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LIFE&ARTS PAGE 12

The Eastern Sea discusses their latest tour

City of Austin passes food cart regulations

Students object to game on Yom Kippur

NEWS PAGE 9

OPINION PAGE 4

THE DAILY TEXAN Monday, September 27, 2010

THE WEEK AHEAD TODAY ‘Heaven’

Los Lonely Boys perform a free show at Waterloo Records at 5 p.m.

TUESDAY Flower power

The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center hosts “The Yard Show,” an exhibit of yard art projects and decorative bird houses. Starts at 9 a.m.

Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

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Federal stimulus funds ‘ultracapacitor’ research Because batteries use chemical reactions to conduct energy, they degrade over time and eventually stop working, but not this gadget. An “ultracapacitor” can conduct By Collin Eaton energy over and over again without chemDaily Texan Staff ical reactions and without shortening its Chemistry graduate student Daniel Dreyer lifespan at all, Dreyer said. twirled a nickel-sized device between his finThe only problem is that it can’t store gers Friday, explaining with a grin that it can much energy, and that’s what Dreyer and store energy like a battery — but it can’t die. a team of UT professors and graduate stuEditor’s Note: This is the first in a two-part series about the impact of federal stimulus funding at UT. The second installment will run tomorrow.

dents are trying to work out, all thanks to more than $200,000 in stimulus money from the federal economic stimulus package. “That funding has enabled collaborators from different disciplines to come together,” said Christopher Bieladwski, a chemistry professor who is leading part of the “ultracapacitor” research team. As of Sept. 6, the federal government has awarded UT researchers about $60 million

in stimulus funds, which have supported more ON THE WEB: than 140 research projects. Faculty in See a breakdown of stimulus money for the College of NatuUT researchers ral Sciences and the @dailytexan Cockrell School of Enonline.com gineering received the

STIMULUS continues on page 2

Bruins brand Longhorns with first loss

To the moon!

Russian astronaut Alexander Martynov gives a talk about international cooperation in exploring space. Starts at 7 p.m. in BUR 112.

WEDNESDAY Red River Rivalry The Texas Exes Student Chapter hosts this year’s Texas vs. OU Torchlight Rally Parade. The event starts at 8 p.m. on the Main Mall.

Ethics panel The Faculty Council hosts the first-ever Ethical Research Awareness Day, which focuses on highlighting UT’s research standards in the Texas Union 2.201 at 10 a.m.

THURSDAY He’s alive

Austin-based Trouble Puppet Theater Co. performs an puppet adaptation of “Frankenstein”. Show begins at 8 p.m. and tickets start at $11.

Too hot inside, too hot outside

CocoRosie, a duo of sisters, performs at Emo’s with No Mas Bodas and My Empty Phantom. Show starts at 9 p.m. and tickets cost $20 at the door.

FRIDAY Stop poking me “The Social Network” opens in theatres across the nation.

‘‘

Quote to note “The tour went all the way up the middle of the country and to the Midwest and to the East Coast and back down to here. It was really, really well-received, surprisingly, because nobody knows who we are...” — Matt Hines Lead singer of The Eastern Sea LIFE&ARTS PAGE 12

Danielle Villasana | Daily Texan Staff

Two young Longhorn fans wait for the third quarter to begin in Saturday’s game against the UCLA. Texas fared little better in the second half against the Bruins.

Texas tumbles from AP top 10 rankings as result of Saturday’s heartbreaking defeat By Dan Hurwitz Daily Texan Columnist Winning is one of the University of Texas’ greatest traditions. Whether it’s football or partying, Longhorns expect to be among the best. So on Saturday evening, Darrell K RoyalTexas Memorial Stadium was supposed to be nearly empty at the final whistle of the game against UCLA because the Longhorns

were supposed to be so far ahead that the dium like they were leaving a funeral. fans could comfortably leave knowThe funeral of the 2010 Longhorn ing that a large margin of victory football season. INSIDE: would be safe. “It was not fair to Texas fans. It was More coverage But instead, as UCLA continnot fair to the players,” said head on the Texasued to run the clock down, a sicoach Mack Brown. “I’ve got to do a UCLA game lenced group of thousands in better job. You can’t have that many on page 7 burnt orange — some of whom mistakes when you’re doing my job.” had been booing their team earlier — Where one loss may not be so painslowly made the painful walk out of the sta- ful in any other sport, in college football,

where the a BCS formula that involves computers and human polls determines a championship rather than a playoff system, one loss significantly hurts a team’s chance of being crowned the champion. In the wake of the one-sided loss to a nonranked team, the Longhorns, who started the weekend ranked No. 7, fell to No. 21,

LOSS continues on page 8

Week of events UT Visual Arts Center celebrates redesign seeks to honor Facility to display exhibits from college’s collections, Latino heritage to be curated by students By Audrey White Daily Texan Staff More than 20 Latino student organizations will celebrate their cultural and Longhorn identities in the coming days with the University’s first Latino Heritage Week. The week falls during Hispanic Heritage Month, which lasts from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, and will include a rally, leadership panel, art showcase, and civil rights and identity discussions. Leaders of the Latino PanHellenic Council, in coalition with other Latino leadership groups on campus such as the League of United Latin American Citizens and immigration activist group University Leadership Initiative, decided it was necessary to bring UT’s many Latino voices together for a week of conversation and community action. “The Latino Pan-Hellenic Council is meant to be a uniting force,” said Nathan Bunch, president of the council. “Our executive board is made up of many different organizations and we wanted to use this as a vessel to unite the community. We realized there wasn’t a central celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month and this is our

LATINO continues on page 9

By Emily Sides Daily Texan Staff Discolored and stained, abandoned carpets surround a bed crushed by more than 200 geometrically interwoven white PVC pipes. A childhood pillow is covered in gold and silver tacks, which stick out at all angles. A mirror creates an infinite design of a sculpture collage of photos. Artist in residence at UT’s Visual Arts Center, Los Angeles-based Ry Rocklen, created his exhibition “ZZZ’s” with the help of students in the College of Fine Arts. The center opened its doors last weekend to more than 1,000 guests with a dinner reception, an interactive painting exhibition, tours and music performances. The center, which was revamped by San Antonio-based architecture firm Lake|Flato, includes a new entrance and many more windows. “Before, this building was just a gold block and students didn’t know what’s going on inside,”

Caleb Bryant Miller | Daily Texan Staff

People walk by “Above the Ceiling, Below the Floor,” a sculpture by Ian Pedigo at the Visual Arts said You You Xia, spokeswoman for the center. “The windows can get people curious.” She said some of the college’s permanent collections will be displayed in year-round exhibitions. Each gallery is curated by

different members of the community, from faculty and professional artists such as Rockland, to the student-run Center Space Project, Xia said. Jade Walker, the center’s director, said students from every

college have many ways to get involved with the center. “The students are getting a real skill set to function outside of the University with

CENTER continues on page 2


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NEWS

THE DAILY TEXAN Volume 111, Number 76 25 cents

CONTACT US Editor: Lauren Winchester (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Sean Beherec (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Web Office: (512) 471-8616 online@dailytexanonline.com Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@dailytexanonline.com

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2010 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

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professional artists in a professional setting,� Walker said. “It’s also for students interested in art and want to have a taste, see how art evolves.� Covering 25,000 square feet, Walker said the center has five free galleries, which are open to the public. The center meets the college’s long-pursued goal of collaboration with students, faculty and the community, she said. “Our goal of being a hive of energy and synergy [has been realized],� Walker said. “It gives us more of a presence. So many people can see through our windows, it allows for a back and forth conversation.� Jack White, a New York artist who moved to Austin three years ago, said he liked the fact that wherever he stands in the center’s new galleries, he is able to see outside. “I remember coming in once and I wondered, if there’s a gallery here, where is it?� White said. “Now, it’s totally different. The openness of it is beyond imagination. The building itself is a work of art. The openness of the space really grabs you — from almost any spot you can see outside.�

Caleb Bryant Miller | Daily Texan Staff

Admirers examine artist and UT alumna Rebecca Ward’s installation, “Newton Would Be Proud,� on Sunday at the UT Visual Arts Center.

STIMULUS: More than 140 projects sponsored so far From page 1 majority of the stimulus funding, and researchers said the money has enabled them to hire more graduate student research assistants, build better research centers and move forward with projects that would not be possible otherwise.

