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THE DAILY TEXAN Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

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Thursday, August 4, 2011

Grad student school loans lose backing in budget cuts

WEEKEND TODAY Pop Princess Sing-Along

By Huma Munir Daily Texan Staff

Sing along with the pop princesses of the past two decades at the Alamo Drafthouse at 10 p.m. Tickets are $12.

FRIDAY

Free movie under the stars

Head to West Austin at 8:15 p.m. for a free outdoor screening of the 2009 movie “The Blind Side” starring Sandra Bullock at 1010 West Lynn Street, hosted by Bond’s Television and Electronics. Rebeca Rodriguez | Daily Texan Staff

SATURDAY Chicago

The pop rock and fusion band formed in the Windy City will perform at the Austin City Limits Live theater downtown at 8 p.m. Balcony seats start at $50.

‘The Good Thief’ The Hyde Park Theatre is closing out its run of Conor McPherson’s “The Good Thief.” The show starts at 8 p.m., and tickets are $19 for students.

Campus watch Pay up

2100 blk. of San Jacinto Boulevard Arrested passed out pedestrian for public intoxication. Subject was unable to care for himself. He attempted to hand over a $20 bill as if to secure his release.

Today in history In 1958

Billboard introduces its first Hot 100 list.

‘‘

Quote to note “We’ve been up, we’ve been down because of inexperience and youth. I have to commend the young lady from Texas. She made a bad play then comes back with a clutch hit that was basically the difference in the score tonight.”

— Ken Eriksen Softball U.S. National Team head coach SPORTS PAGE 8

Nahla, a young girl whose mother chose to not give her daughter’s last name, drinks water at the Nueces Mosque on Wednesday evening in a crowd of women. Ramadan is an Islamic holy month where followers traditionally fast during daylight hours.

RAMADAN By Victoria Pagan

HEATS UP

Since Ramadan began Monday, UT’s practicing Muslim students have abstained from food and water from sunrise to sunset — a challenge when temperatures have reached 107 degrees twice this week. Ramadan is from Aug. 1 to Sept. 1 this year. Pre-pharmacy junior Pari Wayafee said Ramadan becomes more challenging every year because it falls on the ninth month of the lunar Islamic calendar, which gets

shifted back around two weeks yearly. She said the two-week change has moved Ramadan into mid-summer this year, which means dealing with extreme heat and humidity. “It takes a lot of energy out of you, especially in this time of heat in Austin walking from class to class,” Wayafee said. “It really drains you. The worst thing is not so much the

RAMADAN continues on PAGE 2

Allen Otto | Daily Texan Staff

Members of the Nueces Mosque partake in prayer as part of Ramadan on Wednesday night. People of the Islamic faith started their month-long fast Monday in accordance with the traditions of Ramadan.

The bill to raise the debt ceiling that passed Congress this week offers mixed results for students as it preserves Pell grants but cuts from subsidized loans for graduate students. The stalemate in Congress ended Tuesday with a bipartisan deal to raise the debt ceiling by a trillion dollars in exchange for cutting more than $2 trillion over the next 10 years in federal spending. Rep. Gene Green, D-Texas, who voted for the bill, said in an email it was a difficult decision for him. He said he was dissatisfied with several portions of the bill, particularly those that increase the cost of postgraduate education by eliminating subsidized loans. The deal reached, however, was the best they could have agreed to, Green said. “While the cuts to the forbearance of interest on government subsidized student loans for postgraduate education is unpleasant, the alternative was to see Pell grants dramatically cut,” he said in the email. The bill will preserve Social Security, Medicaid, most of Medicare and Pell grants for the time being, Green said. At the last minute, the deal averted a bad credit rating for the United States that would have caused interest rates to skyrocket and a default that would have prevented the government from paying its bills. Democrats and Republicans agreed the deal isn’t perfect but it saved the country from a self-inflicted

CUTS continues on PAGE 2

Austin hospital put on chopping block

In August of 2012, new guidelines will go into effect mandating that insurance providers cover a wide variety of new sexual and reproductive services for women. However, it’s not certain how the new policy, devised by the Department of Health and Human Services, will affect the premiums of health care providers and insurers.

By Will Alsdorf Daily Texan Staff

Because of increasing operating costs and decreased state funding, the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston may cease operating the Austin Women’s Hospital located at University Medical Center Brackenridge, a UTMB spokesman said. Legislative budget cuts reduced UTMB’s budget by $114 million over the next two years. Spokesman Raul Reyes said the health system is responding by reducing its budget by 6.1 percent for the 2012 fiscal year. “We are being more prudent in the way that we manage our costs and are implementing measures to ensure financial success,” Reyes said in a statement. “It is projected that UTMB will sustain a $1.5 million

Photo Illustration by Andrew Edmonson

loss on the Austin Women’s Hospital contract for fiscal year 2011. We have to mitigate those losses.” Reyes said one cause for the projected loss is a lower-than-expected number of patients. “We staff based on the assumption that there will be a certain level of patients coming in the door, and we don’t have that level,” Reyes said. Central Health, formerly known as Travis County Healthcare, owns University Medical Center Brackenridge. In 1995, it leased the hospital to the Seton Healthcare Family, a Catholic health care system. After Seton could no longer provide contraceptive and sterilization services because of the Catholic Church’s Ethical and Religious Directives, the health department took back the fifth floor of the Brackenridge building in 2002 to open a “hospital within a hospi-

tal” that could provide those services Seton could not, according to Catholic Health East, a Catholic health system. According to the UT System, in 2003 the city of Austin and UTMB reached an agreement for UTMB to run the Austin Women’s Hospital on the fifth floor of University Medical Center Brackenridge. If UTMB does decide to withdraw from the hospital, there are currently no plans for Seton to take over the fifth floor for its own uses, said Seton spokeswoman Adrienne Lallo. Reyes said no decision regarding UTMB’s withdrawal has actually been made. “We’re considering our options,” Reyes said. “We just want to make sure we do the financially responsible thing for UTMB and Texas taxpayers.”

