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The Denisonian

Established in 1857

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2013

DENISON UNIVERSITY GRANVILLE, OHIO 43023

Volume 161, No. 1

Hung Tran and Lia Windt / The Denisonian

There was plenty to be excited about at the campus Involvement Fair. Chickens, snow cones, faces old and new, and of course the many organizations and clubs to be a part of all made an appearance to bring a strong start to the next year at Denison.

Students kick off semester exploring opportunities on campus Students stepped out in the sun on Academic Quad to take a look at what various campus clubs, groups, and activities have to offer at the annual Involvement Fair on Sept. 5. According to Natalie Keller Pariano, director of the Campus Leadership & Involvement Center (CLIC), Denison has about 175 campus organizations, many

of which were present at the Involvement Fair. These organizations include service groups, academic activities, club sports, Greek life, multicultural organizations, campus media, student government, religious life groups, and many special interest groups. Rachel Auerbach, a sophomore from Mount Horeb, Wis., currently serves as the public relations chair for Denison Homelessness & Hunger, which made waves

CarShare comes to campus By Caroline McCauley Staff Writer This 2013-14 school year, DCGA has collaborated with Denison administration to create a car-sharing program that will benefit both students and the environment. The program, Enterprise CarShare, works to encourage environmentally friendly practices and focuses on student convenience. The way in which the Enterprise Carshare program works is simple. Since it is a membership-based car-sharing program, anyone wishing to use to the program will need to obtain a membership. Anyone with a valid driver’s license (international licenses will also be accepted) and a willingness to spare some cash can become a

member. The membership will allow a student to rent vehicles for short term needs of several hours or for extended lengths of time. The cost of renting one of the vehicles is an annual membership fee of $35 and an hourly rental fee, $9.50 on a weekday and $10.50 on weekends. Program benefits include but are not limited to: free gas, insurance, parking, and a $25 dollar credit for the first three hours after joining.

Lia Windt / The Denisonian

CarShare at the involvement fair. See CarShare, page 2

across campus last year with its “Peanut Butter Jelly Time” video promoting their sandwich prep event for the Newark Salvation Army. “We’ve tried to expand, and

Any student who wants to start their own organization should do their best to ensure that their group is ‘sustainable’ and... will attract other like-minded students.

By Cecilia Salomone Staff Writer

we’re now working with Sparta Café and Saint Vincent de Paul.” Auerbach added that the group also hosts “sleep-out” events to raise awareness. Denison Christian Community president Tori Newman, a junior from Willard, Ohio, expressed hope that her organization could offer interested students “a fun, welcoming community– we’re really excited!” Pariano advises students looking for involvement to “take it

slow” and carefully consider what groups they want to be a part of. She adds that involvement means more than just campus organizations. “It includes having a campus job or even just attending campus events too.” Pariano says that any student who wants to start their own organization should do their best to ensure that their group is “sustainable” and will not only last, but will attract other like-minded students.

$25,000 break-in at Mitchell Center By Chris Herman News Editor

On July 20, 2013, Steve Romine of the Athletics Department arrived at his office in the Mitchell Athletic Center to find his monitor missing from his desk. Romine inspected other offices to find over $25,000 worth of Denison property missing from the building. “There were 13 Denison owned laptops, three desktops, two monitors, and some cameras were taken. Also assorted personal property of staff was also taken,” said Head of Security Garret Moore. He was believed to be posing as a custodian the day before and swiped a master key set from the construction office in the lower level of Mitchell. The next night with keys, radio and ID in hand, the suspect broke into the building, took what

he could carry, and exited via the doors to the basketball court on the south side of the building. The suspect was captured on surveillance footage from the building’s camera system which directly resulted in his apprehension. “The defendant’s name is Yusef Ali Mcleod, a 37 year old Columbus resident. None of the computers were found,” said Moore. However, other property taken in this incident and in a burglary from the week prior was found after a search of Mcleod’s vehicle. Mcleod was arrested by the Granville Police with the assistance of Columbus PD in Columbus, Ohio. He paid his bond and was released from the Licking County Justice Center. Not long after, he was once again arrested as suspect to a burglary at Ohio Dominican University on July 30th. He is cur-

The suspect inside Mitchell. Courtesy of Denison Security

rently serving time. Since the burglary at Denison, security has made changes to how master keys are managed with construction projects. “We might want to consider increasing the amount of surveillance equipment we have in Mitchell since the facility is so large,” said Moore.

IN THIS ISSUE

FORUM

FEATURES

Join the debate about Syria

Huffman or Curtis? The age-old debate

See PAGE 5

ARTS & LIFE See PAGE 6

SPORTS See PAGE 8

Crown Fitness Center opening See PAGE 10


NEWS

Page 2

Off the Hill

LOCAL New animals at The Wilds The Newark Advocate A rhinoceros calf and male giraffe calf have joined the African herds at the Wilds, a safari park in nearby Cumberland, southeast of Zanesville. City of Granville helping Schilling The Granville Sentinel The Granville Village Council is considering backing local businessman Robert Schilling in his application to the Ohio State Historic Preservation Tax Credit program for developing the Granville Inn and a second property. If approved, Schilling would receive a 25 percent tax credit.

NATIONAL Unemployment rate decreasing US Today During August employers added 169,000 jobs and the national unemployment rate fell to 7.3 percent, down only 0.1 percent, according to the Department of Labor. The highest areas of employment included retailers, education, and health. NSA hacks everything The New York Times A new leak from Edward Snowden reveals the NSA has succeeded in hacking into almost all encrypted electronic information worldwide, including global banking systems, trade networks, medical records, and communiques such as emails and social networking sites. Obama to decide on Syria Politico With opinion in Congress growing in disfavor, President Obama will address the American people today to clarify his position on military intervention in Syria. Obama spent the end of last week in St. Petersburg, where he discussed the Syria issue with Assad supporter Vladimir Putin at the G-20.

