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NCAA football players talk video game counterparts

Thirsty Thursday’s alcoholic sweet tooth

SPORTS PAGE 6

Sizing up the Big 12 with Iowa State and Baylor

THE DAILY TEXAN Thursday, August 5, 2010

TODAY Calendar ‘I smell sex and candy’

Marcy Playground plays Red Eyed Fly. Tickets cost $12.99 and doors open at 8:30 p.m.

Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

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Student struggles as undocumented immigrant and she has never had a paying job. Despite being one of the top students in her high school graduating class, only a few By Destinee Hodge universities would accept her. Nora is one Daily Texan Staff of more than 9,000 undocumented students Nora is a 23-year-old UT graduate stu- who attempt to earn advanced degrees dent. She has never had a driver’s license, throughout the state of Texas, according to Editor’s note: The student’s name has been changed to protect her privacy.

an overview report of House Bill 1403 from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Her parents came to the U.S. when she was a child, and they lived in Houston along with her two American-born siblings, both born after her arrival. Despite all the experience Nora has gained

at college, she will most likely not be able to work because of her lack of identification. “[The worst part is] just being limited in my career. Every time an opportunity comes up, it’s like I can’t [do it],� she said.

Prop. 8 declared unconstitutional

The Paramount Theatre hosts Beatles cover band 1964 the Tribute at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $32. See page 4

‘Everyone is at the mercy’

Sam Baker plays the Cactus Cafe at 8:30 p.m. Tickets cost $10.

Campus watch Can you hear me now?

Photos by Ryan Smith | Daily Texan Staff

Above, Irene Andrews chants with the crowd at the Proposition 8 rally held in front of City Hall. Andrews is the precinct chairperson of the Democratic Party in Bell County and was a guest speaker for the event. Below, Erin Boyle stands in protest at the rally on Wednesday.

Judge rules Rally celebrates California reversal law violates Today in history equal rights, In 1962 due process Nelson Mandela is jailed. He remains imprisoned until 1990.

Inside In Opinion: Schools vie for spots on Princeton Review lists page 3

In Life&Arts:

Humane Society program lets students foster pets page 4

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Quote to note “When [EA Sports’ ‘NCAA Football’] first comes out, we all talk about and hate on each other about speed. We get in arguments all the time. We all think we’re the fastest.� — Kheeston Randall Texas defensive tackle SPORTS PAGE 6

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‘Can’t buy me love’

Chemical Petroleum Engineering Building, 200 E. Dean Keeton UT police officers responded to an emergency activation and discovered a non-UT subject using the callbox. The subject informed the officers that he had run out of prepaid minutes and wanted to call his wife and tell her about his day. The subject was escorted from the area. Occurred on Tuesday at 7:14 p.m.

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By Nolan Hicks Daily Texan Staff A federal district judge in San Francisco on Wednesday struck down Proposition 8, which banned gay marriage in California, setting off gay-rights rallies across the country. Judge Vaughn Walker, a 21-year veteran of the court who was nominated by President Ronald Reagan in 1987, ruled that the California proposition violated both the due process and equal rights clauses of the 14th Amendment. Walker suspended the enforcement of his ruling, leaving

JUDGE continues on page 2

By David Colby Daily Texan Staff With chants of “No more hate! We dumped Prop. 8!� gay-rights activists gathered at City Hall on Wednesday to celebrate a U.S. District Court judge’s ruling in Perry v. Schwarzenegger that overturned California’s ban on same-sex marriage. Proposition 8, a California ballot initiative that passed in 2008 with 52 percent of the popular vote, overruled a California Supreme Court decision that said same-sex couples have a constitutional right to marriage. The proposition amended the state’s constitution, adding a section that reads “only marriage between a man and a woman is valid or recognized in California.� Judge Vaughn Walker’s ruling strikes down that amendment, potentially legalizing same-sex marriage in the state again.

to appeal Walker’s decision if he ruled against them. GLBT activists across the country expressed their joy with the district court’s decision. “I think it’s about time that

AUSTIN continues on page 2

INSIDE: Celebrate the striking down of Proposition 8 on page 3

White allegedly played larger role in energy contract By Jay Root The Associated Press Former Houston Mayor Bill White got involved in a billing dispute between an area agency and a company he recommended to help the region recover from Hurricane Rita. White allegedly played a greater role than previously acknowledged in the transaction that gave BTEC Turbines LP, a supplier of power generators, an emergency contract to provide electricity to hurricane-stricken areas of Houston, according to documents and interviews with those involved in the decisionmaking process. The dispute was eventually set-

“This is a landmark day in American jurisprudence,� said Anne Wynne, board member for Equality Texas. However, the court battle is far from over. Even before Walker released his ruling, both sides had acknowledged that they planned

tled out of court in April 2006, with BTEC getting $264,000 of the more than $424,000 it sought. Five months later, White was invited to invest $1 million in the company, and tax returns show he has reported more than $500,000 in earnings on the investment. BTEC said White owns about 1 percent of the company. Gov. Rick Perry released a statement in which he called on White to drop out of the governor’s race over the latest revelations. When asked if such a statement was hyperbolic, Perry campaign spokeswoman Catherine Frazier said it wasn’t.