Insurance requirements to raise women’s coverage By Liz Farmer Daily Texan Staff

Women’s health advocates are celebrating a new set of guidelines from the Obama Administration that require insurance providers to cover a slew of sexual, reproductive and mental health services for women. For all new and renewed policies, insurance providers will be required to waive co-pays for contraception, women’s health visits, domestic violence counseling, sexually transmitted disease screening and support for breast-feeding equipment because of guidelines adopted by the Department of

Health and Human Services. The nonpartisan Institute of Medicine proposed the guidelines, which go into effect August 2012. This additional health insurance reform is part of the Affordable Care Act President Obama signed into law March 23, 2010. Other items that require coverage under the act include mammograms, colonoscopies, blood pressure checks and childhood immunizations. It is unclear how the changes will affect insurance premiums or health care providers and pharmacies, such as the University Health Andrew Edmonson | Daily Texan Staff

WOMEN continues on PAGE 2

Hospital visitors walk by the entrance to the Austin Women’s Hospital on Wednesday evening.


2A

2 news

Thursday, August 4, 2011

The Daily Texan Volume 112, number 19

RAMADAN continues from PAGE 1 hunger. It’s the thirst that’s difficult.” Wayafee said only the able and healthy fast during Ramadan. She said young children, the elderly, women who are pregnant, breastfeeding or menstruating and those with health problems do not fast or fast only as much as they can. Engineering junior Rakin Mazid said the summer’s high temperatures make breaking the daily fast at sundown that much more enjoyable. She said the promise of a collective meal with friends and family in the evening allows her to get through her day. “The hunger bounces off, but the thirst is what you feel,” Mazid said. “You really enjoy going through it all at the end of the day. It’s one of the months that every Muslim looks forward to.” Arabic language and literature senior Mason Merrill said the high heat of August makes fasting even more meaningful because the word Ramadan makes reference to scorched earth. “You’re using the heat of fasting

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Viviana Aldous (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Veronica Rosalez (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com sports office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com life & Arts office: (512) 232-2209 dailytexan@gmail.com Photo office: (512) 471-8618 photo@dailytexanonline.com

to burn away sin,” Merrill said. Plan II senior Isbah Raja said she stays indoors as much as possible to stay hydrated while fasting. She said when the summer heat cannot be avoided, she takes many naps throughout the day to replenish her energy. Raja said Ramadan is an especially important time because it brings together all Muslims and gives them a sense of community. It is a sacred time to get rid of bad habits, learn patience and let go of worldly items, she added. “Politics and social issues aside, this is a sacred time for prayer,” Raja said. “What’s interesting is regions overseas that have turmoil very often call a cease-fire during this month.” Raja said many UT students gather for late night snacks at 24-hour restaurants to eat before the sun comes up. She said these gatherings are a fun way to celebrate Ramadan collectively during a time when many students are away from their families.

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Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viviana Aldous Associate Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dave Player Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Veronica Rosalez Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reese Rackets News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Audrey White Associate News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matt Stottlemyre Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Huma Munir, Victoria Pagan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katrina Tollin, William James Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reese Rackets Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kaine Korzekwa, Brenna Cleeland Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Simonetta Nieto Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Kang Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Torrey Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Allen Otto, Ryan Edwards Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Julie Rene Tran Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aleksander Chan Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alex Williams, Aaron West Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trey Scott Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sameer Bhuchar Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Christian Corona, Nick Cremona Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katheryn Carrell Video Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jacqueline Kuenstler Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gerald Rich Associate Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Abby Johnston Senior Web Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ryan Sanchez, Michelle Chu Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren Multimedia Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jennifer A. Rubin

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Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rebeca Rodriguez, Andrew Edmonson Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Beth Purdy Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matt Daley Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alexa Hart Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Benjamin Holder, Cindy Brzostowski Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Liz Farmer, Diego Cruz, Will Alsdorf

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Director of Advertising & Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Business Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lori Hamilton Business Assitant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amy Ramirez Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Senior Local Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brad Corbett Broadcast & Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cameron McClure Student Assistant Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veronica Serrato Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Casey Lee, Emily Sides, Emily Zaplac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jason Tennenbaum, Paola Reyes, Sarah Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Susie Reinecke, Zach Congdon Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rene Gonzalez Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Casey Rogers, Bianca Krause Special Editions Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adrienne Lee Student Special Editions Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan Schraeder

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published twice weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks and most Federal Holidays. and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2011 Texas Student Media.

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8/4/11

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Monday .............Wednesday, 12 p.m. Thursday.................Monday, 12 p.m. Tuesday.................Thursday, 12 p.m. Friday......................Tuesday, 12 p.m. Word Ads 11 a.m. Wednesday................Friday, 12 p.m. Classified (Last Business Day Prior to Publication)

TEXASNT STUDDEIA ME

WOMEN

continues from PAGE 1

Allen Otto | Daily Texan staff

Jack sanford takes part in Wudu at the Nueces Mosque Wednesday night during ramadan. Wudu is the islamic procedure of cleaning body parts in preparation for formal prayer.

Middle eastern studies senior Yajaira Fraga is experiencing Ramadan for the first time this year. Although she is not Muslim, she said she wanted to understand a practice that is important to many of her friends. “It’s something you have to really just submerge yourself in,” Fraga said. “All of my friends have been very supportive of pushing me along.”

Fraga said the hardest part of practicing Ramadan is keeping up with the five daily prayers Muslims practice. “I go in there and I try to keep up with their moves, but they go too fast for me,” Fraga said. “I will learn them by the end of the month, although I don’t know the language.” — Additional reporting by Huma Munir

CUTS continues from PAGE 1 financial crisis. A powerful new Joint Select Committee formed Tuesday will make recommendations to reduce the U.S. deficit by cutting back on more public programs, Green said in the email. Director of Student Financial Services Tom Melecki said undergraduate education will not be affected as much as graduate education. Currently, the government pays interest on subsidized loans for graduate students until six months after they graduate, he said. Congress eliminated subsidized loans for graduate students, which means they will have to rely on unsubsidized loans and pay the interest as it starts accruing from the moment they take out the loan, Melecki said. “[Eliminating subsidized loans for graduate students] is expected to yield savings of $21 billion over the next several years for the country as a whole,” he said. “Seventeen billion of that savings will be used to preserve the Pell grants [and] $4.6 billion will go to reducing the federal deficit.” Congress also eliminated a 0.25 percent interest reduction for all students who make payments toward their loan through their checking or savings accounts online, Melecki said. College Republicans Vice Pres-

For WEB

ExclusivE

ident Cassandra Wright said even though cutting back on education is a big sacrifice, the decision to reduce spending was inevitable. For the past three years, the club advocated cuts to federal spending, she said. With a Republican majority in the U.S. House of Representatives since last year, Wright said the organization and its leaders were excited about spending cuts that will allow the country to reduce its $14 trillion debt. “In general, we are just glad that cuts will be made as much as possible,” she said. Ray Perryman, who runs an economic analysis firm in Waco, said in an email the impact of the deal will not be immediately clear on education and research. Still, he said, it will be very important for the education community to effectively communicate the value of education and research to the new Joint Select Committee. “There will be a lot of areas targeted for potential cuts. Educational support and research grants will certainly be among them,” Perryman said in the email. “There will no doubt be challenges, and they will be exacerbated by much of the anti-intellectual rhetoric that seems to permeate the thought of some constituencies at present.”