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Changes on campus now involve student input By Celeste Alsina Special to The Denisonian The beginning of each semester at Denison usually brings with it a lot of transformations to get used to. This semester has come with quite a lot, a new president, a new cardio room, and some administrative changes you still may not be completely up to date with. This week the Denison community received an email from Laurel Kennedy announcing once again the time to swipe into a residence hall had changed, extended an hour from 11pm to midnight. The initial change occurred this past spring, when the time was moved from 1am to 11pm. The initial change was motivated by a rise in vandalism in residence halls. These acts included fire alarms being pulled and glass doors being broken. Garrett Moore, Director of Security, Safety &

Risk Management at Denison, stated that “people were being held responsible for damage in the area that they lived in and many claimed that they weren’t responsible.” As a result the two hour deduction from swipe access time was made to control non-resident access to the halls. Tuesday Questions, conducted by the Department of Student Development at Denison, gathered data on students’ perception of the changes in residence hall access. Students communicated feeling safer and noticed less disruptions and noise in the residence halls. Others noticed a negative effect from the change, finding it inconvenient when trying to meet friends or peers. There were also complaints about students congregating near entrances to let nonresidents into a building. Because of the aforementioned and there being a reduction in vandalism the decision was

made by Moore, Kennedy, and Bill Fox, Dean of Students, to restrict access by one hour instead of two. Another recent administrative change is the renaming of “Medical Amnesty” to “Medical Assistance.” The administration was finding that students were waiting for people to get better on their own instead of seeking help; with the name change the hope is that it will be clearer to students that they should call for help as soon as someone is in a bad state. Change is also on the minds of many with a new president on campus. President Adam Weinberg is known as someone who is open to student input, spending the summer meeting with all who were willing, and although the above administrative changes were made with the best intentions for students, this year may bring changes that involve the decision making of students.

Fraternity investigations conclude, chapter reinstated By Kristóf Oltvai Features Editor In July, Denison’s administration concluded investigation into possible violations of the Student Code of Conduct by Kappa Sigma, Sigma Chi, and Sigma Phi Epsilon, three of Denison’s seven recog-

nized Interfraternity Council (IFC) fraternities. The school reached three distinct decisions. Kappa Sigma was found not responsible and was reinstated with full privileges. Sigma Chi was placed on disciplinary probation until Apr. 30, 2014, when the administration will reevaluate their status.

Sigma Phi Epsilon has lost its charter and is no longer recognized as a legitimate student organization at Denison. At earliest, SigEp may begin recolonization in 2018. The Denisonian’s full summer coverage of the case can be found online; visit www.denisonian.com.

Aug-O festivities bring together class of 2017

INTERNATIONAL Largest volcano discovered CNN Scientists led by William Sager of the University of Houston have discovered the largest volcano on earth submerged beneath the Pacific Ocean. Dubbed the Tamu Massif and approximately the size of New Mexico, the dormant volcano was active around 145 million years ago. Jessie Mack/ The Denisonian

U.S. intercepts threats from Iran The Wall Street Journal U.S. officials intercepted orders from the Iranian government to Iraqi Shiite militants on Friday, commanding elements to attack American assets in Baghdad in the event of a U.S. strike on Syria. Possible targets include the embassy in Beirut and the U.S. fleet in the Persian Gulf. DCGA Weekly Report The first Senate meeting of the year took place last Tuesday, Sept. 3. Presidentelect Ana Morales ‘14 and the senators of the class of 2016, 2015, and 2014 was officially inaugurated. Meghan Pearce ‘16 was elected as the Senate Speaker, and Kiara Sims ‘14, Jackson Wu-Pong ‘15, Emily Schultz ‘16, and Chris Hoye ‘16 was respectively elected as Chair of Finance, Policy, Public Relations, and Rules Committee in all-senate votes. DCGA was also nominating student representative to many different committee: Dining Committee, University Council, etc. Students can send email to Ana Morales to nominate themselves or to find out more at morale_a1@denison.edu.

Corrections The Denisonian regards itself as a professional publication and strives for the highest standards of journalism at all times. If there is a mistake, please contact us at denisonian@denison.edu so we can correct our error.

Senior Michael Vawter dealing cards at the Casino Night for the class of 2017.

CARSHARE Continued from page 1

After proof of license and payment, students will receive a membership card that activates a sensor on the driver-side window to start and end their reserva-

President Weinberg and History professor Catherine Dollard welcome freshman to the Hill.

tion. Reservations are easily accessible and can be made online at the Enterprise Car Share Site (http://www.enterprisecarshare.com). Keeping the environment in mind, the program exclusively uses fuel-efficient and hybrid vehicles to reduce fuel emissions. With designated spaces at Swasey

parking lot, this program aims to reduce parking problems while giving students greater mobility on campus and beyond. For this upcoming school year, Denison’s Enterprise CarShare Program hopes to make life greener on the other side not only for the environment but also for its students.

Alumni Lugar and Bowen awarded during the summer By Kristóf Oltvai Features Editor Earlier in the summer, two Denison alumni, Richard Lugar ‘54 and William G. Bowen ‘55, received national awards from President Barack Obama. Bowen received the National Humanities Medal on July 10 at a White House ceremony, whereas Lugar is slated to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom later this year. Bowen, an economics major here at Denison, would go on to become “one of the great figures in American higher education” according to Christopher L. Eisgruber, President of Princeton University, a post Bowen himself held for eighteen years from 1978 through 1996. According to Princeton’s University Com-

munications, his leadership of that school is considered “legendary.” Bowen went on to serve as President of the Mellon Foundation from 1988 through 2006, and has been a lifetime researcher of higher education and economics. He has authored or co-authored over 20 books, according to Princeton, and was critical in founding JSTOR and ARTstor, electronic databases for scholarly articles and fine art, respectively. Bowen serves on Denison’s Board of Trustees as a life trustee. Richard Lugar, another economics major here on the Hill, served in the U.S. Senate from 1977 to 2013. At the time of his departure from Capitol Hill earlier this year, he was the most senior Republican in the Senate. Prior to running for Senator, Lugar served as mayor of India-

napolis, Ind., his hometown, from 1968 to 1976. He served as Chair of the Senate’s Foreign Relations Committee twice and twice again as Chair of the Senate’s Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry. On Aug. 8, President Obama named him among this year’s Presidential Medal of Freedom recipients, alongside several others including Oprah Winfrey and Bill Clinton, according to the White House website. Lugar currently serves as president of the Lugar Center, a think-tank, and is an active member of Denison’s Board of Trustees. Earlier this year he was also made a Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire.