CONTRACT continues on page 2

STUDENT continues on page 2

UT professor aids Kenyans in drafting constitution By Ashley Meleen Daily Texan Staff Constitutional drafters in Kenya asked a UT professor and a team of scholars to review the nation’s proposed constitution, which citizens voted on in a referendum Wednesday. Assistant government professor Zachary Elkins worked with University of Chicago law professor Tom Ginsburg to assemble a team to review the proposed draft. “It’s pretty common for constitutional drafters to ask a few political scientists and law professors to review their work and provide some feedback,� Elkins said. “Sometimes they have technical questions, but mostly they’re interested in having people with a Zachary Elkins more comp a r a t i v e Assistant government professor and historical perspective provide some sense of what alternatives might be available to them. That was our role.� Ginsburg said he and Elkins were contacted by the International Development Law Organization to “provide some background to the drafting commission.� Both professors collect and study constitutional data through the Comparative Constitutions Project, which they co-direct. Kenya’s new constitution targets a more decentralized government and aims to reduce the power of national leaders, addressing what many feel is too much presidential power given by the current constitution. “You want a constitution by which the government officials are selected by the people at regular elections,� UT law professor Lino Graglia said. “I think that is essential to have a government with some guarantee against tyranny.� The new draft also addresses sensitive issues such as land

KENYA continues on page 2

Paid parking hours may be extended By Leah Wise Daily Texan Staff UT students often count down the minutes until 5:30 p.m., when they can finally park for free at parking meters surrounding the downtown and campus areas. But because of a recent development with the Austin Transportation Department and downtown businesses, this may no longer be possible. Stakeholders have been corresponding with the department regarding the lack of parking downtown for customers, and they are proposing that the city extend parking-meter hours and eliminate free parking on Saturdays, department Danielle Villasana | Daily Texan Staff spokeswoman Leah Fillion said. Claudine Kuykendall, left, and Julie Vaughan, right, pay to park in a lot “If you extend parking-medowntown before visiting the Austin Children’s Museum on Wednesday. ter hours, you increase the turnover,â€? said Steve Grassfield, parking enterprise manager of the department. tEPXOUPXOTUBLFIPMEFSTXFSFTVSWFZFE Grassfield said that if more peotQFSDFOUPGNFUFSFETQPUTEPXOUPXOBSFPDDVQJFEPOB8FEOFTEBZOJHIU ple have to go to their car after 5:30 tQFSDFOUBSFPDDVQJFEPO4BUVSEBZOJHIUT p.m. — when their maximum time tQFSDFOUPGEPXOUPXOFNQMPZFSTCFMJFWFUIFSFJTOPUFOPVHIQBSLJOHGPS

The numbers

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employees and customers.

Source: Austin Transportation Department


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Thursday, August 5, 2010

Last days of summer

THE DAILY TEXAN Volume 111, Number 46 25 cents

JUDGE: Verdict becomes first

to validate same-sex marriage

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Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Lauren Winchester (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Ben Wermund (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Web Office: (512) 471-8616 online@dailytexanonline.com Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com

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Danielle Harris, 10, and Ethan Estrada, 2, play Wednesday on the playground at Chestnut Park, which features fountains, a playscape and a covered picnic area.

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“[I’m] somebody who has two degrees, but what do I do with these degrees and all these qualities? Babysit kids and clean the house.” When Nora’s family took a trip to Mexico in the early ‘90s, what was supposed to be a quick Christmas stop to visit family turned into a permanent stay. “My mom’s visa was expired, so they didn’t let us come back in,” she said. “They told us that if we gave them money, they would let us in [but we didn’t have any].” Her parents made the decision to stay in Mexico so that they could all be together. But after the 1994 Mexican Peso Crisis, when Mexico’s currency depreciated in value, her father’s food businesses began to collapse and he had to sell them off. At that point, her siblings and father — who had residency — were able to return to the

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learning to drive — but not me. It was hard,” she said. Years later, Nora attended UT, despite not having a Social Security number, because of HB 1403, which was passed in 2005. According to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, the bill “granted certain nonimmigrant students, including undocumented students, access to in-state tuition rates at Texas public institutions of higher education and state financial aid.” The bill had four general requirements for students who wanted to take advantage of the provisions. In 2005, Senate Bill 1528, which extended these opportunities to more students, amended the original bill. Nora’s paths to legalization are limited. Although her parents had residency, they are not U.S. citizens. Her options are to stay on the 17-year waiting list for residency, marry a U.S. citizen or go back to Mexico.

White campaign spokeswoman Katy Bacon shot back, claiming the Perry campaign was pushing old news in an attempt to distract the press from reporting on Perry’s vacation in California. “As Bill White has said before, he had no financial interest in BTEC at the time of Hurricanes Katrina and

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Rita,” she said. “BTEC never had a contract with the city of Houston.” Bacon said White helped to secure necessary generators to keep water pumps working in south Houston after the storm hit. In an interview with The Associated Press, White’s recollection of the deal and its details was incomplete, although he remembers urging a resolution to the dispute. But

he insisted his actions on behalf of Houston-based BTEC were proper and said he did not personally benefit from them. At issue are the actions White took as mayor in guiding the massive relief effort that followed Hurricane Rita. White has previously said he called BTEC to suggest they provide power generators to the Coastal Water

hopeful over future of GLBT rights professor in the University’s College of Communication. people are people, and everyone de“Judge Walker basically said serves equal rights. You can’t use the that we are not second-class citpopular vote to discriminate. From izens, and of course it’s not over, my standpoint, it’s a victory for but this feels like a precedent,” the [GLBT] community,” said Erin Cloud said. Deneke, who was visiting San FranSpeakers at the event urged the cisco at the time of the decision. crowd to work for change in Texas, Despite the likelihood of a long saying they should not be discourlegal battle, Austin activists were aged by the state’s political climate. excited about what the ruling “It is a defeatist attitude that we means for their cause. have in Texas,” said Ambalika Wil“First thing I want to do is to liams, campus and community rebring back that incredible sense of lations director for UT’s chapter of relief and joy that came over me Queer People of Color and Allies. when I heard today that the judge “We have to get rid of the mindhad struck down Prop. 8 in Califor- set that this is Texas and we can’t nia,” said Dana Cloud, an associate change anything,”