Center, that may rely on co-pays as a source of funding. Kathleen Sebelius, the secretary for the Department of Health and Human Services, said in a press release the new guidelines will help women get the preventative health benefits they need. Texas Feminists President Jenny Kutner, a Plan II and women’s and gender studies senior, said the act provides relief after a state legislative session that reduced access to women’s health with a bill requiring women to undergo sonograms and hear a description of the fetus before they can get an abortion. “I think [these guidelines are] necessary especially in the current political climate around reproductive health,” Kutner said. “It currently seems like a war on women.” Alumna Anna Sallack was in the Catholic sorority Mu Epsilon Theta and said the Catholic Church’s stance on contraception is difficult to summarize, but she believes it is wrong to use contraception to prevent new life. She also said she is disappointed there’s not emphasis on multiple prevention methods including abstinence. “I would be more pleased with it if there was a pro-life versus prochoice aspect to it,” Sallack said. Out-of-pocket co-pays for contraception can run from $25 to $35, according to Sarah Wheat, interim Co-CEO for Planned Parenthood of the Texas Capital Region. “I think it’s incredibly positive news for women’s health,” Wheat said. Wheat said women have historically paid 65 percent more for health care out-of-pocket than men because pregnancy planning is not covered by insurance. “For decades, contraception has been treated as something outside the health care system,” Wheat said. “So with these guidelines, contraception and women’s health are being mainstreamed.” LeAnn Gutierrez, assistant director for University Health Services, said the lowered costs are good because accessibility to women’s health services has been reduced because of decreases in state funding over the past few years. “Anytime an insurance company is waiving co-payments, it is an awesome benefit for our students,” Wheat said. “Especially when our students are making so many health care decisions with their pocketbooks.”

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Thursday, August 4, 2011 | The Daily Texan | Brenna Cleeland, Wire Editor | dailytexanonline.com

Jurors complete first day in Katrina shooting trial By Michael Kunzelman The Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — Jurors deliberated for several hours Wednesday without deciding the fate of five current or former police officers charged in deadly shootings on a New Orleans bridge in the chaotic aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Deliberations are scheduled to resume Thursday. U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt read instructions about the 25-count indictment before the jury began deliberating Wednesday after weeks of testimony and several hours of closing arguments. Prosecutors contend the officers shot unarmed people without justification and without warning, killing two and wounding four others Sept. 5, 2005, then embarked on a cover-up involving made-up witnesses, falsified reports and a planted gun. Defense attorneys countered that the officers were returning fire on the city’s Danziger Bridge and reasonably believed their lives were in danger as they rushed to respond to another officer’s distress call less than a week after Katrina.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Theodore Carter said in closing arguments that police had no justification for shooting unarmed, defenseless people. “It was unreasonable for these officers to fire even one shot, let alone dozens,” he told jurors. All told, jurors heard five weeks of testimony by roughly 60 witnesses in the Justice Department’s case against former officer Robert Faulcon, Sgts. Robert Gisevius and Kenneth Bowen, Officer Anthony Villavaso and retired Sgt. Arthur Kaufman. Faulcon, Gisevius, Bowen and Villavaso are charged with civil rights violations in the fatal shooting of 17-year-old James Brissette on the east side of the bridge. Faulcon also is charged with gunning down 40-year-old Ronald Madison, a mentally disabled man, on the west side. All four of those officers also are charged with taking part in the alleged cover-up. Kaufman, who investigated the shootings, is charged only in the alleged cover-up. If the officers are convicted in the shootings, jurors must decide if the deaths “involve circumstances constituting murder,” which would carry stiffer prison sentences.

NEWS BRIEFLY Officials dismiss complaint surrounding Palin’s TV series

Nasser Nasser | Associated Press

An injured pro-Mubarak female protester is evacuated by a fellow protester outside the police complex in Cairo on Wednesday during the trial session of Egypt’s ousted President Hosni Mubarak.

Ill Mubarak goes on trial, provokes revolutionaries By Hamza Hendawi The Associated Press

CAIRO — From a bed inside the defendants’ cage, an ashen-faced Hosni Mubarak showed a glimmer of his old defiance. Egypt’s former president wagged his finger in the air and denied all charges against him Wednesday as he went on trial for alleged corruption and complicity in the deaths of protesters who helped drive him from power. The spectacle, watched live on state television by millions of Egyptians, calmed the fury of those who

suffered under his rule. The father of a slain protester, among those sweltering in the heat outside the courtroom on the third day of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, was ecstatic. “The biggest achievement of this revolution is that all these crooks and scum are in a cage,” said Mohammed Mustafa El-Aqqad. “We’re here to tell Hosni, ‘Happy Ramadan. Congratulations on your new cage.’” With Arab Spring revolts sweeping the Middle East, the sight of Mubarak during Wednesday’s hearing could serve as a powerful

cautionary tale for other autocratic leaders who have long acted as if they alone were fit to rule. People watching the spectacle across the region proclaimed it a watershed. “This is the beginning of democracy in the Arab world,” declared Rabha Idris, an engineer from Libya. “This is a new era,” enthused Zainab Hassan, a 22-year-old university student from Bahrain, a tiny Gulf Arab nation whose Muslim Shiite majority is demanding equality with the Sunni minority. “The people now believe they can be free from dictatorship.”

