Page 1

P1

THE DAILY TEXAN Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

Garrett Gilbert is out for the season after surgery on his right shoulder; should he stay at Texas? SPORTS PAGE 16

SPUTNIK LANDS IN AUNSTIN

Gastropub converts to comfort food focused burger joint LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10

>> Breaking news, blogs and more: www.dailytexanonline.com

TODAY Calendar Wellfest 2011

Join University Health Services and more than 30 campus and community organizations for Wellfest 2011 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. on the FAC porch.

‘#?*!’ Texas country singer Kevin Fowler will be performing a free show as part of KVET’s Free Texas Music Series at Nutty Brown Cafe.

ON THE WEB

Young entrepreneur funds his invention through Kickstarter

@thedailytexan

bit.ly/dt_video

facebook.com/dailytexan

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Freshman SG candidates compete in election By Allie Kolechta Daily Texan Staff

An official list of the more than a dozen first-year student government representative candidates was released last night. Elections will be held today from 8 a.m. to

5 p.m. and the winner will be announced at 6 p.m. tonight. Four candidates dropped out of the race and several others left after breaking rules last week, said public relations freshman Jacob Irvin. He was in the race until he dropped out after not turning

in financial disclosure forms on time, along with at least one other candidate, he said. “It was extremely hectic getting involved,” Irvin said. “Nobody really knows what the first-year representative is. Even with all of SG’s efforts it became kind of a hassle,

I guess.” The process of getting involved and campaigning was made more complicated by changes such as one made to the name of the position from freshman representative to first-year representative, and prospective candidates did

not know what they were getting involved in, Irvin said. “Nobody really knows what the position is going to do because this is the first year that it’s been available to anyone,” he said. “No one

ELECTION continues on PAGE 2

Fighting cancer with every mile

Investing for Life Learn how to use investments to satisfy your financial goals in the latest installment of Bevonomics from 2-3 p.m. in BUR 112.

‘Camino Real’

Meet the artist and tour the photography exhibit “El Camino Real de los Tejas” by photographer Christopher Talbot at the opening’s reception from 5-7 p.m. in Sid Richardson Hall.

‘Rappahannock County’

Texas Performing Arts presents “Rappahannock County,” a new music theater piece about life during the Civil War. 8-10 p.m. in McCullough Theatre. Tickets start at $10.

Today in history In 1780 During the American Revolution, American General Benedict Arnold meets with British Major John Andre to discuss handing over West Point to the British. Danielle Villasana | The Daily Texan Staff

Inside

Members of the 2011 LIVESTRONG Texas 4000 Team for Cancer cycle through the Coast Mountains in Canada as part of their 70-day, cross-country journey from Austin to Anchorage, Alaska. A nonprofit organization, Texas 4000 is comprised of UT students who bike every summer as a way to raise money and awareness for the fight against cancer.

In News:

Nonprofit jobs interest business majors

U.S. relationship with India affects China’s growth page 7

In Opinion: Perry dances around illegal immigration issue page 4

In Sports: Garrett Gilbert suffers a season changing injury page 16

In Life&Arts:

Check out Toro y Moi, St. Vincent music reviews page 11

‘‘

Quote to note

In my opinion, burgers aren’t supposed to be gourmet. They’re not supposed to be specialty. They’re supposed to be comfort and that’s what we focused on. There’s no pretentiousness going on here. — Brandon Stratton Sputnik Owner LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10

By Lydia Herrera Daily Texan Staff

Students crowded into the Texas Union Theatre Tuesday to listen as Brian Gallagher, CEO of United Way, spoke about the importance of mobilizing people and strengthening communities. United Way is a nonprofit organization that seeks to improve lives by mobilizing the caring power of communities and focusing on big issues such as health, education and income, said Chris Schulze, co-chair for the VIP Distinguished Speaker Series. Currently, United Way has 1,800 local affiliates and is represented in 44 countries and territories. Schulze said the Undergraduate Business Council puts together the VIP Distinguished Speaker Series to host about seven influential

business leaders from around the world every year to give students the chance to learn what opportunities and career paths are out there and give them the ambition to make it up the corporate ladder one day. “There’s a lot of [business students] that do want to go into nonprofit,” Schulze said. “Having Brian Gallagher here to talk about the nonprofit industry as a whole and your corporate and social responsibility as a businessperson, even if you do go into the corporate world, helps you to have it at the back of your mind about always trying to give back.” When asked if he would recommend nonprofit as a career path for business students, Gallagher said the current generation is lucky because modern day businesses create social entrepreneurship and com-

UT won federal affirmative action suit, plantiff appealed to Supreme Court for review By Liz Farmer Daily Texan Staff

et Mars that offered better immediate results and poor long-term results or poor immediate results and better long-term results, older adults outperformed their younger counterparts. Theatre and dance junior Graciela Reyna said to her, it appears to be common sense that older people would be better problem solvers.

A court case about UT’s use of race in the admissions process is being appealed for review by the U.S. Supreme Court. The lawsuit, Fisher v. Texas, was filed against UT when two white students were denied admission to the University in 2008. It claims that the University’s admissions policies, which take race into consideration, violated the plaintiff ’s right to equal protection of the laws under the 14th Amendment. UT won the lawsuit in an Austin federal district court and the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals. The 5th Circuit judges denied an appeal for rehearing of the case in a 9-7 vote. In Circuit Judge Emilio Garza’s opinion, the court must uphold the 2003 Supreme Court decision in Grutter v. Bollinger that race can be used as a determinant in college admissions decisions. “The Supreme Court has chosen this erroneous path and only the Court can rectify the error,” Judge

AGING continues on PAGE 2

ADMISSIONS continues on PAGE 2

Mary Kang | Daily Texan Staff

United Way CEO Brian Gallagher speaks at the Texas Union Theatre Tuesday afternoon.

munity value, whereas business one wants to do is change the huin the past lacked community involvement. He said if what someUNITED continues on PAGE 2

Study shows older adults make better decisions By Megan Strickland Daily Texan Staff

Older people make better decisions than younger people overall, according to a study released by psychologists at UT and Texas A&M University. Researchers led by Todd Maddox and David Schnyer, professor and associate professor of psychology at UT, and Darrell Worthy, as-

sistant professor of psychology at Texas A&M University, found that people over 60 years old learn from situations and make better longterm decisions than young adults in their late teens and early twenties. “When past behavior influences choice of decision, older adults make choices that yield better long term results than young adults,” Worthy said. “Our study doesn’t at

Fisher v. Texas appeal reaches Supreme Court

all suggest that older people have poor memory compared to young adults.” During the study groups of participants were asked to make decisions in which the only decisionmaking factor was the short-term results of good decision making. Young adults excelled at this portion of the study. However, when participants were asked to decide between an oxygen system on plan-


P2

neWS

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

UNITED continues from PAGE 1 man condition in whatever scale, they need only choose the vehicle, whether it be business, government or nonprofit. “I do what I do because I’ve been doing it my whole life,” said Gallagher. “I want to be a part of changing people’s lives, and I want to do it at scale.” Gallagher said that one of the biggest innovations United Way is aiming to implement is getting

people mobilized and involved in social change. “If we really are a global community, which obviously I believe we are, then like any strong community you can’t leave the relationship management just to business and just to government. You have to have civil society in it, and you need organizations like ours and others to talk about the future of unities and countries and the world because when we do our job right we’re speaking for individuals,” Gallagher said. “We’re speaking for citizens and that’s important.”

campus watch Graffiti

Criminal Tresspass Warning

Batts Hall, #3 South Mall A face wearing sunglasses was discovered spray painted on the northeast corner of the building. estimated repair: $200.00. Discovered on: 9-2011, at 1:17 AM.

1900 University Ave Criminal Trespass Warning: A non-UT subject was discovered sleeping in an established campsite located on the west side of the building. During the investigation, the subject was issued a written Criminal Trespass Warning and escorted from the area. Occurred on: 9-19-11, at 10:27 PM.

Public Intoxication

Criminal Trespass Warning

Colorado Building, 702 Colorado Criminal Trespass Warning: A non-UT subject was discovered sleeping near the entrance to the building. During the investigation, the subject was issued a written Criminal Trespass Warning and escorted from the area. Occurred on: 9-20-11, at 4:00 AM.

2200 Block San Jacinto Blvd A UT student observed a marked UT Police vehicle and hailed the vehicle in the same manner as one would hail a taxi. When the student approached the officer, she explained she needed a ride to her apartment, but could not provide the officer with directions. The officer detected a very strong odor of alcohol on the student�s breath and noted other signs of intoxication. The student then told the officer that she knew it was dangerous to attempt to cross large intersections. The student was taken into custody for Public Intoxication and transported to Central Booking. Occurred on: 9-17-11, at 2:40 AM.

THE DAILY TEXAN

This newspaper was printed with pride by The Daily Texan and Texas Student Media.

Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viviana Aldous Associate Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Matthew Daley, Shabab Siddiqui Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lena Price Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sydney Fitzgerald News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Matthew Stottlemyre Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Huma Munir, Colton Pence, Victoria Pagan Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jillian Bliss, Liz Farmer, Allie Kolechta Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Austin Myers Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elyana Barrera, Ashley Morgan, Klarissa Fitzpatrick Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alexa Hart Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Nuncio, Chris Benavides Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Torrey Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Edwards, Shannon Kinter Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thomas Allison, Mary Kang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lawrence Peart, Fanny Trang, Danielle Villasana Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aleksander Chan Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katie Stroh Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ali Breland, Benjamin Smith, Julie Rene Tran . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aaron West, Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trey Scott Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Austin Laymance Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nick Cremona, Christian Corona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lauren Giudice, Chris Hummer Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Victoria Elliot Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katheryn Carrell Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gerald Rich Associate Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Sanchez Web Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Savannah Williams Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren Multimedia Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jennifer A. Rubin

Issue Staff

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Messamore, Lydia Herrera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Megan Strickland, Sarah White Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Samian Quazi Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marco Lopez, Andie Shyong, Brionne Griffin Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarah Foster, Jamie Cheng Editorial Cartoonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill, Emery Fergosun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Claudine Lucena, Katie Carrell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rory Harmin, Tyler Suder Volunteers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katherine Loter, Gary Hsu, Rainy Schermerhorn Life&Arts Writers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Benner, Jessica Lee Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tamir Kalita, Jono Foley, Kiersten Holms Sports Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hank South Videographers/Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yimou Lee, David Castaneda

Advertising

The Daily Texan Mail Subscription Rates One Semester (Fall or Spring) $60.00 Two Semesters (Fall and Spring) 120.00 Summer Session 40.00 One Year (Fall, Spring and Summer) 150.00 To charge by VISA or MasterCard, call 471-5083. Send orders and address changes to Texas Student Media', P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713-8904, or to TSM Building C3.200, or call 471-5083. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713.