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ers are selected and, very importantly, how long they serve,” UT reform and others that have come law professor Sanford Levinson under frequent debate, including said. “These are actually far more abortion and Kadhi courts for the important, with regard to the fuMuslim minority. However, El- ture of any given country, than the kins and his team kept their focus ‘rights provisions’ of constitutions on “structural and institutional that people tend to fixate on.” issues” such as county governPolls indicate the majority of ments and decentralization. Kenyan voters are in favor of the “Constitutions are often very new constitution, but results from important with regard to the suc- Wednesday’s referendum may cess of a country because of the take up to 48 hours to calculate. ‘hard-wired’ structures they esElkins said the new draft of Ketablish with regard to making de- nya’s constitution is “one of the cisions, the way that officehold- clearest and best-organized consti-

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Authority, an intergovernmental agency that provides water to Houston, surrounding communities and businesses. “That was the end of my conversations and involvement in the case,” White said in June. The company later won an emergency contract with the authority to provide those generators. But records obtained by the AP

from the Coastal Water Authority show White was later involved in a dispute over unpaid invoices filed by BTEC to the agency. The records show he discussed the issue with two top city aides and a lawyer for the authority, telling them he wanted to make sure BTEC got paid for its services. Daily Texan reporter Nolan Hicks contributed to this story.

KENYA: Polls show most voters favor changes METER: Reactions From page 1 of store owners mixed, uncertain tutions I’ve read,” and is confident Kenyan voters “will know what the drafters’ intent was.” He shared the draft with his constitutional design class at UT last semester. “As a final assignment, I had my students review the Kenyan draft constitution and offer some guidance,” Elkins said. “As a result, there are 30 UT students walking around Austin who know the Kenyan constitution backwards and forwards. I know, from e-mails from them, that they’re watching [the] referendum closely.”

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Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ashley Meleen, David Colby, Leah Wise Photographer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ryan Smith Life&Arts Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Neha Aziz Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emily Grubert, Jonathan Rienstra Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rafael Borges Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Melanie McDaniel, Tracy Lim, Benjamin Miller Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yasmine Pirouz, Jin Kwon, Aron Fernandez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michael Bowman, Jonathan Kuykendall, Betsy Cooper Web Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Melanie Gasmen

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AUSTIN: Gay community ecstatic,

CONTRACT: Murky details obscure post-hurricane deal From page 1

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U.S. But Nora, who was 10 at the time, and her mother were left in Mexico and were forced to take an entirely different route so their family could be reunited — over the river. “At the time, in order to cross the border, you had to hire a person who is in a gang, and in this gang, they knew the routes,” she said. “There was one point when we finally crossed through the water and we got there, like on dry land, we saw all these men with knives and crazy faces and looks, and then my mom was kind of desperate. She said, ‘Will you let me pray?’” Nora said that after the crossing, her life in Texas was fairly normal until high school, when she understood what it truly meant to be undocumented. “Everything was OK until I was in high school and I couldn’t drive, and all my friends had cars and were

Proposition 8 in effect until the defendants can file an appeal with the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. “[This decision], it’s the first real time that a federal court has equated gay rights, not just gay rights, but same-sex marriage into the equality paradigm,” said Dan Rodriguez, a law professor at the University of Texas School of Law. “It took decades and decades for the courts to equate discrimination against women to discrimination by discrimination.” This decision marks the first time that a federal court has ruled directly on the issue of gay marriage. Rodriguez said that in his ruling, Walker largely came to the same conclusion the California Supreme Court came to when it issued a 2008 decision that legalized gay marriage. In that ruling, the state’s Supreme Court ruled that limiting marriage to heterosexuals was discriminatory. Conservative groups in California used the state’s Supreme Court decision to energize their efforts and put Proposition 8, which amended California’s constitution to ban gay marriage, on the bal-

lot. The proposition passed with 52 percent of the statewide vote in the 2008 election. “He pretty much accepted, right down the line, the challengers’ arguments,” Rodriguez said. “He held that the [proposition] had no rational basis under the 14th Amendment.” The rational basis standard is one of three tests used by the judiciary to consider the constitutionality of laws brought before the federal courts. It’s the most lax standard of scrutiny that laws are examined under, and is usually deferential to government policy. The standard only requires that the law be rationally related to a legitimate government interest. “Judge Walker is really framing this case as involving the same kind of fundamental liberties and the same dimension of individual rights that were at stake in the most important of the later part [of the] 20th century,” Rodriguez said. “For the same reasons that invalidated antimiscegenation laws [as well as] bans on contraception, he sees same-sex marriage laws as equivalent.” By press time, no appeal had been filed, but federal court officials expect one soon.

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From page 1 is up — it gives more customers the opportunity to park at meters, and increases business. “Many of the people getting first dibs on free parking are employees,” Fillion said. “They end up staying in that parking spot all night, and customers are not able to find parking.” Julie Copp, owner of clothing boutique C. Jane on Guadalupe Street, does not think that the extension of meter hours will affect her store significantly. “It’s always packed here, and people have to drive around to look for parking anyway,” Copp said. Other Drag businesses are unsure of the proposal’s effect. “Most of our customers arrive on foot, so I don’t know if this will affect us,” said Sarah McKinney, manager of Potbelly Sandwich Shop. According to the department, business owners believe extending meter hours will still benefit customers because most ramps and surface lots charge $6 to $10, so on-street parking will still be cheaper even if hours are extended until 8 p.m. on Saturdays. Valet services will also come under scrutiny for taking up a high number of street parking spaces, Fillion said. The department is currently working on a recommendation to determine how long meter hours should be extended. Stakeholders are currently drafting the proposal and plan to submit it in the near future, Grassfield said.


