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LIFE&ARTS PAGE 7

SPORTS PAGE 8

Where to find the best bar food in Austin

The Hell Marys stay tough in an epic roller-derby battle

SPORTS PAGE 8

The greatest children’s sports movie of all time

THE DAILY TEXAN Tuesday, August 3, 2010

Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

TOMORROW’S WEATHER

www.dailytexanonline.com

Deadline in sight for budget revisions

Calendar Bourbonitis blues ...

Alejandro Escovedo & The Sensitive Boys play the Continental Club at 10:30 p.m. Tickets cost $15 at the door.

Legislature-mandated cuts responsible for elimination of full-time University jobs

What a burger!

versities advocating student issues. According to the TSA website, it disbanded after 45 years, but in recent years the University of Houston, University of North Texas and Texas A&M University have been working to bring it back.

By Collin Eaton Daily Texan Staff As the University prepares to submit a budget plan to the Legislature with a 10-percent reduction that was due Monday, UT’s chief financial officer warned that the next round of budget cuts will most likely have an impact on staff and other jobs. Two factors, the 5- to 8-percent budget cut and merit-pay increases, have resulted in a $14.6 million cut from UT’s budget as well as the elimination of at least 80 facilities and maintenance jobs. From September to June, the University laid off 273 full-time employees because of budgetary reasons. Several colleges have already set aside funds for the 2-percent merit-pay increases, but some, such as the School of Information, have implemented hiring freezes to pay for the raises. The 10-percent cut that was mandated by the state leadership May 28 must be submitted by Aug. 30 to the Legislative Budget Board. The cut may have an unavoidable impact on jobs at the University, UT CFO Kevin Hegarty said. “Should additional budget reductions be required, they are likely to be painful for the campus,” Hegarty said. “Because 70 percent of what the University spends is for salaries and benefits, it is difficult to conceive of a reduction plan that won’t involve further reductions in University jobs. We all hope that we can avoid further job loss, but in the end, the state must balance its budget and the University must do the same. I am sure that any actions will be thoughtful and considerate just as they have to date.” Hegarty said the University will review the portfolios of vice presidential offices, colleges and other administrative offices over the next semester. “We have not asked the VPs to submit any plan other than the one they submitted last May for the 5- to 8-percent reduction plan, and the details of those plans are confidential,” he said. The 10-percent cut will be for the 2012-2013 biennial budget and will apply to all state agencies,

SG continues on page 2

UT continues on page 2

Wear orange to a Whataburger between 5 and 8 p.m. and get a free sandwich in celebration of the chain’s 60th anniversary.

‘Bueller ... Bueller ... ’

Play hooky at the Paramount Theatre with a screening of “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” at 1 p.m. Tickets cost $9 at the box office.

Campus watch ‘The Situation’?

West Martin Luther King Boulevard A UT police officer discovered two non-UT subjects arguing and fighting inside a vehicle. As the officer approached the vehicle, a non-UT passenger got out and began walking toward the officer in an aggressive manner, removing his shirt. The unknown driver decided her best option was to leave the area, and as the officer was telling her to turn off the car, she drove away. During the investigation, the officer learned the passenger had an outstanding arrest warrant from another county. The subject was taken into custody and was transported to Central Booking. Occurred on Thursday at 2:30 a.m.

Today in history In 1934 Adolf Hitler joins the German offices of president and chancellor to become the supreme ruler of Germany — the Führer.

Inside In Opinion: More women in the workplace not a sign of equality page 4

In Sports: The lineup for special teams positions page 8

In Life&Arts:

3-D TV isn’t all it’s cracked out to be page 7

‘‘

Quote to note “It’s [a] ... wonderful feeling to knock someone down who’s trying to get past you or successfully hold back a jammer or blocker. It’s so hard to really articulate.” — Catherine Bacon Texas Rollergirl SPORTS PAGE 8

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Reach for the sky

TODAY

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Photo courtesy of Caleb Bryant Miller

The Flatiron Building, constructed in 1902, was one of the first skyscrapers ever built. The efficient structure inhabits a triangular island block at 23rd Street, Fifth Avenue and Broadway.

INSIDE: 48 Hours reports from New York City on page 5

SG may join student leaders alliance By Ashley Meleen Daily Texan Staff UT Student Government may soon join a statewide organization uniting Texas student government assemblies. Representatives from student governments across the state gathered Saturday at the University of Houston to discuss the formation of the Texas Student Association, which SG will vote on joining this fall. The University of INSIDE: Houston’s Student Read the editorial Government Associboard’s take on SG ation hosted the conand the TSA ference to discuss the on page 4 organization, elect the leadership and review the goals of the re-established TSA. “We had a lot of student leaders come together and give ideas and make commitments to making each of these universities better,” said Kevin Sanders, president of the University of North Texas Student Government Association. The convention included representatives from UT, University of Houston, University of North Texas, Texas State University, Rice University, Texas Tech University, Sam Houston State University, Stephen F. Austin State University and Galveston College. “One of the major points of emphasis was the point that our name is the Texas Student Association, not the Texas Public

Derek Stout | Daily Texan Staff

Jimmy Talarico discusses the Texas Student Association conference, which was held on Saturday in Houston, during a meeting Monday. Student Association, therefore we shouldn’t leave out any student in the state of Texas,” Sanders said. “Our goal as an organization is that if you’re a student in Texas at any institution, you’re taken care of and your voice is taken to the state Legislature.” The organization dates back to 1948, when TSA began as a collaboration of uni-

Cost of West Campus Meningitis shot required to live in dorms more susceptible too pricey for some Students to contracting disease; Still-weakened economy causes students to select cheaper living options

By Destinee Hodge Daily Texan Staff As difficult economic times persist, the high price of housing in the West Campus area is causing students to consider cheaper alternatives. With an average price per bedroom of more than $600 a month, the area has become increasingly unaffordable for most students. “Most one-bedroom apartments and studios around the campus area start at the lowest [at] $600, but I would say on the average of closer to $800 to $900,” said Chris Zaiontz of Skylight Living, a realty office within a few blocks of UT. “Of course the newer, loft-style condos and some of the newer buildings can go anywhere from $1,000 or $1,500 per bedroom.” Many of the large apartment

complexes also do not include the cost of a parking pass and some utilities in their pricing. As a result of these high prices, students are beginning to consider more novel living arrangements, such as cooperative houses. “Our members live together and work together, so that’s how we can offer low rates,” said Kim Penna from College Houses Cooperatives. The company has operated in the UT area since 1965 and offers affordable housing throughout West Campus. Penna said that all the responsibilities usually taken care of by property management in normal apartment complexes are transferred to students, which helps lower the cost of living. Some students have turned to more economical areas such as North Campus and Hyde Park. Even lower pricing can be

ZONING continues on page 2

vaccination mandatory

By Hannah Jones Daily Texan Staff Incoming freshmen, out-of-state transfer students and international students residing in on-campus housing this fall are now required to have the meningococcal vaccine as a part of a Texas law that went into effect Jan. 1. Meningococcal disease is a potentially fatal bacterial illness that can affect anyone, but young people who live in crowded environments such as dorms are more susceptible to contracting the disease. It is most commonly transmitted through the exchange of saliva and can cause healthy people to become sick within a few hours. According to the Texas Medical Center, about 15 college students die annually and about 1,500 cases of meningococcal disease are diagnosed in the United States each year. More than 50 cases of the disease were diagnosed in Texas in 2009.

