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The Denisonian Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Established in 1857

In this issue:

Big Red’s Big Day!

See page 7

Volume 159, No. 8

Shannon residents face potential housing reassignments By Andrew Luftglass Editor-in-Chief Three white-painted pieces of plywood are drilled into the living room wall of Shannon House, covering a series of holes. Around the corner, duct tape hides another hole in senior Lars Pettygrove’s bedroom door. At the back porch, the frame of the screen door is broken and the screen itself is torn. Because of these and other damages, Pettygrove and fellow seniors Andrew Shouvlin and Max Harris may not be allowed to live in the satellite residency for the rest of the year. The residents were informed of their violations and consequences via individual letters (provided to The Denisonian by the residents of Shannon House) from Bill Fox, director of residential education. In response to violations of the code of student conduct and the housing contract, the seniors have been issued three sanctions: They have been placed on disciplinary probation until May 14, which places them in poor behavioral standing with the university and prevents them from representing Denison in any official capacity. Second, they are required to pay for the damage (estimated to be in excess of $2,500 according to an initial cost sheet) by May 1. Finally, they are sanctioned with reassignment of rooms, meaning that the Shannon residents will be moved into vacant spaces in a room, apartment or suite assigned by the university, pending appeals by the students. The resulting sanctions caused student backlash, ranging from a Facebook petition to save the house to a poem by the Wingless Angels that commented, “Shannon will soon burn.” “We are in no way threatened by that,” said Harris in response to the threat. The Wingless Angels reportedly left a lawyer’s

Debbie Gillum /The Denisonian

The residents of Shannon are facing room reassignment as a result of several code of conduct violations, including damage to the house and breach of their housing contract. Bill Fox, director of residential education and housing, detailed the violations to the residents in a letter discussing the outcome of their conduct meeting, which occurred on March 8. The university board of appeals is considering a written appeal filed by Shannon’s residents. The board is scheduled to meet tomorrow.

business card on the residents’ living room table in case the residents wanted to investigate and press charges against the Wingless Angels. “They don’t have a problem with us. They have a problem with the administration,” added Shouvlin. School officials took necessary steps to protect the house and its residents. In response to the threat, policemen, firemen and Fox came to Shannon to make sure it was up to fire code. In addition, a policeman guarded the house from the driveway from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. The residents, however, said they were not in-

formed of that measure beforehand. Pettygrove, Shouvlin and Harris responded personally to the sanctions by filing a written appeal on Friday, which will be reviewed by the university board of appeals tomorrow. The decision of the appeal board could determine whether or not the men will have to comply with room reassignment. Though the seniors disagreed with some of the sanctions, they did not argue about paying for the damages. In compliance with the housing contract, the residents accepted all damages, including those allegedly caused by guests.

According to Harris, guests were responsible for the case with the most pronounced display of destruction—a hole in the wall caused by unnamed parents during a sorority parents’ weekend on Feb. 25. Although the residents agreed to pay for the damages, school officials have expressed concerns that consistently accepting damage charges could be problematic. According to Laurel Kennedy, vice president of student development, Denison would not be a good place to live if students believed they could justify damages simply by paying for them. Continues on page 3

Party registration resolution progresses through DCGA By Madeline Skaggs Arts and Life Editor After a resolution recommending party registration was introduced by the commission on social culture and passed with a vote of 28-1-7 by DCGA last November, efforts have continued in drafting a proposed policy. Though talks of party registration only began in the fall of 2010 by former DCGA president Harry Brisson, it is not the first time the process has been used. According to DCGA president and commission chair Hannah Frank, there was a time in which Denison students would register all social events. After the current resolution was passed by the DCGA senate body, the resolution then moved through the campus affairs council, at which point the event-registration-policy-writing committee was formed.

The purpose of the committee is to act as a task force, which will attempt to draw up plans for what such a policy would look like at Denison, according to Frank. “We, as the students who comprised the commission on social culture, decided that we did not have the authority or the knowledge to make decisions that will affect so many members of our campus community,” said Frank. Frank explained, “In order to do this, we needed to bring together a number of different voices: security, res ed, party hosts, members of Greek life, and members of DCGA.” The members were nominated by the campus affairs council to participate in the committee. The resolution, Frank explained, focuses on an incentive-based party registration system. This would not require students to register parties, but would offer incentives for those who chose to take advantage of a party registration option.

“The idea is that students will want to register their events in exchange for some sort of incentive,” said Frank. These incentives range from 2 am quiet hours to a direct line to security and residential education if needed. Frank also commented on the positives Denison students would gain from this type of legislation. “The benefits of a good event registration system include mutual trust and understanding between administration and students, improved relationship and communication between security and students, and a safer party environment for all students. Ultimately, we think a registration system will foster a campus community that is more respectful of one another and their space, a community that is more mindful of its alcohol consumption and the culture surrounding it,” Frank said. The next steps for the event-registration-policy-writing committee will be to

draft specific plans for implementing such a party registration system. Using other schools’ party registration systems as a guide, the committee will begin to draft a policy. “Once the policy is drafted, which we hope will be before the end of the semester, it will be amended as necessary and approved by CAC, DCGA senate, an open student forum, university council and senior staff,” said Frank. The committee held its second meeting yesterday, April 2, to begin answering in what direction the draft should go. The committee was given the task of reviewing policies at other institutions and contacting counter-parts to get a better idea of what concepts Denison’s draft should consider. With a task force hard at work in hopes of offering up a proposed draft by the end of the semester, Denison students can expect to see some proposed plans for party registration in the near future.


NEWS

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Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Denison celebrates swimmers, student athletes By Sarah Wiley News Editor Every once in awhile, something so extraordinary happens that Denison pride comes out in stripes. Thursday was one of those days. Last week, Denison’s swim team won a decisive victory in the Division III national championships, winning by 81 points. This was the second year in a row that the men won nationals. Last year they won by one point; this year’s win was far more decisive. In honor of this feat, Denison held a rally celebrating the men’s swim team on Thursday March 29. “It is a tremendous tribute to the 17 men who committed themselves to swim for each other. It is an example of tremendous team unity,” explained Nan CarneyDeBord, the director of athletics. “It’s not everyday that you win a national championship. Not every school can say they have done that. I thought that it should be acknowledged.” Carney-DeBord said the victory was a true team victory. “We couldn’t have won without any one of those individuals.” According to Carney-DeBord, the members of the swim team deserve to be celebrated, whether or not they win. “These men are doing everything everyone else is doing, plus they are swimming at 5:30 every morning, and again at 4:30 in the afternoon. I think that having a rally for their success is important.” Before the men’s victory, the Denison Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (DSAAC) had a cookout scheduled for Thursday. “The all-athlete cookout put on by DSAAC was already scheduled for this past Thursday as an end-of-the-year celebration, but with the swimming national championships we moved the cookout to the Campus Commons at 11:30 so that all athletes could attend the swim/dive team celebration,” explained Claire Koneval, a senior from Solon, Ohio in an e-mail. The athletic department handed out Tshirts to all the student athletes saying “534 STRONG.” “The shirts have been a year-long project for DSAAC that say 534 STRONG on the back. This number represents all athletes, coaches, trainers, and faculty in Mitchell that make our athletic program possible. Our goals with these shirts were to unite all student-athletes and really show how enormous of a part of our student body are

Hung Tran/The Denisonian

Sarah Wiley/The Denisonian

The 17 members of the Division III national champion men’s swim team were honored on Thursday at a rally on the Academic Quad. The rally was well attended by the student body, including student athletes wearing the “534 STRONG” t-shirts provided by the athletic department, President Dale Knobel and the athletic department staff. This is the second year in a row that the men’s swim team has won the national championship.

athletes,” explained Koneval. “Everybody that makes the show go is a part of that number,” said Carney-DeBord. The shirts were handed out in anticipation for Division III Week, which starts on

Corrections The Denisonian strives to publish information that is factually accurate. Factual errors should be brought to the attention of the editorial staff immediately. Corrections will be published in the space below.

Corrections should be submitted to denisonian@denison.edu.

April 9. “They [the national division] decided to celebrate the division. These students are not getting paid to play, they are playing because they love the game, and deserve to be

recognized for that,” said Carney-DeBord. Denison’s student athletes are not often recognized on campus. The athletic community’s recognition should contribute to more support for hard working athletes.