OPINION

Editor-in-Chief: Lauren Winchester Phone: (512) 232-2212 E-mail: editor@dailytexanonline.com Associate Editors: Heath Cleveland Doug Luippold Dave Player Dan Treadway

3 Thursday, August 5, 2010

T HE DAILY T EXAN

VIEWPOINT

Celebrate the defeat of Proposition 8

A crowd of about 100 activists gathered on the stone steps of City Hall on Wednesday to celebrate the overturning of California’s Proposition 8, undoing the ban on gay marriage in the state. Hoisting gay-pride flags and signs declaring “Marriage is a civil right,” they shouted, “No more hate! We dumped Prop. 8!” In Wednesday’s pivotal decision, Chief U.S. District Judge Vaughn R. Walker ruled that Proposition 8 — a controversial 2008 California ballot proposition that declared only marriage between a man and woman would be considered valid in state of California — was unconstitutional. Shortly after Californians voted the proposition into law two years ago, two gay couples filed a lawsuit on the grounds that it violated the rights of gay and lesbian couples under the equal protection clauses of the 14th Amendment. Essentially, their case claimed there are no legal grounds for dictating that marriage be exclusive to one man and one women. Walker’s ruling in favor of this notion is a tremendous victory for the GLBT community. Walker wrote that Proposition 8 “fails to advance any rational basis in singling out gay men and lesbians for denial of a marriage license. Indeed, the evidence shows Proposition 8 does nothing more than enshrine in the California Constitution the notion that opposite-sex couples are superior to same-sex couples.” But even though the obvious has been stated, the battle isn’t over, and California gay couples aren’t able to marry just yet. Walker issued a

stay on the decision, meaning that gay marriages won’t be performed until after the appeals process is finished — which could take up to two years. From here, the Proposition 8 battle will go to the 9th District Court, and no matter what the outcome there, the case will likely be appealed to the Supreme Court, which will decide whether or not to hear the case. If a twoyear wait isn’t excruciating enough, the national campaign for the matter is guaranteed to be a much more difficult fight for gay marriage and equal rights supporters than the effort in California. The two-year time period also coincides with the 2012 presidential elections, meaning the issue may be more prominent than in the past. The final decision will hinge on the Supreme Court’s distinction between viewing homosexuality as a conduct or a status — something that the Supreme Court has failed to articulate in the past. Conduct implies choice, which weakens the argument that Proposition 8 is discriminatory. Considering homosexuality as a status, on the other hand, would endorse the view of gays and lesbians as an identifiable class. Another issue that muddies a national discussion is the Defense of Marriage Act. Passed by Congress in 1996, DOMA established the federal government’s definition of marriage as being between one man and one woman, and it also says that states don’t need to recognize gay marriages made in other states. Therefore, uphold-

Ryan Smith | Daily Texan Staff

Eric Caruthers waves his flag in joy in downtown Austin to celebrate California’s overturning of Proposition 8 on Wednesday. ing Walker’s ruling would require the Supreme Court to do two things it doesn’t like: strike down deep-rooted legislation and make a decision with sweeping application across states, including those with state laws explicitly banning gay marriage. Without a doubt, Texas politicians will resist recognizing, or try to undermine, federally recognized gay marriage as they have resisted national education and environmental standards — especially if Rick Perry is in office. Despite numerous legal victories for gay marriage across the country, domestic partnership and marriage benefits — and true equality on all fronts — could still be a long way

off for many gay and lesbian couples. We can only hope that the University of Texas System won’t continue to wait for a green light from the Texas Legislature to give equal benefits to gays and lesbians. But, in light of its budget setbacks, even a federal ban on gay-marriage bans might not be enough to make the University pick up its feet on domestic partner benefits. UT associate communication professor Dana Cloud offered a little hope for Texas at the rally: “Activism changes people’s ideas. It can make what once seemed an insurmountable barrier beatable.” — Heath Cleveland for the editorial board

GALLERY

A war we can win By Emily Grubert Daily Texan Columnist I was fortunate to receive a graduate student’s dream project — characterizing freshwater systems in Maui — which is how I found myself on business in Honolulu this week. Stay in school, kids, these assignments actually do exist. After island-hopping from my project island of Maui to Oahu, where Honolulu is located, I realized I had some time to be a tourist. So, I tasked my phone with giving me walking directions from the airport to Pearl Harbor. Though many of the residents told me the bike lanes leave something to be desired, I was impressed by how walkable the area near the airport is, largely because curbs separate the bike lanes from the freeway. When I asked the phone how to walk to downtown Nashville last week, it told me to merge onto a freeway and meant it. (Warning: Walking directions are in beta.) In Honolulu, my phone instructed me to merge onto a freeway and then presented me with an 8-foot bike lane and 4-foot walking path alongside the freeway. I was so excited that I took a picture, especially since Austin is making an effort to develop triple-use motor, bicycle and pedestrian boulevards. Pearl Harbor’s war memorials — with torpedoes, pieces of submarines and pictures of the harbor before and after it was bombed — fascinated me. In the harbor, beyond the nuclear torpedo that would probably have blown up both assailant and target if fired (oops) and the dive chamber used to rescue submariners trapped below the ocean (cool), there is a bridgelike structure straddling the sunken USS Arizona, the battleship whose stocks of ammunition exploded upon being bombed, killing more than a thousand sailors. The bulky physicality of the sunken ship, never raised in almost 70 years, is a sobering reminder of the realities of war. So is the more immediate presence of the ships in the harbor that are preparing for deployment. The tourist ferry that brings people from shore to the USS Arizona memorial took us directly past a ship loaded with warplanes. Our proximity reminded me of an eighthgrade history lesson about people picnicking in fields next to one of the Civil War’s major battles, looking on. War is close but distant, deeply moving as memorials and difficult to grasp while it’s happening. War is not a spectator sport; but then, what is? Even as I was awed by the scale of the war equipment, sobered by the loss of life and grateful for some of the victories, I couldn’t help but regret that so much of the reverence reserved for defensive wars is not also applied to the more insidious wars we face — wars against poverty, against violence and against pollution. I’ll focus on pollution here because it’s what I know best. It’s pretty well known that defense applications are far better funded than many government efforts, and it can seem obvious why when we think about protecting lives. But environmental problems claim and destroy lives too, through air pollution, water pollution and the degradation of opportunities. Pollution’s destructiveness is just less obvious; sometimes occurring over years or decades, it is death by a thousand cuts from a thousand different problems. It’s harder to point to one cause and one effect when we talk about illness and death from environmental causes, so fighting pollution is a harder war to frame — but it is one we can win. As with any other war, though, we need a comprehensive plan, serious commitment and some sacrifice. It means paying more for energy so companies can meet higher standards, or conserving the energy that people work long and dangerous hours to provide. Mine and rig fatalities are unfortunate realities of the business. Committing to environmental integrity is not easy, but recognizing the human costs of failure is an important step. Incidentally, as we finally draw close to declaring the Deepwater Horizon spill over, the USS Arizona still leaks oil into Pearl Harbor. You can even see it from the memorial over the ship, oil bubbling up every few seconds in the blue water below. You can also smell it. Like the Macondo well, the Arizona serves as a reminder of how difficult seemingly obvious tasks can be: Gushers are hard to cap and sunken fuel tanks are hard to drain. When the Arizona went down in 1941, dive equipment was not sophisticated enough to allow fuel recovery. Now, because experts are hesitant to release the entire 500,000 gallons of oil into the harbor at once because of intense corrosion from the past 70 years, the ship’s fuel tanks will likely continue to leak oil into the harbor for another 60 to 75 years. Pollution challenges are extraordinarily difficult and dangerous, and they deserve to be treated with as much respect as other wars. Grubert is an energy and Earth resources graduate student.