Jeff Heimsath | Daily Texan Staff

Charlotte Katzin, managing nurse of the UHS Allergy/Immunization Clinic, calls out patients’ names in the waiting room. “Vaccinations take seven to 10 days to become effective, therefore students are required to get the vaccination at least 10 days prior to coming to school so they will already be immune,” said Nadine Kelley, program coordinator of the Division of Housing and Food Service. “If students haven’t received the vaccination,

it doesn’t stop them from going to class, but they are not allowed to check into housing.” According to the University Health Services website, symptoms include kidney failure, learning disability, hearing loss, blindness, permanent brain

SHOTS continues on page 2


2A

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NEWS

Tuesday, August 3, 2010

A vintage advantage

THE DAILY TEXAN Volume 111, Number 44 25 cents

SHOTS: Vaccine

does not protect against all strains

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591

From page 1

Editor: Lauren Winchester (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Ben Wermund (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Web Office: (512) 471-8616 online@dailytexanonline.com Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office: (512) 232-2209 dailytexan@gmail.com Photo Office: (512) 471-8618 photo@dailytexanonline.com

Nasha Lee | Daily Texan Staff

Rachel Mescall, 20, shops for summer clothing at Cream Vintage on Guadalupe Street.

Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu

campus watch

Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@dailytexanonline.com

Well, that’s just careless Parking Lot 108, 1500 Red River St. Assist Outside Agency: A UT police officer discovered a white Buick parked with a set of keys in the ignition. A check revealed the vehicle had been reported stolen. The vehicle was impounded. Occurred on Sunday at 9:50 a.m.

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2010 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

Dude, where’s my car? 600 Block, Colorado St. Public Intoxication: A non-UT subject was observed staggering back and forth as he attempted to walk along the sidewalk. The subject stopped and stood between two parked vehicles looking at both of them. With the use of a remote key unlock, the subject located his vehicle, staggered to the driver’s side and attempted to enter the vehicle. The officer stopped the subject after noting the signs of intoxication and the subject’s attempt to get into the vehicle. The subject was taken into custody for Public Intoxication and was transported to Central Booking. Occurred on Sunday at 2:42 a.m.

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Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Winchester Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ben Wermund Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Francisco Marin Jr. Associate Editors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Heath Cleveland, Douglas Luippold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dave Player, Dan Treadway News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Claire Cardona Associate News Editors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pierre Bertrand, Kelsey Crow, Cristina Herrera Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Collin Eaton, Nolan Hicks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Destinee Hodge, Michelle Truong Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vicky Ho Associate Copy Desk Chief. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elyana Barrera Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Olivia Hinton Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Veronica Rosalez, Simonetta Nieto, Suchada Sutasirisap Special Projects Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .Thu Vo Photo Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bruno Morlan Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Gerson Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tamir Kalifa, Mary Kang, Peyton McGee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Derek Stout, Danielle Villasana Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Lingwall Associate Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Madeline Crum Senior Entertainment Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Addie Anderson, Katherine Kloc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mark Lopez, Julie Rene Tran Features Entertainment Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kate Ergenbright, Gerald Rich Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dan Hurwitz Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Austin Ries Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Will Anderson, Chris Tavarez, Bri Thomas Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carolynn Calabrese Multimedia Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Murphy Associate Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carlos Medina Senior Videographer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joanna Mendez Editorial Adviser. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doug Warren

cy: A blue Dodge vehicle was stopped for exceeding the posted speed limit. During the traffic investigation, the non-UT driver could not provide the officer a valid driver’s license. The officer learned the subject’s license had been suspended. The driver was taken into custody. After the driver was removed from the vehicle, the officer noticed a plastic baggie on the driver’s seat that contained a white powdery substance. The substance later tested positive for cocaine. The subject was taken into custody for Possession of a Controlled Substance/Driving without a Valid License and was transported to Central Booking. Occurred on Saturday.

The traipse of wrath Pharmacy Building, 2409 University Ave. Criminal Trespass Warning: A non-UT subject was discovered walking through the building. When stopped, the subject became very aggressive toward the officers. The subject told the officers that he was a prospective student and was looking around. The subject was issued a written Criminal Trespass Warning and was escorted from the area. Occurred on Friday at 7 p.m.

If it ain’t broke ... Student Services Building, 100 W. Dean Keeton St. Suspicious Person: Two UT staff members discovered an unknown subject looking around inside offices located on the second floor. The subject informed the staff members that he was waiting for a repair man. One staff member offered the subject a chair inside the lounge to wait for the repair man while the other called to confirm his story, but discovered no repairs had been scheduled for their area.

The subject left the area ... quickly. The subject was described as: Black male, 25-30 years of age, curly hair, with hair products. He was last seen wearing a white T-shirt and camouflage shorts with black-andwhite tennis shoes. Occurred on Friday at 2:22 p.m.

Keep your hands to yourself Mezes Hall, #5 South Mall Disorderly Conduct-Offensive Gesture: A UT student reported an unknown subject had attempted to grope her as he was walking past her on a flight of stairs. The unknown subject was described as: White male, 22 years of age, 5’10”, with short brown hair. Subject was last seen wearing black pants and a black T-shirt. Occurred on Friday at 9:47 a.m.

Identity crisis Communications Building B, 2504-B Whitis Ave. Possession of Alcohol by a Minor: A UT police officer observed a non-UT subject grab a 12-ounce cup of beer and attempt to walk into a event located on the sixth floor. The subject was stopped by a UT volunteer and was asked for his ID. The subject opened up his wallet and the police officer saw the subject use his thumb to cover the picture on the ID. The officer observed he was being handed a counterfeit driver’s license and requested the subject’s real Texas driver’s license. The subject produced a second Texas driver’s license that had been issued to him. The officer learned the subject was under the legal age of 21 and issued him a court appearance citation for Possession of Alcohol by a Minor and escorted him from the area. Occurred on Wednesday at 8:15 p.m. Compiled by UTPD Officer Darrell Halstead

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$2 million in recurrent savings. The last 5-percent cut totaled including the UT System and all about $14.6 million from the budother UT academic campuses get, mostly from vice presidential and health science centers. and other administrative offices. The UT System Board of Re- Hegarty had said the 10-percent gents will meet Aug. 11 and 12. cut could equal about $30 million The system also restructured in from UT’s budget — and if those part to focus on commercializa- savings come from jobs, it would tion efforts and in part to obtain equal roughly 600 jobs.

From page 1

ZONING: Possible regulations

may push out group housing From page 1 found across Interstate Highway 35 on Riverside Drive, where bedrooms cost as low as $450 a month in complexes such as Longhorn Landing and University Estates. In June, the Central Austin Neighborhood Plan Advisory Committee showed support for new regulations that could further increase campus housing. Several neighborhood associations within CANPAC are also in favor of MF-4, or multifamily, zoning regulations that would limit the number of shared living spaces in the area and would push co-op housing and traditional group housing farther from campus. Historically, West Campus has often been a hub of expansion and growth. According to the Austin Planning and Development Review Department website, the area has been home to the Adams Extract Factory as well as the location of a community of freed African-American slaves called

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The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily except Saturday, Sunday, federal holidays and exam periods, plus the last Saturday in July. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591) or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified display and national classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2009 Texas Student Media.

may cause loss of 600 jobs

“Wheatsville,” founded by former slave James Wheat. Organizations such as CANPAC, however, are seeking to restrict co-op housing and fraternity and sorority houses from being built or moving to single-family neighborhoods near campus. “Most of the objections that have been raised have to do with behavior,” said Robert Heil, a senior planner in the Planning and Development Review Department. “[It] is really kind of a different issue than land-use discussion.” John Lawler, a University-wide representative for Student Government who is also a member of both CANPAC and University Area Partners, said that as a result of limited student input on issues of zoning in the past, there are plans to get students more involved with the issue this year. “We’d like to have another town hall [meeting] just to basically gauge, what are the issues that students are facing in West Campus?” he said.