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Sriram Vishwanath, an associate engineering professor, said two of his labs would have been put on hold for several months, without the stimulus funds. “Without the stimulus support, much of the research I do would not be possible,� Vishwanath said. But UT Provost Steven Leslie said the temporary status of certain stimulus funds raises questions about support for ongoing research projects. “For the federal research funding, we want more stable, longterm funding, and there are questions about what will happen when these funds terminate,� Leslie said. Stimulus funds from the Nation    

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al Institutes of Health will expire after a two-year period, and many projects began in 2009. The shorter expiration date gives UT researchers less time to perform necessary research, said Susan Sedwick, associate vice president for research. But other projects, such as those

neering professor, said he isn’t concerned about money for research because the National Institute of Standards and Technology guaranteed his funding and scheduled it to last for three years. But some researchers say it will be a lot harder to know where fund-

‘‘

Without the stimulus support, much of the research I do would not be possible.� — Sriram Vishwanath, Associate engineering professor

funded through the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation, could last longer because those institutions did not put the same expiration dates on the stimulus funds they provided, Sedwick said. “We anticipate that next year we may not see a huge increase [in research funding], but I can tell you that right now, what we’re seeing coming in the door is pretty substantial,� she said. Richard Klingner, a civil engi-

ing will come from in the future. Elizabeth Pena, a communication sciences professor whose research is funded by the stimulus, is studying what performance markers distinguish between language-impaired and non-impaired students. “There’s a lot more competition for fewer dollars,� Pena said. “We can’t assume that we’ll be able to write a continuation grant proposal and get it funded.� For mechanical engineering professor Glenn Masada, the stim-

ulus funds have unearthed a topic that Texas has largely ignored — geothermal energy provided by ground-source heat pumps. Because of the stimulus funds, about 300 mechanical engineering seniors have been exposed to the domestic energy source, and both graduate students and undergraduate students can get jobs as research assistants. “Until the [American Recovery and Reinvestment Act] program, geothermal energy had been largely overlooked nationally — but certainly in Texas — as a renewable energy source,� Masada said. Because buildings in Texas need cooling and are placed in relatively dry geological conditions, Masada said he is investigating methods to prevent the water under the earth’s surface in Central and West Texas from heating the local ground. Vishwanath, who was awarded more than $380,000 in stimulus funds, said he has been working overtime to find the money necessary to continue his research after the funds expire, but it’s not a big deal. “Good research speaks for itself, and so funding will come by in the future, I am sure,� he said.

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Laken Litman, Andy Lutz, Jon Parrett, Bri Thomas Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Victoria Elliott Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ryan Murphy Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Carlos Medina Associate Multimedia Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pierre Bertrand Senior Video Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 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Issue Staff

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emily Sides, Lauren Giudice, Nick Mehendale Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kate Clabby Editorial Cartoonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Thomas Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Hummer, Emily Brlansky, Wes Maulsby Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Shawn Johnson Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Benjamin Miller, Leslie Hansen, Will Alsdorf Wire Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nolan Hicks Comic Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Betsy Cooper, Riki Tsuki, John Massingill, Amyna Dosani . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Connor Shea, Brianne Klitgaard, Gillian Rhodes, Denise Chee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aaron West, Claudine Lucena, Garrett Sullivan

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Wire Editor: Nolan Hicks www.dailytexanonline.com

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Monday, September 27, 2010

T HE DAILY T EXAN

Preacher says he will fight child abuse allegations By Errin Haines The Associated Press LITHONIA, Ga. — Casting himself as the Bible’s ultimate underdog, Bishop Eddie Long went before thousands of faithful supporters at his megachurch Sunday and promised to fight accusations that he lured four young men into sexual relationships. “I feel like David against Goliath. But I got five rocks, and I haven’t thrown one yet,� Long said in his first public remarks since his accusers filed lawsuits last week claiming he abused his “spiritual authority.� He stopped short of denying the allegations but implied he was wronged by them. “I have never in my life portrayed myself as a perfect man. But I am not the man that’s being portrayed on the television. That’s not me. That is not me,� he said. Long’s brief addresses to the congregation at New Birth Missionary Baptist Church were met with thunderous applause and an outpouring of support during services that were equal parts part rock concert and pep rally. The sanctuary was nearly filled to its 10,000-seat capacity for both the 8 a.m. and 11 a.m. services. Many lined up two hours before the doors of the church opened. Over the past 20 years, Long became one of the country’s most powerful independent church leaders, turning a suburban Atlanta congregation of 150 to a 25,000-member powerhouse with a $50 million cathedral and a roster of parishioners that includes athletes, entertainers and politicians. There was almost no sign his flock wanted to turn him away, Sunday. Followers prayed, sang and embraced one another as they rallied around their senior pastor. During the second service, however, one young man in a blue shirt stood up and shouted: “We want to know the truth, man!� He was escorted out and did not return.

NEWS BRIEFLY Wisconsin levee failure causes additional flooding PORTAGE, Wis. — A levee along the Wisconsin River failed on Sunday, flooding the access road leading to a park area and cutting off any residents who did not heed daylong warnings to evacuate. It wasn’t immediately clear how many of the roughly 300 residents remained in Blackhawk Park around 4 p.m. Sunday when the road was closed following the failure of the Caledonia Levee. The Columbia County Emergency Management Office was letting nobody in or out of the park until further notice and warned all morning that emergency vehicles would not be able to reach any residents who stayed behind.

Settlement slowdown ends imperiling peace talks Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

Soldiers of the 36th Infantry Division of the Texas Army National Guard participate in a ceremony Sunday on the floor of the Frank Erwin Center honoring their service. Their upcoming mission is to train Iraqi security forces and to assist in the American troop withdrawal from Iraq.

Troops prepare for Iraq mission By Collin Eaton Daily Texan Staff Private first class Gerlencia Robinson smiled with quiet pride as an army band blew their last ceremonial note and her young daughter clung to her fatigues. Robinson’s mother, stepfather and stepbrother — as well as 800 other soldiers — are all deploying to Iraq on a peacekeeping mission as part of the 36th Infantry Division, based out of Camp Mabry. But someone has to stay, and that’s her, Robinson said at a deployment ceremony at the Frank Erwin Center Sunday morning. Robinson said the mission — helping U.S. forces withdraw from Iraq and train Iraqi security forces — should be one of the best the division has ever undertaken. “On this mission, we’re looking to bring all the troops over there home,� she said. “For our troops in Iraq, it’s pretty much a wel-

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come home. I think all the families should be OK.� The soldiers form the Texas Army National Guard’s 36th Infantry Division, which normally responds to ecological disasters such as Hurricane Ike. The division was reinstated in 2003 — the last time it was deployed into combat was during World War II. During the deployment ceremony at the Frank Erwin Center on Sunday morning, families watched as the civilian reserve troops — their sons, daughters, spouses and parents — lined up in rows, hands behind their backs, itching to rush back to their children, family and friends for the afternoon. Robinson’s mother, Sergeant Roselyn Wilkins, said she’s excited about the mission — her third deployment overseas. “I’ve been on all the peacekeeping missions so far and I’m really excited,� Wilkins said. “It’s

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hard [being away from each other], but we’re a military family and I guess we’ve gotten used to it.� Staff Sergeant Eldridge Wilkins, Robinson’s stepfather, said he’s been deployed to Kosovo and has been stationed in Egypt, so the experience with the heat is one thing that won’t be alien about the deployment. “It’s going to be interesting,� Eldridge said. “I know about the heat. Just got to get back into it.� The soldiers wore T-patches shaped like arrowheads on their sleeves, showing the Texas Army National Guard 36th Infantry Division. The soldiers will train in Washington, D.C. and arrive in Iraq in December.