Texan Ad Deadlines

9/20/11

Monday .............Wednesday, 12 p.m. Thursday.................Monday, 12 p.m. Tuesday.................Thursday, 12 p.m. Friday......................Tuesday, 12 p.m. Word Ads 11 a.m. Wednesday................Friday, 12 p.m. Classified (Last Business Day Prior to Publication)

knows what they’re getting involved in.” The assembly passed legislation last semester to create a freshman representative position, and the title was later amended to read as first-year representative so that any first year students could join, said SG vice president Ashley Baker. Any student can run for the position as long as it’s their first year at UT, she said. Many problems in this election could have been solved by

increasing communication with first-year students who have the opportunity to run and vote in the election, Baker said. “Every year it’s just reaching out to new students,” she said. ”We’re communicating to 10,000 students so publicity is always the fun part.” Kinks in the campaign process may have arisen not only because this is the first time this election has been held, but it is also the first time many of the participants have run their own

AGING continues from PAGE 1 “I feel almost like that’s stating the obvious,” Reyna said. “The longer you live, the more experiences you have, and you would make better judgements. It’s a product of life.” Karen Fingerman, professor of human development and family sciences, said typical stereotypes about aging people losing mental capabilities are a product of a system of mental gains and losses that occur when people age. “People do not lose their mental abilities as they get older,” Fingerman said. “You have gains and losses. Older adults usually do better in knowledge because they have

more knowledge. People often lose their speed as they get older.” Stereotypes about aging and loss of mental capability result from older people noticing the losses but not their accumulated gains, Fingerman said. “We have stereotypes,” Fingerman said. “If you even go to the grocery store and look at the birthday cards you can tell that. It’s because there’s a lot of times that people notice the loss of speed but not the gains of knowledge.” Researchers for the study hypothesize that the cause of this phenomenon of brain change with age is the deterioration of the ven-

The Daily Texan campaigns, said SG communications director Sydney Farenze. “These kids are just running off of nothing,” she said. “When I ran my first campaign, I had people around me who’d done it before to tell me what not to do. I had so much help. It’s just so hard because these are their peers and they don’t have that guidance.” A hearing was held last night for the disqualified students to plead that they be re-allowed into the race.

tral striatum, a part of the brain utilized by young adults. As the ventral striatum deteriorates, the researchers theorize that the prefrontal cortex, an area of the brain that controls rational and deliberate thoughts, compensates for it, Worthy said. To test this theory, researchers have begun using neuro-imaging technology to track which parts of the brain react in the decisionmaking process, Worthy said. “Our preliminary data do support these conclusions,” Worthy said. “We are finding older adults are having more activity in the studies.”

The plaintiff ’s attorney, Bert Rein, said the appeal to the Supreme Court is in response to the loss in the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals. “The Texas Legislature had changed Texas law and, prior to the change, the top ten submissions system was uncapped,” Rein said. “If the court were to reverse that decision then the cap is taken off and you go back to the top 10 system.” The project on fair representation is a not-for-profit legal defense fund which has funded the plaintiff from the beginning of the lawsuit. Edward Blum, director for the project on fair representation, said the organization pro— William Powers Jr, vides representation to individuals UT-Austin President who have been unfairly discriminated against. He said the top 10 percent rule, which at the time required the University to accept all Texas public high school stuty’s website, admissions takes ac- dents within the top 10 percent of ademic achievement, personal their class. “UT thinks the law allows them achievement and special circumstances into consideration. Race to reintroduce race and we argue and ethnicity are one of seven that the law forbids them from reother factors that fall under the introducing race,” Blum said. He said the appeal was filed Sept. special circumstances portion. 15 and it’s hard to know when the University will respond. “The University has 30 days to respond to that, but it’s not unusual for a respondent to ask for more time,” Blum said. the top 10 percent,” Garza said. He said race is one of many factors considered in admissions for students who fall outside of the projected automatic admittance for their class. According to the Universi-

The University of Texas at Austin is firmly committed to a holistic admissions policy...

APPLY THIS SEMESTER

GOT PARKING?

The Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees has an opening for one student board member to fill a College of Communications unexpired term from October to May 2012. This board oversees the largest student media program in the United States with a budget of $2.3 million, a professional staff of 18 and student staffs totaling 300 on payroll and 300 volunteers.

Assigned Garage Parking Available! THE CASTILIAN RESIDENCE HALL across the street from UT 2323 San Antonio St. 478-9811 (ask for Heather) www.thecastilian.com

SPACES ARE LIMITED & GOING FAST!

COLLEGE SKI & BOARD WEEK breckenridge

Vail • Beaver Creek • Keystone • Arapahoe Basin

20 Mountains. 5 Resorts. 1 Price. FROM ONLY

Your job as a board member?

plus t/s

*Adopt annual budget *Review monthly income and expenses *Select KVRX station manager, TSTV station manager, Travesty and Cactus editors, Daily Texan managing editor *Certify candidates seeking election to TSM board and for Texan editor *Review major purchase requests Time commitment? About five hours per month (one meeting, reading before meeting, committee work). Pick up an application at the Hearst Student Media building (HSM), 25th and Whitis Ave, Room 3.304, or print a application from our website: http://www.utexas.edu/tsm/

Deadline is noon on Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Apply today!

TEXASNT STUDDEIA ME

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Viviana Aldous (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Lena Price (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office: (512) 232-2209 dailytexan@gmail.com Photo Office: (512) 471-8618 photo@dailytexanonline.com Comics Office: (512) 232-4386 Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@dailytexanonline.com

ADMISSION continues from PAGE 1 Garza said. UT-Austin President William Powers Jr. said in a statement that the admissions policy upholds the 2003 Supreme Court decision. He also said that because of the top 10 percent rule, it is important to weigh a multitude of factors in terms of balance among the incoming student body. “The University of Texas at Austin is firmly committed to a holistic admissions policy that is consistent with the rulings of the U.S. Supreme Court,” Powers said. “We must have the flexibility to consider each applicant’s unique experiences and background so we can provide the best environment in which to train the students who will be our future leaders.” A Texas law allows UT-Austin to only accept 75 percent of incoming freshman under the top 10 percent rule, said Augustine Garza, deputy director of the office of admissions. The 2011 class is the first class to be selected under this admissions policy. “There are some excellent students out there who are not in

Volume 112, number 42

WWW.UBSKI.COM

1-800-SKI-WILD • 1-800-754-9453

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. I f we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2011 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER Low

High

69

96

F.M.L

ERROR

Because of an editing error, the chart with Tuesday’s Page 2 news story about hispanic enrollment should have titled “2010 UT Graduation Rates.” Because of an editing error, Tuesday’s Page 13 Life & Arts photo caption should have spelled the name “Hanson.”

R E C YC L E

Director of Advertising & Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Business Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lori Hamilton Business Assitant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amy Ramirez Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Senior Local Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brad Corbett Broadcast & Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Ford Student Assistant Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veronica Serrato Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Casey Lee, Emily Sides, Emily Zaplac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paola Reyes, Zach Congdon Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rene Gonzalez Student Marketing Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jason Tennenbaum Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Casey Rogers, Bianca Krause, Aaron Rodriquez Special Editions Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adrienne Lee Student Special Editions Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan Schraeder The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published twice weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks and most Federal Holidays. and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2011 Texas Student Media.

ELECTION continues from PAGE 1

2

your copy of

The Daily Texan


P3 W/N

World&NatioN

3

Gays in military celebrate end of DADT

Former Afghani president killed by suicide bomber

Wednesday, September 21, 2011 | The Daily Texan | Klarissa Fitzpatrick, Wire Editor | dailytexanonline.com

By Amir Shah & Deb Riechmann Associated Press

Navy Lt. Gary Ross, right, and Dan Swezy exchange wedding vows on Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2011 in Duxbury, Vt. The two men recited their vows at the first possible moment after the formal repeal of the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy.

Toby Talbot Associated Press

By Brian White The Associated Press

They were young children — mere kids when the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy on gays serving openly in the military took effect. But over two decades, attitudes shifted, America changed and these youngsters grew up to win coveted spots in the top military academies. Now they are giving a collective shrug to Tuesday’s end of the “don’t ask, don’t tell” era.

The nation’s military leaders of tomorrow say they have less preoccupation with the sexual orientation of their colleagues than generations before them. And gay students are quietly reporting that a burden is being lifted that had weighed down those who went before them through the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, the U.S. Naval Academy and the U.S. Air Force Academy. In interviews at all three academies, midshipmen and cadets tell The Associated Press that the

once-thorny issue of homosexuality doesn’t create controversy as in the past. Students who weren’t even in their teens at the time of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks have grown up in a nation at war. They say competence and character are what matter. “The United States has been ready for a long time for them to be able to serve openly, and they deserve to serve openly,” said Naval Midshipman Lorenzo Santos, of King George, Va. , interviewed in Annap-

olis. “They’re going to do the job, the same job, just as well as anybody else, and they’re going to risk their lives besides everyone else.” G ay a c t iv i s t s an d ot h e r s say such talk on the campuses bears out a shift in attitudes regarding sexual orientation. “They are of a generation that doesn’t really care,” said Dan Choi, a gay activist, former Army lieutenant and West Point graduate who was discharged from the military for revealing his orientation.

A suicide attacker with a bomb in his turban posed as a Taliban peace envoy and assassinated a former Afghan president who for the past year headed a government council seeking a political settlement with the insurgents. Tuesday’s attack, carried out in former President Burhanuddin Rabbani’s Kabul home, dealt a harsh blow to attempts at ending a decade of war. The killing of Rabbani, an ethnic Tajik and one of the wise old men of Afghan politics, will blunt efforts to keep in check the regional and ethnic rivalries that help feed the insurgency. President Hamid Karzai cut short a visit to the United Nations and called on Afghans to remain unified in the face of Rabbani’s “martyrdom.” The attack came days after a daytime assault by insurgents on the U.S. Embassy and NATO headquarters that deepened a sense of insecurity in the capital. NATO said in a statement that two suicide bombers were involved in the attack on Rabbani, both of them men who had feigned a desire to reconcile with the government. It was unclear if a second bomber was able to detonate his explosives. Afghan officials, however, insisted there was only one attacker. Four men were wounded, including a key presidential adviser, said Mohammad Zahir, the head of criminal investigations for the Kabul police. Initial reports had four bodyguards killed but Zahir said those were incorrect. Close friends of Rabbani said

that the former president returned from a trip to Iran to meet with a man who had been described as a high-ranking Taliban contact. The visitor, a young man, was shown into the house by two of Rabbani’s associates at the Afghan High Peace Council, who insisted that he did not need to be fully searched, said a friend who spoke anonymously because he was not a spokesman. When Rabbani appeared, the man shook the former president’s hand and bowed as a sign of respect, said Fazel Karim Aimaq, a former lawmaker from Kunduz province and friend of Rabbani. “Then his turban exploded,” Aimaq said. The blast broke windows in Rabbani’s home and shook nearby houses. As the leader of the anti-Taliban Northern Alliance, Rabbani sought a political deal with the Taliban — with U.S. blessing — and he will be hard to replace soon. His death could unleash a well of resentment among some senior Northern Alliance members, who accuse Karzai of colluding with the Taliban. Already Afghanistan’s ethnic minorities have begun to rearm in the face of negotiations with the Taliban, who are mostly ethnic Pashtuns, as is Karzai. Rabbani’s killing is likely to accelerate that process and lay the foundation for a possible civil war once U.S. combat troops leave the country or take on support roles by the end of 2014. President Barack Obama said the killing will not deter the U.S. and Afghanistan from helping that country’s people live freely. He said the former president’s death is tragic because he was a man who cared deeply about Afghanistan.