for student group to join TSA

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Director of Advertising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jalah Goette Assistant to Advertising Director. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C.J. Salgado Local Sales Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brad Corbett Broadcast Manager/Local Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus/National Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Classifieds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Teresa Lai Student Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kathryn Abbas Student Advertising Managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Ford, Meagan Gribbin Student Account Executives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rene Gonzales, Cody Howard, Josh Valdez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cameron McClure, Sarah Hall, Daniel Ruszkiewkz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Josh Phipps, Victoria Kanicka Senior Graphic Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Creative Services Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Danny Grover Student Graphic Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alyssa Peters, Suchada Sutasirisap Special Editions, Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elena Watts Special Editions, Student Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reshma Kirpalani Special Projects Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adrienne Lee

UT: Ten-percent budget cut

SG: Parks must sign resolution

Issue Staff

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Jones, Ashley Meleen Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jeff Heimsath, Nasha Lee Sports Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jon Parrett Life&Arts Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan Bodkin Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joshua Avelar, Lindsey Purvin Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rafael Borges, Julie Paik, Mark Daniel Nuncio Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vivian Graves, Benjamin Miller, Carlos Santiago Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katie Carrell, Yasmine Pirouz, Sammy Martinez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Melissa Lu, Nick Jimenez Web Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Melanie Gasmen

damage and death, which can occur in eight to 24 hours. The effects of meningitis can also damage extremities, which could require amputation, and can cause gangrene, coma and convulsions. Vaccinations are recommended for those living in close quarters and college students 25 years old or younger, according to the website. Immunizations are effective against four of the five most common bacterial types that cause 70 percent of the disease in the U.S., but do not protect against all types of meningococcal disease. UHS coordinator Sherry Bell said this is the University’s first full semester that they’ve had to deal with the law. Timothy Simmons, rhetoric and writing junior and Jester Center employee, said he thinks the majority of students are vaccinated before they get to the University. “It probably isn’t efficient as a whole with only new students being vaccinated,” Simmons said. “But right now, it’s working because we haven’t had any cases here at Jester.”

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Sanders said one of the reformed association’s main objectives is to represent students across Texas by considering their opinions on the many campuses involved. If TSA representatives can unanimously agree on an issue, they will then go to the Legislature and lobby for it. While UT representatives were present at the convention, UT Student Government hasn’t joined TSA yet. This fall, the Student Government Assembly can pass a resolution to join that must be signed by the president for membership to become official. However, SG is already on the association’s leadership board, as representative John Lawler was appointed to a chair position at Saturday’s convention. Lawler said although the association doesn’t have any official stances yet, issues such as textbook affordability and graduate student health care are already being discussed. “Individual student affordability is something every Tex-

as student can see eye-to-eye on,” Lawler said. Lawler hopes that UT’s involvement with the TSA will bring more immediate responses to issues important to individual students, rather than working toward other legislative efforts that might not bring immediate results. “It’s going to be about letting students experience the legislative process, which is a learning experience you’re never going to get once you leave college,” Student Government executive director Jimmy Talarico said. According to Talarico, the association will encourage Student Government’s goal of getting students involved in decision and policy making. It will allow Texas schools to team up for lobbying power when it comes to statewide issues, but still lobby individually for issues that they don’t all agree on. “If we talk with the right people and start organizing early, we can have a lot of momentum in the spring and really get stuff accomplished for UT students,” Talarico said.


3A W/N

WORLD&NATION

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Tuesday, August 3, 2010

T HE DAILY T EXAN

Survivors protest Safety of Gulf seafood in question lack of aid after floods in Pakistan By Chris Brummitt The Associated Press CAMP KOROONA, Pakistan — Relief efforts in Pakistan’s flood-ravaged northwest picked up pace Monday, but survivors complained about government inaction — a worrying sign for authorities seeking public support for the fight against militants in the region. Around 300 people blocked a major road in the hard-hit Nowshera district to protest at receiving little or no aid, witnesses said. Other survivors returned to devastated villages, wading through waist-high water to salvage chairs, plates and other possessions from beneath mud and debris. “We have nothing, we are just depending on the mercy of God. Nothing left except this wet wheat,� said Marjan Khan, sorting through piles of the grain laid out on wooden beds. Scores of bridges, roads and buildings have been washed away by the torrents, which were triggered by exceptionally heavy monsoon rain. The floods are the worst in a generation, and weather forecasters say more rains are due to fall in south and central Pakistan. The death toll was at least 1,200 on Monday, with up to 2 million survivors requiring assistance. The northwest is the epicenter of Pakistan’s battle against al-Qaida and the Taliban. Alongside military and police operations, the government —

with the support of the West — is trying to improve its services and living standards there to blunt the appeal of militancy. The Pakistani army, which has the helicopters, boats and infrastructure needed for relief work, is delivering food, medicine and tents, as are government agencies and several different political parties and welfare organizations. At least one extremist group — a welfare organization allegedly linked to the Lashkar-e-Taiba terror network — is also helping survivors. The group, Falahe-Insaniat, helped civilians fleeing the Swat offensive. The United States is providing $10 million in emergency assistance. It has also provided rescue boats, water filtration units, prefabricated steel bridges and thousands of packaged meals that are being distributed by the army and the government. Other foreign countries, aid groups and the U.N. have promised or are delivering aid. But for victims now mostly surviving in hot camps or in the open, it can not come quick enough. “This is the only shirt I have,� said Faisal Islam, sitting on a highway median, the only dry ground he could find in Camp Koroona village. Hundreds of people in makeshift shelters constructed from dirty sheets and plastic tarps were also there. “Everything else is buried.�

Mohammad Sajjad | Associated Press

People carry their belongings after heavy flooding destroyed their homes in Nowshera, Pakistan, on Monday. An estimated 28,000 people have been trapped by the floodwaters.

By Greg Bluestein & Jason Dearen The Associated Press VENICE, La. — Seafood from some parts of the oil-fouled Gulf of Mexico has been declared safe to eat by the government, based in part on human smell tests. But even some Gulf fishermen are questioning whether the fish and shrimp are OK to feed to their own families. Some are turning up their noses at the smell tests — in which inspectors sniff seafood for chemical odors — and are demanding more thorough testing to reassure the buying public about the effects of the oil and the dispersants used to fight the slick. “If I put fish in a barrel of water and poured oil and Dove detergent over that, and mixed it up, would you eat that fish?� asked Rusty Graybill, a fisherman from Louisiana’s St. Bernard Parish. “I wouldn’t feed it to you or my family. I’m afraid someone’s going to get sick.� Despite splotches of crude that wash up almost daily in marshes east of the Mississippi River, Louisiana has reopened those waters to fishing for certain finfish varieties, and will allow shrimping when the season begins in two weeks. Oysters and blue crabs, which retain contaminants longer, are still off-limits. Smell tests on dozens of specimens from the area revealed barely detectable traces of toxic substances, the Food and Drug Administration said. The state of Louisiana has also been testing fish tissue for oil since May and has not found it in amounts considered unsafe. In Mississippi on Monday, FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg said the government is “confident all appropriate steps have been taken to ensure that seafood harvested from the waters being opened today is safe and that Gulf seafood lovers everywhere can be confident eating and enjoying the fish and shrimp that will be coming out of this area.� Similarly, BP chief operating officer Doug Suttles said Sunday that authorities “wouldn’t open these waters ... if it wasn’t safe to eat the fish.� He said he would eat Gulf seafood and “serve it to my family.� Dawn Nunez, whose family operates a shrimp wholesale business in Louisiana, said he finds it absurd that the government is reopening the fishing grounds when so many doubts linger. “It’s nothing but a PR move,�

Charlie Riedel | Associated Press

Plaquemines Parish coastal zone director P.J. Hahn holds up a small oiled fish at Bay Long off the coast of Louisiana on June 6. Fresh splotches of chocolate-colored crude still wash up almost daily in marshes in reopened fishing grounds east of the Mississippi River. she said. “It’s going to take years Andrew Hunt, a real estate agent marsh and reeled in a foot-long to know what damage they’ve who lives in Meraux, La., motored speckled trout. done. It’s just killed us all.� his small recreational fishing boat “We’ll go and have us a nice litNot everyone is concerned. out to the newly opened area of tle fish fry,� he said.