NEWS

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Page 3

New Denison website raises visibility, targets prospective students By Debbie Gillum News Editor A new president, a new food provider, a new cardio room, the CarShare program, and of course, a new website - that is all it takes to amaze students, faculty, staff, alumni and parents alike. While still in the very early stages, the new website has already had positive anecdotal comments by key influencers. “So far, prospective students, guidance counselors, and donors really like the website. The hope is that MyDenison becomes the internal portal and the Denison.edu website becomes the external portal,” said President Adam Weinberg. The website serves a wide variety of audiences, but a main focus is in recruiting prospective students. “The new website will help raise visibility. We are always concerned about admissions, so we hope the website will become a sort of funnel to encourage new students to visit our campus,” Weinberg said. Jesse Yeager ’10, assistant director of Admissions, who just returned from a “Southwest” tour of the Colleges That Change Lives fair in Chicago, Denver, Albuquerque and Phoenix, said that the new website attracted students to learn more about Denison. “I had multiple students comment to me that Denison had the best website of any of the (40 or so) Colleges That Change Lives schools,” said Yeager. Yeager said she liked how the new website is very externally oriented, “It is a place I want to send students to so they can truly explore our college more and learn about the wonderful people here and the fascinating projects and passions that they pursue!” The site is primarily for people who don’t know Denison, but is still useful for staff and students. “The site is designed to help outsiders and newcomers get to know Denison better and provide a big picture overview of who we are,” said Scott Tribble, director of he Office of Digital Strategy & Development. Tribble was the guiding force throughout the long process of getting a new website. “It was his vision and guidance that enabled us to produce a site that goes well beyond the countless standard-issue ‘.edu’ sites that so many colleges are publishing these days,” said Jack Hire, director of University Communications. Though the initiative was a team effort by THE DENISONIAN

Denison’s newly design website.

the Office of Web, Social and Mobile Strategy & Development, and the University Communications staff, Tribble was charged with managing the project from concept to launch. This included defining the mission and scope of the site, developing its technical specifications, and identifying its organization, form and functionality. “Because of the breadth, depth and richness of this dynamic site, it was an enormous undertaking, but with its launch in mid-August, Denison was able to take a quantum leap into a new era of communications with its public audiences.” said Hire. “It’s often challenging to help people understand how vibrant the Denison community is and how engaged and friendly students are,” said Weinberg. “The more we can tell stories about our students, the more it helps people understand the texture of our community,” emphasizing that Denison’s major “selling point” is its quality of students, faculty and staff. The previous website, last revamped in 2007, was viewed as static, whereas the new website helps keep Denison up with the times. Getting to the new website was far from a quick and easy experience, especially because it was built up from scratch. First, it was agreed upon by the college that Denison needed a modern web communication platform that could connect with prospective and current students, as well as faculty and staff. “We wanted the website to communicate to these audiences in a way that they are accustomed to being communicated to online,” said Tribble. He emphasized how it is

“important for Denison to be aligned with the times and modern communications.” Next, the right web partner had to be found. This search started in the early summer of 2011. Code and Theory, the partner that Denison ultimately chose to help them with the programming, code and design, has previously worked with Vogue and The Daily Beast. When thinking about a new website design, Tribble looked to websites like Mashable, CNN and ESPN for inspiration. He wanted to explore what non-education organizations were doing on their websites. “In the .edu space, there is a lot of similarity out there. We wanted something different,” Tribble said. The new website was a lengthy process because the new site was built from scratch and it was time consuming to move content from the old website to the new website, according to Tribble. In the end, the new layout of the website is, “striking, elegant and has beautiful typography” according to Tribble, “It’s bold for a college website but still feels appropriate.” The new site is more conceptually organized around topics and related areas of interest, whereas the old website was based on the university’s organizational chart. Three new features of the website are the “Straight Talk From Students”, “Get to Know Denison” and “Denison A to Z”. The “Straight Talk From Students” is from-the-heart unedited student comments and advice. The “Denison A to Z” guide is a dynamic directory which is a literal and figurative A to Z guide of everything you need to know.

The “Get to Know Denison” section gives people a virtual campus experience of not only the exterior of buildings but also highlights what happens inside those buildings. This is a great tool for students who live outside of America and might not be able to visit Denison before applying. The key motto behind the new website’s design is the tried-and-true phrase “show, don’t tell.” Tribble wanted it to be more visual. “Images can be very powerful,” said Tribble, “It was a conscious decision to make the site much more visual.” Online, www.wenison.edu will continue to grow over the next several years. Websites are built to be continually adapted, according to Tribble. Tribble himself said it best: “The day you launch a website, it is already out of date.”

What we think... “I think it looks great. It has a nice visual presentation. It’s very new and upbeat.” - Bridget Tyznik, administrative and Planned Giving

“I like the front page. Some things aren’t where they used to be, so that was a little frustrating for two years and now I have to re-learn where they are.” India

“It seems cool. It’s more modern and more interactive. I like it.”

ing... But, it’s hard to navigate sometimes.”

“It’s cool and easy to navigate. I think the kinks need to be worked out. It’s frusterating when it says page not found. But overall I like it.”

MEET YOUR EDITORS

NEWS ALL THE NEWS THAT MATTERS

Chris Herman ‘16 Hometown: Wheaton, Ill. Majors: Political Science and International Studies Campus Involvement: News Editor

D

I spent this summer interning in Washington, DC. When I’m not studying Arabic denisonian@denison.edu

people.

Debbie Gillum ‘14

Carrie Burkett ‘16 -

back riding, and The Doobie

D

I just got back from studying abroad in Copenhagen, Denmark. My favorite color is purple and I love horses and dogs.

D venturing in Granville and northern Michigan.