LEGALESE Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees. All Texan editorials are written by The Daily Texan’s Editorial Board.

All hail college rankings or at least closer to it. It also holds the colleges more accountable. Meet the most powerful man in college toNo longer can a school rely on its reputaday. He instructs wide-eyed high school stu- tion or simply dominate a geographic area to dents across the world where to send their time, money and hopes. He is Ron Franek, author of the Princeton Review’s “The Best 371 Colleges, 2010 Edition.” It is no secret that rankings dominate the minds of many prospective college students when choosing a school. Class rankings and It is OK to be on the SAT percentiles keep them up at night as they top 10 party school eagerly await the fat acceptance envelope and list, but that doesn’t fear the skinny one. For a long time, universities dominated the balance of power — they mean we can’t also wielded the ability to say yea or nay. excel in areas such But Franek is giving some of this power back to students with his exhaustive tome, as “Best Career which breaks down and ranks just about evServices.” ery aspect of college life in areas such as happiness, gay-friendliness, religiousness and party-ness. In all, Franek compiled 62 different “Top 20” lists that help give applicants an idea of how to find the school that is the best fit. Franek formulated the rankings based on surveys from 122,000 students at 373 schools. attract students, because Franek tells students On CBS’ “The Early Show,” Franek recent- if a school deserves its reputation. Universily said students are now “laser-focused on ties now must constantly re-evaluate their trying to find that best-fit school for them” various amenities and decide where and and not only evaluating a college based on its what to improve. academic credentials. For instance, you won’t find UT on the Franek’s books are beneficial to both stu- list of the nation’s top 10 happiest schools, dents and colleges. My cousin, a sophomore though Rice University is No. 9. UT is also in high school, bought the book last year and not one of the 19 schools awarded a five-star spent several days absorbing its numbers ranking for gay-friendliness, but other uniand facts. To the prospective college student, versities such as Ohio State University, the Franek is akin to Moses coming down from University of Southern California and Penn Mount Sinai with the 371 Commandments. It State University received the distinction. puts the power balance back in equilibrium, Where you can find us, as mentioned in By Jonathan Rienstra Daily Texan Columnist

Wednesday’s Texan, is No. 6 on the top party schools list. I’m not going to qualify one of these over the others, but fraternity parties should not be the endgame, just as being on the “happiest students” list isn’t the most important criterion. Rather, and this is tricky, we should scrutinize these lists and figure out how we can improve UT in the areas in which it is lagging. It is OK to be on the top 10 party school list, but that doesn’t mean we can’t also excel in areas such as “Best Career Services.” Penn State, for example, is No. 2 on the career services list but still maintains a healthy No. 3 party ranking. Far be it from me to question the validity of a list that says Penn State parties more than UT, but a university can offer more than just a wild Thursday night. I’ve long held and defended the idea that UT is a premier institution of higher learning, a belief I would put up against just about any other college in America, and I still believe that. But Franek’s book, which he has seen through 12 editions, is the stone tablet upon which future college students can study the facts that will direct them to their college of choice. Texas cannot, and should not, rest on its laurels. It’s nice to be ranked highly on the party school list (though others will disagree), but there is no reason to think we can’t be on more of them. After all, isn’t that the goal of this University? We should strive to receive as much notoriety as possible so that we have evidence supporting what most Longhorns already believe: Texas is the premier public university in America. Rienstra is a journalism junior.


4A ENT

LIFE&ARTS

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Thursday, August 5, 2010

Life&Arts Editor: Mary Lingwall E-mail: dailytexan@gmail.com Phone: (512) 232-2209 www.dailytexanonline.com

T HE DAILY T EXAN

Foster care program lets UT students help animals

Alcoholic desserts intoxicate sweet tooth

Short-term commitment gives busy animal lovers a taste of pet ownership

Like water, carbon, high-fructose corn syrup and all other great substances, booze is exceptionally versatile. From beer to tiramisu, alcohol can be manipulated to work with anyone’s palette. For those with a sweet tooth, there are surprising combinations that can make the often jarring flavor of alcohol much more enjoyable.