4

OpiniOn

Wednesday, September 21, 2011 | The Daily Texan | Viviana Aldous, Editor-in-Chief | (512) 232-2212 | editor@dailytexanonline.com

Viewpoint

Diluting the student vote The U.S. Department of Justice sent Texas’ new political district maps back to the drawing board Monday. Responding to a suit filed by Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott, which sought a declaration that the new lines drawn during this past session do not violate the Voting Rights Act, the Justice Department signaled it will fight it in court. The department’s move to block the new maps should be viewed as a hopeful and welcome one for every Texan who values fair elections and as an especially important for the minority groups the new lines seek to silence. A provision of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 requires that any changes to voting procedures in Texas must be examined by either the U.S. Department of Justice or the U.S. District Court in Washington D.C. before they can take effect. Texas is one of nine states, most of which are in the south, to which this “preclearance” provision applies. In order to conform to the law, new maps must not “have the effect of denying or abridging the right to vote on account of race or color.” New district lines are generally drawn every 10 years to reflect changes in population distribution. The 10-year interval mirrors the frequency of the decennial census, from which population data is drawn to tweak the maps. Because of its large population increase from 2000 through 2010, Texas gained four seats in the U.S House of Representatives. With the Republican Party firmly in control of the Texas government, many Democratic commentators were concerned that the new districts would be drawn to benefit Republicans in future elections. But such is the nature of the hyper-partisan redistricting process. Given the opportunity to increase their chances of electoral success, their opportunism is understandable and predictable. Of course, Democrats have done it where and when they have been in power. The problem for Republican lawmakers during the past session was that minority groups — primarily Hispanics — were responsible for 89 percent of the population growth between 2000 and 2010, according to The Texas Tribune. Because these groups tend to vote for Democrats, lawmakers had to get creative with their new lines to achieve their partisan goals. Of the four new Congressional districts, only one was drawn to be a “majority-minority” district, meaning that most voters in the district belong to an ethnic minority group. The remaining three were designed to be easy Republican wins. It was at this point that lawmakers ran afoul of the Voting Rights Act. Because they failed to give due weight to the increased minority populations — and in some cases, diluting their own voting strength in existing districts — the new lines were immediately challenged in court. The continued litigation will likely mean that new district lines will need to be drawn by the courts for the 2012 election cycle as the lawsuit moves through the court system. Looking at the new maps quickly reveals the lawmakers’ methodology. Austin looks like the center of a wagon wheel, with five Congressional districts radiating out from Central Austin as far afield as Dallas and Houston. Dallas, Fort Worth, San Antonio, Houston and as much of the Rio Grande Valley as one could possibly imagine look largely the same. This pattern results in the absurdity of, for instance, students living on campus, in West Campus and in parts of North Campus being represented by three different Congressmen. The maps as drawn during the 82nd legislative session split the major areas where UT students live into four congressional districts, and their shapes demonstrate the extent to which lawmakers were willing to go to create districts which would benefit them. The Justice Department’s move is particularly courageous as the Supreme Court indicated as recently as 2009 — in another case originating here in Austin — that the preclearance provision of the Voting Rights Act may be unconstitutional. Commentators have expressed concern that any new challenge based on the Voting Rights Act could be used by the court to strike it down. But Texas’ new maps are so unbalanced as to clearly demonstrate its continued necessity. And while the Voting Rights Act does not apply to students as a group, students have often been victims of the same political calculus that has sought to divide other minority voting groups in Texas over the past several decades. In this sense, the department’s action should be seen as a victory for students as well. Moreover, the University reported Friday that enrollment of Hispanic students at UT stands at 17.5 percent of the total as of this semester. This number has “increased steadily” since 2001, when it stood at 12 percent. Our University greatly benefits from the incredible diversity of thought and backgrounds present here among students. Texas, in the same way, benefits greatly from its own diversity in its residents. It is shameful that state lawmakers would seek to marginalize their political influence while reaping the economic windfalls of their residency. — Matt Daley for the editorial board.

John Massingill | Daily Texan Staff

Avoid immigration, Perry By samian Quazi Daily Texan Columnist

As the Republican presidential primary campaign season begins to generate buzz in the media, immigration has been conspicuously absent from public debates. Nevertheless, candidates such as Gov. Rick Perry are aggressively courting Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio, a virulently anti-illegal-immigration crusader notorious for the way he treats his prisoners. Perry would do well to avoid Arpaio and immigration as political issues. The self-proclaimed “toughest sheriff in America,” Arpaio has been a deeply polarizing national figure since his 1992 election as Maricopa County sheriff. A former federal narcotics agent, Arpaio garnered headlines for forcing his county prisoners to wear pink underwear, eat outdated green bologna and live in a ‘Tent City’ made up of Korean War-era military tents that reached temperatures of 138 degrees during a heat wave. The sheriff has come under acute public scrutiny in the wake of Arizona passing increasingly restrictive laws against illegal immigration. Hispanic neighborhoods in Maricopa County have borne the brunt of Arpaio’s “crime sweeps,” as many Hispanic residents have been arrested for minor traffic-related offenses and live in fear of racial profiling by the police. Republican candidates, seeking to bolster their “tough-on-illegals” credentials to an increasingly conservative core of primary voters, spent much of last week calling Arpaio and visiting his office in downtown Phoenix to seek his endorsement. Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota posed for the cameras next to Arpaio last Wednesday and declared him to be one of her heroes. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, who received Arpaio’s endorsement back in 2008, spoke to the sheriff on the phone last week, according to The Texas Tribune. The immigration issue is particularly dicey for Perry, as his record has certainly lacked the ideological purity espoused by his rivals. For one, Perry has bucked the wishes of many conservatives by openly opposing a border fence with Mexico. He also signed off on granting instate tuition to illegal immigrants in 2001 and opposed Arizona’s SB 1070, which required immigrants to carry their documents with them at all times. Perry has feverishly worked to contact Arpaio to neutralize his rivals exploiting this ideological divide on immigration. By securing the endorsement of an icon of the nativist right, the Perry campaign hopes to mollify Tea Party stalwarts just enough so they don’t perceive him as too soft on illegal immigration. Indeed, Perry has undergone a gradual and elaborate

metamorphosis on his position on illegals, lurching ever rightward to appease an increasingly intractable and partisan base. When The Dallas Morning News published a report a decade ago indicating Perry was unreceptive to amnesty for illegals, the newly-appointed governor felt compelled to reply on July, 28, 2001: “I am intrigued and open to the Bush administration’s amnesty proposal. Most Texans would agree that it’s better to have legal, taxpaying immigrants from Mexico working in the United States than illegal immigrants living in fear of the law and afraid to access basic services.” Perhaps a tiger can’t change its stripes, but would Perry stick to his original pro-amnesty convictions or flipflop for expediency? It seems unlikely, given Perry’s support for a ‘sanctuary cities’ bill that would have penalized Texas cities such as Austin and Houston that declined to inquire potential suspects of their immigration status. The bill failed to pass this year. Arpaio, for his part, has been intentionally coy as to whether he’ll endorse Perry. Essentially ignoring Perry’s perceived transgressions, Arpaio told The Texas Tribune he was personally fond of Perry and could still endorse the governor by looking “at the big picture” in what type of president he’d be. Yet by being too aggressive in trying to downplay his immigration record, Perry risks putting himself in needless trouble. Perry’s meteoric rise as the Republicans’ current frontrunner is because of one issue: the economy. Republicans know the anemic state of the national economy, combined with Obama’s seemingly hapless inability to reverse the situation, will be their cardinal pitch in 2012. And when they smell blood in the water, many Republican voters would be loath to hand another victory to the true central character of the race, Obama, if they were to forward a loser more rigid on immigration than Perry. America’s changing demographics and its increasing Hispanic population also serve as a buffer against conservative stridency on immigration. Hispanics may end up as the decisive voting bloc in key swing states such as Nevada and Florida. Although Perry is quite unlikely to win a majority of the Hispanic vote overall, many Hispanics who would otherwise stay home may ramp up voter turnout for Obama if they feel their civil liberties are threatened. Perry may score points with the Republican base in the short term by adopting Arpaio’s creed, but shifting to the right on immigration will surely hurt his candidacy in the general election. Quazi is a nursing graduate student.

Notice to our readers The Texas Student Media advertising policy allows TSM to “reject any advertising that can be considered to contain attacks on a person’s gender, sexual orientation, race, religion or any other personal trait.” As a result, we were concerned about the ad on the opposite page because of its nature and the language involved. After deliberation among the advertising department, the TSM director and members of The Daily Texan staff, including the managing editor, suggested changes were made, and while the editorial board does not support the content, tone or language of the ad, it still complies with the TSM ad policy. This is an advertisement and does not reflect the opinions or beliefs of The Daily Texan staff or TSM. If you have comments about this ad, please contact TSM Director Gary Borders at gary.borders@ mail.utexas.edu or at 512-471-5084. — Viviana Aldous for the editorial board.

legalese Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.


P5

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

The Entire Palestinian Case Against Israel is Based on a Lie

I

t is true that the Arabs of the West Bank and Gaza are suffering. But they are suffering because of sixty years of Arab aggression; sixty years of Arab dictators rejecting peace, and sixty years of aggressive wars whose stated goal is to replace the Jewish state with an Arab state “from the river to the sea,” in other words to erase the Jewish State. They are suffering because whenever the Arabs of the West Bank and Gaza were given the opportunity to hold free elections, they elected oppressive regimes bent on war to rule over them. The Palestinian Authority in the West Bank and the Hamas Government of Gaza both claim that Israel is “Occupied Palestine.” In fact, Israel does not occupy “Palestine.” When Israel was created in 1948, there was no Palestine nation to occupy. There has been no state, no country, no nation called Palestine in the Middle East since Roman times when there were no Arabs in Jerusalem. The derivation of the name “Palestine” is not Arabic. It is Roman. Palestine is in fact a geographical region of the Middle East. Its status is identical to that of New England in America. It is not and has never been a nation. The claim that Israel occupies a nation called “Palestine” is simply false. The land on which Israel now stands did not belong to the Arabs, let alone the “Palestinians.” Israel was created in 1948 on land that was part of the Turkish empire for four hundred years until the Turks were defeated in World War I, when it came under the rule of Britain and France. The Turks are not Arabs and there was never a province, nor entity in the Turkish empire called “Palestine.” In fact virtually no Arabs called themselves “Palestinians” until 1964, the year the “Palestine Liberation Organization” was created – sixteen years after the creation of the Jew-

ish state. In 1964 the West Bank and Gaza did not exist even as independent territories. Jordan had annexed the West Bank and Egypt had annexed Gaza fifteen years earler. These annexations of the so-called Palestinian homeland called forth no protests from the Arab world, not even from the “Palestinians” themselves. That was because the “Palestinians” in 1949 did not regard themselves as Palestinians. They regarded themselves as Arabs. Although Jordan had annexed the West Bank and Egypt had annexed Gaza, the Palestine Liberation Organization did not call for the liberation of the West Bank or Gaza. It called for the destruction of the “Zionist entity.” Today the head of the Palestinian Authority, Mahmoud Abbas, still opposes the existence of a Jewish state and Hamas, the ruling party in Gaza calls for “the obliteration of Israel.” The destruction of the Jewish state is the real (and avowed) goal of the Palestine liberation movement. Israel is bordered to the east by the Jordan River and to the west by the Mediterranean sea. The slogan — “Palestine Must Be Free From the River to the Sea” — is the demand that the Jewish state disappear. This September the Arab League will attempt to take another step in its sinister sixty-year effort to erase the indigenous people of the geographical region called Palestine. They will attempt to establish a Palestinian state unilaterally – that is without signing a peace agreement that would end their sixty year aggression against the Jews — and their leaders will continue to claim the territory between “the river and the sea.” The civilized world needs to stand up to prevent a second Holocaust and to oppose this latest campaign to eliminate the Jewish state.

PUBLISHED AS A PUBLIC SERVICE

BY THE DAVID HOROWITZ FREEDOM CENTER WWW.HOROWITZFREEDOMCENTER.ORG


P6 UNIV

6

NEWS

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

SPLASHING IN THE SUN

Low taxes, wages bring business to Texas By Andrew Messamore Daily Texan Staff

Texas was rated the best climate for business in the U.S., according to a survey of 322 corporate executives by the New York-based marketing company Development Counsellors International, where it was indicated that half of the responding executives were planning on expanding or consolidating offices or facilities in Texas. These companies want to come to

Texas to enjoy its low taxes, low wages and little business regulation, said former UT professor and current Ohio State business professor Michael W. Brandl, “Corporations that relocate to Texas can instantly be more profitable and pay non-executives less,” Brindl said. “The executives will also personally benefit from a move to Texas since Texas has no state income tax.” However, the climate may not be

entirely friendly to all forms of business, Brandl said. The statistics represented in the survey may represent the top end of business and not the employees, he said. “[The survey] means that while Texas has attracted a lot of corporations to relocate into Texas, it’s not all good news for nonexecutives,” Brandl said. “I think it is true that Texas

BUSINESS continues on PAGE 7

Lecture teaches faculty new teaching methods By Andrew Messamore Daily Texan Staff

Jono Foley | Daily Texan Staff

Ari and Soli enjoy the nice weather by taking a dip in the Littlefield Fountain on Tuesday afternoon.