TEXASNT STUDDEIA ME

Ted Jackson | Associated Press

Retired New Orleans police sergeant Arthur Kaufman enters federal court Monday, July 11, in New Orleans.

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ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Alaska officials have dismissed an ethics complaint filed against former Gov. Sarah Palin that alleged she violated state law because the TLC docu-series “Sarah Palin’s Alaska” took advantage of a state film production program she signed into law. Malia Litman of Dallas filed the complaint. She also alleged Palin benefited from the production of the eight-partseries in violation of a two-year moratorium that bars former officials from being compensated for assisting others in state dealings. Documents show producers of the reality program received nearly $1.2 million in tax production credits. The complaint dismissal says there’s no basis for the grievance.

Woman finishes state bar exam undeterred by going into labor CHICAGO — A pregnant suburban Chicago woman was so determined to finish the Illinois bar exam that she completed the test even after going into labor. The Chicago Tribune reports 29-year-old Elana Nightingale Dawson had started the final portion of the exam last week when the woman went into labor. The exam must be finished to be valid. After finishing, she walked to a downtown Chicago hospital. The woman’s son, Wilson, was delivered about two hours later. She’ll find out in October if she passed the bar. — Compiled from Associated Press reports


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Thursday, August 4, 2011 | The Daily Texan | Viviana Aldous, Editor-in-Chief | (512) 232-2212 | editor@dailytexanonline.com

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Support the DREAM Act In recent weeks, two states passed versions of the DREAM Act to help increase accessibility of higher education for undocumented immigrants. On Monday, Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn signed into law the state’s version of the DREAM Act, creating a private scholarship fund for children of immigrants to pay for college. Moreover, last week, California Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law the first part of the state’s DREAM Act, which will allow undocumented students in California to access private financial aid. The federal Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act would reward those who have been educated in or have shown their dedication to the United States by providing legal residency to those who have lived in the country since at least age 15 and have completed college or military service for at least two years. The act would potentially allow those who already contribute to our economy and society to continue to do so. Undocumented children in Texas who attend public universities currently qualify for in-state tuition rates, thanks to the 2001 passage of the Texas DREAM Act. Twelve other states face similar situations, as they, like Texas, allow illegal residents to pay in-state tuition rates. The DREAM Act makes sense economically. As it stands now, the state invests a significant amount of funding in educating young undocumented students from K-12 and into college. However, if those students are then denied access into the workforce, the state loses out on its investment. Even amid the media attention surrounding his speculation of a run for presidency, Gov. Rick Perry has stood by his support for the statewide DREAM Act. Despite his opposition to the passage of the federal DREAM Act, Perry’s continued support for the Texas DREAM Act is, unsurprisingly, raising questions from tea party groups and other conservatives whose support Perry would need to secure the Republican nomination for president. “From my experience dealing with Iowans in all 99 counties, the immigration issue is a very sensitive issue,” Iowa tea party activist Gregg Cummings told The Dallas Morning News last week. “He’s going to have a tough time trying to answer.” Nonetheless, Perry defended his support for the Texas DREAM Act. When questioned about the act in an interview with the New Hampshire Union Leader last month, Perry responded, “To punish these young Texans for their parents’ actions is not what America has always been about.” The arguments against the DREAM Act are typically unfounded and consistently fall back on the same hackneyed rhetoric and fear-mongering. The DREAM Act is not an incentive that will encourage illegal immigration. Rather, it is a gateway to allow a hard-working and educated segment of our population the ability to contribute to its nation. Considering the dismal rates for college graduation and degree obtainment nationwide, continuing to shut out qualified graduates is not just bad policy, it’s nonsensical. Though it is unlikely that the federal DREAM Act will pass in the immediate future, the passage of state DREAM acts across the country and the U.S. Senate’s hearing on the act in June, the first such hearing, indicate that the act is becoming increasingly important to Americans. Without the DREAM Act, children of immigrants who came to the United States illegally are at an unfair disadvantage, and DREAM acts at both state and federal levels help to rectify that injustice by providing them equal access to the workforce and a path to citizenship. — Viviana Aldous for the editorial board.

Students dealt another blow By Matt Daley Daily Texan Columnist

Texas students, already reeling from the Legislature’s recent higher education funding cuts, were hit again by the recent debt deal in Washington. Part of the debt deal just passed in Congress will change the way many students pay for graduate school. Federal Stafford loans have been an option for students unable to independently finance their educations since the passage of the Higher Education Act of 1965. These loans, which are offered in limited amounts to eligible students, have the advantage of being backed by the federal government. This means they often carry lower interest rates than what students would be offered by private lenders. Stafford loans can be either subsidized or unsubsidized. If a loan is subsidized, the government pays any interest which accumulates while a student is in school and for a period of six months after graduation. Unsubsidized loans are allowed to accumulate interest that the student borrower is responsible for paying off either as it accumulates or after graduation. The Budget Control Act of 2011, the debt ceiling disaster aversion bill, ends subsidized Stafford loans for graduate and professional school students. After July 1, 2012, no new subsidized loans will be available for these students, further increasing the cost of post-secondary education for those students already least able to afford it. The Congressional Budget Office estimates that the elimination of graduate student loan subsidization will save $21 billion between July 2012 and 2021. Of this, $17 billion will be directed to the Pell Grant

Program, which provides aid to low-income students. The infusion will allow that program to remain solvent. For years, the Department of Education has borrowed against expected future funding in order to be able to give to students the maximum amount: $5,500 per year. It has been running a deficit as the cost of education and the number of eligible students has soared in recent years. The Congressional Budget Office estimates that $38 billion worth of Pell Grants will be awarded in the 2012-13 academic year, compared with $26 billion during the 2009-10 year. Despite the debt-deal infusion, funding for the Pell Program will still fall $1.5 billion short. The Chronicle of Higher Education reports that this remaining funding gap has caused concern among financial aid professionals that more student aid programs will soon be on the chopping block to save Pell Grants. Alternatively, they worry the program will be restricted either in terms of award amount or eligibility. To put the estimated savings into perspective, the Obama administration estimates that the nation’s wars in Iraq and Afghanistan will cost almost $160 billion in the next fiscal year. The continuing military operations in Libya cost around $40 million per month, according to the U.S. Department of Defense. Added together, the nation’s active military engagements currently cost over $13 billion per month. With the exception of action in Libya, the wars are being scaled back. But continuing the wars for only the next month and a half will eliminate the savings from cutting subsidized Stafford loans for graduate students. If the amount of savings to be diverted to bail out the chronically underfunded Federal Pell Grant Program is subtracted, the total amount of federal deficit reduction,