By Katherine Kloc Daily Texan Staff Having a pet in college is not easy. Pets often end up being high-maintenance or too loud. And for some students, the choice is limited to animals that live less than two years because a postgraduation lifestyle can be hectic and hard on the wallet. The Austin Humane Society’s foster care program offers the best solution for students who want a pet but not the longterm commitment that comes with it. Foster families host animals, usually kittens or puppies too young to be housed in the shelter, for a period of time ranging from a few weeks to a few months. “Sometimes we’ll have kittens that are too young to eat on their own, and foster parents have to feed them every two to three hours,” Austin Humane Society spokeswoman Lisa Starr said. “So, there’s that level of intensity to really just keeping a dog that is really stressed here at the shelter as a regular pet. Most of the time it’s 4-week-old kittens that are eating on their own and can use the litter box. So they’re fine; they need to be socialized to people.” Although the foster care program has been around for “a very, very long time,” it expanded two years ago as a result of a grant from the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. “[The grant] allowed us to hire a full-time foster care coordinator, which allowed us to solicit more foster families and other volunteers,” Starr said. “Over the past three years we’ve gone from having, say, 400 animals go through our foster care program to about 1,200 in 2009. Where we’ve had to turn animals away before, we can now take them in.” Foster parents must attend a volunteer orientation, but there are few other requirements beyond that. There are currently 275 foster families in the program who come from different backgrounds and represent a wide range of lifestyles. “It’s college students, it’s parents with appropriate aged children, it’s single people, it’s people with no pets, it’s people with lots of pets,” Starr said. “There’s no typical foster parent.” Starr said the success of the program is largely a result of the foster parents, who actively try to get their foster pets adopted. “A lot of times [the pets] do end up getting adopted by their foster parents or one of their family [members] or friends,” Starr said. “What’s really beneficial about the foster parents taking on that role to get them adopted is that the animals never have to come back to the shelter.”

THIRSTY THURSDAY

By Mary Lingwall

Dolce Vita Gelato & Espresso Bar, 4222 Duval St. Perhaps the best after-dinner date spot in Austin, Dolce Vita has more to offer than wine and coffee. One of Dolce Vita’s most unique drinks is its sorberita, a margarita revamped with any flavor of Dolce Vita’s homemade fruit sorbets, including coconut and raspberry passion flavors. Sweet and smooth, the Dolce Vita soberita is the perfect sweet summer drink. For those seeking richer dessert flavors, Dolce Vita also offers a cioccolatini cocktail. Though difficult to pronounce, the cioccolatini’s scrumptious mix of Stoli vanilla vodka, Kahlúa and Godiva liqueur in a rich chocolate sauce-rimmed martini glass is a delicious way to cap off a night. For those who want to enjoy some of the flavors of their favorite liquor without necessarily getting buzzed, Dolce Vita’s Guinness-flavored gelato captures the smooth, heady flavor of fresh Guinness and pairs it with chocolate chunks for a sweet translation of the classic beer.

Photos by Peyton McGee | Daily Texan Staff

Above, Dolce Vita’s Guinness gelato is one of the unique flavors that the cafe handcrafts in-house. Below, the cioccolatini is a Dolce Vita cocktail made with Stoli vanilla vodka, Godiva liqueur and Kahlúa. mixture of orange vodka, Cointreau and lemon juice in a sugarrimmed glass tastes like a sophisticated version of an orange hard candy. Playing up sweet notes but not falling on saccharine ones, the Southern Belle is great as an aperitif or after-dinner drink.

At home

If you’re looking to get your sugary-booze fix at home, my 219 West, 219 W. Fourth St. favorite way to serve it is “a la This is the nicest bar I think I’ve mode.” Just about anything tastes ever been to. And despite the ab- amazing in float form, particularsurdly confusing menu organiza- ly Guinness. Made with vanilla or tion — where all of the food and chocolate ice cream, a Guinness drink items are arranged accord- float can be delicious, though exing to the kind of liquor you’re in- tremely filling. Less filling desterested in drinking, which is hard sert cocktails can be made from a to get used to — 219 West has a small serving of vanilla ice cream distinguished selection of special- (or pecan or praline ice cream) ty cocktails. One of my favorite topped with a bit of Disaronno 219 West cocktails is a sweet drink amaretto or even a leftover Jell-o called the Southern Belle. This shot from your fridge.

EVENT PREVIEW

1964 THE TRIBUTE

Tribute band brings Beatles’ theatricality, music to Austin By Neha Aziz Daily Texan Staff It’s Beatlemania all over again. Dubbed the “best Beatles tribute on Earth” by Rolling Stone, 1964 the Tribute is considered to be the premiere Beatles cover band. The band formed in 1982 and has performed shows around the world. Its goal is to perform authentic shows that fans could have seen when The Beatles toured in the United States in the early ‘60s. “All four of us grew up in Akron, Ohio; we ran in the same music circles and shared similar musical influences. We decided to band together and create something different,” said Mark

Benson, who plays John Lennon in the group. As iconic as The Beatles are, criticism from die-hard fans about the quality of a cover band is to be expected. But, that’s not the case with 1964 the Tribute. “They can expect a full-blown Beatles concert, mostly its songs from the first few American releases,” Benson said. “We not only perform the songs, but we have that theatricality — we add the hairdos, costumes, body language and speaking parts. We do a lot to prepare for a show. When we perform, we drink some Starbucks, get onto the stage and go.” With an abundance of songs

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5A CLASS/COMICS

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COMICS

Thursday, August 5, 2010

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

560 Public Notice

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6A SPTS

SPORTS

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Thursday, August 5, 2010

Sports Editor: Dan Hurwitz E-mail: sports@dailytexanonline.com Phone: (512) 232-2210 www.dailytexanonline.com