UT deemed military friendly By Sarah White Daily Texan Staff

UT is among the most military friendly schools in Texas, according to a list recently published by GI Jobs magazine. This annual list recognizes the top 20 percent of schools from each state in terms of military friendliness. “The list itself is designed to be a resource for students. We are trying to match students with schools that meet their unique needs,” said Sean Collins, general manager for GI Jobs. Collins said the ranking was based on four factors: non-financial effort, financial effort, schools results in recruiting military and veteran students and factors such as a school’s academic accreditations. “The list was compiled using a survey derived by a third-party academic advisory board,” Collins said. The survey was sent to and completed by more than 8,000 schools, including UT. Assistant dean of students LaToya Hill said that UT has recently been investing in becoming more mil-

itary friendly through a number of programs. “Two years ago UT organized a Veterans Services committee to provide information and coordination of resources,” Hill said. This initiative employed resources and individuals from all over campus and resulted in a number of advancements in the way that UT assists its veteran students. “Among other things, they developed a comprehensive website with resources and videos for veterans at UT and their families,” Hill said. Additionally, officials at UT are working to establish a Student Veterans Services Office located in the Student Services Building. She said that the Dean of Students has a close working relationship with the Student Veterans Association. The SVA’s charter states that “the primary purpose of the Student Veterans Association at the University of Texas at Austin is to serve the needs of students with prior or current military association, their families and dependents.”

Shawn Fogarty, event coordinator for the SVA, said that the organization also works to link students with resources on campus and establish social connections with other veteran students. “Connecting veteran students with other veterans at UT is especially important for new students, because [as a veteran] you don’t come into UT like freshman or sophomores,” Fogarty said. “You feel much more like you are a senior.” He said that this was especially important for young students who come into UT without the network of high school friends that most freshmen have. “[I would like to see UT do more through] the new Veterans Services Office, like helping students translate military skills into job skills, write resumes that better represent their abilities, help them with career choices and connect them to other veterans.” Both Fogarty and Hill said they were excited for these new developments at UT in assisting veteran students and their families.

In hopes of encouraging faculty to apply student-centered teaching techniques to their classrooms, educational psychology professor Marilla D. Svinicki lectured on how professors could apply recent discoveries in psychology to their curriculum as part of the Academic Transformation lecture series by the Center for Teaching and Learning. At the FAC, Svinicki lectured to a group of nearly 60 professors from different UT departments interested in improving their teaching methods using Svinicki’s data from current research literature. “They want to get a dialogue going on what students can do to regulate their own learning experience,” said Michael Sweet, director of Instruction and Development at the Center for Teaching and Learning. “Our goals are to talk more and more about learning and less and less about teaching.” After a short introduction by Sweet, Svinicki began her lecture by pointing out long term changes in education resulting from behaviorist theories about the way people learn. “We felt we could know everything by observing what people did and not what they thought, but modern theories have replaced that and now we believe that the learner ultimately controls learning,” Svinicki said. “Unfortunately,

Jono Foley | Daily Texan Staff

Mailla Svinicki passes out notes in preparation for her lecture over maintaining student engagement in the classroom.

every tool our students have now is based on old models — taking notes and reading the book and writing down anything the teacher says.” Svinicki then listed ways in which teachers can work to improve their students self-efficacy, that is, their ability to work and learn on their own. Interested professors were then given time to discuss the different methods they used in their own classrooms to address these issues. “I think what’s being said here is about important motivation in teaching,” said kinesiology professor Dolly Lambdin. “There are always better ways to teach, and everybody here is anxious to find better ways to do what they

are doing.” However, the reality of applying these issues is more difficult than simple discussion. In class sizes like those at UT, some students wonder if a professor can really attend to the education of every student in the classroom. “You can’t attend to 300 kids in one class, but if you got 30-40 in a single class then, yeah, you can do that,” freshman Brent Schiffman said. “I think the better question is, ‘Do kids take advantage of what’s already there?’” This will be the only lecture by Svinicki this semester, although the Academic Transformation series will continue in October with a presentation on integrating technology into the classroom.


P7 St/LCL

News

wednesday, september 21, 2011

7

US-India relations could hinder China’s economic growth By Megan Strickland Daily Texan Staff

China may not become the political and economic superpower that many expected in the next two decades, because of developing relations between India and the United States, said Daniel Twining, Senior Fellow for Asia at the German Marshall Fund of the United States. At The Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law speaker series, Twining said policy and economic similarities between India and the United States will form a bridge for countries in Asia towards economic progress, reduce China’s communist influences on those who live nearby and secure the United States’ place as a global power. “The liberal order that we built around our friends and allies in our sphere has gone global,” Twining said. “The liberal order was built upon the idea of representative government and global free markets that resulted in the rise of Asian nations such as India.” Twining said the idea that the rise of market democracies around the world is somehow bad for the United States is somewhat contorted and bad logic. “Power is not bleeding out of Washington and reconcentrating itself in Bejing,” Twining said. Twining said that a breakthrough in U.S. relations with India five years ago caught the attention of China and other Asian nations because it helped break down barriers to the economic growth that is now skyrocketing in India. Twining predicts India will become even more economically relevant in the coming years and believes that development will depend on U.S. international relations in the region. “There is a great demand for our leadership in Asia,” Twining said. “Countries are watching our domestic debates about debt and spending with the greatest interests and concern because the infrastructure we and our friends have built begins to wither away if we aren’t here. Countries are trying to remind us that we need to be there, and trying to facilitate that in our domestic debate.” Twining said China looks like an outlier in economic policy as its neighbors see that economic growth alone isn’t appealing without policy changes that allow growth, and many countries shy away from mirroring China’s oppressive state-run model. “Making people richer, a little better off, doesn’t resolve issues,” Twining said. “How do you move beyond the business of man-

Business continues from PAGE 6 leads the nation in the percentage of workers that earn the minimum wage. This is good for business (low labor costs mean higher profits) but what does it really mean for the Texas non-executive workers?” Austin in particular has aided the growth of small business through the use of its Small Business Development Program. The 15-member program staff, which is one of only a handful of entirely city-funded business programs in the country, has partnered with UT through a contract to offer classes and documentation for loans to small businesses, which often fare better than larger businesses in times of recession, said Blake Smith, financial analyst for SBDP. “I’m sure we’re making a significant change in the business climate. In the past year we’ve worked with 354 customers for one-on-one coaching [for small business owners],” Smith said. “Our role is an information portal — [we answer] how do I do it, and where do I go.” Local business owners Michael Heyne and Dominik Stein of Verts Kebap started their restaurant on the Drag to appeal to the active fast food culture and small business climate. It is a very employer-friendly city, with plenty of opportunities for employers to get to know the people they work with, Heyne said. When asked if they came to Texas because of its laws, the answer from Heyne was a firm “no.” “We could have gone to other states. We had the option to go to New Orleans. But in Austin there’s just a really active food culture,” he said. “We came here just because we wanted to make tasty food where you didn’t feel like you couldn’t eat for a month.”

ufacturing cheap toys and exposing widgets to the West? How can people produce the next Steve Jobs when people can’t use Google or Facebook?” As nations such as India continue to grow and seek alliances with Western nations, Twining said he is advising people to look to Asian countries often overshadowed by China’s prominence in the global market. “Ten years ago, I was telling friends to study Mandarin, now I am telling them to study Hindi,” he said. Advertising freshman Dillion Wardian said he often reads about theories that an alliance with the United States would help Asian nations move away from China’s communist shadow in order to adopt a free-market economy and repre-

sentative government policy, but he has not seen this issue discussed in other mainstream lectures on Asia. “I think it’s absolutely fantastic that we brought in India and addressed the idea of Asian plurality [at this talk],” Wardian said. “It’s often overlooked. It’s not just China anymore.” Aaron Tinjum, a public affairs graduate student, said he was a bit surprised by the enormity of the liberal order’s rise in Asia. “I’ve heard of the idea of pluralistic world, but the idea that India or South Korea could help completely contain China was kind of a new idea.”

Director of the Strauss Center for International Security and Law Frank Gavin, left, and Daniel Twining, Senior Fellow for Asia at the German Marshall Fund of the United States, talk after Twining’s lecture on Tuesday afternoon.

Kiersten Holms Daily Texan staff


EXPOSURE

Wednesday, September 21, 2011 | THE DAILY TE

Danielle Villasana | Daily Texan Staff

Melody Liao, right, assists an attendee of an event hosted by PureSport, one of Texas 4000’s sponsors, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Shannon Kintner | Daily Texan Staff

Nahil Hamam, left, and Whitney Mangold turn their faces away from strong winds and dust at the Oklahoma-Colorado border. Winds often were the hardest element to endure.

After biking through dry farmland for 7 days, Bijal Mehta, left, and Tyler Shaw observe the last few miles of Oklahoma land Colorado.

S

Shannon Kintner | Daily Texan Staff

Above: Rest stops were set up by fellow teammates every 15 to 25 miles as a way for riders to refuel. The entire team ate more than 6,000 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches this summer, as well as many PowerBars, nuts and fruit, all of which were donated from local grocery stores. Above right: Bijal Mehta, left, and Elizabeth Peters wade in glacier water in the Yukon Territory, Canada. The team often cooled down in natural bodies of water and at times bathed in them when showers were unavailable. Right: Though the team slept and ate with host families for the majority of the ride, camping became more frequent once the cyclists biked further north. Edward Standefer, far left, kindles a fire while teammates sit around the fire to keep warm during an evening in the Grand Tetons National Park, Wyoming.

D


EXAN

9

| Andrew Torrey, Photo Editor

Danielle Villasana | Daily Texan Staff

Nahil Hamam, far right, trims Melody Liao’s hair during festivities held after the Atlas Ride, an annual bike ride and fundraiser that marks the first day of their journey.

Shannon Kintner | Daily Texan Staff

dscape before crossing into Colorado. The team first rode through the Rocky Mountain range in

Danielle Villasana | Daily Texan Staff

Shannon Kintner, far left, Ilya Kuperman, Benjamin Wagman and Bijal Mehta explore an abandoned house in Oklahoma where one of the team’s rest stops was located.

4000 miles for the cure Editor’s Note: As cyclists on the 2011 LIVESTRONG Texas 4000 team for cancer, Daily Texan staff members Shannon Kintner and Danielle Villasana biked this summer from Austin to Anchorage, Alaska, alongside 43 other UT students who all raised $1 per mile for the 4,500-mile journey.

To convey the events of our summer in words is almost as challenging as waking up before dawn to bike an average of 75 miles nearly every day for 10 weeks. After two years of preparation, the 2011 LIVESTRONG Texas 4000 for Cancer Team, a nonprofit organization consisting of UT students who raise money for cancer research, embarked on their journey from Austin to Alaska through the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains on June 4, 2011. As members of the Rockies team, we braved sweltering heat, freezing cold temperatures, gargantuan mosquitoes, impenetrable headwinds and miles-long mountain climbs. However, our 4,500-mile journey would not be the same without these challenges that inspired us to show those who are affected by cancer that it’s possible to keep fighting the seemingly impossible even when you want to give up. After collectively being supported by generous hosts, teammates and strangers who we’ll never meet again, we crossed the finish line into Anchorage. As a goal and destination that had existed only in our imagination for so long, reaching Anchorage in 70 days was our way to honor those we thought of, rode and fought for every day both before and during the ride. Texas 4000 is now recruiting for the 2013 team and an information session will be held today at 7 p.m. in MEZ 1.12. Applications can be found at www.texas4000.org and are due this Friday, September 23 at midnight.

Text and photos by Danielle Villasana & Shannon Kintner

Shannon Kintner | Daily Texan Staff

Danielle Villasana | Daily Texan Staff

Danielle Villasana | Daily Texan Staff

Oftentimes when the cyclists approached construction zones or dangerous road conditions, team members would wait for everyone to arrive before proceeding, giving riders a chance to catch a few minutes of sleep.