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Interested in writing news stories? Focused on improving your journalism skills? Contact one of the news editors at denisonian.news@gmail.com


Tuesday, April 3, 2012

NEWS

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Shannon residents fight sanctions, eviction

Continued from page 1

The Shannon residents agreed with Kennedy’s sentiments and filed their appeal in opposition to the disciplinary probation and room reassignment sanctions. “I went into the meeting where I found this out thinking that I was going to get maybe a letter of warning and have to pay for the repairs. And then I come out of their and I’m on disciplinary probation and we’re being kicked out of the house,” said Shouvlin. For the Shannon residents, the sanctions signify harsh and unfair punishment. They feel that other residences on campus have had similar violations and have not been threatened with eviction or disciplinary probation. “In years previous, apartments have been found to have over $6,000 of damages and the occupants have simply been asked to pay for the damages, which they did and which we will too,” read a passage from Harris’ appeal. The trio also argued that they have exhibited generally good behavior during the

year. “We have not had any incidents of alcohol or drug abuse/overdoses take place in our home, any acts of violence, or anything else that would warrant true concern from the school administration as to something that may threaten anyone’s well being or health and safety,” read the appeal. The residents also cited a good rapport with neighbors and security, as well as a consistent compliance with school and Granville officials. Because the appeal board is scheduled to meet tomorrow, Fox declined to comment about the sanctions or the appeal. The director of residential education cited student privacy and confidentiality as reasons for not commenting at this juncture in the proceedings. “I think it would be inappropriate at this time to offer additional comment in The Denisonian,” wrote Fox in an e-mail. “As we move forward though, I remain open to hearing student feedback and considering concerns and questions. It absolutely does matter when students raise concern about a decision or a process as many have done recently.”

Davis Peace Project brings resources to Congo By Anastasia Yefremova Staff Writer According to Makorobondo Kamongwa Salukombo, known to Denison University as “Dee,” his family is used to his coming up with “crazy ideas.” So when he decided that he was going to build a learning center and start a running camp, all under the simple name of “Project Kirotsche”, few were shocked. And whereas the former had been in his mind for longer, the Davis Projects for Peace and a grant of $10,000 made the latter possible. He has always been running, Salukombo said. Since before moving to Lakewood, Ohio, from his home village Kirotsche in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), all the way through high school and college, a senior French and chemistry double major has sped toward his goal. “My plan was, in the next four years of my life, after graduation to 2016, to try to see if I’d be in good enough shape to make the 2016 Olympics,” Salukombo said. When asked why return to his war-ravaged homeland instead of stay in the United States, Salukombo lists off his reasons. First, the high altitude that draws many world champions to train in areas like Kenya and the DRC. Second, it’s where he came from. Third, although not last by far, the war and death there have made him eager to share the blessing running has been for him. “I want to go back there, start a running camp, get 20 other guys running with me, so it just takes off from trying to transform me to trying to transform a group,” said Salukombo. “Trying to create some motivations, opportunities and goals some kids back home don’t have.” Salukombo is planning to name the camp after Denison’s board of trustees member Louis Mitchell, whom he met while shooting baskets and who, according to Torrens, has been a close friend since.

With the addition of the Davis Projects for Peace, Salukombo has been able to add another important factor to the equation. “Education has been a big thing in my family,” he commented. “We went hungry days but we’d keep the money and pay our school fees.” Most of the money is going toward building a health vocational school and taking technological resources like computers, internet and projectors to the Kirotsche community. The DRC is predominantly French speaking, Salukombo commented, so English books would not be of much help for now. He bashfully admitted he was naming the learning center after the Torrens, his adoptive family at Denison, in appreciation for all the help they provided, especially Denison library associate Sarah. “She played a huge role,” Salukombo said. “I brought all my ideas and she was there to listen to me, give me a lot of suggestions, and spent nights just talking and put my thinking into writing.” Cross-country coach Phillip Torrens thinks back to the Friday the proposal for the Davis Projects for Peace was due and how much help his wife had been at the time. Nevertheless, he admits they were shocked to hear of Salukombo’s decision. “It’s just more than I ever expected,” he said. “It made my wife cry, because that’s how close Dee is to us.” As of right now, Salukombo went on, he is simply trying to make sure that the Torrens Learning Center comes to life strong. He is aware of the enormity of the task ahead of him, something Torrens has stressed for him, but he is also aware that he is not alone in the endeavor. “I think what I’ve realized since being in America is that there are amazing people here,” he said. “They really care about people they don’t know because they just want the best for them. All the things I’ve been able to do I wouldn’t have been able to do by myself.”

Andrew Luftglass/The Denisonian

At top, a plaque yields the honorary name of the Shannon residence, “McCravey Mansion.” Damage to the screen door is also visible. Above left, a more detailed view of the damaged screen door. Above right, an Americana view of Shannon’s porch.

Former members of congress visit Denison

Courtesy of James Hale

Two former members of congress, Representative Dan Miller, a republican from Florida (left) and Representative David Skaggs, a democrat from Colorado (right) visited Denison’s campus on Monday and Tuesday March 26-27. The representatives were brought in through Congress to Campus and the Richard G. Lugar Program for Politics and Public Service. Congress to Campus is a national program that brings bipartisan pairs of former congress members to college campuses across the country. Miller and Skaggs attended a number of classes in the political science department and a dinner for the Lugar Program. They provided insight into the U.S. House of Representatives and gave advice to students who will participate in internships on The Hill this summer.


EDITORIAL

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Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Our Voice Vague agreements allow for unusual disciplinary action Both the student code of conduct and the student housing agreement fail to establish specific consequences for violations. The 2011-2012 Student Residence Agreement states, “Failure to abide by this policy could result in reassignment and conduct action.” This intentionally vague language provides opportunities for broad interpretations of the rules. Why are residents of Shannon House suddenly facing reassignment when residents of multiple room suites have been fined for similar damages? We understand that every case of student misconduct is unique, but the incident involving the residents of Shannon House reflects an unusual consequence for the Denison community. The purpose of rules is to protect the needs of the community. Rules should make things fair and clear to everyone. We have them in society so that everyone can follow the same guidelines and be treated equally under the law. Denison’s code of

conduct should carefully explain the potential for severe punishments, particularly the specific conditions in which students can be re-assigned to another residence hall. Vague rules result in students feeling unsure of what to do when confronted with a tricky situation. Call security? Tell an RA? Do nothing? And, what would the different consequences be if you chose to call security versus not calling? The specific punishments are not spelled out so students are left wondering what can happen to them if they violate any given policy. Students accept calculated risks when we sign agreements with the university. Currently, students are unable to calculate the risks associated with their actions. Moving forward, we encourage students, faculty and staff to work together to decide how to apply the student code of conduct in a manner that is as consistent and transparent as possible.

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The Denisonian Denison University‘s Oldest Student Organization-Established 1857 Andrew Luftglass Nick Garafola Hillary Webb Sarah Wiley Debbie Gillum Joyce Lindsey Eric Evans Natalie Olivo Madeline Skaggs Tristan Eden Ruby Montes De Oca Luke Belechak Jessie Mack Katherine Palms Hung Tran De-Von Dudley Melissa Grannetino

Editor-in-Chief Editor-in-Chief News Editor News Editor Forum Editor Cartoonist Features Editor Features Editor Arts & Life, Copy Editor Arts & Life Editor Sports Editor Sports Editor Web Editor Layout, Photo Editor Photo Editor Business Manager Editor Emeritus

The opinions expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of Denison University, nor any of its constituents. Unsigned editorials represent the majority view of the editorial board, consisting of the Editor-inChief, section editors and assistants. Columns, letters and Forum pieces represent the views of their authors. Letters to the editor of reasonable length will be accepted prior to 12 p.m. the Saturday before publishing. Letters may be edited for length or content. The Editor-in-Chief reserves the right to refuse the printing of submissions. Remaining Issues: 4/17 and 4/24

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Editor’s Corner “Getting the facts” proves to be difficult at Denison, in Granville

By Andrew Luftglass Editor-in-Chief It’s always ideal when you can get straight, clear-cut information. Everything is just so much easier when you don’t have to jump through hoops or read between the lines to understand what you’re dealing with. Unfortunately, in many facets of life, getting just the facts proves to be increasingly difficult. Whether you are trying to sort through the carefully selected words of a car salesman or figure out what your professor (or boss) considers a “good job,” it often requires a little extra labor to fully understand things. In most cases, as Bono of U2 famously sang, “I still haven’t found what I’m looking for.” According to the song’s Wikipedia page, Bono was talking about a spiritual yearning. Unfortunately, I’m not that complex. All I’m looking for is transparency from government and school officials. When writing any story in this publication, it is extremely important to me that I report every side equally. As a newspaper, The Denisonian strives for objectivity whenever possible. This, however, requires cooperation from voices that can represent each of those sides. Often I am able to gather information easily. Twice recently, however, I have been thwarted in my attempts to provide you, the readers, with all of the available relevant information. One of those information road blocks occurred in Granville and the other occurred within the Denison community. I begin with the lack of transparency in Granville. Before The Denisonian eliminated the ever-popular crime reports, an editor would travel down to the Granville police station every Sunday and get the crime reports from the past week. Aside from the chore of travelling into town, obtaining such information was never labor intensive. Last Sunday, however, The Denisonian attempted to find information from the Granville police department about the March 10 break-in at Kappa Sigma House. The police department said that it had a policy of not releasing such information on weekends. By my way of thinking, there are two things wrong with this statement. First, the police department clearly did not adhere to that policy (if it existed) when The Denisonian used to publish crime reports. If they did not then, why do they withhold