T HE DAILY T EXAN

SIDELINE

FOOTBALL

Athletes find time to play themselves By Dan Hurwitz Daily Texan Staff Nebraska wide receiver Niles Paul, known to video gamers as “WR No. 24,” was immediately upset upon hearing his rating on EA Sports’ “NCAA Football 11.” “I didn’t like it,” Paul said of his 87 rating. “I thought I was [at] least going to be a 93.” Each year as the popular college football video game is released, the people most eager to play it are not children or even childish adults, but rather the athletes who are portrayed in it. Because of NCAA regulations, EA Sports is not allowed to include the names of amateur athletes in the video game, but that doesn’t stop the creators from doing their best to make the virtual version of the players as close to the originals as possible. When it comes to how the game portrays the football players based on their talents, not many of them are satisfied. “I thought they kind of underrated all of us on the team,” Paul said. “Other teams got a whole bunch of guys that are good, and you got us — and we have two or three guys that are good and everyone else is average.” With many NCAA football locker rooms now equipped with Xbox 360s and Playstation 3s, arguments often arise when athletes first check their ratings. “When it first comes out, we all talk about and hate on each other about speed,” Texas defensive tackle Kheeston Randall said. “We get in arguments all the time. We all think we’re the fastest.” The speed ratings are just one

Toronto 1 NY Yankees 5

Chi White Sox 4 Detroit 1 Minnesota 1 Tampa Bay 2 Cleveland 9 Boston 1 National League San Francisco 1 Colorado 6 Milwaukee 3 Chi Cubs 15 Cincinnati 9 Pittsburgh 4

SPORTS BRIEFLY Courtesy of Electronic Arts

The virtual representation of Texas running back Cody Johnson, center, runs through the Ohio State defense in this scene from the recently released video game “NCAA Football 11” by EA Sports. of the game’s many inaccuracies, according to the athletes. Others aren’t too satisfied about their appearance. Oklahoma State defensive end Jamie Blatnick, or “DE No. 50” as “NCAA Football 11” depicts him, is a 6-foot-3-inch, 270-pound dark-skinned man, but that’s about all the game got right. “I look like a Neanderthal,” Blatnick said of his image in the game. “The pictures are so far

off and goofy.” Blatnick received the game as a gift from his mother on the day it came out, but he hasn’t played it as much as other games. “[I realized that] playing college football and playing college football some more when you got home just wasn’t as fun as it used to be,” Blatnick said. Oklahoma’s Ryan Broyles, also known as “WR No. 85,” stays away from the game as well.

“I’m more of a FIFA guy,” Broyles said about his video game preference. “I try to get away from football when I go home.” But at least Broyles can say that he’s in the video game. Its creators made the mistake of leaving out Oklahoma State defensive back Orie Lemon. “They thought I was done, I guess,” said Lemon, who missed the entire 2009 season because of injury.

Lemon doesn’t think his teammates will ever stop mentioning his absence from “NCAA Football 11.” “They are like, ‘Hey, you must be too old,’” Lemon said. At the end of the day the ones who weren’t left out are just happy to be represented in the popular game. “It’s pretty cool to be on a video game,” Kansas State offensive lineman Zach Kendall said.

Coaches hopeful about resetting offenses at Iowa State, BU BAYLOR BEARS

IOWA STATE CYCLONES Alexander Robinson, the No. 2 rusher in the Big 12 last season, takes questions from the media. Robinson will be an important part of ISU’s offense in 2010.

Chalie Neibergall Associated Press

By Will Anderson Daily Texan Staff As one of only two programs without a player named to the Big 12’s preseason football team, Iowa State is expected to be low on star power, but the Cyclones will rely heavily on the leadership of seniors Alexander Robinson, Austen Arnaud and Rashawn Parker as they attempt to improve on their 3-5 conference record from 2009. Arnaud returns for his third season under center for ISU, which will suit the Cyclones well as they scramble for an identity. The only other offensive staple is Robinson, who finished last season as the No. 2 rusher in the Big 12 with 99.6 yards per game. But the speedy, compact runner managed only six touchdowns as Iowa State’s offense floundered as a whole, only averaging a conference-worst 20.5 points each week. Arnaud threw as many interceptions last year as Texas Tech’s Taylor Potts despite completing about half as many pass-

Schedule Northern Illinois at Iowa at Kansas State Northern Iowa Texas Tech Utah at Oklahoma at Texas Kansas Nebraska at Colorado Missouri

Coach: Paul Rhoads (7-6 with Iowa State)

2009 record: 7-6 Last game: 14-13 win over Minnesota in the 2009 Insight Bowl

Returning starters: 12 starters (eight offensive starters, four defensive starters)

American League

Kansas City 3 Oakland 4

BIG 12 FOOTBALL PREVIEW

Sept. 2 Sept. 11 Sept. 18 Sept. 25 Oct. 2 Oct. 9 Oct. 16 Oct. 23 Oct. 30 Nov. 6 Nov. 13 Nov. 20

MLB

es. The senior play-caller will have to improve his accuracy if the Iowa State offense wants to make up any ground after a disastrous 2009. “I think Austen emerged through spring ball as our most improved player,” head coach Paul Rhoads said. “He needed to improve fundamentally on his mechanics at being quarterback. He did that this spring.” Despite allowing 415.8 yards per game last season, defense will be the team’s strength come the Sept. 2 opener versus Northern Illinois. The Cyclones managed the fifth-best scoring defense in the Big 12 last year and proved their merit by putting up the second-best red zone defense. A tough schedule, including back-toback games at Oklahoma and Texas, will test the Cyclones. It will also harden them for the backside of their conference schedule and could prepare ISU for a secondstraight bowl appearance.

Key players: Offense - RB Alexander Robinson (2009 stats: 12 games played, rushed for 1,195 yards on 232 carries and scored six TDs) Defense - DB David Sims (2009 stats: made 88 tackles [44 solo] in 13 games, 3.5 TFL and five INT)

Key losses: Leading tackler Jesse Smith, defensive end Christopher Lyle and linebacker Fred Garrin, leaving a gaping hole in ISU’s front seven Key matchup: Oct. 2 versus Texas Tech Outlook: If the Cyclones can win their

first two conference games of the year, they could very well be undefeated heading into the meat of their schedule, which begins with a tough nonconference matchup against Utah. Rhoads faces a hellacious five-game gauntlet after that, but the second-year head coach can only improve after a full season getting used to his team.