about $4 billion, will be used in these conflicts in the next 10 days. Ten years of painfully extracted savings will be negated in 10 days. The comparison to military spending may be criticized, quite reasonably, as unfair. But the comparison supports a broader point, especially considering recent education cuts in Texas. Education is being wrongly marginalized in these budget debates. The lack of federal support for student financial aid comes as yet more gloomy news to Texas students, who have seen funding for the TEXAS Grant Program and for public higher education cut as the state government grappled with its own budget crisis earlier this year. The TEXAS Grant program provides aid to low-income Texas students. According to The Texas Tribune, as a result of this year’s cuts, 43,000 students will see less aid money from the state over the next two years. The recent legislative session also saw state funding for higher education decrease by more than 9 percent. These cuts will likely translate into higher tuition as state universities try to make up the funding gap. Sadly, it has become a tired cliche that young people don’t vote. Many commentators cynically labeled the spike in youth turnout during the 2008 election a fluke. Unfortunately, turnout in the 2010 election largely vindicated that view. The only real way to get politicians to remember students when money is tight is if they know we’ll remember their actions at the polls. So next November, to send the message that these misplaced spending priorities are unacceptable, let’s all vote. Daley is a biology and government senior.

gallery The firing line Psychics fail to adequately demonstrate ability The Aug. 1 article about Joe Nicols and his battling stereotypes of paranormalists was a fascinating delve into a fantasy world that seems out of place at an institution of learning. Rather than running counter to the stereotype of paranormal performance artists, Nicols seems to be a paragon of this illogical system of unsupported magical thinking. While many psychologists and professional magicians would readily recognize what Nicols does as either conscious fraud or unconscious self-delusion, no one would be able to show any connection with what he claims he is doing and anything that we know about how the world works. Many psychics or dowsers or whatever may be sincere in their beliefs that they have discovered some pathway to hidden knowledge, but beyond making good guesses about what will impress their clients, they have always failed controlled tests of their abilities.

— Steve Bratteng UT alumnus

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5A UNIV/CLASS

NEWS 5

Thursday, August 4, 2011

Influential judge’s documents available at Benson Collection

City Council may ban plastic bag use of plastic bags but only reChanging dates of election, use duced the number of discarded extending parking hours bags by 20 to 30 percent, said Ancomprise principal issues drew Moore, policy aide to coun-

By Diego Cruz Daily Texan Staff

By Diego Cruz Daily Texan Staff

The University has received documents donated by the family of a Mexican-American judge who was influential in shaping Texas and U.S. law. The documents donated by the late Judge Filemon Vela’s family would be interesting for people working with border legal issues such as immigration and drug control and are freely available for consultation after years of cataloguing, said librarian for U.S. and Latino studies at The Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection, Margo Gutierrez. The collection received documents that belonged to Vela and were donated by his widow Blanca Sanchez Vela in 2007, said Christian Kelleher, archivist for the rare book and manuscript collection. Kelleher said the donation includes records of his personal life, his time as a student, his activity in his community, his life as a father and family man, the majority of his professional documentation and activities, as well as clippings, scripts, notes, photographs and radio broadcast recordings. “Judge Vela was very influential, particularly in his community but also as a district justice, in really formulating law for the United States,” Kelleher said. The collection brings together his experience as a MexicanAmerican legal scholar from the Rio Grande Valley, providing unique historical documentation day, month day, 2008

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Allen Otto | Daily Texan Staff

christian Kelleher, archivist for the rare book and manuscript collection, displays documents received by the university.

on the region, he said. According to biographical resources in the UT online libraries, Vela received his license to practice law in Texas in 1962 and participated in an influential 1970 case that helped establish the pursuit of due process in governmental bodies in South Texas. Vela served as judge of the 107th Judicial District Court of Cameron and Willacy counties starting in 1974 and was later elected as federal judge of the Southern Region of Texas, Brownsville Division in 1980, according to the online resources. According to his biography, as a federal judge for southern Texas, Vela oversaw more than a thousand cases related to drugs and immigration, including a controversial 1989 decision to lift travel restrictions on

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refugees seeking asylum in the U.S. “Many of the programs and institutions he created during his lifetime have and will continue to have an impact on the lives of current and future South Texas citizens,” according to his biography. Throughout his professional career, Vela remained involved in his community by supporting civic organizations and activities, mentoring in youth programs and even cohosting a radio program popular in South Texas and northern Mexico in which he answered and discussed legal questions, according to the online resources. “We are delighted and honored that [Vela’s] family made these doc- 1 uments available to us and to future generations of scholars,” Gutierrez said.

City Council will meet today to discuss more than 50 different issues facing Austin, including a potential ban on plastic bags, changing city council election dates and delaying implementation of a new schedule for parking meters. One important item the council will discuss is the reduction of single-use retail plastic bags within city limits, according to the meeting agenda. Mayor Lee Leffingwell, who sponsored this item, said Austin residents use approximately 363 million plastic bags every year, which cost the city nearly $850,000 to dispose of annually. “It’s a recommendation for a comprehensive end of plastic bags within the city,” Leffingwell said. City Manager Marc Ott will be directed to generate an ordinance that will provide a widespread phaseout of single-use bags in the city after discussion with retail stakeholders and concerned citizens, according to supplementary information on the city’s website. The council enacted a similar voluntary program in the past that attempted to halve the

cil member Mike Martinez who co-sponsored the item. Moore said the numbers soon returned to normal, mainly as a result of pushback from retailers. “[The item] will try to bring together the stakeholders, big retailers, environmental groups and everyone involved to come up with an ordinance that says we will ban these types of plastic bags and to figure out all the details,” he said. The council will also consider approving a resolution to investigate the administrative costs of both moving city elections to November 2012 and keeping them in May, according to the agenda. A bill passed during the most recent legislative session adjusted timing requirements for federal primary elections and allows the city to move municipal elections to November in order to increase voter turnout. Postponing city elections would conflict with the May reelection of four council members and require extending their terms for six months, said council member and item sponsor Laura Morrison. However, Travis County is already planning to move their elections to November, so it may be more beneficial to keep the two together. “This is a resolution to ask the