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Tuesday, August 3, 2010

OPINION

Editor-in-Chief: Lauren Winchester Phone: (512) 232-2212 E-mail: editor@dailytexanonline.com Associate Editors: Heath Cleveland Doug Luippold Dave Player Dan Treadway

T HE DAILY T EXAN

OVERVIEW

A force to be reckoned with Last weekend, Student Government representatives drove to Houston for a Texas Student Association (TSA) conference, a student advocacy organization composed of public, private and community colleges throughout the state. The TSA is a nonpartisan group that focuses exclusively on student-oriented issues. UT is not currently a member of the group, but the SG members took promising steps toward making this group of students more prominent and effective. The TSA was established in 1948, but in the 1990s, large and small schools were unable to agree on certain issues, which eventually rendered the group impotent. Over the past two years, leaders from the University of North Texas and University of Houston re-established the organization, but the lack of involvement from larger state schools such as UT, A&M and Tech impeded its effectiveness — until now. UT representatives’ willingness to travel to the meeting shows an initiative that will help boost UT’s reputation. Many leaders at other colleges see UT as snobby, elitist and pretentious and feel as though UT views itself as better than every other school. While most Longhorns would probably think this status is rooted in jealousy, its existence is impossible to deny, and it can impede our ability to work with other schools. UT representatives’ pilgrimage to the conference will send the message that we are more interested in results than ourselves. Beyond the positive public relations impact of our attendance at the conference, a successful TSA has tremendous potential to benefit both Longhorns and college students across the state. While concealed handguns, domestic partner benefits and sustainability efforts are certainly — and rightly — student issues to Longhorns, our counterparts at other colleges throughout the state do not share the same views. The TSA solves the problem of political divisiveness because as a strictly nonpartisan group, it advocates only for student affordability and other politically-neutral issues. With the TSA focusing on these issues, UT Student Government and student leaders will be more available to lobby legislatures and promote the more partisan issues that are better handled by a UT-centric approach. The TSA helps compartmentalize our lobbying efforts and will help us be effective on both fronts. But before we get ahead of ourselves, UT is still not officially a member of the TSA, and it cannot rejoin until Student Government reconvenes in the fall; however, we are confident that the SG administration understands the TSA’s importance and will support UT’s participation in the association. The TSA has the potential to promote student issues like never before. Lawmakers give SG credibility because it represents 50,000 UT students, and the influence of an effective and well-organized TSA, which represents 500,000 Texas college students, is immeasurable. — Douglas Luippold for the editorial board

GALLERY

Update student-athlete safety standards By Josh Avelar Daily Texan Columnist Football is about as popular in Texas as barbecue, air conditioning and breathing. Given that the state is home to the nation’s most extravagant high school, college and professional football stadiums, it is obvious that the sport plays a huge role in our culture. Most states in the Union cannot compete with our football prowess, but Texas fails to meet standards in the most important aspect of the game at the high school level: safety. The Dallas Morning News reported online Sunday that the University Scholastic League, the governing body of high school sports in Texas, has an outdated concussion protocol in comparison to those used by the NFL, NCAA and the National Federation of State High School Associations. The UIL is more relaxed on recommendations for how soon student athletes should return to play after head injuries, allowing athletes to return to play on the same day if the athlete hasn’t lost consciousness. However, less than 10 percent of athletes who suffer concussions lose consciousness. The UIL guidelines also allows athletes to return to play if concussion symptoms are resolved within 15 minutes. This is troubling when considering a 2003 study found that 33 percent of college football players who returned to play after a concussion didn’t develop symptoms until three hours after their injury. The report also found many other problems with concussion prevention throughout Texas. Fifty-three percent of public schools in the state do not have a

full-time athletic trainer on staff, and 33 percent of public schools do not even have weekly access to a certified athletic trainer. This leaves many concussion evaluations in the hands of coaches. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said concussions make up one in 10 sports injuries, so being educated about the dangers of such an injury should be a huge aspect of coaching in fullcontact sports. Though the UIL’s concussion guidelines are meek by national standards, retired Mesquite High School athletic trainer Bucky Taylor told The Dallas Morning News he believes more than half of UIL schools don’t even follow the guidelines. If stricter standards are good enough for the college and professional level, they should be good enough for Texas high schools. Furthermore, the UIL should take the matter more seriously by no longer using “guidelines” and begin to implement rules. If any high school coach, after receiving proper education about concussions, fails to comply with the rules, the UIL should punish the school harshly, implementing either forfeits or suspensions. Impacting the actual football season will bring more community pressure — which should exist anyway given the severity of the matter — on these coaches without access to athletic trainers. I can hear the “good ol’ boys” diminishing the seriousness of the situation already, the tired rhetoric stating that everyone is simply being overly cautious and kids nowadays are too soft. Anybody with that train of thought is just lucky enough to have never had a teammate who ended up with paralysis or permanent brain damage,

Peter Morgan | Associated Press

New York Jets football helmets sit on the field at Giants Stadium before a football game between the Jets and the St. Louis Rams in East Rutherford, N.J. in this Aug. 14. file photo. The results of an independent study commissioned by the NFL and the players’ union show modern helmets meet all national safety standards, though it stressed that no helmet can prevent concussions and more studies are necessary. or else their opinions on the matter would surely be different. There’s nothing anyone could do to take concussions out of the game, of course, but dealing with the injuries properly is essential. Broken arms and sprained ankles can be bandaged or put in casts, but mistreated concussions can cause irreparable trauma to the brain. The athletes who suf-

LEGALESE Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees. All Texan editorials are written by The Daily Texan’s Editorial Board.

RECYCLE! Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange news stand where you found it.

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

fer under these relaxed guidelines are not getting million-dollar contracts or even free tuition for their time on the field. They’re simply doing it for the love of the game, and often for the pride of their community. The UIL owes it to these athletes to get tougher on concussion prevention. Avelar is a government and journalism senior.

A turning point for women in the workforce By Lindsey Purvin Daily Texan Columnist In The New York Times last week, columnist Nicholas Kristof reported that for the first time in history, men no longer dominate the American labor force. In fact, women were the majority of payroll employees for the five months preceding March, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Women occupy more than half of the professional and managerial positions in the country. Kristof argues that this phenomenon is partially because three-quarters of the Americans who lost their jobs in the recession were men. But he also offered another explanation: Perhaps women are “simply bettersuited” for today’s jobs. He cited Hanna Rosin from The Atlantic, who argued today’s postindustrial economy values predominantly female attributes such as social intelligence and communication over men’s physical strength and size. But have women actually achieved equality — or even, as Rosin suggests, superiority — in the workplace? Statistics demonstrate that the number of male-dominated, labor-intensive positions has decreased as a result of the current recession, while female-dominated positions, such as secretarial and daycare workers, have increased. Women’s presence may be more dominant in the current workforce but not necessarily the result of equality so much as an increased demand for fields traditionally occupied by women. More importantly, the job market remains segregated in terms of salary. Still, there is a growing enthusiasm that the current recession may provide a turning point for women in the workforce. Although women increasingly demonstrate prowess in professional fields, surveys indicate that the distribution of men and women across fields is lessening. There is no denying the fact that women continue to advance academically. According to a 2010 report from the Center on Education Policy, while boys and girls perform equally in math, 79 percent of elementary schoolgirls can read at a proficient level compared to 72 percent of boys. Increasingly, these same skills are translating into college level academics. At UT, the 2009 summer/spring enrollment indicates 55 percent of entering freshmen are female. While the average SAT score across the University for admitted freshmen was higher for males than females, females consistently had higher GPAs than their male counterparts in the respective SAT ranges, according to a University report. But the steady rise in female performance at UT has not yet translated in to equitable salaries in the workplace. Although declaring women’s superiority in the workforce may still be presumptuous, the result reinforces indicators that women’s increased performance in academics is having a positive impact as more women pursue professional fields. We are making headway as academic performance translates into professional equality. More importantly, Kristof’s rallying declaration that women are well on their way to achieving job equality reinforces the growing gender support for an issue that began significantly divided within “the battle of the sexes.” Purvin is a rhetoric and writing senior.