By Austin Ries Daily Texan Staff Baylor head coach Art Briles walked into his third Big 12 media day press conference last week with a smile on his face that you could see from the back row. Part of it was the excitement all coaches and players are feeling about another football season underway. Another factor was that his star quarterback, Robert Griffin, was going to be back on the field, healthy and ready to go. But a lot of it was the way he feels about his team this year. After finishing last in the Big 12 South last season, Briles feels that things are starting to click for his group from Waco. “Our guys feel good about each other, they feel good about the direction,” Briles said. “I feel we are better now than we were in 2008 or even 2009 because if you live with someone for a certain amount of time, you either like them or you dislike

Schedule Sept. 4 Sept. 11 Sept. 18 Sept. 25 Oct. 2 Oct. 9 Oct. 16 Oct. 23 Oct. 30 Nov. 6 Nov. 13 Nov. 20

Sam Houston State Buffalo at TCU at Rice Kansas vs. Texas Tech at the Cotton Bowl in Dallas at Colorado Kansas State at Texas at Oklahoma State Texas A&M Oklahoma

them, either appreciate them or don’t appreciate them, either work with them or against them.” Briles said Griffin is in good shape from a physical standpoint, but he wants to see how Griffin instinctively reacts during practice. He is the focal point of the Bears’ offense, and when he is playing at 100 percent, he is one of the fastest and most capable players in the nation. Combine that with a solid group of linebackers on defense with returning starter Antonio Johnson. In fact, Johnson is the only player Briles said is a guaranteed starter going into practice. Key players such as Griffin and Johnson make Baylor a contender for an upset each week. It did just that last season against Missouri and threatened Big 12 North champion Nebraska and Texas Tech, but the Bears are going to need a lot of guys to step up and a little luck to reach their first bowl appearance since 1995.

Key matchup: Nov. 6 at Oklahoma

State

Outlook: Last season was a washout

with Robert Griffin’s injury, but the Bears still managed to win a conference game. Even with Griffin back, it will take a lot for the Bears to get past Big 12 South giants Texas, Oklahoma and even Texas Tech to make a run at a bowl game.

The Texas basketball program announced its complete 2010-2011 schedule on Wednesday. Previously confirmed nonconference contests at North Carolina and Michigan State will occur on Dec. 18 and Dec. 22, respectively. The team’s first Big 12 game comes Jan. 11 at Texas Tech before facing Oklahoma and Texas A&M at home. The Longhorns will get their first shot at reigning conference champion Kansas in Lawrence on Jan. 22 and on March 5 will once again play their final regular season game at Baylor. With the departure of Colorado and Nebraska to the Big Ten following the conclusion of next season, the Horns will get their last shot at Nebraska on Feb. 19 in Lincoln and then against Colorado on Feb. 26 in Boulder, unless the teams meet up in the Big 12 or NCAA tournaments. Texas 2011 Big 12 Schedule Jan. 11 at Texas Tech Jan. 15 Oklahoma Jan. 19 Texas A&M Jan. 22 at Kansas Jan. 26 at Oklahoma State Jan. 29 Missouri Jan. 31 at Texas A&M Feb. 5 Texas Tech Feb. 9 at Oklahoma Feb. 12 Baylor Feb. 16 Oklahoma State Feb. 19 at Nebraska Feb. 22 Iowa State Feb. 26 at Colorado Feb. 28 Kansas State March 5 at Baylor

Groups face off in million-dollar bidding war for Texas Rangers The bidding war over the Texas Rangers heated up Wednesday as Hall of Fame pitcher Nolan Ryan’s group offered $2 million more than Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban’s group, which then upped the ante by $15 million — to about $335 million in cash. When the auction in bankruptcy court started Wednesday afternoon, a Texas Rangers attorney said Cuban’s group had the highest starting bid. The Cuban-Crane bid was about $25 million more than the $520 million bid submitted by a group led by Ryan and sports attorney Chuck Greenberg. About two hours later, the Greenberg-Ryan group’s attorney said his group was bidding $2 million more than the cash portion, about $318 million, of the Cuban-Crane group’s offer.

Celtics land Shaq to bolster Perkins-less frontcourt in 2010

Coach: Art Briles (42-44 career, 8-16 with Baylor)

2009 record: 4-8, 1-7 Big 12 Last game: 12-20 loss at Texas Tech Returning starters: 14 starters (seven offensive starters excluding Robert Griffin, five defensive)

Key players: Offense - Robert Griffin (2009 stats: Three games played, 45-for-69 for 481 yards with four TDs and zero INT) Defense - LB Antonio Johnson (2009 stats: 12 games played, 77 tackles, six tackles for loss for 24 negative yards)

Key losses: Center J.D. Walton and linebacker Joe Pawelek, tight end Justin Akers, offensive lineman James Barnard, wide receiver David Gettis and safety Jordan Lake

Texas basketball releases next season’s conference schedule

Paul Chouy | Daily Texan file photo

Robert Griffin hopes to boost the Bears’ offense this year after missing most of 2009 with a knee injury.

Shaquille O’Neal has changed The Big Three of the Boston Celtics into a Very Big Four. The 7-foot-1, 325-pound center in the twilight of a brilliant career is coming to the Eastern Conference champions, hoping to add to his four NBA titles. O’Neal signed a two-year contract worth about $3 million on Wednesday, a person with knowledge of the negotiations said on condition of anonymity because no details were released. So this is where Shaq’s colorful career will end after 20 seasons if he completes his contract with the Celtics. One of the NBA’s most charismatic players will finish with a legendary franchise on the parquet floor beneath 17 championship banners and the retired numbers of Bill Russell, Larry Bird, John Havlicek and other NBA greats. Compiled from Associated Press reports

The Daily Texan 8-5-10  

The August 5, 2010 edition of The Daily Texan.

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