information now? Another issue relates to public information. Crime reports are considered public information. Though they are usually not published online where they can be accessed conveniently, they must (by law) be available to the public. The fact that Granville authorities have withheld public records--particularly those that affect Denison--is inexcusable. Furthermore, news outlets are supposed to eliminate transparency whenever possible. How can they bridge the information gap between authorities and the public if they are denied such information? This next issue does not deal with an issue of public information, but it still deals with eliminating transparency. On the front page of this publication, we covered the potential reassignment of residents from Shannon House. The residents were frustrated with the sanctions leveled against them and their peers were similarly incensed. In seeking information for that story, I had no problem communicating with the residents of Shannon House. As can be expected of anybody with grievances, they wanted their voices heard. However, I was unable to obtain a statement from school officials about the matter. Bill Fox, director of residential education said that he could not comment on the subject due to a commitment to privacy and confidentiality. I was given a similar explanation from Laurel Kennedy, vice president for student development. For the sake of clarity, I do not have a problem with the answers I received from either of those officials. They were following school policy and I respect how important privacy and confidentiality are to them. I also concede that, like the residents of Shannon, Fox and Kennedy did not want to risk saying anything that might compromise the upcoming case and its appeal. I do, however, find fault with the way the policy promotes a lack of transparency. The case of the Shannon House eviction is part of the student discourse. In cases such as these, the school policy of confidentiality vilifies its officials by silencing them. In my attempt to write an objective article about Shannon House, I wanted an administrative voice in the story. Even if it voiced an unpopular opinion, any quote sounds better than the dreaded phrase “John Doe declined to comment.” Such a phrase unjustly assigns blame to the silenced. Remember when Mark McGwire exercised his fifth amendment rights in front of a House Committee about steroid use? How many people thought he was innocent after he deliberately kept silent? By law, Granville Police cannot “plead the fifth” and withhold public information. Denison officials can, but given the context of widespread discontent among students, they should strive to do better.


FORUM

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

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Your Voice New housing lottery is less painful but still stressful

By Kelsey Ingram Staff Writer It’s that time of year again: Housing Lottery. The time where bros chill and girls kill. Denison’s Housing Lottery has caused somewhat of a controversy for the rising seniors. In case you weren’t aware, the college has implemented a new system in which groups can register to receive one number for a special group lottery. This one number will either make you or break you, and for a lot of rising seniors, housing for their final year looks bleak. But is the new group lottery system really to blame for how many people are discontent over housing? I think that while it is unfortunate that some people got poor lottery numbers, the cutbacks on cattiness outweigh this discontent, and that the same amount of people would have been upset anyway.

In the past, each student would receive an individual number and the person with the best number out of the group would pull the other roommates up. Therefore, a group of four rising seniors had four chances of getting a decent number. However, the Denison student body was not mature enough to handle this system as people, particularly the women on this campus, who turn on one another. Roommates were dropped based on a bad lottery number, some people were liked solely based on their good lottery number, and obscene amounts of money were offered as bribes for an excellent number. Friendships were often tested during a process that shouldn’t be that emotional anyway. The group lottery system is a less painful experience. Since the whole group gets the same number, roommates cannot be dropped solely based on the number. Bribes in this sense have a significantly less chance of working with groups. Sure, catty behavior still occurs, but it’s on a much smaller scale than in other cases. One of the reasons why a group lottery system came about was due to the new program of gender-neutral housing. This new lottery system seemed to be the best and most effective way to make a lottery happen for genderneutral housing. So it would seem to the administration that if we want gender-neutral housing, a group housing lottery system would be the only way to bring this about. Lastly, discontent over the housing lottery should not lay with the manner in which it is conducted. Whether or not

Denison uses a group lottery system, there are limited apartment spaces and only a fraction of the rising senior class will get them. The problem, ladies and gentlemen, lies with the fact that the college informed us (rising seniors) freshman year that we would each have the opportunity to live in a senior apartment. We therefore got the idea into our heads that we would definitely have one. We have seen those before us get senior apartments, and felt that there was no reason for us not to get one either. The key phrase from the administration is that

each rising senior would have the opportunity rather than the entitlement to have a senior apartment. Each rising senior had the same chance of getting a senior apartment. The school has tried to ensure that each student has a fair shot, and is even trying to increase those chances by renovating Chamberlin. Therefore we cannot blame the system, we must take the blame upon ourselves for thinking it irrefutable that we would. Kelsey Ingram is a junior from Fairview, Pa.

Since the whole group gets the same number, roommates cannot be dropped solely based on the number.

Cartoon by Joyce Lindsey

What do you think of the new gender-neutral group housing lottery?

Name: Nathan Forrester Year: Junior Major: Psychology Hometown: Chagrin Falls, Ohio

“ I think the partying in the Sunnys will get worse because of genderneutral housing.

Name: Kristie King Year: Sophomore Major: Studio Art and History Hometown: Tarrytown, NY

I think it’s good that you have the opportunity to live with your friends regardless of gender. ”

Name: Jessa Ogilvie Year: Sophomore Major: Biology and Women’s Studies Hometown: Kapaa, Hawaii I support gender neutral housing because I think it’s a good idea. It provides support for students who don’t want to identify with a gender. It sends an important message.

Name: Jennifer Low Year: Senior Major: Environmental Science Hometown: New York, NY

“ It helped minimize the tears and

made sure students are choosing their house mates carefully. I think it’s a great change and say kudos to Res Ed.


Page 6

INSIDE STORY

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Tuesday, April 3, 2012

First Fridays lower stress levels in time for finals By Natalie Olivo Features Editor When the staff at Whisler examined the results of the National College Health Assessment (NCHA) of February, they noticed that stress was a leading issue for students. Sonya Turner, the director of health and counseling services, had also heard anecdotal evidence that reinforced these findings. “Stress is a high percentage in schools across the country,” said Turner. “This is not unique to Denison, but we want to be proactive.” Turner worked with Catherine Champagne, Denison’s alcohol, drug and H.E. coordinator, and Molly Thurlow-Collen, the associate director of health services, to develop an event that encourages healthy ways to decompress. They expanded the Slayter stress fairs during Finals Week to develop First Fridays. Just as the name implies, the first Friday of every month Slayter transforms into a haven of stress relief. The event features cuddly puppies, chair massages and even Tai Chi. Students looking to unwind can drop by the fourth floor of Slayter this Friday, April 6 from 5 – 7 p.m. for some well deserved down time. “We understand students are very stressed, which can lead to physical and emotional consequences,” said ThurlowCollen. “Our goal was to develop a plan that addressed that, even if it’s just once a month.” Champagne added, “this event is about opening minds to different possibilities of stress reduction.” Chair massages and certified therapy pets from Angel Paws are two opportunities that provide instant stress relief. Turner noted how students talk about missing their pets, but having animals on campus reminds them of home, comfort and support. At a previous First Friday, a single dog bark was enough to summon a group of excited students from the Shepardson Room. “They dashed out of the room and their faces lit up,” said Champagne. Soon a circle had formed around the animals as the students played with them and talked about their own pets at home. “It was a very inviting environment,” said Thurlow-Collen. First Fridays also aims to teach students healthy ways to relax on their own. Dick Kinsley, from the office of campus compact, offers Tai Chi lessons at each event. He explained that Tai Chi Ch’uan “translates from Chinese as the great polarity boxing, and draws upon the traditional Taoist belief in the interdependence of yin and yang on the body’s chi or life force.” For those concerned about the level of rigor in Tai Chi, Kinsley noted that it is a low impact, meditative exercise developed from a martial art. “As an integrated exercise, it provides an enjoyable way to improve balance, stability, and flexibility, while reducing stress and alleviating mental and physical tension.”