During his keynote speech, Gov. Rick Perry said the Texas National Guard remains an essential part of the U.S. combat forces. Perry said the Texas Army National Guard division is only the third to obtain command and control over the withdrawal of U.S. brigades in Iraq. “I’ll tell you this: Folks who know anything about military history will find it very reassuring to hear a Texas accent over the radio,� Perry said. “Since the 36th Infantry Division was reinstated in 2003, you’ve served Texas by stepping up to face monstrous hurricanes, massive wildfires and other challenges — you are consistently there.�

REVAVA, West Bank — Jewish settlers released balloons and broke ground on a kindergarten in celebration Sunday, as a 10-month construction slowdown expired. Meanwhile U.S. and Israeli leaders tried to figure out how to keep Palestinians from walking out of peace talks over the end of the restrictions. After the slowdown ran out at midnight, there was no Palestinian statement about the future of the talks. The Palestinians asked for an Oct. 4 meeting of an Arab League body to discuss the situation. Minutes after the expiration, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called on the Palestinians not to walk away, but instead to maintain constant contact “to achieve a historic framework accord within a year.� Palestinians have questioned whether they can make peace with Netanyahu, known as a hard-liner. Compiled from Associated Press reports


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Monday, September 27, 2010

OPINION

Editor-in-Chief: Lauren Winchester Phone: (512) 232-2212 E-mail: editor@dailytexanonline.com Associate Editors: Viviana Aldous Susannah Jacob Doug Luippold Dave Player

T HE DAILY T EXAN

GALLERY OVERVIEW

The next step The Red River Rivalry game and Yom Kippur fall on the same day in 2011. Yom Kippur is one of the most sacred and solemn days of the Hebrew year, and many Jewish and non-Jewish Longhorns are outraged by the conflict. In protest, students launched a campaign including a Facebook group that already has several hundred members, an online petition and campus rallies all in an effort to change the date of the game, but Big 12 and UT officials indicated that a change was unlikely. The Red River Rivalry should not be on Yom Kippur; hopefully everybody can agree a major campus festivity should not fall on one of the most revered days in the Jewish faith. The dates should not conflict, but they do, and we would completely support a change — once somebody offers a solution to bring one. To this end, while advocates have vehemently demanded a change, no one has put forth a way to enact one. The discussion should not be whether the game should be on Yom Kippur but how to change it at minimal cost and with the least inconvenience possible. The dates conflict largely because they are designated by two different calendars. The Red River Rivalry game annually occurs the second weekend of the State Fair of Texas, which begins the last Friday of September and continues for 24 days. Advancing the game one week would be difficult because the State Fair Classic between Grambling State University and Prairie View A&M is the first weekend of the State Fair. Pushing the game back a week would require Texas and Oklahoma to reschedule their games for that week, forcing their opponents to reschedule theirs, setting off a chain reaction that could potentially impact several teams. Any scheduling changes could cost the University significant amounts of money, not to mention the impact it would have on businesses that operate and plan around a game being played on the second weekend of the fair. This is not to say the date shouldn’t change; just that so far, we just haven’t heard any plausible suggestions for how to accommodate such a change. While extremely organized and savvy, the campaign to move the game has been more of an outlet for frustration than a forum for solutions. The Facebook group “Texas OU Game 2011 on Yom Kippur...LET’S CHANGE IT,” the centerpiece of the effort, claims its purpose is to “work together ... to come up with suggestions on how we can spread the word and make this happen.” However, the group’s discussion section is empty, and its wall isn’t a platform for solutions as much as a forum for boasting about its media attention and ostracizing those who disagree with its movement. To be sure, some critiques of the efforts are fallacious and mean-spirited. Some claim moving the game would be some overreaction by the “P.C. Police,” and that the conflict is acceptable because UT has held games on Christian and secular holidays, such as the A&M game on Thanksgiving and last Easter’s spring game. Comparisons between an Easter spring game and Yom Kippur OU game are ignorant at best and offensive at worst. Easter and Christmas are of a joyous nature, and a vibrant football game would not conflict with the festive nature of the holiday. Yom Kippur, on the other hand, is a reflective and solemn high holy day where Jews focus on sacrifice and subservience to God through strictly prescribed and centuries-old practices. Opposing a change because of the logistical and financial implications involved is perfectly reasonable, but denying the validity of the campaign’s grievances is disrespectful. The campaign has done an impressive job of bringing attention to the issue, but so far that is all it has accomplished. If its members really want to work with the University to move the game and convince the Longhorn population it is worth the cost and effort, then they must acknowledge the complexities involved and start presenting alternatives. — Douglas Luippold for the editorial board

GALLERY

The politics of sugar By Kate Clabby Daily Texan Columnist The food processing industry doesn’t want you to be confused. That is why representatives of the Corn Refiners Association say they recently applied to the FDA to rename their most vilified product, highfructose corn syrup (HFCS), the more innocuous-sounding “corn sugar.” Within the past few months, consumer concern that HFCS is more harmful than sugar has led companies to remove the HFCS from products such as Hunt’s Ketchup, Wheat Thins and Sara Lee bread, and USDA statistics show that HFCS consumption is at a 20-year low. Although it could take up to two years for the FDA to allow the name “corn sugar” onto ingredient labels, the Corn Refiners Association is already using it in a TV ad and on its new website, cornsugar.com. The TV ad claims, “Whether it’s corn sugar or cane sugar, your body can’t tell the difference. Sugar is sugar!” I like seeing the makers of Coca-Cola and Hostess Cupcakes on the defensive, but the media storm surrounding this name change might distract consumers from both the real science and the real politics behind the sweetener. The website quotes doctors who claim that cane sugar contains the same simple sugars, fructose and glucose in roughly the same proportions as HFCS. Most HFCS contains 55 percent fructose and 45 percent glucose. Cane sugar is actually sucrose, which is one molecule of fructose bonded

to one molecule of glucose. So while it does contain 50 percent glucose and 50 percent fructose, your body uses enzymes to break apart the molecules in order to digest it. The sugars do act the same by the time they get to your bloodstream, but it’s feasible that the difference in the digestive process could change your body’s reaction. Some studies have shown that HFCS causes more weight gain in lab animals than cane sugar, but the data is not conclusive. The real reason behind HFCS’s widespread use is that it’s cheap. In 1973, The USDA started subsidizing corn by paying farmers to grow as much as possible and sell it below the cost of production. Corn production skyrocketed, and its price continued to fall. So the food processing industry looked for new ways to use this cheap commodity and invented HFCS. It was a few cents cheaper than sugar, so companies started to add it to food in the late 1970s. Simultaneously, American obesity rates exploded. We can, in part, blame the sweetener for the obesity crisis, but any qualitative difference between HFCS and sugar is dwarfed by the quantitative difference. Food companies didn’t just swap out the old sugar for the new HFCS — because it was cheaper, they induced consumers to eat (and drink) more of it. Soft drink makers “supersized” their portions, offering larger bottles for only a few cents more, and HFCS started to show up in foods we don’t even think of as sweetened, such as bread, lunch meat and hot dogs. Almost anything tastes better

with a little bit more sugar, so adding HFCS is a cheap way for food processors to “add value” to a product and entice customers to keep buying it. All of this extra HFCS has meant that, according to Michael Pollan, America’s percapita consumption of all sugars has increased from 128 pounds per year in 1985 to 158 in 2006. Chemical nuances aside, sugar is sugar, and 158 pounds a year is far too much. Pressuring companies to switch from HFCS to cane sugar won’t solve our obesity problem, and cane sugar is often grown by exploited, impoverished farmers in developing countries, so the politics are just as bad. The Corn Refiners Association claims that HFCS is “fine in moderation.” But what is moderation? The World Health Organization recommends that no more than 10 percent of your daily calories come from added sugar. For someone who eats 2,000 calories a day, that’s only 200 calories — and 200 calories of sugar a day adds up to less than 40 pounds a year. If we all started consuming HFCS in true moderation, the industry would never survive. It absolutely makes sense to avoid HFCS — it is a sign of a processed, nutritionally deficient food that probably contains far too much sugar as well as other less-thanhealthy additives. But if cane sugar starts to replace it in more of these products, don’t let the food industry off so easily. Junk will still be junk. Clabby is an English senior.

LEGALESE

RECYCLE

Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange news stand where you found it.