EDITORIAL

Page 4

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

OUR VOICE >>

Editor’s Corner >>

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Staff Editorial

Be mindful of Denison’s offerings

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Women’s Volleyball: Denison vs. John Carroll

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Football: Denison vs. Hiram

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speak up

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THIS WEEK ON CAMPUS

Sex Discussed Here

THE DENISONIAN >> FORUM

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DITA: Opens in 24 Hours

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Career Exploration & Development: Senior Orientation

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Denison University‘s Oldest Student Organization - Established 1857 Hung Tran

Editor-in-Chief

Ruby Montes De Oca

Editor-in-Chief

Jessie Mack

Managing Editor

Chris Herman Carrie Burkett Curtis Edmonds Joyce Lindsey Kristof Oltvai Sam Heyman Sam Taggart Golzar Meamar Luke Belechak David Allen Lia Windt Latasha Hoard Caroline McCauley Margie Iselin Marissa Gilbert Kevin Torres Charlie Severson Raghav Daswani Rohin Daswani Shakia Asamoah

News Editor News Editor Forum Editor Cartoonist Features Editor Arts & Life Editor Arts & Life Editor Arts & Life Asst. Editor Sports Editor Sports Editor Photo Editor Copy Editor Copy Editor Copy Editor Copy Editor Business Manager Webmaster Asst. Webmaster Asst. Webmaster Social Media Manager

The opinions expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of Denison University, nor any of its constituents. Unsigned editorials represent the majority view of the editorial board, consisting of the Editor-in-Chief, section editors and assistants. Columns, letters and Forum pieces represent the views of their authors. Letters to the editor of reasonable length will be accepted prior to 5 p.m. the Sunday before publishing. Letters may be edited for length or content. The Editor-inChief reserves the right to refuse the printing of submissions. Remaining dates of publication: 9/17 9/24 10/1

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108 Knapp t Denison University tGranville, Ohio 43023

denisonian@denison.edu www.denisonian.com

MEET YOUR EDITORS Jessie Mack ‘14 Hometown: Chicago, Ill. Communication Major & Studio Art and English-Writing Minor On campus: Agape Christian Fellowship, The Black Student Union, Tehillah, Gospel Choir, Student Chaplain Associate Intern. As the leader and active member of it quite exciting and enjoyable to see organizations thrive. Each semester gives us an opportunity to venture out beyond our comfort zone with something new and different. I enjoy singing and writing. My

developmental mindset is deonstrated through my dedication and involvement with organizations and activities. I am trade it nor any of the opportunities I have been provided during my time on the hill.


FORUM

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Page 5

YOUR VOICE >> POINT/COUNTERPOINT When it comes to Syria, what approach should the U.S. take?

We have no place in this conflict

By Chris Herman ‘16 News Editor

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The humanitarian thing to do

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Upperclassmen, what advice do you have for the new freshmen? “Come in with an open mind and get your GE’s out of the way!�

“Get involved with everything and don’t be afraid to drop what you don’t like!�

Name8JMM#SBDLFOCVSZA MajorćFBUSFBOE &DPOPNJDT Hometown*OEJBO)JMM 0IJP

“Invest in a good pair of snow boots before the winter!�

“Work hard, play hard!�

Name:,SJTUJBO(BSDJBA Major$PNNVOJDBUJPOBOE$JOFNB Hometown(VBZOBCP 1VFSUP 3JDP

Name$SJTUJOB-BOHA Major1PMJUJDBM4DJFODF Hometown1FMIBN /:

MEET YOUR EDITORS

“Manage your time wisely, but don’t let that stop you from getting involved!�

Curtis Edmonds ‘15 Hometown: Chicago, Ill. Major: Communication, Political Science On campus: Forum Editor, MLK Day Plan-

Name$FMFTUF"MTJOBA Major$PNNVOJDBUJPOBOE&EVDBUJPO Hometown$IJDBHP *MM

ning Committee, Black Student Union, Student Conduct Board, Huffman Service Center, Former DCGA Senator I love working for The Denisonian. It’s an important way to transmit information to the student body. We have an opportunity

here to make sure that student voices are heard, and that Denison is the most transparent institution that it can be.


Tuesday, Septem

FEATURES

Page 6

Bon Appétit debuts: Better food with some drawbacks By Kristóf Oltvai Features Editor The past two weeks have been something of a proving ground for Denison’s new dining service provider Bon Appétit. The new company, which took over from Sodexo in June, has attempted to revamp the Denison's dining experience. Bon Appétit’s managers affirm the progress they have made, and students generally agree that the new food is better, albeit highlighting a few drawbacks in service such as longer waits. Denison’s dining system is built on the “station” service model, meaning different types of foods are available in distinct physical locations within the three main service facilities: Huffman, Curtis, and Slayter. From Sodexo to Bon Appétit, station location and production have been the main changes, while concepts have remained similar. In Slayter, the new “Cantina” option, which offers Chipotle-style burritos and other pseudo-Mexican cuisine, is the only station without a Sodexo predecessor; the burger/grill, salad, soup, panini, and “Asian bowl” stations have existed in some form before. Curtis and Huffman retain the traditional options: pasta, pizza, burger/grill, stir fry, salad bar, deli, and “main line.” In Huffman, the layout of these stations has been modified to reflect Bon Appétit’s “made-to-order” business model. Student agrees that the food, culinarily, an improvement on Sodexo - with some drawbacks. There is “better food” and “more variety,” says Max Kelly ‘16, a physics major from Vienna, Austria, adding that “the only thing Huffman lacks, really, is ice cream. If Bon Appétit had been at Denison last year, we [would have] seen way more of the freshman 15...[You] couldn’t have asked for a better setup,” he concludes. “You can definitely taste the difference,” agrees Celia Cambray ‘15, an economics and education double-major from Waukegan, Ill. She highlights the greater degree of control the guest has. “You can make your own sandwich, your own salad,” she says. Others disagree. “I hate it,” says Nancy Martinez ‘16, a psychology major from Chicago, Ill., “We don’t have a lot of options and the portions that we get are very small.” Max Collins ‘15, a biology and philosophy double-major from Stanford, Conn., agrees regarding portion size, and adds that Bon Appétit “probably will be [better than So-