Although First Fridays does not offer yoga, the organizers noted that mindful meditation is another beneficial method of stress relief. Alina Haliliuc, assistant professor of communication explained that “meditation cultivates the awareness that arises from paying attention, on purpose, in the present moment, non-judgmentally.” Haliliuc catalogued the various benefits to mindful meditation, such as improved learning and memory, emotional regulation, perspective taking, as well as relief from chronic conditions such as anxiety and depression. First Fridays is part of a larger campus effort working toward overall health and wellness. The events’ organizers worked with Mark Orten, Denison’s director of religions life and chaplain, to develop new ideas. They noted how the campus needs to move away from thinking that stress relief is an eastern activity that only “hippies” participate in. “Stress management can be a very practical experience,” said Turner. “Students think they just need to push through their work, but actually just relaxing for a bit makes students think clearer and can actually make them more productive.” Champagne agreed that many people feel guilty when they take time for themselves, but everybody needs a break. “Students have to identify things they get relaxation out of,” she said. Turner offered few suggestions for healthy stress relief such as exercising, going for walks, taking a hot shower, reading a favorite book before bed or talking with a support system such as family and friends. “Students should do what is feasible and fits easily into their schedules,” said Tuner. “They’re so over-extended these days, they shouldn’t stress about ways to relieve stress.” While First Fridays will follow the same format for April and May, Champagne, Turner and Thurlow-Collen explained that it might be different in the fall. They are interested in hearing student feedback to get a better idea of how to plan future events. They did ask student groups at the previous First Friday for an assessment and have received positive responses so far. However, they are always interested in hearing more ideas from the students. “We could possibly take First Fridays on the move, change the location, perhaps outdoors,” said Champagne. “We’ve just scratched the tip of the iceberg.”

When you go...

First Fridays Fourth Floor of Slayter Friday, April 6, 5 - 7 p.m. They want your feedback!

If you know of a Denison alum who should be featured in “Where are they now?” contact

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Tuesday, April 3, 2012

INSIDE STORY

Page 7

Students rally around for day of community service By Sarah Wiley News Editor Students across campus went out and provided service in the community on Saturday for Big Red’s Big Day. Denisonians have four school organized opportunities for service each year; the National Day of Service commemorating 9/11, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Service Challenge, Make a Difference Day and Big Red’s Big Day. Each year, the service events have a different theme. “The theme for the year is community empowerment and civic engagement. That theme has been expressed through all four days of service,” said Lyn Robertson, the director of the Alford Center for Service Learning. Big Red’s Big Day is run by the Denison Community Association (DCA) to provide students an opportunity for service. It is a long standing tradition at Denison, though it has not always had the participation it now does. “When I joined Denison University eight years ago, 25 DCA affiliated students supported a single service project. Since that time, there has been a significant increase in participation by athletic teams, Greek life, and numerous other student groups. Last year, student volunteers numbered over 150 in support of 17 projects. This year, additional projects have been added, such as “The Community Blitz.” This one project alone will engage over 50 student volunteers in a cleanup effort in a local south side community,” explained Susie Kalinoski, the associate director for community service. “Involvement has definitely increased. We now have a lot more community involvement,” said Kalinoski. This year’s event provided two options for students to participate in community service, working in civic engagement or working at the Health and Fitness Fest.

Hung Tran/The Denisonian

Above, Denison students manage a balloon animal table and provide amusement for local area children. Below, Denison and Granville community members participate in a variety of off-campus events.

“The civic engagement portion of the event will be in South Newark. We will do a neighborhood clean-up/fix-up or neighborhood blitz, work at the 6th Street garden, a very large community garden where one plot is devoted to Denison where student summer interns work there with youth assigned by the juvenile court, and do canvassing to provide voter education and registration,” said Lyn Robertson. At the Health and Fitness Fest, “people of all ages from the Licking County community can come and get health advice and screenings. Different health organizations and service groups will have tables, and there

will be entertainment,” Robertson said in an interview prior to the event. This was the second year that the Health and Fitness Fest has occurred. “It was so successful last year that our partners, the Licking Memorial Hospital and the YMCA, wanted to repeat it,” explained Robertson. This year the Health and Fitness Fest included more events than in previous years. “Last year we didn’t think of enough projects, and people spent time waiting around instead of actually participating. So this year we put out extra projects for groups to take on,” Kalinoski explained. Students who participated in Big Red’s

Big Day went to one of two service locations in Newark. They either went to St. John’s UCC Church in South Newark to work on civic engagement or the YMCA on Church Street for the Health and Fitness Fest. All of the events for Big Red’s Big Day occurred off campus. “This event is not on campus, it’s all in the community. That is the point of service, that we do it with people in the broader community, and in the process we learn from them,” concluded Robertson. This year, Big Red’s Big Day was undoubtedly a success.

Hung Tran/The Denisonian


Page 8

Review

ARTS & LIFE

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

BFA seniors celebrate their works with solo exhibitions By Melissa Grannetino Editor-in-chief Emeritus A bachelor of fine arts degree (BFA) differs from a bachelor of arts degree in that the former requires the candidates to take more intensive classes and submit a portfolio in their sophomore year. A BFA is the highest degree in art studio one can receive as an undergraduate. Th is year’s senior BFA candidates are particularly talented, especially Brittany Kunkel. Kunkel, a senior from Yardley, Penn., put on her solo exhibition opening on March 23 in The Bryant Arts Center Gallery entitled Whimsy. Having been to numerous openings here at Denison, Kunkel’s opening was without a doubt the best I have experienced. Her attention to detail not only in her art, but all aspects of the opening made for an enjoyable experience, including cupcakes that perfectly matched the color scheme of the show, set upon whimsically embellished cupcake stands. As soon as I opened the doors I felt like I had become part of a fairy tale, a darkish Tim Burton type fairy tale. Kunkel’s exhibition catalogue was a work of art in itself; an antique looking book with bits of paint and color that looked like it had magically fallen out of one of her paintings. Kunkel’s art deals with the juxtaposition of fairy tales and nursery rhymes that don’t necessarily have a happy ending. In essence, the themes of perfection and chaos make for paintings and photographs that are familiar, yet haunting. My favorite piece pictured above right entitled, “That Place Between Sleep and Awake” is breathtakingly beautiful. Her use of color and the massive scale have a visceral affect on the viewer. After years of encapsulation, the monumental moment the ship breaks free of the bottle is intensified as raw emotion mixes with the raging storm. The artist has also been chosen as a finalist for the prestigious 2012 Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Ohio Award.

When you go... Penguins & Bots with Vases & Pots

All That Remains

Hannah Reiman Solo Exhibition

Ashlee Dickson Solo Exhibition

Opening Reception April 3, 5-­7 p.m. Bryant Arts Center Gallery

Opening Reception April 3, 6-­8 p.m. Mulberry Gallery Courtesy of Brittany Kunkel

To learn more about Kunkel and her art, visit www.aicuoartaward.com.

Above, Kunkel pictured with her work “That Place Between Sleep and Awake.” Right, another of Kunkel’s pieces, “The Knave of Hearts, He Stole the Tarts.” While it is too late to see Brittany’s BFA show, the remaining BFA candidates will be presenting their work, taking place at Bryant Arts Center Gallery and Mulberry Gallery.

Books2Eat celebrates 12th literary food festival

Madeline Skaggs/The Denisonian

The Internation Edible Books Festival, or the Books2Eat Fesitval, took place yesterday afternoon in the Doane Libary. The Festival’s 12th annual event awarded prizes for “most creative,” “best presentation,” “most bookish,” “best of show” and “best use of campus-wide theme, ‘Migrations.’” The only requirements were that participants create edible works related to books, either through content or appearance. After each submission was judged and awarded, came the best part, eating them.


ARTS & LIFE

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Page 9

3RHW&.:LOOLDPVLPSUHVVHVFKDUPVWKHDXGLHQFH By Tristan Eden Arts & Life Editor As Pulitzer Prize winning poet C.K. Williams took the podium in the Barney Davis boardroom this past Wednesday evening, the large crowd seemed to know they were going to see something special. The reading, part of the English departmentsponosered Beck Lecture Series, was indeed a startling success. The Barney-Davis Boardroom was packed with Denison students (mostly English majors) and faculty, but a few people from as far away as Athens, Ohio, were also in attendance. Williams, 76, tall (“I’m too tall for podiums,� he would cheerfully mumble later) and distinguished yet unpretentious, looked like a much kinder, more humble Lou Reed. He immediately launched into a poem for “every girl in the world that I didn’t want to make love to anymore.� He spoke very fast, in a deep, smooth and flowing way that reminded me more of a rapper than a poet. Th roughout the reading, he read so fluently and his poems were so dense that it was hard to visualize how the lines would look on the page. He has flow. This first poem was gorgeous and after it was over, Williams spoke to the audience. He thanked David Baker, chair of the English department, for his heartfelt and earthy introduction. Among other things, Baker called Williams one of his “absolutely favorite poets.� And, speaking more broadly about the creative process, Baker called poetry the “Truth of the spiritual life,� said Baker. “This matters. Why make art if you’re not aspiring to make things better.� Williams seemed genuinely touched by Baker’s comments and said it was “the most moving introduction I’ve ever had.� Charles Kenneth (C.K.) Williams grew up in Newark, N.J. He attended both Bucknell University and the University of Penn-

sylvania. During college, Williams spent time alone in Paris, trying to write poetry. While in Paris he realized he knew essentially nothing about writing poetry and came back to Pennsylvania with a strong desire to learn. Apparently, he did learn. Since 1969, Williams has published nearly 20 collections of poetry, a book of essays, a memoir, and a book about poet Walt Whitman. In 2000, Williams won the Pulitzer Prize for his poetry collection Repair. Williams’ style is notable for its long lines of unrhyming free verse. After the first poem, Williams began reading a piece called “Salt.� This poem shared the fi rst’s dense and fl owing style, and after a line containing the name “Catherine,� Williams paused, charmingly, to clarify, “Catherine’s my wife––she’s in a lot of my poems.� He pronounced “Catherine� the French way, without the h sound. Williams was on a roll now. He read a poem called “Halves,� about “two women,� one about his wife (“Now I have to read you a poem about Catherine�), and another one about his time in Europe, called “Bianca Burning� (“So, I thought I’d just continue with the love and sex stuff�). Th roughout the reading, Williams expertly walked the fi ne line between dirty old man style braggadocio and endearingly funny boasting. He was clearly having a very good time up there. “I liked how he was sincere and not pretentious like a lot poets. He didn’t take himself too seriously,� said Liz Zak, a sophomore from Buffalo, N.Y. Williams also helpfully and eagerly described the subject matter of many of his poems before he read them. He explained what certain obscure references meant or why they were included. He seemed excited to clarify and to teach. The audience appreciated this approach. “It was really cool to get background information about the poems before h\e read them because it made