THE FIRING LINE Not America’s problem On Wednesday, Sept. 22, The Daily Texan published an opinion column, “Take responsibility for Mexico’s tragedy,” concerning the drug cartel war, and in particular, the resignation of El Diario de Juárez from the coverage of that war. This resignation was communicated through a letter. The letter spoke of the ineffective actions of the government and the effective actions of the drug cartels, and finally pleaded the cartel leaders to tell the newspaper what to publish so there would be no repercussions. It was poignant and sad. Even worse, as I was reading it, I knew I could only stand and observe in silence. So when I read an opinion article that attempts to illustrate that the United States of America is at the root of this drug war, I get angry only because there isn’t anything that I know of to help the situation. When I change my vacation spot from Mexico to Costa Rica, it’s because I don’t want to die, not because I do not care. In all of the world’s history, when has the United States of America forced the United Mexican States to be its crack transport? I know we have subdued much, if not all, of Latin America at some point in the 20th century and then strutted back across the Rio Grande; the United States should take responsibility for that. But we do not have to take responsibility for the drug wars. This is not a problem caused by America. It’s just a problem that needs to be solved. — Abhijit Sreerama Mathematics freshman


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SBOE: History textbooks contain ‘Pro-Islamic’ bias By Nick Mehendale Daily Texan Staff The State Board of Education has taken on alleged bias in social studies textbooks, evolutionary theory in its biology standards, and now, Islamic bias in textbooks. The Texas State Board of Education passed a controversial resolution by a 7-6 vote Friday that warns textbook publishers against “pro-Islamic/ anti-Christianâ€? views in world history textbooks. Rene NuĂąez and Mary Helen Berlanga, two Democratic members of the board, were absent when the final vote was taken. The resolution cites supposed instances of emphasis on unfavorable aspects of Christian history in textbooks that also attempt to overlook similar events in Islamic history. “I think there is a bias,â€? said board member Don McLeroy, R-College Station. “How can we go forward as a great society unless the children know what the truth is?â€? The resolution is nonbinding, with no legal weight, and merely a suggestion to publishers, said SBOE chairwoman Gail

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Monday, September 27, 2010

Lowe, R-Lampasas. Still, the resolution has major implications not just in the state but also on a national level. Texas is the second-largest textbook market in the nation, with approximately 4.8 million students, so the state’s standards could impact what makes it into textbooks outside Texas. Kathy Miller, president of the Texas Freedom Network, said the debate over the resolution was a waste of time because it concerned textbooks that are not even used in Texas schools. She also said the language of the resolution, which uses words like “tainted� and “whitewashed� to describe treatments of Islamic history, was inflammatory. But Lowe said board rules do not allow discussion of current books more than 90 days after they are adopted, and other Republicans said the bias already existed in current textbooks. “I believe that it’s happening in the current [world history textbooks] even though we can’t cover that in the resolution,� said board member Terri Leo, R-Spring.

Supporters of the resolution pressed the need for a “fair and balanced� representation of faiths in textbooks. “It is critical that this board send this message ... that you’ll reject inaccuracies and distortions in the submissions to this board of textbooks,� said Dave Welch, executive director of the Houston Area Pastor Council and a frequent outspoken critic of Islamic “indoctrination� of public school children. SBOE member Rick Agosto, D-San Antonio, said the resolution tarnished the image of the board. “It makes us look cuckoo,� he said. “We are allowing ourselves to be distracted by this narrow-minded resolution, which is itself biased. We should have taken the higher ground on this.� The resolution comes on the heels of the board’s controversial decision in May to revamp the social studies curriculum by removing Thomas Jefferson from a list of “revolutionary thinkers� and toning down criticisms of McCarthyism and the Red Scare.

Stopping for a bite

Danielle Villasana | Daily Texan Staff

Armando Figueroa repairs a rooftop on Manor Road across the street from El Chile CafĂŠ y Cantina just east of Interstate Highway 35.

NEWS BRIEFLY Band students hold pep rally prior to UCLA football game A group of about 200 volunteer band students marched around campus Friday night, playing school fight songs and pumping up the student body for the UCLA game. The march was reminiscent of a 1950s and ’60s tradition, when the Longhorn band would lead a pep rally before home games on Friday nights. Band leaders, who were led by Longhorn Band Student Association president Sam Clark, organized Friday’s march to try and bring back the tradition. “This was sort of a trial run,� Clark said. “One thing that we thought about is if this became a big thing in the future, we could make this a Texas Tech tradition before the game. That’s become a pretty big rivalry these days and we don’t have a parade or any sort of pep rally before that so we think this could fill that void.� Clark said he is hoping he can keep the event going in the future and get more people to know about it. “If we do it in future weeks, then we can get a big turn out and a big audience,� Clark said. “I think that can generate a lot of excitement.� The march included cheerleaders and Texas Cowboys. Computer sciences freshman William Vickery said more people showed up to the event than expected, which made the music sound even better. — Daniel Sanchez

Professor says students fall behind while not in school By Lauren Giudice Daily Texan Staff Students who attend low-income schools are more likely to fall behind during vacations than they are while in school, assistant public affairs professor Paul Von Hippel said during a lecture Friday. Von Hippel said the majority of schools are much fairer than most people would assume. Low- and high-income schools in the United States provide nearly equal educations to students, but a child’s experience at home is one component that

may widen the education gap, he said. “Schools do not contribute to inequality; they decrease it,� he said. “There’s a widespread belief that the achievement gaps between children of different backgrounds exist because of something that happens in school.� Von Hippel said the home lives of students broaden the achievement gap more than the type of school they attend. To minimize the disparity between low- and high-income students, he said he supports keeping all students, re-

gardless of class, in school for as out of school, during summer long as possible while reducing vacation, than when they are the length of summer vacation. in,� he said. “So perhaps the sim-

weeks into summer vacation.� Von Hippel said people tend to believe that the only variable in education is the quality of schools, but the public needs to start treating schools as partners rather than adversaries in the Schools do not contribute to inequality; they decrease it.� fight against inequality. Charter schools such as the — Paul Von Hippel, Assistant public affairs professor Harlem Children’s Zone Promise Academy and the Knowledge Is Power Program already keep stu“One of the most startling plest thing we can do for poor dents in school longer. Von Hippel findings in education research children is to offer them more said they are seeing some of the is that achievement gaps grow time in school, for example, by best results, and he hopes the pracmuch faster when children are extending the school year a few tice can extend to other schools.

‘‘

Von Hippel’s research is valuable because it provides a nonbiased method for solving social problems, said Robin Pearson, senior program coordinator for the Center for Health and Social Policy. “I appreciated the fact that he separated the difference between influences of inequality between home and school,� said Katie Schermerhorn, a public affairs graduate student. “It’s a strong argument for increased social services that positively affect the family.�

  

   

                                        

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SPORTS

Sports Editor: Dan Hurwitz E-mail: sports@dailytexanonline.com Phone: (512) 232-2210 www.dailytexanonline.com

T HE DAILY T EXAN

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      WINNING

STARTS HERE

Monday, September 27, 2010

www.utrecsports.org

SIDELINE TEXAS 12

UCLA 34

SOCCER

‘Rout 66’ replicated in shocker at DKR UCLA storms into Austin with smash-mouth plan, drills Horns on home turf By Jordan Godwin Daily Texan Staff Whatever you did before the game on Saturday, never do it again. Whatever you wore, burn it. Whatever you ate, forget it. Whoever you watched the game with, un-friend them. The monumental death that Texas football suffered Saturday can only be your fault. Head coach Mack Brown nobly took the fall after the game and expressed his embarrassment and sympathy for the fans. There’s no denying it — when the Longhorns lose, everyone associated with the University of Texas loses. Your Facebook friends make fun of you, your parents say you should have listened to them when they told you to attend an Ivy League school and your pets act like they don’t know you. And unfortunately for all of us, this loss won’t get Reggie Bushed — it’s in the history books to stay. Just like that 66-3 whooping UCLA put on Texas the last time the Bruins visited Austin in 1997, a loss commonly referred to as “Rout 66.� Saturday’s loss was the biggest margin of defeat the Longhorns have suffered at home since that game, more than 13 years ago, and it was the worst home loss Brown has ever coached at Texas. “I don’t feel like we’re very good at anything right now,� Brown admitted after the game. But there was no hiding the fact that the Texas offense has been moving toward that implosion all season. The offense