P10 ENT

10

LIFE&ARTS

Wednesday, September 21, 2011 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Aleksander Chan, Life&Arts Editor | (512) 232-2209 | dailytexan@gmail.com

Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

In addition to Sputnik’s signature burgers and hot dogs, they offer an off-the-menu item that must requested called “The Altered Beast” (pictured). The burger comes with grilled onions, cheese, secret sauce and spices.

Sputnik lands downtown to serve scrumptious burgers By Sara Benner Daily Texan Staff

“Well, we’ve decided to close the Good Knight ... We’ll see you around,” tweeted popular restaurant The Good Knight on its three-year anniversary. But out of the gourmet gastropub’s ashes comes Sputnik, an Americanstyle burger joint with a funny Russian name. Randall Stockton, former own-

er of The Good Knight and current owner of Sputnik, is also the owner of many other restaurant ventures, including Rio Rita, Beerland and Live Oak Barbecue and co-owner of the East Side King trailers — the closest thing Austin has to a food trailer chain. In the last year, he has opened seven venues. In the wake of The Good Knight’s closing, Stockton decided to open his latest project, Sputnik, in the The Good

Knight’s location. Originally, Stockton and his wife Donya intended to make The Good Knight’s space into a burger place. But fate’s intervening hand distracted the Stocktons from their initial vision. Instead of going with their instinct toward a relaxed burger joint, they opened a gastropub — a bar that pairs cocktails with gourmet entrees. With only 25 seats and a tiny

kitchen, going gourmet wasn’t necessarily the best logistical choice for their restaurant space. In the long run, the restaurant was too small to support The Good Knight’s intricate menu and turn the tables over often enough, Stockton said. “Despite the fact that we wanted to do a burger joint, when we tried something different instead, we’re still ver y proud of The Good Knight menu. I thought it

was really great food and there were plenty of people that really enjoyed it, but logistically it just wasn’t working out,” Stockton said. The new restaurant’s menu, consisting of burgers, hot dogs and fries, is a lot like the restaurant space itself: deconstructed and simple with a sexy twist. The dimly-lit space is filled with

SPUTNIK continues on PAGE 11

WHAT: Sputnik WHERE: 1300 E. 6th & Attayac WHEN: Sunday - Friday HOURS: 3 p.m. - midnight COST: $10 per person

Student bloggers use social media for personal branding, propelling future careers By Jessica Lee Daily Texan Staff

When Anjli Mehta began sorting through dozens of unanswered emails, she thought the message from USA Today was junk mail. She took a quick glance at the contents of the email only to find that it was a job offer. The newspaper had found her dating blog, This Single Life, through Twitter and asked that she write for its online, college-themed publication. A year ago, Mehta, a senior multimedia journalism major, created her blog through Wordpress, a website that allows users to create their personal blogs for free. “I created This Single Life not only as a space for me to express my ideas about relationships and dating, but also I wanted something that I could put at the top of my resume,” Mehta said. “I definitely didn’t create it expecting major magazines to come knocking at my door with job opportunities, but I guess it just suddenly got popular and worked out that way.” It was the idea of linking her blog to her Twitter account that allowed Mehta to reach a broader audience. Every time she creates a new post, Mehta includes a link to the post on her Twitter account so her followers can easily access the blog. Patricia McConnico, the senior content editor at Texas Monthly, has noticed an increase in job candidates using social media outlets to exhibit their skills. “I think the reason for this is twofold: to show potential employers that said candidate has web experience and to cut back on costs,” McConnico said.

But are businesses really taking the time to look at personal interest blogs provided on resumes? “I do find these useful,” McConnico said. “But I look at the resume first. If the candidate looks promising, I print the resume and then I might look at the website.” Matt Berndt, director of communication career services, urges students to manage their Facebook and Twitter accounts to uphold their online public brand, the identity they create for themselves online. “You have to remember that the Internet is a public environment,” Berndt said. “Anything available online is fair game.” According to Berndt, social media can be a means of connecting people with businesses and employers that would usually be hard to connect with. Students in search of employment can put a portfolio of their work online that is more accessible than a print copy. “Social media is a great way to advance your brand, but you’ve got to back up that networking with substance,” Berndt said. Junior psychology major Sarah Kettles has created a personal brand for herself through her website The Positive Affect. She uses the site to display her research at UT as well as to document her journey to graduate school. Kettles plans to show potential employers her website so they will be able to get to know her beyond an interview and a resume. “I think this is a great way to show schools and employers that I really know my stuff,” Kettles said. “On the website, they can look at all my accomplishments and see

Photo illustration by Ryan Edwards | Daily Texan Staff

Social media is becoming a means for many to connect with potential job employers. Online information is an easy way for employers to judge one’s personal abilities and access online portfolios.

how hard I’ve worked and how hard I’m willing to work.” As an editor hiring new professionals regularly, McConnico finds social media to be a great judge of one’s abilities. “A website that is easy to navigate, professional, designed well and showcases a person’s talent and work history is a plus,” McConnico said. “We don’t see that many huge boxes of portfolios coming through like we used to.”

GETTING HIRED AND SOCIAL MEDIA

Facebook: Manage your photos, provide links to your professional blog/ website and use strict privacy settings

Twitter: Edit tweets, link to blog posts and follow potential employers Sites/Blogs: Post work associated with potential career and your resume


P11 ENT

Life&Arts 11

Wednesday, september 21, 2011

St. Vincent’s album exhibits growth Toro y Moi brings By Eli Watson Daily Texan Staff

Annie Clark, better known as St. Vincent, has grown considerably since her first album. Lending her talents to eclectic acts such as The Polyphonic Spree and Sufjan Stevens, Clark has displayed an interesting transformation over the course of her short career. From the poppy Marry Me to the intricate and dark Actor, Clark continues to push the boundaries while finding a suitable middle ground in her latest album, Strange Mercy. With assistance from producer John Congleton, Strange Mercy channels the pop sensibilities and creative compositions from Clark’s past albums, resulting in arrangements that are filled with searing guitar work and analog keyboards. “Chloe in the Afternoon” opens up

with noisy, buzzing guitar, while fuzzy synths provide a base for the many layers of melodies. Clark’s vocals are beautifully haunting: They become one with the many instruments present, adding to the complexity of the song’s arrangement. “Cheerleader” and its repetitious “I” delivers with conviction Clark’s frustration teetering on an edge of counter-melodies and thumping, mechanical drums. “Surgeon” is a psychedelic-soul hybrid; the riff that Clark plays in the chorus shows how she can make something so unconventional sound hip, and the Brian Eno-sounding synth solo at the end wails with an art-rock bravado. The title song is beautiful with the strange, eerie atmosphere it creates. It plays like Radiohead’s “Karma Police,” the tension building as Clark sings about revenge to the “policeman” that hurt someone close to her.

SPUTNIK continues from PAGE 10

oversized, dark wooden booths and a bar that spans the length of the restaurant. The walls are decorated with scantily adorned pinup girls, which Stockton says are of his wife’s choosing. Brandon Stratton has been the head chef of The Good Knight since he moved to Austin two years ago. Stratton will continue his reign over the kitchen as head chef for Sputnik. Although The Good Knight’s menu was complex, with favorites like shepherd’s pie and pork belly confit, Stratton said he feels Sputnik’s down-to-earth

burgers will stand out among specialty gourmet burger enterprises in the area. “In my opinion, burgers aren’t supposed to be gourmet. They’re not supposed to be specialty. They’re supposed to be comfort and that’s what we focused on. There’s no pretentiousness going on here,” Stratton said. With simplicity as his mantra, Stratton has created recipes for Sputnik that are traditional yet unique. The burgers are 8 ounces, juicy, handformed, freshly ground and seasoned 80/20 chuck patties, served with pick-

Strange Mercy St. Vincent

Genre: Art rock Tracks: 11 For those who like: the Polyphonic spree, sufjan stevens

Grade: ASt. Vincent is demented, but she cleverly veils that with a bubbly demeanor. Her sweet, seductive voice conveys a message of violence and frustration disguised behind alluring imagery, creating lyrics with a full-force blow. Not all songs are masterpieces though. “Champagne Year” is stagnant, with no real significant changes occurring until the very end and “Hysterical Strength” is all over the place: Unlike the other

songs on the album, there is no fluidity and its spontaneous placement of distorted vocals and grungy guitars is overwhelming. Strange Mercy is an eclectic package. Clark carries herself like Portishead’s Beth Gibbons, her voice soft and vulnerable, but peppered with an array of emotions. The album shows Clark’s evolution as an artist and proves that Clark is an unpredictable character.

les, onions, lettuce and tomato on a delectable brioche bun from the HearthStone Baking Company. “When I’m craving comfort food and want a hamburger, I don’t want a hamburger that’s got fried egg on it, with this and that. I just want a good, old-fashioned, burger,” Stratton said. As the weeks go on, Sputnik will add more items to its menu. The item Stratton is most excited for is his favorite burger, known as the Altered Beast, a tribute to the secret, off-the-menu, In-N-Out Animal Style burger. The Animal Style

burger is a mustard-cooked patty topped with grilled pickles, onions, extra cheese and In-N-Out’s special sauce, whereas the Altered Beast is a Sputnik patty topped with grilled onions, lettuce, tomato, pickles, and a “special sauce” of its own. Just like its In-N-Out muse, the Altered Beast is not on the menu. However, Stratton is willing to serve it up to those who order it by name. Though small and with a limited menu, Sputnik’s flame-kissed American fare is a welcome addition to the East Side food scene.

lo-fi techniques to sophomore album By Ali Breland Daily Texan Staff

Chillwave front runner Chaz Bundick, who performs under the pseudonym Toro y Moi, has managed to expand the burgeoning genre again. His new EP, Freaking Out, moves in a direction similar to Toro y Moi’s debut album, Causers Of This, with dancier, more upbeat synth lines lit by catchy, simple piano lines throughout. The lo-fi genre, which purposefully exhibits a lower, degraded audio quality, has been furtively and silently making a return. The relative Internet success of the Denver husband and wife duo Tennis, and their less profound but higher-profile counterpart Best Coast is indicative of this. Rising stars Neon Indian and Com Truise are producing trippy vintage ’80s songs. Even French electronic megastars Justice have taken notice of this trend, incorporating lo-fi techniques onto their single “Civilization” and utilizing chillwave and ’80s-esque synthlines on another single, “Helix,” from their forthcoming record. Chaz Bundwick, a pioneer of

this movement at its core, may be able to capitalize off this rise in popularity with his new sound. His deviation from mellow, more chilled-out instrumentals and complex narratives will definitely make the album more accessible without alienating his original fans. Lyrically, the album falls short. Bundwick could have done a better job combining catchy hooks with unique and drawn out stories so that he wouldn’t be sacrifice depth for listening ease. The song “Saturday Love” is just him singing the days of the week and talking about love lost — like that hasn’t been done before. To his credit, his explicit exhibition of his emotions are bold and worthy of some admiration. Bundwick has demonstrated in the past that he has the capacity for a more intelligent means of expressing himself. While Toro y Moi does a slightly lesser job of storytelling on Freaking Out than in records past, he is still taking an interesting step in the right direction. Freaking Out is only an EP after all, and Bundwick has the chance to make up for his shortcomings on a full LP.

Toro Y Moi Freaking Out

Genre: Chillwave Tracks: 5 For those who like: twin shadow, Neon indian, Com truise

Grade: B-

Young people less repulsed by slurs, offensive language By Connie Cass The Associated Press

NASA | Associated Press

This screen grab image provided by NASA shows UARS attached to the robotic arm of the space shuttle Discovery during mission STS-48.