city manager to evaluate all our options and come back with information on the alternatives and their feasibility and cost,” Morrison said. City Council will also consider creating the Charter Revision Committee to gather public input and provide recommendations regarding plans to switch to single-member districts and other charter amendments. “There will be 15 members, three appointed by me and two appointed by council members,” Leffingwell said. He said the committee would make recommendations on the size of districts, the construction of district lines and amendment language after seeking input from a number of citizens and organizations. “It would be a significant change in our governing structure so it’s a very important issue,” Morrison said. Council members will also consider a resolution to delay the implementation of extending parking meter hours downtown from Sept. 6 to Jan. 1. Morrison, who sponsored the bill, said the council may postpone making the decision, but she believes the later implementation date is necessary. “My concern is that we haven’t done an adequate job yet of really hearing all of the issues of how extending the parking meters will affects folks that live and use downtown,” Morrison said in a separate interview in July.

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Life&Arts

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Thursday, August 4, 2011 | The Daily Texan | Julie Rene Tran, Life&Arts Editor | (512) 232-2209 | dailytexan@gmail.com

Blogs, guide books prove helpful to travelers needing suggestions By Rachel Perlmutter Daily Texan staff

and authentic as they may be, offer English translations on their menus and seem booked entirely by tourists each night. While using these guides (particularly in their book form) can be a vital navigation and informational tool out on the streets, travel blogs can provide helpful ways to personalize your experiences. The firsthand experiences provided by reputable bloggers can create a sense of comfort and ease when trying to find the best pizza place in a country known for its beef tartar. Like “paris (im)perfect� by Sion Dayson, the antithesis of tourist guidebooks. Dayson’s blog provides a much needed balance to usual stops such as the Louvre and Notre Dame with offbeat restaurants, art exhibitions and other cultural treasure troves. And, Meg Zimbeck’s self-titled blog on eating in Paris proves a great alternative if you’re looking to branch out of

your tour book. The author samples cuisine from all over the city and provides a comprehensive take on the fair, including cost. All that said, travelers using the web should be discerning when choosing which sites to take advice from. Essentially, be sure to check a site’s credentials, or if it’s a blog, the writer’s. What kind of experience do they have with the country they’re writing about? Have they actually been there? How many followers do they have on social media platforms? These just a few questions to ask before taking their advice. Finding travel blogs for the destination of your choice can be the difference between a good trip and one that seems perfectly crafted for your tastes — be it food, museums, nightlife or any other area of interest. The old-school guides will get you to the things you can’t say you missed, but the travel blogs will help you score the meals and shops you won’t forget.

On a recent trip to Paris with my family, we chose to stay in an apartment rather than seek the usual hotel experience. Between the three of us, we had no French proficiency, no concierge and because of the costs involved in using American phones overseas, no smartphones. A family of iPhone addicts marooned on an island of meager Internet connection from our living room, we were forced to survive off the grid for a week for the first time in years. Others looking to travel abroad, especially those looking to stick to their budgets, are likely to face similar reductions in their Internet access. What this means for tourists is a lot more true, unassisted spontaneity (actually finding a cafÊ on a whim, not Googling one on the go) and a little more advanced planning than is usually necessary. While you can use travel books, the Web proves most helpful for making your trip truly memorable. Using a classic guide such as Frommer’s or Rick Steves will ensure that you hit all of the highlights and avoid any traumatic food incidents, if that’s your goal. They provide detailed maps of each neighborhood with dining recommendations for varying price points. As comprehensive as these guides may be, they are not very personal. They leave little room for creating your own travel experience, and you run the risk of embarking on a formulaic journey through counPhoto Illustration by Andrew Edmonson tries with enough cultural stock for 20 vacations. Even the recom- American cell phones can come with high costs. Many of the features mended restaurants, as charming users depend on at home can be supplemented by the use of blogs.

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it is often difficult for bartenders to prevent underage drinking. The Texas Alcoholic Beverage commission enforces steep disincentives for bartenders in an attempt to keep minors away from alcohol.

Unequal blame game

THIRSTY THURSDAY INVESTIGATES

Editor’s Note: This is the last installment in a three-part series on underage drinking, focusing on the role of bartenders.

By Gerald rich Daily Texan Columnist Any system of rules and regulations based on controlling alcohol requires some level of trust between all the players involved. However, when you’re a bartender you can never fully trust anyone who walks into the bar since they could either be a minor with a fake ID or a cop on a sting operation. “As a bartender, you’re constantly dealing with situations that can end in fines, community service, jail time or loss of your license and your vote,� said one bartender who has worked downtown and around campus for three months but chose to not be named. “The stakes are extremely high because failure to respect the law results in unfair consequences. It’s not something you want to gamble with.� While the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission and the UT Police Department conduct sting operations that take note of Greek life’s events and alcohol-related incident statistics to decide when and where they’ll strike, the bartender is held more liable than the minor. “The difference between you being fined and going to prison and the bartender being fined and going to prison is if you destroy your