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LONGHORNS IN THE NFL Roy Williams, WR Texas junior running back Fozzy Whittaker stares into space as he enters the tunnel into the Tex Moncrief Athletic Complex after the Longhorns’ 34-12 loss at home to UCLA on Saturday. In a game where Texas was favored by 16, the Bruins looked like the more confident bunch in Austin. played almost exactly like it did the past few games. The running game struggled and had 85 yards for an average of 3.7 yards per carry. The passing game was inaccurate as quarterback Garrett Gilbert went 30 of 45, wildly missing big-time opportunities. Texas had five turnovers, an insurmountable cardinal sin. In many ways, except for the fact that Jordan Shipley wasn’t there to help Texas into the end

Danielle Villasana | Daily Texan Staff

UCLA running back Johnathan Franklin runs through the tackle of Texas cornerback Chykie Brown as fellow Longhorns Kenny Vaccaro and Emmanuel Acho follow in pursuit.

zone, the offense rehashed the woes of the national championship loss in January. Fans didn’t blame Gilbert after that one, and it’s tough to blame him now — he’s just trying to match his skills to the offense that the coaches have designed for him. The two aren’t meshing. “Sometimes you can learn more from a loss than from a win,� Gilbert said. Fans are vilifying offensive coordinator Greg Davis for

questionable play-calling, and they may have a valid argument. If Texas somehow plays in a bowl game and the Big 12 Championship, they’ll play 14 games this season. Average his salary and Davis earned a whopping $29,791.07 on Saturday night. That much money for that little effectiveness on offensive play calling? The truth is, the Texas fan base has grown very comfortable with winning. If you’re a

student in your second year at Texas, that was the first time you’ve seen the Longhorns lose a regular season game. It burns, but are the expectations of this football team too high? “Of course not,� said wide receiver Marquise Goodwin. “This is the University of Texas and expectations are always high. We have to fill those expectations and get the little things corrected. This one loss is not going to bring us down.�

Cedric Benson, RB

Texas silenced by Bruins in advance of showdown in Dallas with Oklahoma

Texas Tech to 144 yards and 14 points in Lubbock, one of the most hostile environments in college football according to Texas players, the Longhorn defense was outrun at home by a UCLA offense that was able to slip in and out of a defensive line and secondary that couldn’t make the right tackles. Most notable on the UCLA offense was running back Johnathan Franklin who racked up 118 yards, which was more than the 101 total rush yards Texas gained by its committee of four different backs. “We definitely didn’t play to our standard,� junior safety Blake Gideon said. “I can speak

for the defense and we are embarrassed that we didn’t hold up to our standard and show everyone how we’ve been preparing all week.� Last year, the Longhorns had the No. 1 rush defense in the nation, only allowing opponents to average 72 yards per game. On Saturday, Texas gave up 264 rush yards — quite a turnaround from 2009, considering it had been leading college football in that category as well in the first three games of 2010, at just under 42 yards rushing per game. “Honestly, I don’t really know what happened,�

Earl Thomas, S

By Laken Litman Daily Texan Staff A deathly silence washed over the Texas locker room after the stunning 34-12 loss to UCLA on Saturday, the Longhorns’ first defeat at home since 2007. “That’s not usually how we like it in the locker room after the games,� junior defensive tackle Kheeston Randall said. “You have to take the highs with the lows, and this is a low.� Just one week after holding

MOURNING continues on page 8

SOCCER

Texas comes away from weekend road trip with loss, draw By Emily Brlansky Daily Texan Staff Women’s soccer head coach Chris Petrucelli had hoped the Longhorns’ final trips as Big 12 oppnents to Lincoln, Neb., and Boulder, Colo., would include more than a learning experience, but in the end his team was only able to earn just that and one point in the conference standings. Texas brought home a 2-1 loss and a 0-0 tie from its Big 12 opening weekend road trip against Nebraska on Friday and Colorado on Sunday, moving to 6-2-2 in the season and 0-1-1 in the Big 12. Acting as the silver lining to a rough weekend, redshirt freshman Leah Fortune returned to Austin as the Longhorn’s top scorer after she scored her fourth goal of the season against the Huskers. Fortune’s goal was the only one the Longhorns posted this past weekend. Fortune netted the ball mere minutes after Nebraska forward Morgan Marlborough shot in a free kick to the back of the net past Texas goalkeeper Alexa Gaul in the second half of the game. Looking for the through ball, Fortune capped off a throwin from junior forward Stacey-

5 Catches 117 Yards 2 TDs

Danielle Villasana | Daily Texan Staff

Ann Smith and sent the ball flying into the upper corner of the net. Unfortunately for Texas, Marlborough got right back in the action and scored the Huskers’ second goal from a penalty kick inside the box. Nebraska outshot the Longhorns 17-8, but Gaul proved to be a valuable asset when she made a career-tying total of seven saves in the box. Gaul was able to stop one-on-one and far-post shots from the Huskers’ forwards, yet Marlborough challenged Gaul when she demonstrated skills of her own with her back-to-back goals. In attempt to recover from that loss, the Longhorns pushed Colorado into double overtime in Boulder on Sunday, but weren’t able to put one behind CU goalkeeper Annie Brunner. In the first period of overtime, Fortune was open in the box on one occasion, but was unable to touch in a long cross from Amanda Lisberger. She was unlucky again on a rebounded shot off Brunner a few seconds later. Colorado outshot Texas 12-8 but never broke past Gaul’s defense. There were few chances for either team to score in the match, according to Petrucelli, but he believed that it was a hard

Andrew Torrey | Daily Texan file photo

Texas junior Kylie Doniak, left, and sophomore Sophie Campise battle for control of the ball in the Longhorns’ 1-0 victory over No. 10 Brigham Young last Monday. The Longhorns tied the Colorado Buffaloes, 0-0, in double overtime in Boulder two days after dropping a close match 2-1 at Nebraska. fought game and that the Longhorns faced some tough competition in both games this past weekend. “We certainly now understand what it is like to play in the league, especially for our

young girls,� Petrucelli said. “It’s a really good learning experience because playing in the Big 12 is different than what we’ve played up to this point.� Texas will take this weekend as a learning experience,

as it was the first time that the Longhorns face Big 12 teams this season, and will gather on the home field to play the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in Austin on Friday at 7 p.m.

27 Rushes 81 Yards, Rush TD, 9 Yards Receiving

Quentin Jammer, CB 3 Tackles 2 Passes Deflected 1 Interception

6 Tackles 2 Interceptions 55 Return Yards 1 QB Hit

Jamaal Charles, RB 12 Rushes 97 Cards 3 Catches 57 Yards

AP Top 25 Poll - NCAAF 1

Alabama

2

Ohio State

3

Boise State

4

Oregon

5

TCU

6

Nebraska

7

Florida

8

Oklahoma

9

Stanford

10

Auburn

11

Wisconsin

12

LSU

13

Utah

14

Arizona

15

Arkansas

16

Miami (FL)

17

Iowa

18

USC

19

South Carolina

20

Michigan

21

Texas

22

Penn State

23

North Carolina State

24

Michigan State

25

Nevada


8 SPTS

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SPORTS

Monday, September 27, 2010

WOMEN’S GOLF

Vandermade shines at Vanderbilt By Chris Hummer Daily Texan Staff The Longhorns continued their first-semester string of tournaments with the Mason Rudolph Invitational hosted by Vanderbilt over the weekend. This tournament marks the return of head coach Martha Richards, previously the coach at Vanderbilt until taking the job at Texas in 2007. “Returning last year was harder than this time. This year I’m really the coach of Texas.� said Richards. “Now I’m a Longhorn. It was great to be a part of Vanderbilt but now I want to beat them.� The Longhorns started the week off with cumulative team score of a 6-over 294, which was good for 14th place, trailing the LSU Tigers, who had a team score of 10-under to lead the tournament. Junior Nicole Vandermade and sophomore Haley Stephens led the team with rounds of 2-under, and were two of 24 players who fin-

ished the round under par. Both finished their day off strong. Vandermade birdied on three out of her final five holes, and Stephens finished her round with back-toback birdies on 17 and 18.

due following close behind, trailing by only a single stroke. Vandermade once again led the team with another round under par. She finished with a 1-under 71, placing her in a tie for 11th place. The Longhorns started the final round Sunday at 8:23 a.m. on the 10th hole. Looking to build on their previous rounds and move up on the tournament ladder, the It was great to be part team improved over their two of Vanderbilt but now previous rounds with a score of a 2-over round and finished in 13th I want to beat them.� place for the tournament. — Martha Richards “Overall we hit the ball well, need to work in the wind and Head coach get better in crosswinds by getting lower a trajectory on the ball. We also hit lots of good putts that burned the edges� said Richards. LSU finished their wire-toThe team finished the second round with a combined score of wire victory with a final score of a 5-over 293, moving up the leader- 21-under 843, finishing two strokes board to 13th place. LSU continued ahead of Purdue in a tight victory. Vandermade once again led the to lead the tournament with a combined score of 16-under with Pur- team with a score of even-par, fin-

‘‘

Shannon Kintner | Daily Texan file photo

Texas sophomore golfer Katelyn Sepmoree lines up a putt in a tournament last season. Sepmoree helped in the Longhorns’ 13th place effort in Tennessee this past weekend, shooting even par in the final round. ishing the tournament in 20th place. With sophomores Madison Pressel and Katelyn Sepmoree matching Vandermade at even par, Stephens finished her round with a score of

1-over and freshman Rebecca LeeBentham finished at 10-over. One positive that Texas can take away from this tournament is that this is the same course that

will host the 2012 NCAA Championships. This bodes well for the young Longhorns who aspire to play in Franklin, Tenn., two years down the road.

