage.

Courtesy goldenglobes.com

This year, however, Gervais was disappointingly tame. I was hoping that he would outdo himself with dry, heartbreaking wit that would leave celebrities and au-

Review

diences devastated. But it seemed that the Foreign Press was able to curb his enthusiasm (yeah, I just said that). There were one or two wise cracks that pushed the envelope, but overall his material was a mild salsa. Like every year, the awards were full of snubs and disappointments. Mostly, though, they seemed accurate. There were two questions that were left on everyone’s minds after the awards: “What the hell is Enlightened?” and, “Does anyone have Homeland on DVD?” Homeland won Best Television Series, and Laura Dern won Best Actress in the comedy series Enlightened, over a number of other talented actresses like Tina Fey and Amy Poehler. That one was a little out of left field–Fey or Poehler should have won. Another surprise was Matt Leblanc winning for the ridiculous Showtime show Episodes. Somewhat awkwardly, even Leblanc himself seemed surprised he won.

As usual, Meryl Streep and Kate Winslet walked away with more mantle pieces for performances in The Iron Lady and Mildred Piece, respectively. Many expected the silent film The Artist to take Best Picture, but it was categorized in Best Comedy or Musical, allowing The Descendants to take Best Picture. And George Clooney won for Best Actor for his performance in The Descendants. In my opinion, the snub of the night went to Brendan Gleeson for not receiving an award for his performance in The Guard, which, apart from Bridesmaids, was the best comedy of the year. All in all, the Golden Globes is nothing more than a great place for beautiful people to get drunk, and for Ricky Gervais to rag on the rich. Each year the Globes is completely forgotten once the Oscars roll around, where big names like Streep and Winslet parade their merchandise to all the nominees around them.

Sassy Gay Friend

By Sam Heyman Special to The Denisonian When a performer introduces his show as being “splatter-the-walls gay,” regularly calls audience participants and their friends “stupid bitches” and has the uncanny ability of interacting with troubled women of literature and history without seeming anachronistic, there’s really only one explanation: it’s Sassy Gay Friend. Since Saturday (Jan. 21) night, the praises of Sassy Gay Friend have been sung via a cascade of Facebook statuses and Tweets from which no Denison student can altogether escape. Sassy Gay Friend is a character of YouTube notoriety created by Brian Gallivan in conjunction with The Second City Network. When Gallivan performs live, he switches personas between Sassy Gay Friend and himself. Gallivan and Sassy drew a substantial crowd to the third floor of Slayter on Saturday evening, and the performance did not disappoint. Though some bits of his routine were directly grabbed from his YouTube videos, which much of his audience likely knew quite well, Gallivan managed to embellish his Sassy skits and keep them fresh by throwing in more gags and biting quips. He even re-enacted one of his more recent videos, “Othello”, with the help of an audience member. Oh the wonders of live entertainment. Audience participation was not something I had been expecting from Sassy Gay Friend. Some of the best comedians and entertainers are so because they directly interact with their audience. And Gallivan is no different. As Sassy Gay Friend, Gallivan wisely chose to incorporate the audience

Katherine Palms/ The Denisonian

Sassy Gay Friend character in the crowded Roost this past Saturday night. Sassy Gay Friend

into his performance, giving eager students advice about their love lives. Even so, as is the case when scripted comedy becomes improv, the parts of the show where audience members were invited to the stage sometimes caused lulls in the comedy. Not because Gallivan was off his game (though he did tend to swear more), but because control had been partially taken out of his immaculately groomed hands. Also experiencing lulls, though in a different form and for different reasons, were

the sequences featuring Brian Gallivan as himself–as opposed to Brian Gallivan as Sassy Gay Friend. Gallivan’s segments ran more like a conventional comedy routine– if such a thing can even be said about anything related to Sassy Gay Friend–but even they came with their own surprises and moments of sublime hilarity. It took some time for the audience to get used to Gallivan as himself, but once they got to know him, his bits garnered about as many laughs as his Sassy counterpart,

Want to write for Arts and Life? E-mail us at

and even a few sympathetic “awws” from those spectators who could appreciate the relationship ups and downs he had gone through. By the time he reached his closing musical number, there didn’t appear to be a soul in the room who was itching to see Gallivanw (or Sassy) go, but I don’t see a more perfect way for the performance to have ended. Well, except maybe with Sassy tossing his scarf and calling us all “stupid bitches.” But this, I dare say, was pretty close.

denisonian.artsandlife@gmail.com


SPORTS

Page 10

Weekly Round-up

Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012

DU swimming and diving top Grove City on senior day By Ruby Montes De Oca Sports Editor

Bringing you the box scores from the past week in Big Red athletics. For game recaps, visit: www.denison.edu/ athletics.