5A NEWS

NEW YORK CITY

HOURS

WORLD&NATION

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Tuesday, August 3, 2010

T HE DAILY T EXAN

Street art vendors lose spaces in parks Editor’s note: These are the eighth and ninth in a series of stories and photos bringing the U.S. and the world to UT.

Attempt to reduce congestion in New York City leaves artists without a place to sell their work By Audrey White Daily Texan Staff NEW YORK — Like soda stands, skyscrapers and celebrity sightings, artists selling original works are a fixture on New York City streets. But a set of new regulations may cut the number of artists who can vend in four Manhattan parks. The Parks Department put codes in place July 19 after a group of artists lost an injunction that would have delayed the regulations. As a result, spaces for what the city calls “expressive-matter vendors� are limited in Union Square, Central Park South, Battery Park and High Line Park. Vendors must station their stands behind small medallions on the ground, and once all medallions are taken, no more artists can set up in that park. The department said the regulations are intended to reduce congestion in parks, but artist Joel Kaye, a professor at NYU who also makes and sells ceramic tiles with original photographs in Union Square, said he has never seen any traffic problems or heard about anyone being injured because of street artists in the parks. The restrictions run counter to the city’s history of diverse arts culture and a constitutional mandate for freedom of expression, said Kaye, who is a plaintiff in the appeal fighting the ruling. “This is opening the door to let government agencies limit people’s rights because by coming down on us, the

city is coming down on all free speech,� he said. Kaye and other artists said they believe the city and Mayor Michael Bloomberg aim to drive all artists out of the parks so they can set up commercial vending and charge for permits in the areas where artists currently sell for free. City officials insist they are concerned about safety and congestion because the number of vendors has risen over the past few years. Street art is a vibrant and standard part of park culture for local residents and tourists, said digital artist Miriam West and her partner Tony Chisholm. The pair have been selling art in Union Square for seven years, but West said they may have to relocate. Under the new restrictions, there can only be 18 artists on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays — the days that the Greensmarket Farmers Markets is in the square — and 58 on other days. In the past, there would be between 100150 artists on weekend days without congestion problems, Kaye said. “People come to the park just to look at art, to converse with artists, to exchange ideas,� Chisholm said. “By bringing our work, people can buy art that’s not homogenized. Not everybody can go to a museum or gallery, but here we can bring art to people who can’t afford to see or purchase it any other way.� Tracy Kutch, a tourist from Coppell, went to Union Square on Sunday to buy art for her sons. Kutch said she was surprised by the high quality of the art available and felt the venue was valuable for art sales. “These are trained artists, not just people messing around to make a few bucks,� she said. “I would rather help someone who is out here than a gallery that will take a huge commission.�

Audrey White | Daily Texan Staff

New York City digital artist Miriam West shows a customer the gray medallion that she must place her stand behind to sell her art. Because of new rules enacted by the Parks Department on July 19, artists must be stationed at a medallion to vend in four Manhattan parks, and the limited number of spaces means many artists are unable to sell their work. However, the city said that because artists can still vend without restriction on any public street and in any of the other parks in the city, there is no compromise of free speech and the new regulations qualify as time, place and manner restrictions designed to promote the “significant government interest� of avoiding congestion and maintaining public safety. In the ruling against the injunction in July, Judge Richard Sullivan cited a previous ruling on the same issue that stated “the First Amendment does not require

that New York City permit plaintiffs to sell their work directly to the public in an ideal venue.� Sullivan wrote in the ruling that artists may actually have more rights than other types of vendors. “Expressive-matter vendors, unlike souvenir vendors, are free to sell at other locations throughout the parks, so long as they do not use carts or stop in one spot for longer than necessary to complete a transaction,� Sullivan wrote. “And if expressive-matter vendors would prefer not to be bound by the restrictions set forth in the revi-

sions, they are always free to obtain a general vendor’s license.� The city has drawn a line between itself and the artists, Kaye said, and artists will continue to fight for their rights in court and through protests. Painter and screen-printer Mush Hosotani said the most important thing is that artists keep sharing their work as much as possible. “The saddest part is so many artists have left completely,� Hosotani said. “We must continue to sell art here, even if there are only 58 or 18 of us. We can’t reduce our rights anymore.�

         

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The Vanilla French is a chocolate-vanilla buttercream cupcake from Butter Lane on East Seventh Street in New York City.

Creme de la creme of NY cupcakes Texan reporter crusades for best Big Apple bakery with compact confections By Laken Litman Daily Texan Staff NEW YORK — Somehow between exploring hip areas such as Tribeca and the East Village, transferring from local to express trains, running in Central Park and working at Sports Illustrated, I have discovered the city’s greatest cupcake. In December I found out I’d be spending the summer interning in New York and quickly gave myself a mission to accomplish during my time the city: Find the best cupcake. First, I laid down some ground rules: 1. I have to order the same cupcake (chocolate with vanilla buttercream frosting with sprinkles) at every single bakery. 2. The cupcake has to be baked on-site that day. 3. The cupcake must be moist. This really should be rule No. 1. 4. The bakery has to smell like heaven. Upon my arrival in early June, the first cupcake bakery I went to was Crumbs. Their cupcakes are just too big, and it’s more like eating cake than a cupcake. Cupcakes are the perfect dessert because you can hold them in your hand and eat them in a myriad of ways. The only way to eat

Crumbs’ cupcake is with a fork. It turns out they don’t bake their cupcakes in-house, nor are they fresh daily. Up next was Amy’s Bread. Amy’s version of my usual had hot-pink buttercream icing, which was appealing. The cupcake met the moistness criterion and was extremely luscious, but something about the cake and icing was too sweet. Baked By Melissa, a closetsized bakery, serves quarter-sized cupcakes that come in 10 different flavors. I got my usual, plus a tie-dyed cupcake that was really just vanilla with food coloring. Both cupcakes were extremely moist and the frosting was perfect — not too sweet, not too hard, not too soft but just right. The reason why Baked By Melissa doesn’t rank above Magnolia Bakery is because its cupcakes are just minis. I found out about Butter Lane from Food Network. There were so many flavors to choose from, but don’t worry — I didn’t stray. I ordered the Vanilla French, which is its chocolate-vanilla buttercream duo. It was delicious. The frosting was silky smooth, and the cake, in the words of Barbra Streisand, was like “butta!� My teeth literally sunk into this delectable creation. Next stop: Magnolia Bakery. Now, I know Magnolia is famous because of Carrie Bradshaw and “Sex and the City� as well as the

fact that it is all over New York and has produced a famous cookbook, but that doesn’t matter. Magnolia aced all four of my rules with flying colors. Inside, the air smells like sugar, but in a cupcakes-are-just-out-of-the-oven way that doesn’t give you a headache. The charming treats are lined up uniformly behind fingerprint-free glass cases, and the flavors aren’t complicated. The little name tags in front of each group read “chocolate� or “vanilla� or “red velvet� rather than “The Elvis� or “Strawberry Swing� or “Mama’s Favorite.� Not only are these cupcakes savory and divine, but before you even take a bite, you know it’s going to be perfect because the server behind the counter pulls them fresh off the cooling rack. After the first bite, Magnolia Bakery soared to my No. 1 spot, but there were more bakeries to try. There’s a place called Sweet Revenge that serves beer and wine according to which the cupcake you order. It only has specialty cupcake flavors, though, with names like “Bird of Paradise� and “Crimson & Cream.� Some say Magnolia is too hyped up, others call it average. But I say, put the same flavored cupcake from all these different bakeries in front of me without telling me where they’re from, and I bet you $100 that I still pick Magnolia as the best.