Satellite to fall on earth in fragments unlikely to injure By Marcia Dunn The Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — NASA scientists are doing their best to tell us where a plummeting 6-ton satellite will fall later this week. It’s just that if they’re off a little bit, it could mean the difference between hitting Florida or landing on New York. Or say, Iran or India. Pinpointing where and when hurtling space debris will strike is an imprecise science. For now, scientists predict the earliest it will hit is Thursday U.S. time, the latest Saturday. The strike zone covers most of Earth. Not that citizens need to take cover. The satellite will break into pieces, and NASA put the chances that somebody somewhere on Earth will get hurt at 1 in 3,200. But any one person’s odds of being struck have been estimated at 1 in 21 trillion. As far as anyone knows, falling space debris has never injured anyone. Nor has significant property damage been reported. That’s because most of the planet is covered in water and there are vast regions of empty land. If you do come across what you suspect is a satellite piece, NASA doesn’t want you to pick it up. The space agency says there are no toxic chemicals present, but there could be sharp edges. Also, it’s govern-

ment property. It’s against the law to keep it as a souvenir or sell it on eBay. NASA’s advice is to report it to the police. The 20-year-old research satellite is expected to break into more than 100 pieces as it enters the atmosphere, most of it burning up. Twenty-six of the heaviest metal parts are expected to reach Earth, the biggest chunk weighing about 300 pounds. The debris could be scattered over an area about 500 miles long. Jonathan McDowell, for one, isn’t worried. He is in the potential strike zone — along with most of the world’s 7 billion citizens. McDowell is with the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. “There’s stuff that’s heavy that falls out of the sky almost every year,” McDowell says. So far this year, he noted, two massive Russian rocket stages have taken the plunge. As for the odds of the satellite hitting someone, “It’s a small chance. We take much bigger chances all the time in our lives,” McDowell says. “So I’m not putting my tin helmet on or hiding under a rock.” Back when UARS, the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, was launched to study the ozone layer in 1991, NASA didn’t always pay attention to the “what goes up must come down” rule. Nowadays, satellites must be designed either to burn up

on re-entering the atmosphere or to have enough fuel to be steered into a watery grave or up into a higher, long-term orbit. The International Space Station — the largest manmade structure ever to orbit the planet — is no exception. NASA has a plan to bring it down safely sometime after 2020. Russia’s old Mir station came down over the Pacific, in a controlled re-entry, in 2001. But one of its predecessors, Salyut 7, fell uncontrolled through the atmosphere in 1991. The most recent uncontrolled return of a large NASA satellite was in 2002. The most sensational case of all was Skylab, the early U.S. space station whose impending demise three decades ago alarmed people around the world and touched off a guessing game as to where it might land. It plummeted harmlessly into the Indian Ocean and onto remote parts of Australia in July 1979. If it happens in darkness, it should be visible. Space junk in general is on the rise, much of it destroyed or broken satellites and chunks of used rockets. More than 20,000 manmade objects at least 4 inches in diameter are being tracked in orbit. It’s mostly a threat to astronauts in space, rather than people on Earth. In June, the six residents of the International Space Station

took shelter in their docked Soyuz lifeboats because of passing debris. The unidentified object came within 1,100 feet of the complex, the closest call yet.

WASHINGTON — Young people immersed in the online world are encountering racist and sexist slurs and other name-calling that probably would appall their parents and teachers. And most consider it no big deal, a new poll says. Teens and twenty-somethings say in an Associated Press-MTV poll that people feel freer to use hurtful language when texting on their cellphones or posting to sites like Facebook than they would face to face. Half the young people regularly see discriminatory slang — including racial taunts and words like “slut,” “fag” and “retard” — and the majority say they aren’t very offended by it. Those surveyed are twice as likely to say biased slurs are used for comedic effect as they are to think that the user is expressing hateful feelings toward a group of people. Another popular reason: to sound cool. “They might be really serious, but you take it as a joke,” said Kervin Browner II, 20, a junior at Oakland University in Rochester, Mich. He’s black, but says the

ugly words he sees are generally aimed at women, not minorities. And although Browner doesn’t like it, he doesn’t protest when his friends use those words on Twitter. “That’s just how it is,” he said. “People in their own minds, they think it’s cool.” When the question is asked broadly, half of young people say using discriminatory words is wrong. But 54 percent think it’s OK to use them within their own circle of friends, because “I know we don’t mean it.” And they don’t worry much about whether the things they tap into their cellphones and laptops could reach a wider audience and get them into trouble. A 13-year-old Concord, N.H., girl was suspended from school for posting on Facebook that she wished Osama bin Laden had killed her math teacher. The University of Texas Longhorns dismissed a sophomore football player for his racial slam against Barack Obama on Facebook after the 2008 presidential election. And a Harvard Law student’s email to friends suggesting that blacks might be intellectually inferior was forwarded across the Internet, prompting the law school dean to publicly denounce it.

NO CAR? NO PROBLEM. Get to campus the quick and easy way. Just take a car2go when you need it, and park it when you’re done. No mandatory reservations or late fees. For a limited time, students get free registration and 30 minutes free at Austincar2go.com (promo code: COLLEGE). Must be 18 years or older to register. Must have valid U.S. driver’s license.


P12 ENT

12 Life&ArtS

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

PETA plans to fight animal abuse with pornography site

Alex Brandon | Associated Press

U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Josh Seefried poses for a photo with his book in Philadelphia.

Gay serviceman helped end DADT SAN FRANCISCO — J.D. Smith came into being when a gay student group in upstate New York needed a speaker to talk about the U.S. military’s ban on openly gay troops. In the 16 months since then, he advised the Pentagon on the policy, became an oft-quoted media commentator on the topic and was a White House guest when President Barack Obama signed the bill paving the way for the ban’s appeal. When the 17-year-old “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy went away on Tuesday, so did J.D. Smith, the name a 25-year-old Air Force officer assumed to shield his identity as he engaged in high-wire activism that could have destroyed on his career. Even if no one asks, Air Force First Lt. Joshua David Seefried is telling.

“It’s all about leading now,” Seefried said as he prepared to come out to his superiors, put a picture of his Air Force pilot boyfriend on his office desk and update his personal Facebook profile to reflect his sexual orientation. “Those are things I feel like I should do because I guess that is what a leader would do. If we all stay in the closet and don’t act brave, then the next generation won’t have any progress.” At Joint Base McGuire-DixLakehurst in New Jersey, Seefried works in finance, oversees a staff of 20 and is attached to the 87th Air Base Wing. Twice this year, he was set to deploy to the Middle East, and felt conflicted when his orders were canceled only because going overseas would have put J.D. Smith

out of commission. A handful of friends at work know he is gay. Only one knows about OutServe, the underground network for gay military personnel he co-founded last year. Although he expects only a fraction of the 65,000 gay men and lesbians estimated to be serving in the armed forces to reveal themselves at first, Seefried will not be alone. On Tuesday, his organization’s magazine will publish an issue featuring photographs and biographies of him and 100 other gay service members. OutServe, which has grown to 4,300 members in more than 40 chapters from Alaska to Iraq, has had an exceptionally aggressive rise since its February 2010 launch. From the start, Seefried and a tech-savvy civilian friend, Ty Wal-

rod, saw its mission as two-fold: to ease the isolation of gay service members and to educate the public about the price of requiring them to serve in silence. Now that “don’t ask, don’t tell” is history, Seefried is looking forward to handing off his leadership role. He will promote a book of essays by gay service members he edited. But first, he had to make it through Tuesday without knowing how his co-workers would respond to his sexual orientation. “You take a chance and you have to hope everything is OK. I think everything is going to be more than OK,” he said. “That kind of familyness I see in the Air Force, that is going to be mine, too.” —The Associated Press

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals is planning to launch a pornographic website to promote its animal rights and vegan diet message, a move that critics say will backfire and ostracize them from mainstream society. PETA spokeswoman Lindsay Rajt said in a telephone interview from Los Angeles on Tuesday that the group has applied with ICM Registry to launch the website peta.xxx. Rajt says the site will feature “tantalizing” videos and photographs, which will lead viewers into animal rights messages. She noted that Norfolk-based PETA has used porn stars and nudity to get its message across in the past, including an annual speech online in which a PETA representative undresses. That video later shares a message about slaughterhouses. She says a pornographic site will allow PETA to reach a broader audience and that publicity about the site is just as important. “I think the bottom line is we live in a 24-hour news cycle where over the years we’ve found our racier actions are kind of a fast track way to get people to stand up and pay attention about the plight of animals,” she said. Rajt says November is the earliest that PETA could receive approval for the site. Critics say that by resorting to pornography, PETA is alienating itself from a large swath of the population that might other-

wise be sympathetic to its cause. “I just don’t want to understand why they want to offend people who would potentially support at least part of their cause. There have got to be other ways to draw attention to their cause,” said Robert Peters, general counsel for the New York-based anti-pornography group Morality in Media. “Metaphorically speaking, they’re getting in bed with hard core pornographers to prevent cruelty to animals. That borders on insanity.” Rajt said PETA officials would track the website to determine if people are viewing the animal rights messages and not just the nudity. Past experience has shown that they will, she said. J. Justin Wilson, senior research analyst for the food-industry backed Center for Consumer Freedom, said moves like this by PETA make them increasingly irrelevant in mainstream society. “They don’t seem to be changing the debate anymore, I think in large part because people are writing them off as whack jobs,” he said from Washington. “This is one more example of them being their own worst enemy. If they’re trying to win the hearts and minds of people considering being vegetarians, this is probably the wrong way to do it.” The Virginian-Pilot in Norfolk, Va. first reported PETA’s plans. — The Associated Press

R E C YC L E your copy of The Daily Texan

MIT Sloan Join us at the Sheraton Austin at the Capitol

701 East 11th Street Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011 at 6:00 pm

KVRX FALL CONCERT SERIES

Meet an admissions representative and learn what makes MIT Sloan different.

F R I D AY S E P T E M B E R 2 3 THE ASTEROID SHOP T H E G R E AT N O S TA L G I C WAT C H O U T F O R R O C K E T S WESTERN GHOST HOUSE

29TH ST BALLROOM D O O R S AT 8 P M ALL AGES $5 COVER $7 W/ CD

T H E Z O LTA R S 91.7 FM // KVRX.ORG

MIT Sloan MBA 2-year innovative, rigorous program. mitsloan-mba.mit.edu


13 COMICS

COMICS 13

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

SUDOKUFORYOU

SUD OKU FOR YOU

8

2 5

2

7

6 5

8 6

7 7

1 9

2 4

6 3 4 8

5 4 1

1

9 5

3 2

1

Yesterday’s solution

9

6

Arrr matey. This scurrvy beast is today’s answerrrrrr. Crop it out, or it’ll be the the fishes for ya!

4 2 5 8 1 6 7 9 3

8 7 9 2 4 3 5 6 1

1 6 3 7 5 9 4 8 2

9 5 1 3 2 4 6 7 8

2 3 7 6 8 5 1 4 9

6 4 8 1 9 7 2 3 5

5 8 6 9 7 1 3 2 4

7 9 4 5 3 2 8 1 6

3 1 2 4 6 8 9 5 7

6 9 4 3 2 1 8 5 7

1 3 7 8 5 6 4 9 2

2 5 8 9 7 4 3 6 1

8 1 3 4 9 2 5 7 6

7 2 9 6 8 5 1 3 4

5 4 6 7 1 3 2 8 9

4 8 1 5 6 9 7 2 3

3 6 5 2 4 7 9 1 8

9 7 2 1 3 8 6 4 5


P14 SPTS/CLASS

14 SPORTS

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Horns take down TCU in straight sets

Senior AllAmerican Rachael Adams led the Longhorns to a three set victory over TCU last night. Adams and the rest of the team will look to take the momentum from this win into the Big 12 season, starting on Saturday.