Women’s Basketball vs. Wittenberg Jan. 14 Denison Wittenberg

57 59

Men’s Basketball vs. Wittenberg Jan. 14 Denison Wittenberg

58 67

Women’s Basketball vs. Depauw Jan. 18 Denison Depauw

37 64

Men’s Basketball vs. Depauw Jan. 18 Denison Depauw

68 73

Women’s Swimming & Diving vs. Toledo Jan. 20 Denison 128 Toledo 178

Women’s Basketball vs. Allegheny Jan.21 Denison Allegheny

53 56

Women’s Swimming & Diving vs. Grove City Jan. 21 Denison 178 Grove City 107

Men’s Swimming & Diving vs. Grove City Jan. 21 Denison 182 Grove City 90

It was an emotional Saturday (Jan. 21) afternoon for the Big Red’s swimming and diving teams as they hosted the Grove City Wolverines for Senior Day. The men’s squad was looking to continue their momentum, while the women were looking to bounce back from Friday’s set back against Division I rival University ofToledo. “It was a pretty emotional day for us because the senior class for both the men’s and women’s team contributed a lot to our success last year,” said sophomore Natalie Lugg. “Each of them have made such a huge impact on all of us. Each of them have individual characters that keep us working well together.” On the men’s side, the Big Red humbled the Wolverines with a 182-90 victory. In the first event, the 200 medley relay, senior Robert Barry, first-year Ben Snader, senior Mike Barczak and junior Quinn Bartlett teamed up for a winning time of 1:33.88. In diving events, senior Phil Meyer set the pace by setting a new six-dive school record in the 1-meter dive with a score of 325.12 which is also an NCAA qualifying score. He was followed closely by junior Gabe Dixson (321.75) and first-year Connor Dignan (313.50) who placed second and third, respectively. “It was an exciting day. A lot of parents came out to support. It was a great day to show everyone what we can do,” said Dixson. “We want to go to nationals again. We have almost a completely different team from last year, but we still have a great team.” In the sprint freestyle events, Barczak won the 50 freestyle with a time of 21.09 and sophomore Spencer Fronk took the 100 freestyle in 46.52. Sophomore Sean Chabot topped sophomore Carlos Maciel in the 200 freestyle with a time of 1:42.21. Maciel finished just over one second behind Chabot in the event but later in the meet, Maciel would get a victory in the 500 freestyle clocking in with a time of 4:48.92. First-year Damon Rosenburg outtouched fellow teammate Snader with a time of 58.64 to Snader’s 59.65 to win the 100 breaststroke. Barry locked up a win in the 100 backstroke clocking in at 49.72 and Bartlett took first in the 200 backstroke with a time of 1:50.55. Sophomore Jackson Humphrey won the 200 butterfly in 1:55.60, while the men’s mile national record holder sophomore Al Weik took care of business in the 1,000 freestyle touching in at 9:43.56. The final victory of the meet went to first-year Brandon Ryan in the 200 breaststroke and his time of 2:10.86. “Every meet is a big meet when we get down close to the championship season,” said Head Diving Coach Jason Glorius who returns for his third season. “We don’t really expect to beat anyone, if we end up winning then all the better.”

Courtesy of Gemma Rosenburg

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The women’s squad also brought their A-game on Saturday. The Big Red bounced back from the Friday night loss to Toledo with a strong 178-107 victory over Grove City. DU racked up 12 victories en route to the 71 point victory over the Wolverines. Sophomore Morgan Nuess anchored the winning 200 medley relay along with junior Victoria Masney, sophomore Natalie Lugg, and sophomore Lauren Wine. The team posted a time of 1:48.65 to kick off the meet. Nuess also won the 50 freestyle, besting teammate junior Alyssa Swanson with a time of 24.08. Swanson took second in 24.15 but came back to win the 100 freestyle in 52.86. The highlight of the afternoon came from Big Red rookie diver Katie Collins who sent a new six-dive school record in the 3-meter competition with a score of 294.22. Firstyear teammate Sterling Keiser followed in second place with a score of 209.10. Senior Hilary Callen was a multiple event winner, taking first place in both the 200 and the 500 freestyle. In the 200, Callen clocked in with a time of 1:55.61, edging senior teammate Marit Wangstad who

touched in at 1:56.76. Callen covered the 500 freestyle with a time of 5:08.85. Senior Emily Schroeder placed first in the 1000 freestyle and the 200 backstroke checking in at 10:44.16 and 2:06.19 respectively. Lugg swept both breaststroke with a time of 1:06.81 in the 100 and 2:27.27 in the 200. Rounding out the winners were senior Laurel Brabson and junior Lindsay Zeberlein. Brabson took the 200 butterfly in 2:06.45 and Zeberlein followed with a win in the 100 backstroke with a time of 58.87. “We want to win our conference for the fourth year in a row,” said Swanson. “Our coaching staff has really challenged us and there will be tough competition, but I think we can do it.” The men’s team improves to 5-3 on the season, while the women’s team improves to a 6-4 record in dual meet action. Both squads return to action on Friday (Jan. 27) in what will be the final meet in Gregory Pool. Denison is in the midst of construction on a new natatorium that will be ready for the 2012-13 season.