Shaojun Li/ The Denisonian

Pulitzer Prize winning poet C.K. Williams gave a lively reading this past Wednesday night in the Barney Davis Boardroom.

the metaphors a lot clearer and the poems more powerful when you knew some of the references,â€? said ZoĂŤ Drazen, a sophomore from Boulder, Colo. About halfway into the reading, Williams read a poem called “Whacked,â€? about all of the great poets he reads every day and feels insignificant to by comparison. He gets “whackedâ€? by each one these great poems. Williams described these poems as “warm tangles of lyrical down,â€? easily one of the

most beautiful lines in a reading full of poems full of beautiful lines. When Williams was finished––he read for over an hour––the boardroom erupted with applause. Directly following the reading, Williams took a seat and goodnaturedly answered questions and signed books. The reading was refreshing both for the quailty of the poetry and the effortless and comfortable way Williams read it.

6WXGHQW6SRWOLJKWIUHVKPDQĂ€OPPDNHU*XV3pZp By Madeline Skaggs Arts & Life Editor Most of us remember the days of our youth when we could spend hours playing make believe, producing homemade theatrical productions for an audience of loving

family members with dad behind the old video-recorder. One Denison student took this love a step further: he made it his career of choice. Gus PĂŠwĂŠ, a freshman cinema and philosophy major from Horton, Mich., has had a passion for film since he was only

Courtesy of Gus PĂŠwĂŠ

)LUVW\HDU*XV3pZpRQWKHVHWRIKLVVKRUWĂ€OPMy Favorite Planet. It was recently accepted and shown at the Ann Arbor Film Festival.

four years old, watching beloved films like Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure and Small Soldiers. But Pewe’s love, unlike other four year olds, went far beyond that of the typical love of colorful and humorous characters. “I would dictate ideas for a sequel I had to my Dad, since I couldn’t read or write at all then,â€? Pewe said about his early film inspirations. Pewe’s interest soon grew from that of imaginative four-year-old, to that of filmmaker. He explained, “I made movies with my cousin starting in the 5th grade. We made “stuntâ€? videos with a stuffed dummy that was dressed up to stand in for my cousin doing stuff like jumping out of a high barn window. I edited those by pressing stop and play on my VCR.â€? As PĂŠwĂŠ continued to pursue his interests in film, he began to be recognized for his talents. What he refers to as his “first significant short filmâ€? ended up being his entrance into Interlochen Art’s Academy for his senior year of high school, where he graduated as a Motion Picture Arts major. PĂŠwÊ’s most recent achievement is the acceptance of his full-length film My Favorite Planet at the prestigious Ann Arbor

Film Festival. Taking place in Ann Arbor, Mich., Tuesday through Sunday of this past week, PĂŠwĂŠ spoke of his success saying, “I’ve gotten several rejection letters from smaller festivals concerning My Favorite Planet, but I don’t really care about that, because it got into Ann Arbor’s Festival.â€? In his short career here at Denison, PĂŠwĂŠ already has already created a short film, This Vacuum is Too Loud, shot mostly on campus and in Granville, and has two new film ideas in the works. Pewe is also currently working on a music video for a signed musician from Montreal, Canada. With so many successes under his belt already, PĂŠwĂŠ commented on his hopes for the next three years saying, “I wanted to study philosophy and cinema because I do not want to make empty films.â€? To view PĂŠwÊ’s latest short film, This Vacuum is Too Loud, or for more information, check out his website at www.guspewe.com

Want to write for Arts and Life? E-mail us at

denisonian.artsandlife@gmail.com


Page 10

Review

ARTS & LIFE

Tuesday, April. 3, 2012

/LYHLQFRQFHUW5HEHOXWLRQEULQJVRQO\JRRGYLEHV By Sam Taggart Staff Writer California reggae group Rebelution, on the road for their Peace of Mind tour, playing alongside reggae up-and-comer the Green and American born hip-hop artist Pep Love, are known for bringing good vibes and great music to their audiences. And this past Thursday at Columbus’ Newport Music Hall, these musicians upheld their preceding reputation. Opening act Pep Love got the initial crowd eager for more live music with his energetic rhymes emphasizing the influential power of hip-hop music. Successfully creating an upbeat atmosphere within the intimate venue reminiscent of a tiny New York City concert hall as fans of a wide range of ages began filling the general admission pit and upper balcony. Pep Love left the stage with a message for his audience reminding them “get lost� in the music, and grassroots reggae artists the Green and Rebelution each showcased their musical talents onstage. Hawaiian natives, the Green entered the stage from the left, and each player took a position in a row along the front of the stage; four imitation plants were illuminated by a rightfully colored green light,

framing the stage for the entirety of the show. The lights dimmed, and the atmosphere grew foggy. Immediately, audience and musician came together in a cohesiveness that would continue throughout the Green’s recital and into Rebelution’s muchawaited portion of the concert. Performing songs that perfectly layer vocal harmonies alongside dueling guitar riffs and fl owing bass lines, the Green truly epitomized the genre of music that people came to see. Th rough their songs, the Green reestablished Pep Love’s previous message, continuing to resonate good vibes throughout the concert hall, enlivening the audience and preparing them for the soulful, relaxed show that Rebelution would perform. With anticipation growing after the exit of the Green, the general admission viewers, chanting “Re-Be-Lu-Tion!� became overtly anxious to hear the primary recital, as audience members squeezed into every space in front of the stage in an attempt to see the headlining band up-close in this small venue. Finally, vocalist and guitarist Eric Rachmany, followed by the rest of his band – bassist, Marley Williams, keyboardist, Rory Carey, and drummer, Wesley Finley – approached the front of the

Review

Taco Dan’s is the new spot

stage, talking for a moment before opening their set with an up-tempo performance of “Attention Span,� followed by their wellknown “Safe and Sound,� to which the audience sung every lyric out loud. With an audience able to recite lyrics to every song, the faces of Rebelution’s musicians were evidently filled with happiness as their show continued with songs off of their new album Peace of Mind. Showcasing new material such as “Lady in White,� “Sky’s the Limit,� “Calling Me Out,� and “So High,� the connection between audience and performer persisted, allowing for a truly flawless musical environment. Performing a set that perfectly combined new and old, Rebelution jammed on each track, and, despite a technical malfunction preventing lead guitarist Eric Rachmany from using his acoustic guitar, filled Newport Music Hall with the sounds of true, relaxed, heartfelt reggae music. Th roughout the show the members of Rebelution bounced around stage eyeing one another with a sense of tremendous joy, and by concluding their initial set with songs – “Feeling Alright� and “Bright Side of Life� – off their fi rst two albums, were able to rouse the audience even more as they exited the stage. Almost immediately

Upcoming

after leaving the darkened stage the audience began chants of “One more song!� in hope that the band would soon return – and our voices were heard. Waiting only a few minutes before returning to the spotlight, Rebelution reentered with even happier expressions on their faces as the small, hazy venue was saturated with applause, only to die down as Rachmany and his accompanying band members built up the beginning of “Outta Control� and fi nished their performance by reintroducing onstage both the Green and Pep Love to complete a rendition of their song “Lazy Afternoon�. With the stage overflowing with musical talent, the audience was treated to an encore that left everyone present with a resonating smile and a sense of happiness that were both undeniable, proving exactly why bands like Rebelution showcase their talents at venues across the country. Rebelution’s tour ends this March, but the good vibes they brought to Columbus this past Thursday will be sure to reverberate within each audience member long after the tour’s conclusion.