Lia Windt and Guram Saqvarelidze/The Denisonian

Students at the Slayter grill at Meal Exchange. Meal Exchange was kept almost the same to that of Sodexo's, enabling students to

dexo], but it’s still in its infancy. A lot of people that work there don’t know where everything is,” he says, a comment corroborated by John Baird ‘15, a biology major from Dallas, Texas. “I have to go hunting for things" in the dining hall, says Baird. Bon Appétit at Denison is still growing Bon Appétit’s campus management, headed by General Manager Jennifer McGann and Sustainability Manager S.K. Piper, seems confident in the firm’s ability to live up to student expectations. McGann says that Bon Appétit’s services are “going according to plan,” while highlighting staffing as the primary challenge of these first few months. She says Bon Appétit is still looking to fill positions, a process she does not expect to conclude as late as Christmas. Piper adds that disposing of compost has become a difficulty because Bon Appétit produces approximately four times as much compost as Sodexo did. Regarding the company’s dedication to local produce, Piper says she “cannot give an accurate percent” for how much of the food in the dining halls is local, explaining that it “usually takes three to four years to build a local produce chain.” She stresses that Bon Appétit’s other local venues, such as Abercrombie and Fitch national headquarters in New Albany, State Auto national headquarters in Columbus, Otterbein University in

Westerville, Oberlin College, and Case Western Reserve University outside of Cleveland may help the firm boost its locality faster than usual. McGann and Piper agree that as of now, the bulk of dining traffic has been concentrated at Huffman and Slayter; Curtis is currently underutilized. To deal with overflow, which according to managers is due to “faculty and staff eating in the dining halls” alongside seniors and eager West-Quadders, the President’s Room has been regularly opened in Huffman for dinner. But Bon Appétit’s plans for redeveloping campus dining is ongoing yet. Friday saw the first full opening of the Curtis Veggie concept, by which students can request a vegetarian meal which is brought out to them at their seat.

McGann and Piper indicate that they are interested in revitalizing The Roost on Slayter's third floor, though they acknowledge that it is difficult to compete with off-campus pub options like Brew’s 2 and Broadway. Currently they are running Late Night out of the Roost, available 10 p.m. through midnight every Wednesday. McGann says that students have expressed support for a “sports bar” theme in The Roost as well. Bon Appétit plans on putting local beers, specifically from Homestead Beer, Co. from here in Granville. Slayter already features coffee from River Road down in town. McGann indicated that the transition has been complicated by internal matters, however, especially since Sodexo did not provide relevant data to Bon Appétit. This makes numerical comparisons of the two providers

MEET YOUR EDITORS Kristóf Z. Oltvai Hometown: Pittsburgh, Pa. Class of: 2015 Majors: Philosophy and English On campus: DCGA, Moot Court, "Exile," "Episteme"

As Features Editor, I'm dedicated to covering the stories that matter to the student body in an in-depth, investigative way, believing the key to journalism is being unafraid to challenge the status quo. I've been passionate about writing since I was little kid, and at its best, I think writing

has the power to move the soul. This may sound philosophical, which is, not coincidentally, my main intellectual interest. I'm particularly interested in existentialism and the philosophy of Christian theology. I also have interests in creative writing, travel, and Hungarian culture.

Lia Windt and Guram Saqvarelidze/The Denisonian

Students wait in line to be served in Slayter Market and Huffman Cafe.


mber 10, 2013

FEATURES

Page 7

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MEET YOUR EDITORS Lia Windt The Denisonian's Photo editor Hometown: Exeter, N.H. Class of: 2016 Majors: Cinema On campus: Denison Sailing Team I discovered my interest in photography in high school while working for the yearbook. Although I worked for the DVD team, I realized that it's a blast working with a camera, and shooting stills became just as fun as shooting video.

I have a pet Cockatiel and no siblings. My favorite color is red, and I was actually born in Indonesia to a Spanish mother and an American father. Life's been amazing thus far and I cannot wait for whatever the future may bring.

Professor Spotlight

New professor Sam Cowling loves philosophy, comics By Sam Heyman Arts and Life Editor You can tell a lot about a professor just by looking at the books on their desk. If they are anything like Dr. Sam Cowling of the Philosophy department, you might be surprised and delighted to find a copy of Modal Logic as Metaphysics just inches away from an issue of DC Comics’ Swamp Thing. One of Denison’s newest hires, Cowling is an amiable and uniquely engaging addition to the faculty. Long before he pursued his doctorate at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Cowling was just a comic book fan living on the Canadian West Coast. Upon taking his first philosophy course at University of Victoria in British Columbia, he realized that a lot of the questions and concepts explored in the comics he loved, particularly the implications of time travel and multiple universes, were ones he could engage with in philosophy. This discovery set him on a course toward scholarly engagement with metaphysics, the philosophy of science and the philosophy of language. He received his B.A. from UVic in 2004, his M.A. from the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg one year later, and his Ph.D. from UMass Amherst in 2011. Like many college graduates contemplating professorship, Cowling decided not to jump into graduate school right away. Instead, he took a year off from school, during which he worked in a pawnshop. “I thought it might not be a bad idea to see if [being a professor] was really what I wanted to do,” he says. “I took a year to reflect, and it helped me realize, of course this is what I want to do!” Though his time being a working professor has been relatively brief (before his arrival in Granville he did a two-year stint at Western Michigan University), Cowling has been impressed by the students and faculty at Denison thus far, comparing his experience on the Hill to his previous work in Massachusetts. Of his fellow professors in philosophy, he was delighted to find that they have social skills, which, he noted, is not always the case with academics. Cowling has also been glad to see the wealth of intellectual and cultural diversity present in our campus community, both among his students and his colleagues. Asked about his own personal philos-

Courtesy of denison.edu

newest Philosophy professor, you can also Swamp Thing.

ophies about education, Cowling said, “I like the idea of giving people philosophical literacy, or the tools of critical thinking and inquiry that philosophy can give you.” He expressed that one of the key values of a philosophical education is that “you can take philosophy wherever you go.” Becoming a professor has not diminished his love of comics, and in between preparing for his Introduction to Philosophy and History of Analytic Philosophy courses, Cowling enjoys a healthy diet of the medium’s finest. Among his long list of favorites are Brian K. Vaughan’s epic space opera Saga, the many works of Mike Mignola (Hellboy, among others), Grahm Morrison’s Doom Patrol and Paul Chadwick’s Concrete. He is encouraged to see comics being implemented into the Denison curriculum, and hopes he can offer Denisonians a chance to explore philosophy through comics sometime soon. Cowling has only had a few weeks to establish himself as a presence on this campus, but students are already raving about his unique approach to teaching. Karen Osbourne ‘16, a psychology major from Nashville, Tenn., says that “Dr. Cowling is enthusiastic about what he teaches and has the talent to make his students excited about the subject matter. He explains philosophy in a way that’s easy to understand and relevant to his students.” Anyone interested in an interesting way to broaden their Denison education should be on the lookout for Cowling’s course offerings this spring.