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ID. The consensus among my [un- mands from customers as well as evderage] friends in that situation is ery single law. to get rid of the fake IDs before There are roughly only 250 anyone asked to see them,� added TABC agents for the entire the bartender. state, forcing them to rely on loThis is where the ability to con- cal law enforcement, bartenders trol the substance fails. A bartend- and convenience store owners to er or store owner who serves a mi- uphold laws. nor faces a Class A MisdemeanIn the last round of minor sting or with a fine up to, but not ex- operations, where the TABC had ceeding, $4,000 and/or one year minors ages 16 to 18 without IDs in jail. The minor could potential- attempt to purchase alcohol, there ly receive the higher Third were a total of 9,256 discreet Degree Felony if they’re stings from June 15, 2010 caught with a fake ID ON THE WEB: to 2011. While that may that has a penalty of a seem like a lot, HousWatch the final $10,000 fine and 2 to ton, the fourth largest installment of thirsty 10 years in jail. But, city in the U.S., has a thursday investigates this afternoon if no counterfeit is total of 7,584 currently at bit.ly/ found on their person, active retailer licenses. dt_video the charge is reduced So, how can we fully to the lowest misdemeanregulate and control alcohol? or, Class C, and a maximum fine Or any substance for that matter? In of $500. Texas, we rely upon those who deal Although it was unclear from with the daily hand-to-hand transthe interviews conducted how ex- actions and hold them more liable ploited this potential legal loop- than the minor, a responsibility barhole is because of the sensitive tenders and other alcohol purveyors nature of the issue, current legis- should live up to. lation does place more blame on “It’s all a part of the game,� said those who would enable a minor Paige, a bartender who’s worked to acquire alcohol. downtown since February 2009 but “If there wouldn’t be any adults asked for her last name to be withgiving alcohol to minors there held. “You must card everyone and would be much fewer of them know the consequences if you don’t. drinking and fewer deaths,� said Either you do that or your ass is on Carolyn Beck, TABC director of the line.� communications and governmenStill, bartenders are faced with tal relations. “I haven’t heard any- steep disincentives to keep the subthing about minors destroying stance under control. the ID, though. Who is the TABC “As a bartender, you have to be more likely to believe? The bar- smart and just assume everyone else tender or the drunk minor?� is smart,� said the first anonymous Controlling a substance such as bartender. “We don’t want anyone to alcohol is extremely difficult, es- hurt themselves. This is just our job. pecially in Austin during festi- We make human errors, though, and vals such as South By Southwest. I think the system is broken if our I know from personal experience customer’s human errors result in that minors have purchased alco- unequal punishment. [Bartenders] hol when bars became inundat- are agreeing to be arrested for crimes ed with inebriated festival-goers. that we’re not trying to commit.� Bartenders respond that it is diffiLeave us a tip at thirstyatx@gmail. cult to keep up with all of the de- com.

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8 BASKETBALL

Philly forward chooses Texas after breaking ties with Pitt

SPORTS

Thursday, August 4, 2011 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Trey Scott, Sports Editor | (512) 232-2210 | sports@dailytexanonline.com

10

Acho set for successful senior season

By Nick Cremona Daily Texan Staff

The Longhorns added a seventh member to their 2011 recruiting class with the verbal commitment of power forward Jaylen Bond on Tuesday afternoon. The Philadelphia, Pa. native, listed at 6-foot7 and 220 pounds, made the announcement via Twitter, saying “Just committed to the University of Texas, thank God for this opportunity!” B ond shou l d c omp e te for playing time immediately because of the early departure of Tristan Thompson to the NBA. He had initially committed to play for Pittsburg h in April 2010, but because of a scholarship crunch decided to decommit this March to play at a prep s cho ol. At Plymout h Whitemarsh High School near Norristown, Pa., Bond averaged 18 points, seven rebounds, four assists and two blocks a game. With the lack of depth in the Longhorn frontcourt, Bond could very likely become a key contributor to this year’s squad. Although he is still technically committed to Pitt, Bond intends to enroll at Texas in the fall, and the Longhorns have until August 19 to figure out his eligibility. Pittsburgh still has to release Bond from the national letter of intent he signed in 2010 in order for the process to be finalized.

Editor’s Note: The Daily Texan will introduce one important longhorn football player each issue. Here is No. 10 of the Texan’s 10 Most Important Longhorns. By Christian Corona Daily Texan Staff

EMMANUEL ACHO outside linebacker

SOFTBALL

Temperatures are approaching 110 degrees, classes are drawing near and everyone is trying to make the most of the last few weeks of summer. It can only mean one thing — football season is upon us. Texas wants to bounce back from a 5-7 campaign last year, but it’s going to need some help from a few experienced veterans and talented upstarts. College football teams always have holes to fill as players graduate, transfer, leave for the NFL and suffer injuries. For Texas, no hole may be bigger than the one left by All-American defensive end Sam Acho, the Longhorns’ leader in tackles for loss and sacks in 2010. Thankfully for Texas, his younger brother still has a year left. Emmanuel Acho is set to be a Texas starting outside linebacker and

one of the defense’s most productive members. Each of his last two seasons have been better than the last, with Acho registering 11 tackles as a freshman, 49 as a sophomore and 87 last season. There’s no reason to believe that he can’t continue the trend this season, and he has a great shot at eclipsing 100 tackles. Like his big brother, he’s smart, athletic and hardworking. Question marks currently surround the Texas program, but the linebacker position is not a cause of concern. Senior Keenan Robinson is a preseason first-team All-Big 12 selection and Jordan Hicks, the toprated linebacker coming out of high school two years ago, is poised to prove he belongs in the starting lineup. Along with Acho, a second-team All-Big 12 pick in 2010, they make up one of the finest linebacker corps in the country. Saint Mark’s School won five games in 2006, Sam Acho’s senior year. In 2007, Emmanuel’s last season at the Dallas prep school, his team won all but one regular season game. The Longhorns are hoping for a similar turnaround. Acho may not be as dominant as his big brother, but he’ll be a big reason why Texas bounces back this year.

FOOTBALL

Despite his sophomore slump, Horns needs Gilbert to start Sue Ogrocki | Associated Press

Taylor Hoagland belts a two-run homerun during the World Cup Softball title game. Hoagland led Texas with 15 homeruns last season.

Hoagland’s homerun helps Team USA win fifth consecutive title Texas’ rising junior Taylor Hoagland hadn’t been playing at her best as she stepped up to bat in the bottom of the sixth inning of the World Cup of Softball Championship game against Japan. Earlier in the game, defensive problems had plagued Hoagland and, even though the United States was clinging to a 4-2 lead, a strong Japanese team was threatening to take the momentum. With a full count and a teammate on third, Hoagland connected on a pitch from Japan’s new pitcher for a home run, her first of the World Cup. It gave the United States a comfortable 6-2 lead and helped them on their way to a 6-4 victory. “We’ve been up, we’ve been down because of inexperience and youth,” head coach Ken Eriksen said. “I have to commend the young lady from Texas. She made a bad play then comes back with a clutch hit that was basically the difference in the score tonight.” The win secured the United

States’ fifth consecutive World Cup of Softball title. Japan handed the U.S. National Team their only loss in 2005, the year of the tournament’s inception. The tournament is hosted in Oklahoma City, Okla. each year by the Amateur Softball Association of America based in the United States. In preliminary play, the United States went 4-for-5; their only loss was to Canada, which took home the bronze medal on the third night of the tournament. Hoagland, who started the national team season on the bench, started five of the six games during the tournament — though she made an appearance in the sixth game. The Longhorn finished the tournament with a .600 batting average with three RBI and three runs scored. She also achieved a fielding percentage of .824, lower than her average for the Longhorns last season. The World Cup of Softball marks the end of the U.S. National Team’s summer schedule, meaning Hoagland will return to Texas to begin fall training with the Longhorns, who hope her championship ways can rub off on the team.