   

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6A CLASS/COMICS

6

COMICS

9 2 6 8 1 8 1 5 2 8 7 7 4 5 6 1 9 6 5 3 9 8 9 6 2 6 8 7 9 5

CLASSIFIEDS THE DAILY TEXAN

Yesterday’s solution

6 9 4 7 3 8 5 2 1

3 5 1 2 6 4 8 7 9

7 2 8 1 9 5 3 6 4

4 1 5 8 2 7 6 9 3

2 3 6 4 1 9 7 8 5

8 7 9 6 5 3 4 1 2

1 4 2 3 8 6 9 5 7

9 8 3 5 7 1 2 4 6

Tuesday, August 3, 2010

day, month day, 2008

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7A ENT

LIFE&ARTS

Life&Arts Editor: Mary Lingwall E-mail: dailytexan@gmail.com Phone: (512) 232-2209 www.dailytexanonline.com

7

Tuesday, August 3, 2010

T HE DAILY T EXAN

Raising the bar on pub cuisine Arcade Fire blends CD REVIEWS

serene moments, rock ‘n’ roll swells By Mark Lopez Daily Texan Staff “Grab your mother’s keys, we’re leaving,” Win Butler sings on the opening track of the new Arcade Fire album, The Suburbs. A few tracks off the new album have already circulated on the Web for months, giving fans a taste of the melancholic angst Arcade Fire is known for. To fully understand The Suburbs, it’s important to take a look at the band’s previous work. Funeral, released in 2004, played on the many themes of neighborhood living, including a night of severe, deadly winter as well as riding in the backseat and losing yourself in the scenery. Funeral solidified Arcade Fire’s reputation as a band that isn’t afraid to branch out into arena-style rock and roll. With The Suburbs, the band sticks with its familiar theme of suburban life, but it does so in a way that doesn’t sound tired or overworked. All the songs fit together as a whole, each song molding into the next with ease. For instance, on

the song “Modern Man,” the band takes an introspective moment to examine man’s place in the world, hoping that “when you are older, you will understand.” The track is poignant and easy to relate to. Another key track, “Rococo,” talks about the “modern kids” and their need to fit a certain mold, yet the song displays a deep sense of empathy for these so-called “intellectual” individuals. The album’s smooth transitions from quiet, self-involved moments to balls-to-the-wall rock — particularly on the track “Month of May” — constantly engage listeners. Arcade Fire has already made a major name for itself, and with The Suburbs, it will finally able to reflect on its success. This may not be the masterpiece that Funeral was, but it’s not too far behind.

Arcade Fire The Suburbs Grade: A-

Photos by Derek Stout | Daily Texan Staff

Above, the goat cheese pizza topped with caramelized onions and roasted bell peppers is one of the types of pizza you can order by the slice at The Flying Saucer Draught Emporium. Below, The Pour House Pub offers fried pickle chips and a wide variety of beers on tap.

Dishes such as fried pickles, pizza make for tasty fare at superb prices

Collage sounds collide in latest Books release By Jordan Bodkin Daily Texan Staff New York folktronica band The Books work in a style known as “collage music.” This style came into existence after various 20th-century composers, such as Iannis Xenakis and John Cage, hit dead ends working in the atonal and 12-tone musical genres. First used to connect various periods and styles of the past through musical collage, the trend mostly fizzled out during the compositional shift to minimalism. The Books have brought this style into the 21st century with their latest release The Way Out. The album opens with the track “Group Autogenics I,” featuring heavy guitar plucking and a voice saying, “Hello, greetings and welcome. Welcome to a new beginning, for this tape will serve you as a new beginning. That’s right, a new beginning.” The relaxation techniques doubled and looped with a collection of reminiscent and nostalgic field recordings offer a new take on collage music, synthesizing old ideas with the new to innovate in an entirely different way.

Album track “Beautiful People” reverses, overlays and distorts a clear vocal to provide a nonsensical yet not entirely foreign collection of harmonies in the cassette-tape vocal. This is a piece treated at the top layer, while underneath lies the interaction between an electronic, driving beat and a synthesized orchestra of only brass. Critics mark the band as aleatoric, or having to do with randomized sound. But the band refutes these claims by stating that its music is very order-oriented. The sound of seeming randomness lies in the decision and interaction of cassette vocals used and the instruments the band members come into musical contact with, but techniques are not presented to the listener in a random way. The album comes across as an intensely structured, precisely planned collection of otherwise random bits of recording.

The Books The Way Out Grade: B+

By Mary Lingwall Daily Texan Staff Nothing really says college like a 3:55 a.m. stop at Whataburger. But as I grow up, I sure hope that I can wrangle myself out of the taquito choke hold and find new ways to avoid my biweekly (or whatever) serving of four tortillas full of bacon, egg and cheese. Hence, my new goal is to the best bar food in Austin. Obviously, I’m not much of a calorie-counter and my desire to avoid the taquito train isn’t motivated by health concerns so much as sheer convenience. If I can get my eating done alongside my drinking, then that’s one less stop where I have to yell at my wonderful but wornout designated driver.

The Pour House Pub, 6701 Burnet Rd. Known for “tasty burgers and cheap drinks,” The Pour House Pub has a variety of classic bar foods. But, my favorite beertime snack is the Pour House’s fried pickles. Fairly unbecoming — the sliced pickles look more like chicken nuggets than vegetables — the Pour House’s fried pickles are a perfectly executed bar-food option. A little bit spicy, covered in crumbly, fried goodness and served with a side of ranch dressing (and no, it’s definitely not Hidden Valley Ranch), these pickles are a tasty pairing for anyone’s favorite beer. For those wanting something a little more well-

rounded, the Pour House also has a rotating variety of tacos, depending on chef preference. There is no real schedule for these tacos, so you’ll be surprised by a new selection each time you go. Just as surprising for a spot known for its beer, the Pour House has some damn good waffle fries.

The Hole in the Wall, 2538 Guadalupe St. Conveniently located on the Drag, Hole in the Wall may be best known for its happy hour, but the dive bar’s offerings of tacos and other, more traditional bar foods have made it a comfort-food haven for stressed-out summer-school students such as myself. When I sit down with a Shitty Lemonade, there is nothing quite like chowing down on a small bucket of french fries drenched in melted cheese and lightly seasoned with a spicy paprika mix. If I’m feeling particularly hungry, Hole in the Wall also offers filling tacos for next to nothing. I usually opt for their pulled-pork taco. A little on the spicy side, overflowing with toppings and costing about $3, the pulled-pork taco is one of the cheapest ways to ward off hunger on the Drag.

The Flying Saucer Draught Emporium, 4600 W. Guadalupe St. With literally hundreds of

beers available and nightly specials, The Flying Saucer Draught Emporium is a beer hall that has kept a surprisingly close eye on its food options. While the food can’t necessarily be called “bar food” — the Flying Saucer has a full menu w i t h e v e r y t h i n g f ro m s a l ads to burgers — it does offer some bar staples such as pret-

zels and nachos. Falling somewhere between bar food and restaurant-style food, the Flying Saucer also offers cheese plates with a variety of specialty cheeses such as Whiskey Cheddar, Cotswold and Brie and fancy pizzas with slightly refined toppings such as goat cheese and caramelized onions.