MEET YOUR EDITORS Ruby Montes De Oca Hometown: Chicago, Ill. Class of: 2014 Majors: Communication Minor: Educational Studies

I have been working with The Denisonian never imagined I would become the Editor-in-Chief of the newspaper, but they say great things happen when you are busy pursuing your passions. Aside from my work with The Denisonian, I also serve on the executive board of

Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Incorporated, The National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC), Students of Carribean Ancestry (S.O.C.A), Golden Z and Kappa Delta Pi International Honor Society in Education. So, when I am not in Knapp 108, I am probably at a meeting or joking around with some friends.

Hung Tran Hometown: Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Class of: 2015 Majors: Computer Science and Communication On Campus: DCGA Vice President, Homelessness and Hunger President You're seeing all the effort that are being made to The Denisonian through last semester. We are going to bring even more positive changes, improving the whole campus media environment. I am very much proud of what we are doing here, but at times mistakes are still being made. Myself, or any other editors cannot be the sole driving force behind this growth, so my dear readers, we would

love to receive your constant feedback. And more? Look around campus, we of the positions interesting, and join our amazing and talented family! Well, about me? You can tell I am an optimist. Some people say I don't sleep, but actually I do.


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ARTS & LIFE

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Review

Members of the Jeremiah Johnson Band rock the stage on a hot, humid Ohio afternoon.

Sam Taggard/ The Denisonian

Nice Riffs! 13th Annual ‘Bluesfest’ rocks Granville By Sam Taggart Arts and Life Editor Organizers and volunteers of the Hotlicks Bluesfest stopped the traffic along Broadway Ave. in Granville early this Saturday, Sept. 7, setting the stage for the 13th Annual music-based event. Arranged by the Granville Federation for the Appreciation of the Blues and funded by donations, the day-long event showcased the rythmyc sounds of the Blues, with performances from two-time Grammy nominated headliner Ruthie Foster and the Jeremiah Johnson Band, a St. Louis based Blues-rock group who played the Crossroads Festival at Madison Square Garden in New York City.

Beginning in the heat of the early afternoon with a performance by Dave Workman and various guests, the festival provided music, a refreshing beer garden, and food from local businesses and food trucks, the event proved fun for all as local families gathered and enjoyed the sounds of the talented, soulful musicians. For the older - and rowdier - members of the crowd, lighting fireworks and “jamming out” with the performers extended late into the night at the upstairs bar in Brews. The festival was an overall success, and the residents of Granville – including its students – look forward to next year’s events!

Sam Taggart/ The Denisonian

ABOVE: Despite the heat, a crowd gathered facing the United Church of Granville, and enjoyed the live performances late into the evening. LEFT: The Mai Chau food truck, based in Columbus, parked itself on Broadway Ave. and prepared Vietnamese-inspired snacks for the audience.


ARTS & LIFE

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Page 9

Review

Fresh, fantastic and all-natural: Alfie’s adds flavor to Granville!

cludes salads like “Happy Tummy” which is a mixture of spinach, carrots, quinoa, chick peas, dried cranberries, scallions, and walnuts drizzled with a citrus vinaigrette. There are also meat options for those with more carnivorous taste, which include House Roasted Turkey Breast, roasted with herbs and apples. If the delicious food were not enough, beverages include local tea as well as fresh orange juice. We were served homemade Rosemary Lemonade, a very special treat that tasted magnificent. Alfie’s is fairly priced and a great option for any Denisonian’s craving some delicious and healthy options off the Hill, since Bon Appetite has gone beyond expectations in providing for us this semester.

By Golzar Meamar Assistant Arts and Life Editor Hidden in a nook in front of the Granville library is Alfie’s, a “wholesome food restaurant,” which opened this summer. While Alfie’s is essentially a very small shop, you can take your food and eat it at tables right outside the restaurant, in front of the library. It’s not on Broadway, but its intimate character still captures the essence of Granville. The restaurant hosts a menu of sandwiches as well as a window you can order from with a sizeable selection of healthy salads. Everything served is fresh and locally produced food. The salads and pastries are made daily and are made from fresh farm ingredients. Alfie’s makes their own mayonnaise and peanut butter and use sandwich bread that is baked in town! A Saturday trip in the middle of the Blues Festival led us to realize that we had found a new place to dine regularly in town. “The V.W.”, their most famous sandwich according to one of their employees, was heavenly. The sandwich included roast turkey, fig jam, brie, and spinach on sourdough bread. I was very excited to be eating there and

Golzar Meamar/ The Denisonian

my friends who tried the V.W. agreed; the sandwich was refreshing, both to their taste buds and in quality. Sophomore Molly McDonough, an education major from Chicago, Illinois, who visited Alfie’s for the first time with me, said that her California Veggie sandwich was “really good for only ten dollars!” The California Veggie contained housemade hummus, tomato, red onion, cu-

cumber, avocado, spinach, and sprouts on whole wheat bread. Other options on the sandwich portion of the menu include “The $14 PB&J” -- don’t worry, it’s only four dollars, and it comes with freshly ground peanut butter, granola, and strawberry basil preserves! Alfie’s also gives you the option to create your own sandwich with all of their fresh ingredients. Beyond sandwiches, Alfie’s menu in-

When you go... Where: Alfie’s is “hidden in a nook in front of the Granville library” 221 E Broadway Hours: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Don’t forget the Bandersnatch, Denison’s wonderful student-run coffee shop Hours: 9 p.m. - 2 a.m. everyday