By Chris Hummer Daily Texan Staff

In their final nonconference game before the Big 12 season gears up, Texas took down TCU in straight sets (25-16, 25-15, 25-19). TCU (13-1) was previously undefeated going into the match, but the eighth-ranked Longhorns (7-3) quickly disposed of them, finishing off their nonconference season strong. Senior All-American Rachael Adams led the team with 11 kills and a .471 hitting percentage, while adding three blocks to the team’s defensive cause as well. Big 12 freshman of the week Khat Bell had a excellent match outside with 10 kills, and her opposite side opposite hitter Bailey Webster contributed nine kills and a .692 hitting percentage. In the first set Texas broke through with a 5-0 run, to take a 19-12 lead against the Horn Frogs. TCU then cut the lead down to four, but then the Longhorns salted the set away with another 5-0 run finished off by a pair of blocks and a kill by freshman Madelyn Hutson. The two teams were entangled in a 10 all tie in the second set, until Texas went on a 15-5 run to close out the set. Early on in the third set the game was tight, but a 6-0 run by the Longhorns put them up 22-15, and later a kill by Adams put the game away 25-19. Texas will look to carry the momentum of a successful non-conference run over to the start of the Big 12 season on Saturday against Kansas.

Mary Kang Daily Texan Staff

Despite turbulent offseason Young has best season of his career Manny Ramirez before getting Napoli. The trade request by Young came in the weeks before spring training, and the Rangers tried to accommodate him in the aftermath of their first World Series. When no deal happened, Young reported to Arizona on time and put his focus on the field. He told teammates he wouldn’t be a distraction and said he was preparing to have the best season he could, just like he always has. “I have really no desire to revisit anything that happened over the winter,” Young said. “But I never wanted to leave. I always wanted to be here. My teammates know that.” Reigning AL MVP Josh Hamilton said it was hard to even consider that Young might not be around. “He’s just a professional’s professional. He goes about his business, he’s a leader in the clubhouse,” Hamilton said during the team’s last homestand. “It just shows you his talent level, capable of playing pretty much any position, and still getting the job done at the plate. So it’s been fun to watch.” Young has started a team-high 151 of the Rangers’ 153 games. While there have been 68 games as the DH, he has started 42 of the last 52 in the field during a stretch when Beltre missed six weeks with a strained left hamstring before coming back at the start of September. Young has started 38 games at third base, 13 at second and 32 at first — a position he had never played at any level, not even Little League, before working there this spring. Even while playing different spots in the field, nothing has changed at the plate for the Rangers’ career hits leader — at

By Jim Vertuno The Associated Press

So when the Rangers’ longest-tenured player stayed in Texas, he stayed Young and is having one of the best seasons in his career. “It’s one of t he b est trades that never happ ened,” teammate David Murphy said. The 34-year-old Young has remained a steady presence for the Rangers as they close in on another AL West title. He already has more than 100 RBIs and is only two hits shy of his sixth 200-hit season while hitting .331. That matches his career best and was tied for second in the AL on Monday, the team’s last day off in the regular season. “I don’t consider this to be any different than my other years. All I care about is being healthy and being consistent,” said Young, a .303 career hitter in his 11th season. “Every year you might find one season that’s maybe slightly below my norm, another season might be slightly above it, but I like to think I’m always the same guy.” Even when having a new role and changing positions again. Young became primarily a designated hitter and utility infielder after the Rangers this winter signed All-Star and Gold Glove-winning third baseman Adrian Beltre and then traded for catcher Mike Napoli. Napoli also was a DH and first baseman, the spots Texas had planned for Young after he played third base the past two seasons. The Rangers showed interest, too, in potential DHs Jim Thome and day, month day, 2008

UNS AD IRNE FOR ONL

E! E R F d wor

ad s

on l y

VEHICLES FOR SALE

100 Vehicles Wanted

CASH FOR CARS RUNNING OR NOT 370 Unf. Apts.

4 BLOCKS FROM CAMPUS

ANNOUNCEMENTS

530 Travel-Transportation COLLEGE SKI & BOARD WEEK Breckenridge • Vail • Keystone Beaver Creek • Arapahoe Basin

breckenridge

20 Mountains. 5 Resorts. 1 Price.

FROM ONLY

plus t/s

x ID 3078686

HOUSE FOR RENT 3/2 in Kyle, Available now 512-422-6965 info Garage community pool $995 month

426 Furnished Rooms FURNISHED ROOM FOR RENT Luxury condo in Southwest Austin with furnished room for rent. Private bathe, 1500 sq. ft. condo on greenbelt close to Mopak, shopping, restaurants, etc. Young at heart senior with sweet lab, open minded, and Texas friendly owner. $600 per mo. ABP 512554-6455

Michael Young was almost traded in the off-season but he ended up staying with the Rangers and has had one of the best seasons of his career, hitting .331 thus far.

Self-serve, 24/7 on the Web at www.DailyTexanOnline.com

Classic 2 bedroom 2 bath loft style apartment, 1500 a month, One year lease. dhays2000@mac. com

420 Unf. Houses

CLASSIFIEDS

Tony Gutierrez | Associated Press

CLASSIFIEDS THE DAILY TEXAN

512-914-1877

HOUSING RENTAL

2,046 and counting. He also has only 78 strikeouts this season, a career low in 599 at-bats. He won the AL batting title in 2005 with a .331 average. But Young is taking no extra satisfaction in having success this season in a different situation. “Not at all, none,” he said. “No person or no situation can take me to a place I’m already at. I mean, either you’re motivated or you’re not. If you’re relying on other people or a particular scenario to motivate you, you’re probably in the wrong business. I’m motivated by winning and by playing well, simple as that.” And the Rangers (88-65) are finally winning after so many seasons of lastplace finishes without ever winning a playoff series before last year. Before Texas won the AL West title and got to the World Series a year ago, Young had played 1,508 regular-season games without getting into the playoffs. That was the second-longest streak for an active player. Young was a second baseman when he became a starter for Texas in 2001, then switched to shortstop after Alex Rodriguez was traded in 2004 and was an AllStar five consecutive seasons. The Rangers moved Young to third base two years ago when shortstop Elvis Andrus was promoted from Double-A. This time, Young had to prepare for multiple positions and not always being on the field. “It further emphasizes how mentally tough he is,” Murphy said. “He’s going to 1 be a leader and he’s always going to be a team guy ... Bottom line is he wants to win.”

WWW.UBSKI.COM

1-800-SKI-WILD • 1-800-754-9453 600 West 28th St, Suite #102

560 Public Notice

FREE $5 LITTLE CAESAR’S gift cards to first 100 new visitors on Sun., Sept. 25 to Central Christian Church, 1110 Guadalupe St.- just 9 blocks north of the UT campus! Service starts at 10:45 a.m. Everyone welcome! Informal attire! www.cccaustin.org

recycle

560 Public Notice

IT’S THE END OF THE WORLD

(as we’ve come to know it)! Very soon, after the corrupt global markets collapse, one very wise person prophesied by ALL major world religions will speak to all of humanity. He will NOT come across as a religious figure & does not want to be worshipped. He will inspire mankind to see itself as one family & to build a new world based upon the principles of Sharing, Justice, & Love. Read all about it: w w w. t h e E m e r g e n c e . org

790 Part Time GYMNASTICS COACHES Former gymnasts and cheerleaders needed to coach gymnastics. Flexible hours. 3 locations. Marla 512-219-9930

HYDE PARK BAPTIST Child Development Center, seeks Teaching Assistants for ages 0-5 Shifts M-F 8:00-12:30 and/or 2:30-6:00 PM. Please apply in person. 512-465-8383 TUTORING. Experienced Advanced Math/Science /Study Skills tutor needed for K-12. Flex hours, Fun job. $15 per hr. 512327-1288

800 General Help Wanted

STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM

SEEKING A NEW SPIRITUAL HOME?

Paid Survey Takers Needed In Austin. 100% FREE To Join! Click On Surveys.

One that honors all paths to God? Join us! Austin Center for Spiritual Living www.austincsl.org

EARN $1000-$3200 A month to drive our brand new cars with ads. www. FreeCarJobs.com

EMPLOYMENT

820 Accounting-Bookkeeping

790 Part Time BARTENDING! $300/DAY POTENTIAL No experience necessary. Training courses available. Age 18+. 800965-6520 ext. 113

BOOKKEEPING NEEDED, Computer Experienced, Working Hrs range 2-3hrs per day. 3-4 days per week. for more info submit your Resume to hpaperdepot@aol.com for review 512-795-7887

875 Medical Study x ID 3099607

BUSINESS

930 Business Opportunities

THE DAILY TEXAN CLASSIFIED Regular rate 15 words for one day=$12.50/ for one week=$42.08/ for two weeks=$67.20 & $.50 per additional word. All ads appear online at no charge unless you opt for enhancements which will incur additional nominal charges.

940 Opportunities Wanted

YOUR AD COULD BE HERE!

CALL 512.471.5244 or self-service to submit Ad at dailytexanonline.com x ID 2860257

keep an eye out for the

super TUESDAY COUPONS clip and save!

every week

3B

ADVERTISING TERMS There are no refunds or credits. In the event of errors made in advertisement, notice must be given by 10 am the fi rst day of publication, as the publishers are responsible for only ONE incorrect insertion. In consideration of The Daily Texan’s acceptance of advertising copy for publication, the agency and the advertiser will indemnify and save harmless, Texas Student Media and its officers, employees and agents against all loss, liability, damage and expense of whatsoever nature arising out of the copying, printing or publishing of its advertisement including without limitation reasonable attorney’s fees resulting from claims of suits for libel, violation of right of privacy, plagiarism and copyright and trademark infringement. All ad copy must be approved by the newspaper which reserves the right to request changes, reject or properly classify an ad. The advertiser, and not the newspaper, is responsible for the truthful content of the ad. Advertising is also subject to credit approval.


P15 SPTS

SPORTS 15

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

GILBERT continues from PAGE 16

THE STAT GUY

“He’s a tough kid that fought through some pain to continue to play. We also know that Garrett is a very smart kid with a great understanding of our offense, so we’re excited that he’ll still be around to help coach Harsin and our young quarterbacks. He will continue to be a great leader for us helping those guys throughout the season. With his work ethic and deter-

mination, we know he’ll get his shoulder back to full strength as soon as possible.” Texas, though, still has options at quarterback. Gilbert is one of four Longhorns to throw a touchdown pass this season, joining McCoy and freshman receivers Jaxon Shipley and John Harris. But for now, it appears that McCoy will be the starter. He did well in his first career start,

completing 12 of 15 attempts for 168 yards and two touchdowns in a 49-20 win over UCLA. Ash has also produced, although his package of plays is limited. Gilbert completed 48.4 percent of his passes in two games this season, throwing for 247 yards and one touchdown. He also rushed for 15 yards on seven carries.

PAC-12 continues from PAGE 16 conference realignment. University of Oklahoma President David Boren has said the two instate rivals will remain in the same league whether they decide to stay in the Big 12 or join the Pac-12. “Whatever we do, we’re going to do it together, and I think that’s very good news for the state of Oklahoma,” Boren said. Texas Tech was going to follow

Texas’ lead. Texas and Oklahoma were not acting together. Texas officials had stated several times it wanted to keep the Big 12 alive. Oklahoma officials said they were looking for stability and equal revenue sharing, which does not occur in the Big 12. Texas has its own cable television network. A person familiar with the

schools’ discussions said Texas and Oklahoma officials are expected to meet in the next few days to negotiate an agreement to keep the universities in the league for at least the next five years. The person requested anonymity because the meeting had not been announced. Whether other schools would be invited to join that meeting was unclear Tuesday night.

Stars open preseason with a victory

Lawrence Peart | Daily Texan Staff

Fozzy Whittaker runs for a touchdown against UCLA on Saturday in a 49-20 win. Whittaker is a part of a three-headed running attack alongside of Malcolm Brown and Cody Johnson. They are a big reason that the Longhorns are averaging 226.33 yards a game on the ground so far.