It’s so easy to (incorrectly) label Garrett Gilbert as the starting quarterback. Much too easy. There’s a quarterback battle between four players starting Friday when the Longhorns begin the first day of fall camps, but the way I see it, this case is closed. The only people who seemingly haven’t determined Gilbert as the starter is the coaching staff. He’s on the cover of every regional college football magazine out there from Athlon to Sporting News and is the designated starter in the college football video game NCAA 12. Any conversation or story regarding the foursome starts with his name. Why? Well, obviously it’s because he was the starting quarterback last year. But more importantly, the public has figured something out that they hope Mack Brown already knows: Without Gilbert, the Longhorns are in trouble. Whoa now, big stock to put into a guy who had a 10:17 touchdownto-interception ratio last season, I know. Yes, it is a strange thing to say about a quarterback who “directed” Texas to its worst season since 1997. Actually, it sometimes looked as if the team stood no chance last year as long as Gilbert remained at the helm. But if you can, think back to his high school days at Lake Travis. He won two straight state championships and rewrote an almanac of records along the way. He was the Gatorade and Parade National Player of the Year. There’s a reason he was offered by Texas, a reason he was considered the secondbest quarterback in his class behind Matt Barkley. You have to believe Gilbert hasn’t forgotten how to play the position. The players trust him now. Fozzy Whittaker said at Big 12 Media Days that Gilbert had improved by leaps and

MLB RANGERS

TIGERS

CARDINALS

BREWERS

DIAMONDBACKS

GIANTS

TWEET OF THE WEEK Kevin Durant @KDTrey5 No lie, jus had one of the best times of my life at Rucker park... wow! I love NY... Harlem waddup..S/O my brotha @ YoungSapp6

SPORTS BRIEFLY

By Trey Scott Daily Texan Columnist

By Sara Beth Purdy Daily Texan Staff

SIDELINE

TEXAS’ MOST IMPORTANT LONGHORNS

Durant dazzles in New York City, drops 66 at famous Rucker Park

Derek Stout | Daily Texan file photo

Garrett Gilbert started all 12 games in 2010, but is mired in a fourway competition for the starting quarterback job. If Texas wants to avoid another frustrating season, Gilbert must win that competition.

bounds in the vocal leadership department and that he was helping guide the players through the summer’s 7-on-7 drills. Whittaker didn’t publicly say who would win the starting job — can’t imagine that’d go over well PR-wise — but a couple of players on the offensive side of the ball have told me, with conviction, that Gilbert is their quarterback. As we head into the fall, Texas looks as if a team that surprisingly has a large share of its pieces in place. The defense should be a nasty one, the receivers are supremely talented and the Longhorns will have their deepest stable of running backs in some time. There’s too much at stake to go with a quarterback with zero experience, which is what Texas would do if it turned to anybody not named Gilbert. Arguments will be made for Case McCoy, mainly because of the bloodlines, but there is probably a reason the Texas coaching staff never turned to him after Gilbert had thrown his fifth interception against Kansas State last year. Connor Wood was a big time recruit, but not much has been heard about him this summer, save for a few transfer rumors. David Ash continues to get rave reviews, but don’t bet on Mack entrusting the job

of saving this proud program to a true freshman. It’s going to have to be Gilbert, and there’s reason to believe that the second half of his career as a starter will be better than the first. This is a guy who, after throwing two interceptions in the 2009 BCS Title Game, one of which went for an Alabama touchdown — it seems weird to say that somebody “threw” a shovel pass — rebounded with a two-touchdown second half. He stared down the best defense in the nation and didn’t look as scared as he should have been. With a full year of experience under his belt, Gilbert should be ready for whatever challenges are thrown at him this year. Or at least, he’ll be more ready than the other three quarterbacks. This quarterback competition is one of two things: legitimate or staged. If it’s a real one, Gilbert will come out of fall camp as the top guy anyway, given his experience and newfound command over the huddle. And if it’s just for show and he is in fact Texas’ secret starter, then the coaching staff knows something the rest of us — the media, the magazines, the videogame corporations — have already figured out: Garrett Gilbert is the guy. He has to be.

The chance of there not being an NBA season isn’t keeping Kevin Durant from working on his game and captivating basketball fans. The former Longhorn poured in 66 points Tuesday at the revered Rucker Park, a renowned streetball court in Harlem. Durant, who was won the league scoring title each of the last two seasons, connected on nine of his 11 three-point attempts. The following day, Durant, who averaged 27.7 points per game last season, scored 41 in a Pro City summer tournament game at Baruch College in Manhattan. He only hit two three-pointers in the contest, but one of them tied the game at 137 and sent the game to overtime, where Durant’s squad pulled away and won, 146-143. — Christian Corona

Former Texas punter McGee joins Colt McCoy in Cleveland The last time Richmond McGee punted in a competitive football game Texas won a national championship. McGee, Texas’ starting punter for three seasons (2003-05), agreed to terms with the Cleveland Browns Wednesday, two days after the Chicago Bears released him. Cleveland’s first option at punter, Reggie Hodges, suffered a torn Achilles tendon Tuesday and was placed on injured reserve, leaving the Browns without a punter on the roster. McGee, who averaged 39.6 yards per punt at Texas, now joins fellow former Longhorn, starting quarterback Colt McCoy, who guided the Browns to wins over the New Orleans Saints and New England Patriots. McGee has not punted in an NFL game but that should change this season. — C.C.


The Daily Texan 8-4-2011