LOSS: Forty Acres lacks usual liveliness MOURNING: Horns face unfamiliar ineptitude From page 1 in the AP poll in 36 weeks — snapping what had been the longest streak in the country at the time. “This is the University of Texas and expectations are always high,� wide receiver Marquise Goodwin said following the loss. “We just have to fill those expectations and get the little things corrected. This one loss is not going to bring us down.� When it comes to college football, to be the best, perfection is needed. And when it comes to this year’s squad, they are far from perfect. Saturday’s 34-12 loss to UCLA marked the Longhorns first home defeat since 2007, when Texas fell to Kansas State — also one week before the annual Red River Shootout against Oklahoma. The majority of students at UT today, including this writer, had never witnessed a home loss.

“It is tough facing reality,� junior Wes Ply said. “It is kind of hard to come to the realization that Texas isn’t as good as we thought.� The Texas Athletic Department has spoiled Longhorn fans. In recent years it wasn’t about if Texas was going to win. It was by how much. And when one thing goes, it is time to start pointing fingers. Last time Texas lost by a margin of 22 or worse at home was when the last the Longhorns hosted UCLA in a 66-3 shellacking in 1997. It became known as “Rout 66.� Following that season, a new head coach came to Austin. Don’t worry. Mack Brown is not going anywhere. But it will be interesting to see if there are other adjustments on the Longhorn coaching staff. But for now, whether you like or not, Texas fans are stuck with this football team. Despite the loss, fans such as

Ply are still making the trip to Dallas for Saturday’s matchup against Oklahoma. Others, however, are not. Following the loss, dozens of listings on Craigslist (asking for way too much money) immediately appeared as people are now trying to avoid making the trek to Dallas to see Texas play. Following Texas’ 2007 home loss, the Longhorns immediately suffered one against the Sooners — the last time they fell to their rivals from the north. This year, it could be the same story. Another loss would take away the slim chance the Longhorns have of reaching a national championship and would immediately hurt them in their quest for a Big 12 title. “Just saying the words OU around here gets everybody fired up,� running back Fozzy Whittaker said. “We’ll be going in there pumped up after this loss.� The players will be pumped up, but will their fans be?

     

“But when we came out for the “The offense didn’t give the second half, we weren’t able to defense enough hope,� head Randall said. “[UCLA] played capitalize on some of the things coach Mack Brown said. “The a great game against us and it’s we were seeing. I think we all defense got their heads down ... just back to the drawing board it seemed like we just kept messnow.� ing up.� The Longhorns were down The week before the Oklahoa manageable 13-3 at the half ma game has historically been and the score could have been rough for the Longhorns, as much worse since Texas’ ofBrown said earlier last week. The defense got their fense and special teams turned In fact, Texas’ last home loss in heads down ... it the ball over four times. Giv2007, a 41-21 smothering in the en those circumstances, the derain by Kansas State, also took seemed like we just fense worked hard to hold the place the week before OU. Texkept messing up.� Bruins to 77 first-half yards on as went on to lose the Red River 30 plays. Shootout, 28-21. — Mack Brown As they trudged into the lockThe Longhorns’ plan to have Head coach er room at halftime, heads hung a short-term memory and focus low. The Longhorns hoped to on correcting their mistakes and come back with some urgency in beating OU all week long. the second half. That desire was “There are a lot of things we shot down early when UCLA played hard, so that wasn’t the can do as a team to get better opened with an 80-yard scoring issue. It was just a matter of ex- in the next few days,� Randall drive that wore down the rush ecution.� said. “I’m not really worried defense that had been on the With an essentially inexperi- about it.� field for much of the first half. One loss doesn’t kill a seaenced offense, the Texas defense “We felt like we had a good has carried the team through the son, but if the Longhorns need hold on what they were doing first three games. By game four, to start worrying, they may only in the first half,� Gideon said. the defense appeared worn out. have to wait a few days.

From page 7

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9 CLASS

LATINO: Program focuses

on education, diversity From page 1 response to that.� This year’s freshman class includes a majority of nonwhite students for the first time and 23 percent of those freshmen are Latino or Hispanic. Overall, the UT student population was 16.2 percent Latino or Hispanic in fall 2009. However, Bunch said a broad range of colors, languages and political and socioeconomic backgrounds make up UT’s Latino community, and events this week will showcase both unity and diversity. “We’re the fastest growing ethnic minority and it is expected that we will become the largest population in the state of Texas in the next couple years,� he said. “There is so much diversity to our community that so many people identify with, so it’s impossible to put us in a single box. I don’t have the privilege of having dark skin, so I have to prove to people all the time that I am Latino. This week, we want to ask ourselves and other students: What does it mean to be Latino?� Because the Latino community is growing rapidly and impacts Texas, organizers of the Latino Heritage Week events are encouraging students from all parts of UT to attend events and interact with the program, said Ilse Quijano, director of communications for the Latino Pan-Hellenic Council. “I grew up in [a] predominately white neighborhood where a lot of the kids didn’t understand why I and my family would or wouldn’t do certain things,� Quijano said. “We want people to come and ask questions. This is for all students. For example, in American culture, it’s more common for students to drive at 16, but some of my cousins live in Mexico still and they didn’t drive until they were 18. It was hard for my parents to understand why I wanted a car at 16.� Bunch said one of the most significant roadblocks to long-term economic success facing many Latino students is a lack of access to or information about graduate education. Graduate Student Assembly president Manny Gonzalez will be part of a leadership panel tonight to discuss whatday, it means day, month 2008 to be a Lati-

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Latino Heritage Week events Somos Orgullosos (We are proud) A rally to showcase the diversity of Latin heritage on campus. 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Monday Sept. 27, Jester concourse. Somos Lideres (We are leaders) A panel to discuss Latino leadership and progress on campus. 6 -8p.m., Monday Sept. 27, Texas Union Quadrangle Room. Somos Fuertes (We are strong) A rally and open forum to address civil rights activism in the Latino community. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Tuesday Sept. 28, West Mall. Somos Diferentes (We are different) A discussion of diverse Latino identities and the distinction between the words “Hispanic� and “Latino�. 12 -1:30 p.m., Wednesday Sept. 29th, Texas Union Santa Rita Room. Somos Creativos (We are creative): A display of art and live acts to display talent and culture of different Latino groups. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Thursday Sept. 30, West Mall.

no leader and topics such as Latino males’ struggle to obtain college degrees. “A lot of times these students have struggles with juggling multiple identities, struggles with completing their four-year degrees, struggles with college readiness,� Gonzalez said. This week’s program is the first of what council leaders say they hope will become an annual project. Educational administration graduate student Cecilia Lopez, who will be featured at tonight’s panel as a Latino leader, said she hopes the Latino community can continue to come together and work for common goals such as increased access to higher education and greater unity within the community. “We can do bigger, better things if we come together as one strong community,� Lopez said.