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SPORTS

Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012

Page 11

Hale’s 23 not enough against Allegheny By Nate Schmidt Staff Writer Despite two near double-doubles from junior wing Dimonde Hale and senior wing Larry Farmer, Denison dropped a see-saw battle against Allegheny College on Saturday, 64-62. The Big Red’s second straight home loss gave the Gators their first conference win of the season. Hale scored a lead-changing lay-up with only 1:20 remaining in the game. While it gave Denison a 62-61 advantage, Allegheny’s Devone McLeod answered back with a lay-up of his own to recapture the lead. The Gators sealed the win with a free throw with 1.3 seconds left on the clock. Despite the loss, Hale finished with gamehighs in both points and rebounding. The Big Red’s leading scorer came away with 23 points and pulled down nine rebounds. Hale was 10-for-15 from the field and three-for-four from the free throw line. Over winter break Hale passed the 1,000 point mark for his career to become the 18th player in Big Red history to do so. He has been a handful for opponents to try to stop all year long, averaging 16 points and seven rebounds a game. Senior Larry Farmer finished with 10 points, nine rebounds and three steals. Senior Brett Tiberi continued to help Denison from beyond the three-point line. The guard connected three times from long-range and finished with 13 points. Denison also got solid minutes from

Courtesy of James Farrell

freshmen Brad Woolard and Robby Weingart. Combined, they shot 23 for 51 from the field, resulting in 45 percent overall. Denison won the rebounding battle 33 to 29 but committed 16 turnovers, which proved very costly. The back-and-forth contest was characterized by 20 lead changes. Neither team

could string together a big run and, as a result, the largest lead for either team was three points. The Big Red fell to 6-11 overall and 3-5 in the NCAC. Allegheny moves to 3-14 overall and 1-7 in the NCAC. Denison goes on the road for its next game at Oberlin, this Wednesday at 8 p.m.

Denison defeated Oberlin at the beginning of the month at home, 72-63. The Big Red enter that contest with a three-game losing streak. Denison will have only three of their remaining eight games at home. Their next home game will be on February 1 against Wooster.

DU falls to .500 mark in the NCAC after loss to Gators By Nate Schmidt Staff Writer With 13.8 seconds left on the Livingston Gymnasium clock and trailing Allegheny 55-53, the Denison women took their final timeout. The Big Red had just gotten a timely interception from sophomore post player Jane Windler and would have one final possession to tie the game. However, Allegheny’s stringent defense forced a tough last second reverse lay-up that fell short. Denison ultimately lost Saturday’s contest 56-53. The Gators entered the game second in the conference with a 6-1 NCAC record, while the Big Red came in at 4-3 in conference play. After a slow start, Denison used a 13-to-2 run to take a 15-6 advantage with 12:25 left in the first half. Allegheny, however, proved resilient. The Gators fought back and took a two point lead with less than a minute to play in the first half. A jump shot with three seconds left from Windler sent both teams into the locker room tied at 28. Down three points with 1:40 left, junior wing Kyli Parker knocked down a jumper to cut the deficit to 54-53. After one Allegheny free throw, Denison missed its final three opportunities to tie the game and ended up with its third con-

BIG RED IN ACTION

secutive conference loss. Parker led the Big Red with a career day on the offensive end. She was 3-for-7 from behind the three-point line, 4-for-4 from the free throw line and 5-for-10 overall from the field. She finished with a career high 17 points. Junior point guard Serafina Nuzzo had 10 points, six assist and four steals. Annie-Rae Dura, Jane Windler, and Lucy Follansbee had six points apiece and combined for nine rebounds. The Big Red struggled from the field, shooting only 31 percent. The performance follows Wednesday’s home loss in which Denison shot only 29.2 percent against DePauw. The Tigers are ranked sixth nationally and remain at the top of the NCAC standings with an 8-0 record. The Gators were led all around game by Daryl Ford. Ford had 19 points on four-of -seven shooting from the field. She was also eleven-for-eleven from the charity stripe to go along with eight rebounds and four assist. Allegheny held onto second place in the conference with a record of 7-1 and 12-5 overall. The loss drops Denison to 4-4 in the NCAC and 11-6 overall. The Big Red is currently 5th in the NCAC and faces off against Oberlin in Oberlin, Ohio next Wednesday.