3-D television blows your budget, not mind TV TUESDAY

By Gerald Rich

3-D television has broken through TV screens and is reaching out toward you, or more specifically, your wallet. If you can’t see it, maybe you’re not wearing 3-D glasses. I’m not writing this as someone who hates new technology or calls the TV the “boob tube” and complains about the degenerative tendencies of humanity. I love my smartphone, relish in great television and believe the world isn’t filled with profitseeking bloodsuckers. I should probably amend that belief, but we’ll get to my eye-popping dissatisfaction with 3-D later. For those who may not have noticed, 3-D everything and anything is everywhere. From porno movies to comic books, a wave of illusionary imaging technology has descended upon the entire entertainment industry. Currently you can watch some pay-per-view and ESPN programming in 3-D on DirecTV. Addition-

ally, the Discovery Channel truer to reality before it’s edited has teamed up with Sony and and made into a reel. When creIMAX for the 3-D version of ating 3-D television and movits “Nature” series set for re- ies, film is shot on two cameras, lease later this year. separated by the average dis“3-D has always been seen tance between our eyes, and is as complicatthen projected ed because you as two ghostly had technical isimages laid on sues during actop of one anquisition, postother. Once you In the end, the idea production and put on special distribution,” goggles, the imof buying an actual said Mark Hora g e s a re b e t 3-D TV, at the low ton from Quanter directed into tel, a produc- end costing $1,399.99 your retinas to er of digital-edfool your brain for a 46” Samsung, iting hardware, is like buying an M. i n t o t h i n k i n g in an interview it’s viewing a Night Shyamalan with the BBC’s whole object or tech corresponperson. video — there is no dent Mark Ward. Now, I’ll adreplay value. “Now [that] we mit that when have digital acfirst viewing 3-D quisition and TV, it’s kind of digital distribucool. Walk into tion and digital projection sys- any Best Buy and you can see tems, a lot of those problems a preselected montage of 3-D have gone away.” stock footage to entice you, like Long, semitechnical story confetti from a Black Eyed Peas short, Horton says that with concert falling on you or cute technology such as digital film, puppies jumping out at you. anyone can easily review the But after a while, the jig is 3-D imagery to ensure that it’s up.

3-D TV looks no more fully formed than picking up a pop-up book and calling its two stacked images “3-D.” You’ve got your foreground, maybe a middle ground and a background image layered on top of one another to give the artistic illusion of perspective. The only time it felt like I was truly experiencing something in 3-D was when one segment of the 3-D promotional loop had water splashing on the screen, but the thought of 3-D porn using the same trick consumed my imagination and caused me to shudder. In the end, the idea of buying an actual 3-D TV, at the low end costing $1,399.99 for a 46” Samsung, is like buying an M. Night Shyamalan video — there is no replay value. But if you like pretty pictures with technology that’s still being refined, go ahead. I don’t know about you, but if I really wanted to experience “Shark Week” in 3-D, I’d rather just swim out far enough into the ocean. It’s cheaper, and I hear the blood looks extremely realistic.


8A SPTS

SPORTS

8

Tuesday, August 3, 2010

Sports Editor: Dan Hurwitz E-mail: sports@dailytexanonline.com Phone: (512) 232-2210 www.dailytexanonline.com

T HE DAILY T EXAN

SIDELINE

ROLLER DERBY

Hell Marys fall in third-place derby match By Bri Thomas Daily Texan Staff As Fort Minor’s “Remember the Name” blared from the Playland Skate Center’s sound system, the Hell Marys made their way onto the rink. Sporting red, plaid miniskirts, destroyed black tanks with nicknames such as “Speedyrella” on the back and faces painted like Gene Simmons from KISS, the women looked more than ready for the 2010 Roller Derby Championship Bout on July 25. While the rockin’ athletes warmed up, a rough group of fans poured in with cans of Lone Star beer, ready to see the Hell Marys take on the Honky Tonk Heartbreakers in the thirdplace match. The two squads had their struggles this season. The Hells Marys had lost a lot of players to other teams during the offseason. That transition made things more difficult for the team. “At the beginning of the season, there were literally as many new Hells as there were veteran Hell Marys,” team member Catherine Bacon said. “That meant that we essentially had to build a new team, and everyone was learning how to work with and skate with basically everyone else on the team.” Bacon, better known as Luce Bandit, serves as a jammer, one of the five players on each team who serves as the scorer. The other skaters block as the jammer attempts to weave her

way around the pack, earning team points. Luce Bandit quickly put these skills to good use as the two teams stayed tied during most of the first 30-minute half and went into the second half with a score of 26-26. “I felt ready to skate the night of the championship,” she said. “I was trying to focus on just skating at my personal best and working with my team. Win or lose, it was going to be a good, close game, which are the most fun to play.” An early second-half lead was not enough, though, for the Hell Marys, who fell into a big hole because of Honky Tonk Heartbreakers skater Shortcut. She was able to outduel Luce Bandit in the match, which ended at 61-52 with a fourth-place season finish for the Hells. Led by their jammer, Shortcut, the Heartbreakers were up 44-61 when five minutes were left on the clock. “We have less numbers, so we are used to working together,” Shortcut said. “I feel we won by having a better feel for each other, which led to better teamwork.” Luce Bandit realized that the Hells had potential but just couldn’t bring it all together in the end. “We had to start from square one in some ways, getting everyone on the same page because we had skaters coming from so many different places and experience levels,” she said. “It takes time to build

Cincinnati 4 Pittsburgh 0 NY Mets 1 Atlanta 4 Milwaukee 18 Chi Cubs 1 Washington 3 Arizona 1 San Diego 10+ LA Dodgers 4+ American League Cleveland 6 Boston 5 Minnesota 2 Tampa Bay 4

Lauren Gerson | Daily Texan Staff

The Hell Marys roller-derby team high-fives fans after the Texas Rollergirls league championship bout July 25. The Honky Tonk Heartbreakers won the third-place bout against the Hell Marys 61-52. teamwork and communication, but we definitely grew as a team — which is a significant achievement, I think.” Luce Bandit’s performance showed that she in some ways mimics a bandit, sneaking past a pack of athletes with great agility and ease. “There are usually several thoughts going through my mind simultaneously since there is always so much going on when sneaking past the pack and breaking away,” Luce

Bandit said. “Usually it’s some combination of, ‘Yes, made it out! Am I safe? Where’s the other jammer? I’m so glad that last blocker didn’t trap me! Need to get around to the pack again.’” Even opposing jammer Shortcut agreed about Luce Bandit’s skills, though the Honky Tonk jammer ended up with the victory. “She played really great,” Shortcut said. “Overall, it made for a really great game.” Despite the loss, Luce Bandit

continues to enjoy the rush of competing with the Texas Rollergirls. “It’s hard to explain why derby is so fun, especially jamming,” Luce said. “I love the feeling of sneaking past a blocker or getting past a wall or juking someone trying to hit you. It’s an equally wonderful feeling to knock someone down who’s trying to get past you or successfully hold back a jammer or blocker. It’s so hard to really articulate.”

Benny ‘The Jet,’ ‘Sandlot’ run away with Movie Madness championship just the game of baseball. It brings up a confrontation between the boys of the sandlot and the preppy kids who ride up on their awesome bikes with their cool uniforms. That exchange between two polar opposite groups is the definition of childhood. “You bob for apples out of the toilet. And you like it,” the leader of the Little League crew says. And how does one respond to that? “You play ball like a girl!” Obviously, I was not alive in 1962. I have no clue what summers were like back then. But when I picture a 1960s summer, it is very similar to “The Sandlot.” Presently, especially among people who grew up in the ‘90s, “The Sandlot” is a staple of life. At least for me, “The Sandlot” seemed like the movie we would rent most often whenever there was a sleepover. At day camp, it was a mov-

ie that was shown every year — and still is played.