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By Emily Sides Daily Texan Staff More than 500 people walked around the Texas Capitol on Saturday to raise awareness about suicide prevention during the Out of the Darkness community walk. Saturday’s event drew the largest turnout in the last three years. The participants earned more than $44,000 for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. Those affected by suicides in their families have a higher rate of death by suicide themselves, said Leslie Paloma, whose 17-year-old son, Scott, died by suicide four years ago. “Since Scotty’s death, I know I wanted to see him, just to see if he’s OK,� Paloma said. “Suicide absolutely adds guilt. There is nobody to go after or blame except ourselves. What could we have done?� Paloma said she missed her son’s warning signs and did not seek appropriate help. “Because he didn’t know it was OK to reach out, we’re walking here today,� she said. “If we can get them over that hump ... so many people wouldn’t be here walking in this walk.� Elizabeth Roebuck, chair of the foundation’s Central Texas chapter, said raising awareness that suicide is a major health concern will break the stigma of not seeking help. The best strategy is to ask what they think about “suicide� or

Jamaal Felix | Daily Texan Staff

Nine-year-old Annie pays her respects to victims of suicide Saturday morning at the Texas State Capitol. “killing themselves,� she said. “The myth is if you ask about the question, it might make them choose,� Roebuck said. “The direct opposite is true. If we get indicators that someone might be contemplating suicide, that’s the right time to ask directly, and direct them to the resources.� Roebuck said Austin has the highest rate of suicide of any

metropolitan area in Texas. Middle-aged men, the elderly, veterans and Hispanics are among the most at-risk, she said. In more than 90 percent of suicide deaths, the victims suffer from often undiagnosed or untreated psychiatric illnesses, according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s website. “It is a preventable death, if the

community provides a safety net for those at risk,� Roebuck said. “It’s something we’re not comfortable talking about yet. The critical thing is to bring suicide prevention [to public consciousness] and help get the community aware [that] mental health is very important, and to break the stigma of seeking help.� Suicide Hotline: 1-800-273-8255

Austin City Council passes food cart regulations said Sue Simons, supervisor of moBy Lauren Giudice bile vending programs for the AusDaily Texan Staff The Austin City Council passed tin/Travis County Health and Huregulations for Austin’s mobile man Services Department. Vendors raised the issue in vendors that improve sanitary and safety standards, but many May and held multiple meetvendors have already been abid- ings with the city to discuss how new health requirements could ing by these rules. The council passed the new impact their businesses. “Food traceback is a very imregulations that require mobile vendors to disclose the com- portant aspect of the new regumissary or kitchen where they lations. The city needs to know buy their products by a 7-0 vote the origin of the products they Thursday. Other requirements sell,� Simons said. “Providing an include accurate sales tax report- itinerary of their route gives us a ing, proper city permitting and means to locate them to ensure disclosure of routes. The regula-1 that the food supply is safe.� Many vendors said the regulations will go into effect Oct. 4. The origin of the regulations tions are reasonable and will improve the industry, Simons said. came from the vendors themselves, LASSIFIEDS

C

“We stay within the law. The new restrictions are very minimal and I actually think there should be more,� said Steve Cohn, owner of Stony’s Pizza at Red River and Sixth Street. “I have seen many vendors with trailers that are both a health and safety hazard.� Cohn said Texas laws are very lenient compared to other states. “I am quite happy with the outcome. I have been pretty involved with the discussion and the regulations that will be implemented on Oct. 4 have been debated for about a year. Nothing that was passed was unreasonable,� said Ricardo Gutierrez, co-owner of F.N. Goode Burgers behind The Local on

CLASSIFIEDS

Guadalupe Street. Mark Avalos, one of the owners of Sugar Shack BBQ, said he is very pleased with the new regulations. “People would show up to work sites with an oven in the bed of their truck. They would undercut real businesses,� Avalos said. “Restrictions were definitely necessary when that began happening.� Avalos said there are not enough health inspectors in the city and there probably never will be. “With about 2,000 mobile food vendors in Austin, it is impossible to keep track of all of them,� he said. “So it is the responsibility of the customer to look for the vendor’s sticker to see if it’s a real business.�

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NEWS

Monday, September 27, 2010

  

  

   

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10 COMICS

10

COMICS

4

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2 6 5 8 6 5 9 7 1 8 4 2 6 4 5 3 7 3 9 7 8 4 3 8 1 5

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Monday, September 27, 2010


11 ENT

11

LIFE&ARTS

Monday, September 27, 2010

FILM: Outdoor backdrops

MOVIE REVIEW

STONE

balance ominous themes

in high school. Characteristics of Mauldin’s idols’ movies are presof their films taking place in ent throughout his body of work. He cites James McTeigue’s “V the wilderness. “The outdoors play a major for Vendetta� and “Friday Night theme in their movies,� Schulze Lights� as two major inspirations said. “The outdoors serve as a of his films. Duggan cites Steven Spielberg sanctuary for the horrible atrocities that occur and surround as one of his primary influences. They share an appreciation of exthe characters.� Horrible scenarios their charac- traordinary, grandiose situations ters endured in past films include as premises for a story. “Steven Spielberg is a huge inWorld War III and an epidemic that results in humans mindless- fluence on me personally,� he said. “His earlier films ly killing one just fill you up with another. Their a sense of magic current projand wonder.� ect is a deparWhile Mauldin ture from this We realize it’s mostly and Duggan have trend to probwho you know in invested a tremenlems on a more dous amount of personal levthe film industry, time and effort to el. It’s called regardless of talent realize their dreams, “Troplet� and and what you know, they still have a long it’s about a way to go. teleporting beand even so we just The motion picing, stuck on want to continue to ture industry is a Earth, trying to do what we enjoy — competitive, cutget back to his throat market into own universe. making movie.� which many film “I am fascinated by tak— Joshua Duggan, students struggle ing the everyRTF freshman making a successful transition. Even day life, addnow, Mauldin and ing some suDuggan have difpernatural and ficulty with things watching what like screenwriting and finding a comes out,� Duggan said. Duggan and Mauldin’s work screenwriter who can convey the extends beyond the realm of meanings they’re looking for and film. They create music videos the stories they want to tell. While for bands like Panic the Brave their future in the film industry from San Antonio. Duggan and has yet to be determined, it is cerMauldin aren’t afraid to explore tain that Mauldin and Duggan will make every effort to pursue their new media. Mauldin works on the film crew passion. “We realize it’s mostly who you for the UT football games helping to make the recordings the team know in the film industry, regarduses to review afterward — some- less of talent and what you know, thing one of his proclaimed influ- and even so we just want to conences, UT radio-television-film tinue to do what we enjoy — makalumnus Robert Rodriguez, did ing movies,� Duggan said.

From page 12

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Outer space continued tidal wave, tell you you’re beautiful like some golden refleclike little time we had. Their tion, remind you tears dry and you don’t want your face to look scent like citrus. I just say what I have to now glazed over? “What’s your name again?� and then I leave — quick like graffiti, like a hit-and-run. Is Jude lights up a cigarette. this something I should tell peoTo submit work, please e-mail ple to expect? If you’re younger than I am, asking for advice, tell- it to dailytexan@gmail.com. All ing me you’re lonely and feeling prose submitted should be under like you’re about to die. Do I dis- 2,000 words and poetry should be suade you? Pull you back like a a collection five poems or fewer.

From page 12

Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

Edward Norton speaks to the press at a red carpet event at the Paramount Theatre on Friday evening prior to a Fantastic Fest screening of “Stone,� John Curran’s recent film that stars Norton, Robert De Niro and Milla Jovovich.