DFS movie presentations:

April 4

Wed 7:30pm

Mill and the Cross (2011)

April 6,7

Fri 7:30/9:30pm Sat 7:30

Senna (2up 010)

April 11

Wed 7:30pm

Swingers (1996)

April 13

TBA

Septien

April 18

Wed 7:30pm

This is England (2006)

April 20,21

Fri 7:30/9:30pm Sat 7:30

Melanchlia (2011)

April 27

TBA

Denison Film Festival

J&D  Storage   summer  specials   please  call  for  rates 740-­366-­3105 Madeline Skaggs/The Denisonian

Large chalkboard menus and a walk-up ordering counter greet Taco Dan’s customers as they enter the restaurant.

By Madeline Skaggs Arts & Life Editor If you find yourself bored with the sameold few restaurants on Granville’s main drag, then it might be time to take a detour to Taco Dan’s. Right off of South Prospect Street, located in the same building as Footloose, Taco Dan’s is Granville’s newest culinary addition. Dan Rogers, whose wife is Footloose owner Barbara Frank, opened the adjoining restaurant last week. Since its opening, students and Gravillians alike have been flocking to check out its offerings. Walking in this past weekend, the thimble-sized space was packed with people enjoying much more than just tacos. Using fresh ingredients, and focusing on producing quality, authentic Mexican dishes, Taco Dan’s is definitely a great new offering in Granville.

The eclectic mix of furnishings and decor mimics that of the adjoining vintage store, Footloose, giving the restaurant a comfortable, homey feeling. The ingredients were fresh, making the wait well worth it. And though the restaurant is called Taco Dan’s, the chalkboard menu covering the walls offers an assortment of Mexican cuisines, from nachos to quesadillas, burritos and, of course, tacos. Along with the food, Taco Dan’s offers various drinks, including a homemade margarita. At only $13.50 a pitcher, it’s a big bang for your buck, not to mention a nice divergence from the typical, over sugary stuff that some restaurants tend to serve. After a long awaited and much talked about opening, Taco Dan’s is a great little gem that gives Granville something different than the typical Broadway fair. Though it may be a little farther out, its worth the trip to give it a try.


SPORTS

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Page 11

Women’s golf looking for comeback

Bringing you the box scores from the past week in Big Red athletics. For game recaps, visit: www.denisonbigred.com

By Luke Belechak Sports Editor Denison’s women’s golf team didn’t meet their expectations this weekend at the Capital University Purple & White Invitational in Canal Winchester, Ohio. The women finished ninth overall out of fourteen teams. “We didn’t do as well as we had hoped,” explained freshman Stacey Adams, who fi nished with a two day total of 182 after an impressive 85 on the second day of tournament play. Freshman Amanda Castle led the Denison team with a two day personal total of 174. The poor weather this weekend also did help the Big Red from hitting a stride. “The first day of the tournament it rained off and on,” Adams added. “The second day it was pretty cold, just not good golfing weather.” The second day of tournament play was notably better for the Big Red women, as they improved their score by 21 strokes. The women from Bethel College in Mishawaka, Ind. took home a first place finish with a two day total of 637, an impressive 34 strokes ahead of the second place Otterbein College. The five Bethel women finished in an impressive second, third, fourth, fifth, and eighth place individually. Denison’s Castle fi nished in a tie for 20th individually, while Adams fi nished in a tie for 32nd. Seeing as this tournament was the team’s first tournament of the spring season, disregarding a second place fi nish

Weekly Round-­up

Courtesy of denisonbigred.com

First-year Amanda Castle led DU, shooting a pair of 87’s. The performance placed her in a tie for 20th on the leaderboard of the Capital University Purple & White Invitational.

at the Myrtle Beach Shootout over spring break, the women are ready to move forward in conference play. They will compete in two more tournaments the coming two weekends, the Wooster Invitational and Laura Bump Memorial, respectively. Adams believes the team has the potential to do very well in the short

weeks of play before NCAC championship series events begin, starting on April 21 at the Allegheny Invitational. “I think we can easily rebound at Wooster this weekend,” Adams noted. “We’ll be playing a course we are more familiar with. We hope to break 360 as a team, which is a very reachable goal.”

Men’s Lacrosse at Denison March 31 Denison Ohio Wesleyan

12 5

Softball at Allegheny March 31 Denison Allegheny

0 2

Softball at Allegheny March 31 Denison Allegheny

2 3

Baseball at Denison April 1 Denison DePauw

5 18

Baseball at Denison April 1 Denison DePauw

0 6

Men’s Tennis at Kalamazoo April 1 Denison Kalamazoo

7 2

Big Red Athlete of the Week Men’s swimming & diving: distance swimmer sophomore Al Weik

Courtesy of denisonbigred.com

By Ruby Montes De Oca Sports Editor Only a sophomore, Weik has plenty to brag about in terms of swimming. The distance swimmer made his presence known as a rookie when as he was named a national qualifier. Weik did not only show up to the 2011 national championships to contribute for the push to break Kenyon’s 31-consecutive year reign, but he also made his mark. He won the 1650 freestyle by shattering the national record of 15:14.55 set by Kenyon’s Elliott Rushton in 2004. Weik covered

BIG RED IN ACTION

the mile-long swim in 15:06.47 to run away with the title. He made an appearance yet again in this year’s national championship meet. Weik shielded his crown in the 1650 freestyle by shaving nearly four seconds off of his personal national record breaking time the previous year, 15:04.85. For the 2012 national championship, Weik ended with three national championships, which were all Division III records. He was also the runner-up in the 400 individual medley. He is also an 8-time All-American. Having been part of both championship teams, Weik is quickly setting himself up as a distinctive leader for next year’s squad. The Denisonian named Weik the Athlete of the Week for April 3rd. We sat down with him to learn more about the man behind the numbers.

Discovery Channel is usually pretty good. RM: What favorite food puts you in a great mood? AW: Chipotle Burrito, hands down. I’m probably going to go there after this interview. RM: Who’s the funniest person you know? AW: Merritt Boardman. He’s one of my good friends, he is hilarious. He is one of a kind, he’s insane. RM: What was the best vacation you ever had? AW: Hawaii with my family, it was a couple of years ago.

Ruby Montes De Oca: What song always makes you happy when you hear it? Al Weik: Anything Blink 182.

RM: Name one thing would you take with you on a deserted island? AW: My iPhone if it worked. It probably wouldn’t work.

RM: What was your favorite TV show growing up? AW: I’m a big fan of like the Discovery Channel like Myth Busters anything on the

RM: What would be the fi rst thing you would save in a fire, assuming your family is safe? AW: My national championship ring.

RM: What did you want to be when you were a kid? What do you want to be now? AW: I always wanted to be a doctor and save peoples lives, but then I realized that you know that reality set in and that it would never happen. Now, I just want to be something that will allow me to be successful, wherever that takes me. I just want to be something that does me well and my family well. I really have not figured it out exactly, but I feel like a lot of people are on that boat. RM: Do you follow any professional sports? If so, what is your favorite sport and team? AW: Yes, I follow NHL, MLB, and the NFL. My favorite team is any Philly team, whatever is in season. RM: What is something most people don’t know about you? AW: I have never lost to my roommate in NHL hockey.

Big Red Men’s Lacrosse vs. Oberlin (April 3) Come support the Big Red as they play conference foe the Yeomen at 7:00p.m. at Deed’s Field.


SPORTS

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Page 12

Men’s lacrosse dominates rival OWU By Luke Belechak Sports Editor

The Denison men’s lacrosse team dominated the Ohio Wesleyan Battling Bishops 12-5 this Saturday. Energized by a packed house at Deeds Field-Piper Stadium, the Big Red was able to maintain the momentum it has had in the previous weeks with a win in the highly-anticipated rivalry matchup. With the win, Denison improved its overall record to 8-0. “It’s a big deal to go 8-0,” said sophomore Eddie Vita. “But I didn’t realize how little it happens. The last year it happened was 1967.” The Bishops started the first quarter with two quick goals to take the early lead. As the pack of Denison students began to file into the stands, many did not realize the Big Red had quickly fallen behind. There was no apparent panicking on the Big Red bench, however. The crowd was optimistic, and with good reason. The Big Red had won the previous 6 games against the rival Bishops. Denison did not disappoint. Senior Zach Walsh responded quickly to OWU’s momentum, scoring the fi rst Big Red goal on OWU goalie Ryan McMahon with 10:51 left in the fi rst quarter. The momentum quickly turned in Denison’s favor. Sophomore Chip Phillips helped the team maintain possession with multiple faceoff wins in the first quarter, including one after Walsh’s goal. Senior Alex Hardt would be the next of the Big Red to strike, scoring not even a minute later, to tie the game at 2. The majority of the Denison crowd had arrived in full force by this time. Chants were abundant, and school spirit was more than noticeable. With each goal, the crowd became more and more excited with the happenings of the game. Senior Davis Lukens gave the Big Red their fi rst lead with 8:11 to go in the quarter. The OWU fans quickly fell silent as the Denison men would go on to score the next six in a row, quickly stifling the Bishop’s opening momentum.