Texas offense invigorated by running game A lot of people believe that winning championships means By Hank South having a stellar passing attack. Daily Texan Columnist While being able to throw the ball is key for a team’s success, Don’t look now, but the Long- statistics have shown over the horns have themselves a run- past four years that being able to run the ball is just as important. ning game. Last year’s champion, Auburn, After years of preseason promises that the Longhorns will put up yards on the ground, followed by the team instead airing it out 40 to 50 times per game, the rushing attack has become prominent once again. Following this past weekend in college football, the Longhorns now rank 21st in rushing yards per game, averaging 226.33 yards per contest. This time last year the Longhorns were averaging 152.33 yards per game, ranking 76th in the nation. And who said change ranked third in the nation in was bad? Malcolm Brown is ranked rushing with 284.8 yards a game. 46th in the nation in yards per In 2009, Alabama ranked eighth game with 88. A revamped Fozzy at the end of the year with 215.1 Whittaker is showing his in- yards per contest on the ground. ner Ronnie Brown, running the Tim Tebow and company ranked “wild-horn” with a veteran ease. seventh in 2008, running OklaAdd the bruising running style homa out of the national chamof Cody Johnson, and Texas has pionship game with 241 yards on a legitimate three-headed mon- the ground in the Orange Bowl. ster coming out of the backfield. LSU ranked 10th in 2007.

The Longhorns have a long road ahead of them, but as long as the running game is alive, the odds of winning many games is, too.

u eB Th

ys

In Texas’ opener versus Rice, the Longhorns rushed for 229 yards. This past weekend, the team rushed for 284 yards, a 24 percent increase from week one. If the Longhorns were to follow this gradual trend, look for a team-rushing total of around 350 yards versus Oklahoma. The fact that Texas has three goto running backs has historically shown to be beneficial. Every national championship team in the past few years has had two or more backs that can rack up yards. Percy Harvin (who split time at wide out and running back) and Tim Tebow at Florida, Trent Richardson and Mark Ingram at Alabama. Cam Newton, Michael Dyer and Onterio McCalebb at Auburn. A lot goes into winning championships in college football, and the running game is just one facet. The last time Texas averaged more than 225 yards per game in a season on the ground was in 2005. The Longhorns rushed for 274 yards a contest, winning the Rose Bowl and Texas’ fourth national championship. The Longhorns have a long road ahead of them, but as long as the running game is alive, the odds of winning many games is, too.

THE

of T as ex

BUYS OF TEXAS HAS GOT A DEAL FOR YOU! • 2 Deals a Week • 50 percent off local businesses • Official UT group buying program

SIGN UP TODAY! FIND DEALS AT: DEALS.DAILYTEXANONLINE.COM

MONTREAL — Brenden Morrow, Adam Pardy and Michael Ryder scored first-period goals to send the Dallas Stars to a 6-3 win over the Montreal Canadiens on Tuesday night in the preseason opener for both teams. Krys Barch put Dallas up 4-0 when he beat Carey Price 4:04 into the second. Mike Ribeiro scored the Stars’ second power-play goal on Nathan Lawson at 16:24, ending a run of three straight Montreal scores. Matt Fraser scored late in the third. Dallas’ Tyler Beskorowany stopped the six shots he faced after replacing Andrew Raycroft 10:14 into the second. Mor row, w ho op ene d t he scoring 3:12 in, left in the third period and did not return. “I just had a little tweak in my knee and I thought I’d give

it a little break before it got any worse,” Morrow said. “More a precaution than anything, day to day.” Erik Cole got his first Canadiens goal, Andrei Kostitsyn scored with the man-advantage and former Dallas defenseman Jeff Woywitka beat Raycroft b efore b ot h te ams change d goalies midway through the second. “It was good to get a spark and get t hings going ,” s aid Cole, who left Carolina for an $18 million, four-year freeagent deal with Montreal. “I’ll definitely be looking forward to more games and certainly to opening night here.” In addition to new plexiglass around the Bell Centre ice, enhance d s afety me asures included curved glass panels at the end of each team’s bench

and a repositioned stanchion at the other end of the visiting team’s bench. Seen countless times in video replays of Boston captain Zdeno Chara’s devastating hit on Canadiens forward Max Pacioretty in March, the padded stanchion has been moved back 18 inches from the top of the boards. It also now supports only one pane of glass perpendicular to the ice boards, with anot her p ane pre v iously in front of the Canadiens backup goalie now removed. “It went from the probably the hardest, most dangerous glass in the league to the softest, most absorbable boards, and as a player it means a lot,” Canadiens left wing Michael Cammalleri said. “I thought they did a great job.” —The Associated Press

tournament Mortal Kombat Halo: Reach 5PM 7PM Sept. 23 at CafFe Medici 2222-B Guadalupe St.

$5 to enter pay online at texasstudenttv.com VGHourlive@gmail.com For more info Hurry in! Drinks provided by Caffé Medici while supplies last! Prizes provided by Caffé Medici & PlayNTrade.


P16 SPTS

RUN A 10K

ON TRAINING STARTS SO INTENSITY

STARTS HERE

www.utrecsports.org

SPORTS

16

Wednesday, September 21, 2011 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Trey Scott, Sports Editor | (512) 232-2210 | sports@dailytexanonline.com

Gilbert out for rest of season

SIDELINE MLB YANKEES

RAYS

BY THE NUMBERS

5 The number of quarterbacks (Cam Newton, Tony Romo, Drew Brees, Phillip Rivers and Tom Brady) after week one on pace to break Dan Marino’s single season passing record of 5,084 yards.

42-0

Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff

Garrett Gilbert has now hit the bottom of the barrel, as his season has been ended by right shoulder surgery. Gilbert started off the season as the Texas starter and then was moved down to third string after a unimpressive first half performance against BYU.

Highly criticized quarterback done for the year after right shoulder surgery By Austin Laymance Daily Texan Staff

And then there were two. The Longhorns lost another quarterback for the season as junior Garrett Gilbert underwent right shoulder surgery on Tuesday. Texas entered fall camp with four quarterbacks battling for the starting job. Only sophomore Case McCoy and freshman David Ash remain with the team after Gilbert’s season-ending injury and Connor Wood’s decision to transfer to Colorado in August. An MRI revealed an issue with Gil-

bert’s throwing shoulder last week and team doctors recommended surgery, according to UT. Texas head football athletic trainer Kenny Boyd said the injury “appeared to occur” in the season opener against Rice. Gilbert had symptoms but was not limited in practice leading up to the BYU game, Boyd said. Gilbert was pulled from the BYU game in the second quarter after throwing his second interception of the night. He completed two of eight pass attempts for eight yards before giving way to McCoy and Ash. Gilbert was the third quarterback for

Saturday’s win over UCLA and did not play. It was the first time in 14 games that the Lake Travis graduate did not start. Gilbert said in a statement that his shoulder was getting progressively worse. “That’s why I decided to have the surgery now,” he said. “I can get it taken care of, start my rehab and be healthy and ready to go for next year. I’m disappointed that I won’t be able to play the rest of this year, but I’ll be out there helping [co-offensive coordinator Bryan Harsin] and the quarterbacks as much as I can.” Gilbert will be able to request a med-

ical hardship waiver at the end of his eligibility. NCAA rules allow athletes to apply for the waiver if they play fewer than 20 percent of their team’s scheduled games in the year they are hurt. Gilbert played in 16 percent of Texas’ 2011 schedule of 12 games. If Gilbert is granted a medical hardship, he will have two years of eligibility remaining. “We’re disappointed for Garrett that he won’t be able to help us on the field the rest of this season,” said head coach Mack Brown.

GILBERT continues on PAGE 15

Pac-12 size unchanged, Big 12 alive for time being By Ralph Drusso The Associated Press

Lawrence Peart | Daily Texan Staff

Garrett Gilbert talks to his former backup Case McCoy during last Saturday’s game versus UCLA. Gilbert has been relegated to the role of cheerleader for the Longhorns after his benching, and now his season is done after shoulder surgery.

After recovery, Gilbert’s best bet might be to transfer By Trey Scott Daily Texan Columnist

Garrett Gilbert, if you didn’t know, has had shoulder surgery before. In February of 2008, right af t e r h i s ju n i or s e a s on at Lake Travis High School, Gilbert underwent a procedure to repair a torn labrum in his throwing shoulder. He rehabbed the shoulder, led

the Cavaliers to a 16-0 record and a state championship and was named the Gatorade National Player of the Year. Not bad. So the odds are good that Gilbert can make a recovery and go back to being his old self — whoever that may be. The hard truth, though, is that his old self will probably not be at Texas. Gilbert would be wise to seek a fresh start at another school, one where he has the chance to start and the chance to play un-

der a system more complimentary of his skills, with a fan base less demanding. He can transfer, sit out a year and then, if he is granted a medical hardship, would have enough time left — two years — to make something out of his career. Coaches have said for the past two weeks that Garrett had taken his demotion well and was still involved in meetings and practices. “I thought Garrett was unb el i e v abl e on t he s i d el i ne

[ agai nst B Y U ] ,” s ai d he a d coach Mack Brown. “He was the biggest cheerleader.” There was some thought that Gilbert could work his way back up the depth chart, should Case McCoy or David Ash struggle. Considering what we saw from McAsh’s performance against UCLA, that wouldn’t have worked out. Gilbert’s time in Austin already looked like it might be over — or, at least his time as a starting quarterback — but this makes it official.

The Pac-12 presidents and chancellors voted late Tuesday night not to expand again. Commissioner Larry Scott says “after careful review we have determined that it is in the best interests of our member institutions, student-athletes and fans to remain a 12-team conference.” Texas, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State and Texas Tech were among those considering a potential move from the Big 12. After expanding from the Pac-10 with new members Utah and Colorado last year, members of the new Pac-12 won’t give them the chance. Meanwhile, across the county in New York, Big East Commissioner John Marinatto said his members “pledged to each other that they are committed to move forward together.” The Big East also has been staring at an uncertain future after Pittsburgh and Syracuse announced last weekend they are moving to the Atlantic Coast Conference. But now it appears the Big East, like the Big 12, stands a good chance to survive the latest round of conference realignment in college athletics. On Monday, the board of regents at Texas and Oklahoma voted to give their presidents the right to choose a new conference. Oklahoma State’s regents have scheduled a special meeting Wednesday about

PAC-12 continues on PAGE 15

Floyd Mayweather’s all-time record after a fourth round knockout of Victor Ortiz over the weekend. But can we just get a Pacquiao and Mayweather fight already?

14

The number of teams the ACC has with the addition of Syracuse and Pittsburgh, making the ACC the first football conference to go over the 12-team mark.

FANTASY FOOTBALL Up 1. Thomas Jones/Dexter McCluster- Jamaal Charles is out

for the season with a torn ACL, and the Chiefs like to run. Both of his backups should put up serviceable flex position numbers for the rest of the year.

2. Cam Newton- Was on my list last week and deserves to be here again with another 400-yard performance. He is still available in 10-percent of leagues, and looks like a possible starter for those who don’t have the elite fantasy QBs Brady, Rodgers, or Brees. 3. Any Detroit Lions player-

The whole team had an incredible game on Sunday. Matt Stafford looks like a top-ten fantasy QB, Jahvid Best had 23 points. Also, with their scary front four, the defense is now a viable fantasy option.

Down 1. Chris Johnson- For a guy who just held out of all of training camp to get the largest contract for a running back ever, he sure isn’t earning it yet. Johnson has only 77 yards on 33 attempts so far this year and he looks a step slow. Fantasy owners everywhere are praying this guy puts it together. 2. Reggie Bush- Only six carries for 18 yards on Sunday and he saw a major slippage in playing time as rookie Daniel Thomas had 107 yards on 18 carries. This could be problematic for Bush owners as he could be regulated to a supplemental player, much like he was in the Big Easy. 3. Luke McCown- The only NFL starting quarterback that should never see the light of day in your lineup, he has a 30.6 passer rating thus far and had four interceptions on Sunday. Ouch.

The Daily Texan 09-21-11  

The Sept. 21, 2011 edition of The Daily Texan

Advertisement