IN PICTURE: UPC brought the Piano Duet to the Bandersnatch last Friday night

MEET YOUR EDITORS THE DENISONIAN

Sam Heyman ‘14 Hometown: Nashville, Tenn. Majors: English Writing and Queer Studies On campus: Hillel, D.I.T.A, Safe Zone, Writers’ Club, Beta Theta Pi

Golzar Meamar ‘16 Hometown: Mission Viejo, Calif. Major: English On campus: Chamber Singers, “Exile,” Kappa Kappa Gamma

Sam Taggart ‘14 Hometown: Summit, NJ Major: English Literature/ Philosophy On campus: Delta Chi (VP), Club Ice Hockey, 2-time Intramural champion

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Arts and Life is one of the most dynamic sections of the Denisonian, and I am honored to be among its editors. I got my Denisonian start writing reviews of the theatre productions put on by the Denison Theatre department and of comedians brought in by UPC, and the entertainment created by members of our campus community continues to inspire and excite me, even as a senior. Writing, acting and videogames are

The Arts and Life section is such a pleasure to write, edit, and share with the rest of campus! Denison is never short of dif-

Hi, I’m Sam! I am on the Hill for the last time this year and I am pleased to be a part of this accomplished Denisonian staff. This year I will be covering events on campus and off, as well as writing my own creative pieces on the side. Having traveled abroad during the Fall of my junior year, and having returned back to Denison the following semester, I recog-

that the Open House is one of the most underrated places on campus. This year looks to be an exciting one for the Hill, and I can’t wait to share it with you.

art performances, meaning there is never a dry spell. The campus-wide appreciation dedication to living and working together is incredible to write about. On a more personal side note, while I love to write, I also love to sing, read, and spend time in the bioreserve. I’m very excited for this semester at The Denisonian and I plan to take it on with a lot of coffee and hopefully great feedback!

had on my growth as an individual. In last year at Denison, I look forward to what lies ahead in school, and outside the classroom, where the my friends - the students - have made my time here truly unforgettable.

Arts & Life On-campus culture, offcampus lifestyles, and everything in between.

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denisonian@denison.edu


ARTS & LIFE

Page 10

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Senior Recipe

Fresh Basil Pesto Sauce

Contributor of this recipe JIMMY CONROY ‘14

Classic Basil Pesto Sauce

forget freshly-grated parmesan! - this spread goes great on pastas, sandwiches, or just about anything. I recommend using it as a sauce for pasta, as I did recently at a dinner with my roommates. For an added zing add sautéed mushrooms, roasted tomatoes, and goat cheese to make the pasta super yummy! Try it now before the basil is gone until next season!

3 cups fresh basil leaves ¼ cup roasted pine nuts ¼ cup pecorino romano (or parmesan) 1/3 cup of good olive oil Pinch of salt As the end of the summer approaches, it’s time to whip up some recipes with ingredients while they are still in season. After living on campus and spending my summer cooking in my Meyers Hall apartment, I practiced the techniques of simple recipes made with only a few ingredients. Ranging from basil tomato sauce to buttermilk baked fried chicken, all my recipes are made with only a few steps. One recipe that I take much pride in is my mouth-watering pesto sauce. Using fresh basil, pine nuts, olive oil - and don’t

Instructions: In a food processor, blend the basil leaves, pine nuts, pecorino romano, and salt. Then, gradually pour in the olive oil. After all the ingredients are thoroughly combined, scrape off the sides of the food processer and re-blend until the sauce is smooth and creamy. The pesto can be kept in the fridge for up to a week with a layer of quality olive oil covering the sauce. Variations of this recipe including adding roasted red peppers or almonds in lieu of pine nuts. Don’t forget to send us your recipe to denisonian@denison.edu

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SPORTS

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Crown Fitness Center caps construction

WEEKLY ROUND-UP Bringing you the box scores from the past week in Big Red athletics. For game recaps, visit: www.denisonbigred.com

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FIELD HOCKEY 9/8 Washington College Denison WOMEN’S SOCCER 9/8 Berry Denison

1 2 2 1

WOMEN’S GOLF 9/8 at Denison Invitational 1st Place FOOTBALL 9/7 Earlham Denison

28 51

MEN’S SOCCER 9/7 Washington & Jefferson Denison

1 5

FIELD HOCKEY 9/7 Denison Johns Hopkins

4 3

VOLLEYBALL 9/7 Denison St. Mary’s

0 3

VOLLEYBALL 9/7 Denison North Park

3 1

Page 11

By Luke Belechak Sports Editor Recently, Denison students have become accustomed to returning to the hill with a new addition to the campus. This summer, work on the $38.5 million newly renovated Mitchell Center came to its conclusion with the opening of the Crown Fitness Center on Monday, Aug. 26. The completion of the 8,000 square-foot space concludes two years of construction. The renovated facility features brand new equipment, providing Denisonians with plenty of space and opportunity to use the machines. The open-air feel is a radical change from the previous confined workout spaces. “The old weight room was always packed,” explained senior Reid Worrel. “This new area allows for plenty of room to spread out.” Now students have both the space and machines to fulfill every cardio and strength-training need. As with the rest of the Mitchell Center renovations, the Crown Fitness Center was built in accordance with U.S. Green Building Council meeting LEED standards, a trend Denison seems to be following. The new space was largely made possible thanks to 1985 Denison graduate Janet Crown, whom the new facility is named after. A member of Denison’s Board of Trustees, Crown led the charge in the funding and construction of the Crown Fitness Center. Crown undoubtedly used her experience as the own-

Luke Belechak/ The Denisonian The front entrance to the Mitchell Center was completed this summer, capping nearly twoyears of construction.

er of Burn 60 Fitness Studios in Brentwood, Calif. in the creation of Denison’s newest addition to campus. Graduating from Denison with a B.A. in History, Crown has taken on numerous tasks and jobs after leaving Granville. After furthering her education at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism, she relocated to Los Angeles and became involved with Creative Artists Agency (CAA), a sports entertainment agency. Her work with CAA led to a position as Vice President of Client Services at Focus Media, Inc. In 2005, Crown successfully opened her first fitness studio, Burn 60, which has

been gaining in popularity since its inception. The studio advertises 60 minute workouts, combining cardio and strength and resistance training for all levels. Nowadays, Crown lives in Los Angeles with her husband and five children. She has recently added a published writer to her list of credentials. She recently published the book Where Do the Animals Go When it Rains?, her first in a four part children’s series. The opening of the Crown Fitness Center is a much needed improvement to the Mitchell Center and will provide Denisonians with a beautiful, well used space for years to come.