Vita continued his recent success with a goal at 6:58, increasing Denison’s lead 4-2. Vita has scored a collective 22 goals this season, 4 against OWU. He currently has the most goals on the Big Red team, with an impressive 0.804 shots on goal percentage thus far into the season. Vita also struck with 1:21 to go in the first quarter, his second of the day. Lukens too scored a second time with 17 seconds remaining in the first, giving the Big Red a 6-2 lead after one quarter of play. Denison opened the second quarter up an extra man due to a slashing penalty on OWU’s Barnett. Freshman Will Koontz took advantage of the penalty, scoring off an assist by senior Cory Couture, only a minute into the second quarter. Walsh pulled another goal two minutes later off an OWU turnover, increasing the Big Read lead 8-2. Junior goalie Nick Petracca remained cool during the second quarter, with a number of significant saves. With 7:02 left in the second, Petracca blocked a rip by OWU’s A.J. Pellis during an OWU extra-man opportunity. Petracca has saved 44 shots this season, with a save percentage of 0.571. Vita commended the work of Petracca and the rest of the defense. “Nick Petracca was phenomenal in the goal,” Vita commented. “He played really well. The entire defense was on their game. They’re the reason why we did so well.” Pellis scored for OWU with little over a minute in the second quarter, ending Denison’s 8-goal run. The Big Red would lead 8-3 with a half left to play. Denison had trouble putting the ball past McMahon during the first half of the third quarter. Couture, Hardt, Vita and Lukens all attempted to increase the Big Red lead before Vita fi nally got the ball past McMahon with 8:43 left in the third. OWU made the best of their extraman opportunity after sophomore Austin Campbell was penalized for an illegal body check with a little more than 2 minutes of play in the quarter. Pellis gave the Bishops their fourth goal, bringing the score

Courtesy of Laura Mexicott

Sophomore Eddie Vita scored four goals against OWU this weekend. The Big Red defeated OWU for the seventh time in a row, winning 12-5.

to 9-4 with the last quarter left to play. Sophomore Chapin Speidel began the final quarter with a bang, connecting with the goal off an assist by Vita at 11:42. OWU was not going to leave without a battle, and diminished Denison’s lead only slightly with a goal by Pat Bassett with 10:02 left in the game. But this would be the last goal OWU would score during the game. Denison scored an additional two times, with points added by Koontz and Vita, to bring the game’s fi nal score to 12-5. Th is victory marks Denison’s seventh straight over rival OWU. Vita can’t help but laugh when he talks about the rivalry.

“It’s always awesome to beat OWU, especially at home,” he explained. “The crowd and the energy they bring makes the game a ton of fun. It’s always hilarious to see the signs that students bring to the game.” The undefeated Big Red face Oberlin tonight at home, but are looking forward to their matchup against Stevenson this Saturday in Baltimore, Md. “[Stevenson is] a top 10 team in the nation,” Vita explained, “and it’s our last really big game in the regular season. The rest of the games we should be able to win so we’re really excited for them. If we beat them, we should be in good shape for NCAAs.”

Offensive explosion fuels DU past Presidents By Ruby Montes De Oca Sports Editor

Courtesy of denisonbigred.com

Senior Olivia Shiland did not contribute a goal in the high-scoring contest against Washington & Jefferson, but she scored three goals and caused two turnovers in the win over Thiel (March 24).

The women’s lacrosse team seems to have finally caught an offensive rhythm as they got their second consecutive win on Wednesday. The Big Red didn’t just win they did it in grand fashion by storming past the Washington & Jefferson Presidents, 15-5. The Presidents struck fi rst as Brittany Fradkin scored the fi rst goal of the game six minutes into the contest. That lead wouldn’t last long as senior Molly Sbrega struck back 25 seconds later, tying the game at 1-1. The Big Red would not look back thereafter as Sbrega’s goal would spark an 8-0 run to close out the first half. In the second half, Washington & Jeff tried sparking a run of their own as they rallied with four goals in the opening nine minutes of the period, but Denison would close things out over the final 20 minutes, going on a 7-0 run to end the contest at 15-5. Sophomore Kiersten Dussinger posted four goals and an assist for the match. She scored twice in the fi rst half and twice in the second half off only six shot attempts. Sbrega and senior Carly Tschantz followed

with two goals and one assist and overall. She also had eight draws and five ground balls. Additionally, junior Molly Cornbrooks contributed four draw controls. Denison had 10 different players in the scoring act. The Big Red outshot the Presidents, 2921 and gathered 15 draws to Washington & Jefferson’s seven. Grace Bodenmann played 60 minutes in goal and recorded eight saves. W&J’s Julia McLellan finished with 11 saves. “What I think is so great about our team and unique is that we have a lot of different scorers,” said senior midfielder Alex Thurner. “We always say that we are an ‘unscoutable’ team because we have so many different girls that are capable of stepping up. Whereas other teams we play have two or three dominant scorers and we have nine which I think is incredible. This year we are playing teams that we have never played before and that are above our level, but we have done a good job.” DU improved to 6-3 while Washington & Jefferson falls to 5-3. Denison will open North Coast Athletic Conference (NCAC) play on April 3 when they host Oberlin at 5 p.m. and then Allegheny on April 7 for Senior Day.


SPORTS

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Page 11

Women’s golf looking for comeback

Bringing you the box scores from the past week in Big Red athletics. For game recaps, visit: www.denisonbigred.com

By Luke Belechak Sports Editor Denison’s women’s golf team didn’t meet their expectations this weekend at the Capital University Purple & White Invitational in Canal Winchester, Ohio. The women finished ninth overall out of fourteen teams. “We didn’t do as well as we had hoped,” explained freshman Stacey Adams, who finished with a two day total of 182 after an impressive 85 on the second day of tournament play. Freshman Amanda Castle led the Denison team with a two day personal total of 174. The poor weather this weekend also did help the Big Red from hitting a stride. “The first day of the tournament it rained off and on,” Adams added. “The second day it was pretty cold, just not good golfing weather.” The second day of tournament play was notably better for the Big Red women, as they improved their score by 21 strokes. The women from Bethel College in Mishawaka, Ind. took home a first place finish with a two day total of 637, an impressive 34 strokes ahead of the second place Otterbein College. The five Bethel women finished in an impressive second, third, fourth, fifth, and eighth place individually. Denison’s Castle finished in a tie for 20th individually, while Adams finished in a tie for 32nd. Seeing as this tournament was the team’s first tournament of the spring season, disregarding a second place finish

Weekly Round-up

Courtesy of denisonbigred.com

First-year Amanda Castle led DU, shooting a pair of 87’s. The performance placed her in a tie for 20th on the leaderboard of the Capital University Purple & White Invitational.

at the Myrtle Beach Shootout over spring break, the women are ready to move forward in conference play. They will compete in two more tournaments the coming two weekends, the Wooster Invitational and Laura Bump Memorial, respectively. Adams believes the team has the potential to do very well in the short

weeks of play before NCAC championship series events begin, starting on April 21 at the Allegheny Invitational. “I think we can easily rebound at Wooster this weekend,” Adams noted. “We’ll be playing a course we are more familiar with. We hope to break 360 as a team, which is a very reachable goal.”

Men’s Lacrosse at Denison March 31 Denison Ohio Wesleyan

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Softball at Allegheny March 31 Denison Allegheny

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Softball at Allegheny March 31 Denison Allegheny

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Baseball at Denison April 1 Denison DePauw

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Baseball at Denison April 1 Denison DePauw

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Men’s Tennis at Kalamazoo April 1 Denison Kalamazoo

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Big Red Athlete of the Week Men’s swimming & diving: distance swimmer sophomore Al Weik

Courtesy of denisonbigred.com

By Ruby Montes De Oca Sports Editor Only a sophomore, Weik has plenty to brag about in terms of swimming. The distance swimmer made his presence known as a rookie when as he was named a national qualifier. Weik did not only show up to the 2011 national championships to contribute for the push to break Kenyon’s 31-consecutive year reign, but he also made his mark. He won the 1650 freestyle by shattering the national record of 15:14.55 set by Kenyon’s Elliott Rushton in 2004. Weik covered

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the mile-long swim in 15:06.47 to run away with the title. He made an appearance yet again in this year’s national championship meet. Weik shielded his crown in the 1650 freestyle by shaving nearly four seconds off of his personal national record breaking time the previous year, 15:04.85. For the 2012 national championship, Weik ended with three national championships, which were all Division III records. He was also the runner-up in the 400 individual medley. He is also an 8-time All-American. Having been part of both championship teams, Weik is quickly setting himself up as a distinctive leader for next year’s squad. The Denisonian named Weik the Athlete of the Week for April 3rd. We sat down with him to learn more about the man behind the numbers.