Acting, music illuminate movie Film makes up for lagging setup with complex layers, chilling soundtrack motifs

But things take a drastic turn wife’s devout Christianity until when Stone claims to Mabry he cracks. that he has been “reborn.� While One of the most beautiful and Stone sets off to find spiritual eneerie aspects of “Stone� is lightenment from a book the music. Inspired by By Gerald Rich on a fictional spirituStone’s philosophy Daily Texan Staff al religion in the prist h a t re v e l a t i o n ON THE WEB: Edward Norton plays a haunt- on library, his initial comes through For more reviews of ingly meditative role once again ploy to use his wife, sounds that resmovies screened at as the title character in the mov- played by Milla Joonate like a tunFantastic Fest visit ie “Stone.� vovich, to seduce ing fork, the In the film directed by John Cur- Mabry continues soundtrack is dailytexan ran, Robert De Niro plays parole to unfold. riddled with dark online.com officer Jack Mabry, who is thrown Eventually, Mabry humming motifs. for a loop when he interviews is caught in a whirlwind There were already Stone, a convicted arsonist up between the extremes of the some whispers of Oscar for parole. enlightened Stone, who has come nominations from the crowd afAs usual with Norton’s films, to terms with fate, the fatal attrac- ter it screened at Fantastic Fest. the opening seems innocent tion of Stone’s wife and his own However, the movie is noenough. Mabry is due to retire in a month, and Stone is a convict with cornrows and tattoos claiming to be reformed enough for parole. Contrast De Niro’s straight-faced portrayal of Mabry with Norton’s squeaky-voiced, jittery Stone, and the first few scenes are a comical juxtaposition.

ticeably slow to start. Most of the first half of the film sets up Mabry’s descent into uncertainty, meaning it’s filled with him acting as a bastion of what a good parole officer and husband should be. Despite this, it begs a second viewing to catch all the layers of tension; from the acting to the music to the cinematography of vast farmlands and confined prison spaces. “Stone� combines all of the subtle elements of film to leave a lasting impression.

Grade: A

         

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12 LIFE

LIFE&ARTS

12

Monday, September 27, 2010

Life&Arts Editor: Amber Genuske E-mail: lifeandarts@dailytexanonline.com Phone: (512) 232-2209 www.dailytexanonline.com

T HE DAILY T EXAN

Outer space

LONGHORN

CHRONICLES

By Zac Carter

Editor’s Note: This is the third installment of a prose and poetry series featuring UT students, faculty and staff.

Jeff Heimsath | Daily Texan Staff

Matt Hines and Tomas Olano of The Eastern Sea sing to a crowded audience at the 21st Co-op Saturday night.

Lead singer discusses previous tour MUSIC MONDAY By Francisco Marin Saturday was another typically packed night at the 21st Street Co-op, where local bands Wild Moccasins and The Eastern Sea were to take the stage. It wasn’t until a mutual friend pointed him out that I noticed The Eastern Sea’s Matt Hines standing right next to me, drinking a Lone Star. It would be ON THE WEB: a n u n d e r statement Read the rest to say that of the interview it’s been an interesting @dailytexan five years for online.com Matt Hines, lead guitarist and vocalist for The Eastern Sea. Initially a solo project, The Eastern Sea ballooned into a full band in 2006 with drummer Zach Duran, bass guitarist Tomas Olano, trumpet player Kevin Thomas and keyboardist Pam Cantu. The band released two consecu-

tive EPs before going on to tour Texas and the rest of the U.S., all the while building a strong fan base in Central Texas. Matt Hines took the time to sit with the Texan to discuss his most recent tour, an upcoming full-length album and why he’s cynical about Death Cab for Cutie references.

in New Orleans. We sold out our shirts, almost sold all of our CDs. We’re lucky. I can only hope that [our next tours] would be so great.

DT: Do you have a theory why this tour went so well? MH: Well, we didn’t play as many shows as we could have. I booked the tour, me and Zach The Daily Texan: So what was booked the shows. Booking this most recent tour like? What shows is tough. Sometimes peowas the reception like outside ple don’t respond, and we had of Austin? a couple of holes. We probably Matt Hines: The tour went should have played four more all the way up the middle of the shows. They might have been country and to the Midwest and bad shows, so hypothetically we to the East Coast and back down skipped the “bad� shows and to here. It was really, really well- played the good ones. received, surprisingly, because nobody knows who we are ... DT: Were there any particular moments on tour that stick out DT: Outside of Austin, you to you now? mean? MH: We got really, really MH: Yeah, outside of Austin drunk in Pittsburgh. The guy and Houston, really. But now we were staying with was actuit’s a completely different per- ally a Canadian immigrant. He spective seeing places that we was squatting at a house just can draw people in. We played to get a green card, and we got two packed shows in New York plastered on gin and proceeded City, a crazy cool show last night to cut our hair with giant scis-

WHAT: The Eastern Sea w/ Frontier Brothers WHERE: The Mohawk

Room like a cheap motel, dark except the bathroom light is on, door cracked and the room is hazy like a cave. He’s really close to my face, named Jude — probably a lie — and with a weird little goatee. It is almost accidental. It is like he forgot to shave or something and then continued to forget for a week or two. “You want some?� he asks, and he slides the mirror over to me. Across the bed. It is the size of two palms, fingers spread, next to one another. Its back is textured and uneven like a pink seashell. It makes a sound when he gives it to me like the sound when you pull your socks on. Fabric against flesh, money against palm, mistake against chalkboard. “Yes,� I say. I am actually lying to him. I just want to sleep. The idea of resting sounds romantic right now, because my legs hurt and my tongue is sore. I can barely focus. Someone might be blowing cold air on my neck, on my chest making the sparse patches of brown hair wave this way, curl that way. It might also

be the apprehension I feel when I lean over, rolled-up dollar bill a half a millimeter inside my nostril, and I snort long and hard like I am barely breathing. We’re disgusting. Where was this dollar bill before? Three hundred years of white party favors have traveled through here, seventy-five thousand ¥saluds!, and all sorts of thank yous. Maybe this should be my smallest concern, because after it’s in my nose cavity, dripping into my throat bitter like poison, the cold air feeling stops. It might be morning or I might be done hibernating or I might be incredibly gone. Outer space, outer south. It’s unclear to me. Jude has moved the mirror off the bed. It’s clean now except for little remains of white, thin and ghostly like winter breath. He asks me if I like it, if I want him, his ass, if I like being his. Hands above my head, his fists clenching my wrists, his fingers white like heat — was he always this strong? With a gold ring on his thumb in the shape of Texas. Similar to being handcuffed. It all feels familiar. I say yes in a voice that isn’t my own. I’m thinking about when I was sweeter and smarter. I imagined boys with tanned skin, peroxide Mohawks, pierced ears, holding hands with me going 80 down I-45. Kissing like children with innocent persistence. We’d almost forget how hard we were,

continues on page 11

WHEN: Saturday, 8 p.m. WEB: http://www.myspace.com/ theeasternsea TICKETS: $5 at the door

sors. So when we woke up the next day, we all had haircuts. I could show you pictures; it’s pretty disgusting. DT: On a completely unrelated note: describe your perfect sandwich. MH: My perfect sandwich has sourdough bread. Turkey or salami. Could be an Italian sandwich. Sourdough, turkey, swiss cheese, honey mustard, lettuce and a ton of sprouts. DT: You get one adjective to describe The Eastern Sea’s music; what is it? MH: Dynamic.

Photo illustration by John Massingill

RTF students use life experience in films

Freshman radiotelevision-film majors Joshua Duggan, left, and Jeshua Mauldin, right, set up their filming equipment at one of the locations used in their recent music video production for a local solo artist.

By Ali Breland Daily Texan Staff One evening in Whitis Court, a girl was silently serenaded by a kid wearing oversized sunglasses, skinny jeans and a hoody. This scene would look absurd, until you noticed it was being filmed by two students. Those students are Joshua Duggan and Jeshua Mauldin, San Antonio natives and freshman radio-television-film majors in the College of Communication. More importantly, they’re student filmmakers. The scene at Whitis Court is the result of Duggan and Mauldin’s shooting of their first music video in Austin for a friend, Taylor Fer-

Michael Baldon Daily Texan Staff

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guson’s electronica solo project, thelovecrimes. Duggan and Mauldin actually have more eclectic backgrounds than their San Antonio roots indicate — Duggan was born in Hawaii, and Mauldin lived in Nicaragua and for much of his life. Between them, they have a tremendous amount of life experiences that they can draw into their films, something Duggan cites as being intrinsic in their work. “We have a very homegrown approach to filmmaking, very naturalistic style with little focus on special and visual effects,� he said. Their close friend Tyler Schulze,

who also writes for the filmmaking duo, talks about the naturalistic element that Duggan and Mauldin’s films focus on and the human aspect that they like to mesh with it. “[Duggan] likes to approach a story from the natural human side of things,� he said. “For example, if one of their films is based around a huge overreaching problem, they’ll focus on the trials and tribulations of those closely involved, instead of the event itself.� They even follow the natural motif on a literal level with most

FILM continues on page 11

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