MEN’S GOLF 9/7 Transylvania Invitational 8th Place WOMEN’S GOLF 9/7 Denison Invitational 1st Place WOMEN’S SOCCER 9/6 Shenandoah Denison

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Luke Belechak/ The Denisonian lion renovation of the Mitchell Center.

MEET YOUR EDITORS Luke Belechak ‘14

David Allen ‘16

Hometown: Pittsburgh, Pa.

Hometown: New Albany, Ohio

Majors: Biology and Chemistry

As a big bad senior, this is my last semester as an editor for The Denisonian. While I will miss the stressful Sunday

younger siblings. I enjoy losing myself in the depths of YouTube, singing, and the

As Sports Editor, I write and edit stories ful and insightful opinions on the Denison

life off the hill. I rep Pittsburgh like nobody’s busisports journalism. enjoy being the big brother to my three

Columbus Museum of Art and I am a -


SPORTS

Page 12

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Courtesy of Sports and Information

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By David Allen Sports Editor Atmospheres are pretty great. They evoke a mood, a touch, a smell, they can evoke everything and anything. And for Denison Big Red Football, the under-the-lights atmosphere on Saturday night evoked dominancewith a bit of heart-warming hope. In their season opener, the Big Red recorded four interceptions, 475 yards of total offense and clobbered Earlham college 51-28. Among the players who excelled in this game, one stood out among the rest. And that man is junior quarterback Brandon Sklenar. Sklenar tallied 275 yards of total offense, three touchdowns, a 72.7% completion percentage and a mountain of respect from his team and coaches during his first game as a college football starting quarterback. “This is the first time since high school that I’ve played with a Quarterback who is younger than me,” mused senior runningback John Wilson. “A Quarterback playing his first college game, there is definitely going to be a learning curve and I think he understands that and he’s going to do what he’s gotta do-filmwise and

studying.” Sklenar was the main lightning rod for DU’s offense early, lobbing a 49yard touchdown pass to DeShawn B r o w n with less than a m i nute into the game and on just the second play of the game. A n d only 40 seconds after that, yes just 40, Sklenar sprinted 20 yards for another TD culminating almost right after senior Joel Elliott’s impressive interception deep in opponent’s territory. “Brandon played well tonight. Really excited about the defense as well,” says offensive coordinator, Austin Holter. “[Sklenar’s] a junior and he’s going into his first college start so there is a lot he still has to work on but you can tell he is a special player and we are really excited about the progress Sklenar’s made so far.” But Sklener’s impressive statline wasn’t done yet, not even in the first quarter. He had yet another passing touchdown, this time to senior John Wilson

for 15 yards. In total, Denison had 21 points in just the first quarter, including 14 points within just the first two minutes of play, all coming from Sklenar. “I think Sklenar did really well,” says 4th year head coach, Jack Hatem. “He’s a great athlete. It’s a fun offense with him running around.” But Sklenar’s dominance isn’t the whole story, actually, according to Jack Hatem, the whole story has to do with speed. “We have some fast guys. I think it’s hard to defend all of them,” says Hatem. “The offensive coaches did a real nice job utilizing all of that.” Within the bevy of offensive coaches there is new offensive coordinator, Austin Holter. Holter has a great reputation within the DU program as he is largely responsible for the development of Denison Football legend Max Paulus ‘13. “Holter is a great leader,” remarks Sklenar. “I’d follow him into battle.” And now, with total reigns over the offensive side of the ball, Holter’s schemes and plays showed serious promise in the season opener. One of the more successful offensive weapons was Wilson, who totaled 102 yards on only 14 carries, accumulating an amazing 7.3 yard per carry average.

We are really excited about the progress Sklenar’s made so far.

Holter is a great leader, I’d follow him into battle.

THE DENISONIAN | SPORTS allen_d2 belech_l1

THE INDISPENSABLE COLLEGIATE LIFE FERVOR

This is a big difference to his stats last year, where he had only 48 yards on 13 carries throughout the entire year. “It starts with the O-line,” Wilson says. “They did a great job in front of me. We’ve been working the run game a lot. With a guy like Sam [Fioroni ‘13] gone, it’s a big shoe to replace and we did a good job and the numbers show that for sure.” John Wilson looks to get his first crack as the feature running back this season after backing up Fioroni for many years, and he seems to be poised for greatness after his 109yard game And while the offense flourished under the pistol/zone-read formation that Holter instilled, the defense also dominated with their scheme. “The defense really played well and put us in some situations with good field positions so we could capitalize,” Holter says. “For a young group, I’m really proud of them. Guys up front did a great job.” The three other players who got interceptions were sophomore Zach Pewitt, freshman Andrew Baird and senior Teddy Kuntz. Baird, in his very first college football game, led DU with six solo tackles as well as the interception which he returned for 28 yards. This incredible defensive performance is very promising compared to last year’s, which only totaled one interception the entire year. For the near future the crystal ball seems bright, but with a flurry of improvements. For instance,basic miscues seemed to be the achilles heel for the team who lost 90 yards on ten penalties. “We have to work on fundamentals. Make sure we are reading our cues, making sure we are taking care of our assignments,” adds Holter. “Obviously, we need to continue to develop. We have a lot of young players playing right now, a lot of them playing in their first actual college football game. I tell them to ‘Enjoy the win but come back tomorrow ready to work’.”

DU Stat of the Day The Denison Football team had four interceptions versus Earlham college on Saturday night. Last year the Big Red only had one interception throughout the entire year. In total, Denison accumulated 109 yards on interception returns on Saturday

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Sept. 10, 2013