Discovery Channel is usually pretty good. RM: What favorite food puts you in a great mood? AW: Chipotle Burrito, hands down. I’m probably going to go there after this interview. RM: Who’s the funniest person you know? AW: Merritt Boardman. He’s one of my good friends, he is hilarious. He is one of a kind, he’s insane. RM: What was the best vacation you ever had? AW: Hawaii with my family, it was a couple of years ago.

Ruby Montes De Oca: What song always makes you happy when you hear it? Al Weik: Anything Blink 182.

RM: Name one thing would you take with you on a deserted island? AW: My iPhone if it worked. It probably wouldn’t work.

RM: What was your favorite TV show growing up? AW: I’m a big fan of like the Discovery Channel like Myth Busters anything on the

RM: What would be the first thing you would save in a fire, assuming your family is safe? AW: My national championship ring.

RM: What did you want to be when you were a kid? What do you want to be now? AW: I always wanted to be a doctor and save peoples lives, but then I realized that you know that reality set in and that it would never happen. Now, I just want to be something that will allow me to be successful, wherever that takes me. I just want to be something that does me well and my family well. I really have not figured it out exactly, but I feel like a lot of people are on that boat. RM: Do you follow any professional sports? If so, what is your favorite sport and team? AW: Yes, I follow NHL, MLB, and the NFL. My favorite team is any Philly team, whatever is in season. RM: What is something most people don’t know about you? AW: I have never lost to my roommate in NHL hockey.

Big Red Men’s Lacrosse vs. Oberlin (April 3) Come support the Big Red as they play conference foe the Yeomen at 7:00p.m. at Deed’s Field.


SPORTS

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Page 12

Men’s lacrosse dominates rival OWU By Luke Belechak Sports Editor

The Denison men’s lacrosse team dominated the Ohio Wesleyan Battling Bishops 12-5 this Saturday. Energized by a packed house at Deeds Field-Piper Stadium, the Big Red was able to maintain the momentum it has had in the previous weeks with a win in the highly-anticipated rivalry matchup. With the win, Denison improved its overall record to 8-0. “It’s a big deal to go 8-0,” said sophomore Eddie Vita. “But I didn’t realize how little it happens. The last year it happened was 1967.” The Bishops started the first quarter with two quick goals to take the early lead. As the pack of Denison students began to file into the stands, many did not realize the Big Red had quickly fallen behind. There was no apparent panicking on the Big Red bench, however. The crowd was optimistic, and with good reason. The Big Red had won the previous 6 games against the rival Bishops. Denison did not disappoint. Senior Zach Walsh responded quickly to OWU’s momentum, scoring the first Big Red goal on OWU goalie Ryan McMahon with 10:51 left in the first quarter. The momentum quickly turned in Denison’s favor. Sophomore Chip Phillips helped the team maintain possession with multiple faceoff wins in the first quarter, including one after Walsh’s goal. Senior Alex Hardt would be the next of the Big Red to strike, scoring not even a minute later, to tie the game at 2. The majority of the Denison crowd had arrived in full force by this time. Chants were abundant, and school spirit was more than noticeable. With each goal, the crowd became more and more excited with the happenings of the game. Senior Davis Lukens gave the Big Red their first lead with 8:11 to go in the quarter. The OWU fans quickly fell silent as the Denison men would go on to score the next six in a row, quickly stifling the Bishop’s opening momentum.

Vita continued his recent success with a goal at 6:58, increasing Denison’s lead 4-2. Vita has scored a collective 22 goals this season, 4 against OWU. He currently has the most goals on the Big Red team, with an impressive 0.804 shots on goal percentage thus far into the season. Vita also struck with 1:21 to go in the first quarter, his second of the day. Lukens too scored a second time with 17 seconds remaining in the first, giving the Big Red a 6-2 lead after one quarter of play. Denison opened the second quarter up an extra man due to a slashing penalty on OWU’s Barnett. Freshman Will Koontz took advantage of the penalty, scoring off an assist by senior Cory Couture, only a minute into the second quarter. Walsh pulled another goal two minutes later off an OWU turnover, increasing the Big Read lead 8-2. Junior goalie Nick Petracca remained cool during the second quarter, with a number of significant saves. With 7:02 left in the second, Petracca blocked a rip by OWU’s A.J. Pellis during an OWU extra-man opportunity. Petracca has saved 44 shots this season, with a save percentage of 0.571. Vita commended the work of Petracca and the rest of the defense. “Nick Petracca was phenomenal in the goal,” Vita commented. “He played really well. The entire defense was on their game. They’re the reason why we did so well.” Pellis scored for OWU with little over a minute in the second quarter, ending Denison’s 8-goal run. The Big Red would lead 8-3 with a half left to play. Denison had trouble putting the ball past McMahon during the first half of the third quarter. Couture, Hardt, Vita and Lukens all attempted to increase the Big Red lead before Vita finally got the ball past McMahon with 8:43 left in the third. OWU made the best of their extraman opportunity after sophomore Austin Campbell was penalized for an illegal body check with a little more than 2 minutes of play in the quarter. Pellis gave the Bishops their fourth goal, bringing the score

Courtesy of Laura Mexicott

Sophomore Eddie Vita scored four goals against OWU this weekend. The Big Red defeated OWU for the seventh time in a row, winning 12-5.

to 9-4 with the last quarter left to play. Sophomore Chapin Speidel began the final quarter with a bang, connecting with the goal off an assist by Vita at 11:42. OWU was not going to leave without a battle, and diminished Denison’s lead only slightly with a goal by Pat Bassett with 10:02 left in the game. But this would be the last goal OWU would score during the game. Denison scored an additional two times, with points added by Koontz and Vita, to bring the game’s final score to 12-5. This victory marks Denison’s seventh straight over rival OWU. Vita can’t help but laugh when he talks about the rivalry.

“It’s always awesome to beat OWU, especially at home,” he explained. “The crowd and the energy they bring makes the game a ton of fun. It’s always hilarious to see the signs that students bring to the game.” The undefeated Big Red face Oberlin tonight at home, but are looking forward to their matchup against Stevenson this Saturday in Baltimore, Md. “[Stevenson is] a top 10 team in the nation,” Vita explained, “and it’s our last really big game in the regular season. The rest of the games we should be able to win so we’re really excited for them. If we beat them, we should be in good shape for NCAAs.”

Offensive explosion fuels DU past Presidents By Ruby Montes De Oca Sports Editor

Courtesy of denisonbigred.com

Senior Olivia Shiland did not contribute a goal in the high-scoring contest against Washington & Jefferson, but she scored three goals and caused two turnovers in the win over Thiel (March 24).

The women’s lacrosse team seems to have finally caught an offensive rhythm as they got their second consecutive win on Wednesday. The Big Red didn’t just win they did it in grand fashion by storming past the Washington & Jefferson Presidents, 15-5. The Presidents struck first as Brittany Fradkin scored the first goal of the game six minutes into the contest. That lead wouldn’t last long as senior Molly Sbrega struck back 25 seconds later, tying the game at 1-1. The Big Red would not look back thereafter as Sbrega’s goal would spark an 8-0 run to close out the first half. In the second half, Washington & Jeff tried sparking a run of their own as they rallied with four goals in the opening nine minutes of the period, but Denison would close things out over the final 20 minutes, going on a 7-0 run to end the contest at 15-5. Sophomore Kiersten Dussinger posted four goals and an assist for the match. She scored twice in the first half and twice in the second half off only six shot attempts. Sbrega and senior Carly Tschantz followed

with two goals and one assist and overall. She also had eight draws and five ground balls. Additionally, junior Molly Cornbrooks contributed four draw controls. Denison had 10 different players in the scoring act. The Big Red outshot the Presidents, 2921 and gathered 15 draws to Washington & Jefferson’s seven. Grace Bodenmann played 60 minutes in goal and recorded eight saves. W&J’s Julia McLellan finished with 11 saves. “What I think is so great about our team and unique is that we have a lot of different scorers,” said senior midfielder Alex Thurner. “We always say that we are an ‘unscoutable’ team because we have so many different girls that are capable of stepping up. Whereas other teams we play have two or three dominant scorers and we have nine which I think is incredible. This year we are playing teams that we have never played before and that are above our level, but we have done a good job.” DU improved to 6-3 while Washington & Jefferson falls to 5-3. Denison will open North Coast Athletic Conference (NCAC) play on April 3 when they host Oberlin at 5 p.m. and then Allegheny on April 7 for Senior Day.

Apr. 3, 2012  

The Denisonian, Denison University's student newspaper. Visit our website at www.denison.edu or contact us at denisonian@denison.edu.

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