We’re done At a student newspaper, it is not easy to put out a daily sports page without any collegiate sports being played. We have definitely stretched the definition of sports this summer by exploring all the options we could. Summer Movie Madness, at least in my opinion, was a success. And it appears that the selection committee did a good job in choosing the seeds. Three of the four top seeds advanced to the Final Four with “Remember the Titans” squeaking by “Space Jam” in the Elite Eight. There were only four lower seeds that advanced past a higher seed. Hopefully, you all enjoyed Sum-

mer Movie Madness. If we could, this is the time when we would show a montage of the highlights from our competition with the song “One Shining Moment” in the background, but copyright laws would definitely be violated.

FOOTBALL

Tucker to replace Lawrence as place kicker

Editor’s note: This is the eighth in a series previewing the prominent position battles that will take place during Texas’ training camp. By Jon Parrett Daily Texan Staff In a downpour of burnt-orange and white confetti at last year’s Big 12 championship game, one player rose above the crowd on his teammates’ shoulders as the unquestioned hero of the game. That player wasn’t star quarterback and Heisman hopeful Colt McCoy or ball-hocking safety and Thorpe Award finalist Earl Thomas. In fact, it wasn’t any of the six Longhorns who were drafted in this year’s NFL draft sitting atop his offensive linemen’s shoulders. It was Hunter Lawrence. Lawrence’s 46-yard field goal as time expired gave Texas its first Big 12 championship since 2005 and a chance at the national championship in Pasadena. It also showed the importance of the oft-overlooked third side of the ball: special teams. While it can be as electrifying as a 95yard kickoff return or as mundane as a 35-yard rugby punt, special teams cannot be overlooked by teams expecting to compete for conference and national titles. Training camp starts Aug. 8, and Texas’ special teams positions will see just as much competition as any other positions on the team.

National League Houston 9 St. Louis 4

MOVIE POLL CHAMPION: THE SANDLOT

“This is a movie that breaks with that tradition, that allows its kids to By Dan Hurwitz be kids,” movie critic Roger Ebert Daily Texan wrote in a review from 2000. “That Columnist shows them in the insular world of imagination and dreaming that children create entirely apart from The people have spoken. The win- adult domains and values.” ner of the search for the greatest kids’ “The Sandlot” is about kids trysports movie is ... “The Sandlot.” ing to go out on the field every Should this be surprising? Al- day and act like their favorite basethough there were many worthy ball player, whether it’s by using competitors and probably three chewing tobacco or doing someor four others that were Final thing as simple as hitting your fist Four-worthy, I would say it is not into a glove, or touching your bat a big surprise. to home plate. “The Sandlot” is a unique cinematic adventure when it comes to children’s sports movies. While Not just about baseball “The Sandlot” is about a lot more the majority of these movies are about an awful team that im- than just baseball. The beauty of the proves with the addition of a new movie is that it doesn’t need to bring coach or player (or both), “The in any controversial topics to teach a lesson that deals with more than Sandlot” is different.

MLB

JUSTIN TUCKER #19

Junior

Tucker will mostly be the man to replace Hunter Lawrence as the place kicker for Texas. Tucker has yet to attempt a field goal in his collegiate career, so all eyes will be on him during training camp. Tucker will be retaining his kickoff and punting duties.

6’1” 185 lbs

2009 stats 43 punts/ 40.4 YPP, two touchbacks; 99 kickoffs/ 62.3 YPK, 14 touchbacks

Eric Ou Daily Texan file photo

Sophomore 5’9” 177 lbs

2009 stats 349 yards / 21.8 YPR, 16 KR , one kickoff for a touchdown, one PR for 22 yards

Eric Ou | Daily Texan file photo

Then-freshman Marquise Goodwin returns a kickoff for a touchdown against Texas A&M.

DJ MONROE #26 Monroe returns this year as the lead kickoff returner from the Longhorns’ 2009 campaign. He’s the only player in UT history to return two kickoffs for touchdowns, and what makes that statistic even more impressive, given Texas’ rich history, is the fact that he did so as a freshman. Monroe also hopes to take on punt-return duties for the Longhorns, but will have to prove himself during training camp. He has yet to return a punt at Texas.

Justin Tucker kicks off the ball during Texas’ Orange and White game in the spring.

Sophomore

2009 stats

5’9”

537 yards / 33.6 YPR, 16 KR, two KR for touchdowns

171 lbs

MARQUISE GOODWIN #8 Goodwin will be competing with Monroe in training camp for the punt returner position. Neither has much experience returning punts, as most of that was done by Jordan Shipley last year. Goodwin does have one punt return on his resume, a 22-yard return against Colorado. Goodwin also will be returning kickoffs alongside Monroe. Goodwin’s biggest kick of return last year was a 95-yard touchdown that guaranteed Texas’ win over the Aggies.

Derek Stout | Daily Texan file photo

DJ Monroe runs the ball during the Orange and White spring game.

Toronto 8 NY Yankees 6 Kansas City 0 Oakland 6

SPORTS BRIEFLY Jets still in contract negotiations with All-Pro cornerback Revis Unless a major resolution occurs soon, it could be a while before the Jets see Darrelle Revis on the field. The All-Pro cornerback sat out the first two practices of camp Monday, locked in a contract dispute. “We’ve got to get who we have ready to go,” coach Rex Ryan said. “If Darrelle’s not here, then we’re going to move on. We won’t make excuses. ... We think we’ll have a great defense anyway, and I know we will. It’s just a lot easier if Revis is out there.” Revis has been hailed by his coach as the best cornerback he has ever coached. He is now looking to become the highest-paid in the league at his position, seeking a deal higher than the three-year, $45.3 million extension Oakland’s Nnamdi Asomugha signed last offseason. Getting a contract done with Revis has turned out to be far more complicated. He is scheduled to make $1 million in the fourth year of his six-year rookie deal, which general manager Mike Tannenbaum has acknowledged Revis has outplayed. Agents Neil Schwartz and Jon Feinsod said Revis was very deliberate with the decision-making process, and his actions would speak louder than words.

Indianapolis clears issues with trio of Hughes, Mathis, Wayne Colts first-round pick Jerry Hughes signed his contract Monday. Robert Mathis suited up and Reggie Wayne apologized to his teammates. Yes, it’s starting to look like a Colts’ training camp. “I thought about it [holding out], but it’s bigger than me,” Wayne said. “I had already let my teammates down once.” The contrite Pro Bowler wasn’t going to let that happen again. Wayne, who was beaten to the ball that Tracy Porter picked off and returned for the game-sealing touchdown in the Colts’ Super Bowl loss, said he wrestled with the decision to come to training camp or hold out. When he woke up Sunday morning, he thought back to the practice tapes he had been watching all summer. “I thought it was weird not seeing No. 87 out there,” Wayne said, drawing laughter. “Yes, I understand the picture, I understand all of the pictures. But I want you to understand my picture. It is what it is, and the fact is I’m still under contract. I’ve got two years left, and I’m going to go do my job.” That’s all the Colts can ask now that their three biggest questions heading into camp have been resolved. Mathis, like Wayne, wanted to redo the final two years on his deal. He also skipped Indy’s offseason activities, including a mandatory three-day June mini-camp. But the Pro Bowl defensive end said Monday that he’s content to play under his current deal. “After a certain point, you don’t let it be a distraction. You come in and take care of business,” Mathis said. “I never really thought about not coming [to camp]. In the end, it was about my teammates.” Hughes’ situation was different. Drafted No. 31 overall, the rookie defensive end from TCU spent most of the weekend waiting for his agent and team president Bill Polian to finish haggling over the final details of a five-year deal. Compiled from Associated Press reports


The Daily Texan 8-3-10