Katherine Palms/The Denisonian

Sophomore Jane Windler scrambles against three Allegheny Gators for possession of the ball. The Big Red would win the possession as head coach Sara Lee called a timeout. Windler had six points, two rebounds, two blocks and two steals. She had a career-high nine rebounds in the NCAC Tournament Championship Game against the Gators last season.

Big Red Women’s Basketball vs. Wooster (Jan. 31) Come support the Big Red as they take on conference opponent Wooster at 7:30 p.m. at Livingston Gymnasium


SPORTS

Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012

Page 12

Break on the hill: life of a winter sport athlete By Andrew Touhy Sports Editor

The Denisonian takes a look into the lives of winter student-athletes as they compete and live on an empty campus over the course of winter break. For many Denisonians, winter break comes as a relief. After sleepless nights and unhealthy study habits, students are more than ready to get off the hill. However, for winter athletes, their break ends almost as soon as it begins. While the majority of Denison students use the first week simply as a warm up for the marathon ahead, Big Red winter athletes are already headed back to Granville. Being on an empty campus during the cold, early weeks of January while your family and friends are at home seems rather unappealing. However, it also allows one to play the role of a professional athlete, as class and other commitments are not in the picture. Freshman basketball player, Mary Margaret Habel, experienced her first break on the Hill. “My first break away from home was pretty boring,” she said. “At first, it was kind of nice to have the whole campus to ourselves but after a few days it began to get dull and uneventful.” For Habel’s fellow teammate, senior post Annie-Rae Dura, spending her break in Granville has become a habit. Despite the normalcy of breaks in Granville, doing the same thing every day

Andrew Hessler/ The Denisonian

becomes tiresome for anyone. “I felt like all we did was practice and play games,” she said, “in general it is just a whole lot of basketball.” While there are certainly low points, both players agreed that there are certainly advantages. “I really did like that, other than basketball practices and games,

Katherine Palms/The Denisonian

Senior Brett Tiberi shoots a jumper with two seconds left on the shot clock. Against Allegheny, Tiberi played 27 minutes in which he scored a total of 13 points, had two assists and two steals.

I had no school work, exams, or meetings to worry about. All my time and energy could be put towards basketball,” said Habel. Men’s basketball player, senior Larry Farmer, agreed. “ Breaks on the hill are pretty relaxing, as there were fewer distractions, and basketball is all that has to be on my mind,” he said. Freshman swimmer, Matthew Duggins revealed the grueling and under-appreciated life of a college swimmer. “The typical day for us was an 8 o’clock wake-up for practice from 8:30 to 10”, he said. “The team went to Aladdin’s for breakfast just about every morning after practice, and then we would all go back to our rooms and nap until the next practice at 2 p.m. Any time not spent sleeping, eating, or swimming was filled by movie watching.” Days for Dura and Habel were similar. “ We woke up every day for practice usually around 9 or 10 am,” they said. After practice we would go to a restaurant and eat lunch as a team because as the dining halls were closed all break. After lunch, we either had to go back to the gym for a second practice or we had the rest of the day free to do whatever we wanted until we met up again for dinner with the team.” Long days spent in the gym or in the pool can certainly be taxing, and these athletes tried to mix up their routines on off nights. “We actually went bowling a few times with the girl’s team,” said Farmer. “On off nights some of us would go shopping at Easton and or hang out with the men’s basketball team. The girls also did some baking to pass the time,” Dura added.

“On off nights, as rare as they were, the team would go to someone’s room to watch playoff football or a movie,” said Duggins. Time absent of any other commitments were good for all the Denison teams, especially with crucial portions of their schedule remaining “Having only to focus on swimming was very helpful for the team. We got closer as a team and started our wind-up to the end of the season by racing each other at the end of each practice. It will only make us stronger in upcoming weeks,” said Duggins. “I think we definitely did improve as a team overall. We became more comfortable playing with each other. Because we were around each other so often, we were able to learn each other’s strengths and weaknesses,” said Dura. “I think we had more intense and better focused practices and games. I think being alone on campus definitely forced us to focus on basketball a lot more than we would have if we had the distraction of friends, school and work,” said Habel. With school back in session, the advantages of the break on the Hill will be put to the test for all the winter teams. Coming off a 28-0 season last year, the women’s basketball team expects a conference tournament championship to always be on their radar. With a high-octane Depauw team now in the NCAC, late season drama could certainly be on the horizon. The men’s basketball team, despite -being 3-5 in the NCAC has eight more conference games on their schedule. A late season run could give them a chance to compete in the conference tournament.

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Jan 24, 2012  

Jan 24, 2012

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