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LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10

Arpeggio Grill/Tomato Shack opens on Guadalupe

UT alumna competes for ‘Mad Men’ walk-on role NEWS PAGE 5

Black Student Alliance greets new students

THE DAILY TEXAN Thursday, August 26, 2010

TODAY Calendar ‘Play it cool boy, real cool’

“West Side Story” plays at the Paramount Theatre at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $9 at the box office.

‘We got flies coming for us’ “Winnebago Man”, a SXSW documentary about an illtempered salesman, shows at the Alamo Ritz at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $9.50.

Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

TOMORROW’S WEATHER

www.dailytexanonline.com

Judge denies request for change of venue By Nolan Hicks Daily Texan Staff Former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay will be tried in Travis County on money laundering and conspiracy charges, a district judge ruled Wednesday rejecting motions for a change of venue. The ruling came during the

second day of a pre-trial hearing that laid the procedural foundation for the former Republican congressman’s upcoming criminal trial, which is tentatively scheduled to begin October 26. Recalling how he had to represent a man in Bexar County in 1975 who was suspected

in the brutal beating of a hospital nurse, Judge Pat Priest said when the court tried to seat the jury, they couldn’t find anyone who didn’t want to give the man the death penalty. “In that case, [the judge] was

TRIAL continues on page 5

Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

Former Texas Congressman Tom DeLay awaits the start of his pre-trial hearing for money laundering and conspiracy charges on Wednesday.

When I reach the place I’m going

Who’s the man?

2500 block of Whitis Avenue A UT police officer observed two UT students carrying two framed pictures. When the students observed the police vehicle, they quickly attempted to hide the framed pictured behind a tree. During the investigation, the officers detected a very strong odor of alcohol on the breaths of both students. Both stated they were pledging a fraternity and had wanted to make a name for themselves so they had been to another fraternity house and removed the pictures. One student informed the officers that he did not have his driver’s license with him and provided a name that was later determined to have been made up when the officer located the subject’s wallet — a wallet that contained two valid drivers licenses. The student was taken into custody and was transported to Central Booking.

In 1920 The 19th Amendment to the Constitution takes effect giving women the right to vote.

Inside In News: New student loan reform takes effect at UT in the fall page 5

In Opinion: How education can make good use of technology page 3

In Sports: Meet the Longhorn volleyball team starters page 6

In Life&Arts:

A cookbook for easy meals in small kitchens page 10

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Quote to note

Jeff Heimsath | Daily Texan Staff

Earle Houston, 86, walks home on 14th Street from the post office on Wednesday afternoon.

Classes continue, students unfazed by rogue bullet By Aziza Musa Daily Texan Staff For many UT-El Paso students returning for the fall semester this week, news of a stray bullet from a drug war shoot-out in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, hitting a building on campus last week has done little to disrupt university life. Most students, like multimedia journalism junior Alejandra Matos, arrived for classes Monday unfazed by the incident. “[The stray bullet] really didn’t surprise me because it had happened with the City Hall building a couple of months ago,” said Matos, who works across from the building that was hit. “What did surprise me was that it was

one of the buildings hidden between a couple of others.” UTEP policemen were performing daily inspections of the campus Sunday morning when they found a bullet lodged in the door frame of one of the university’s buildings, Bell Hall, which houses the office of the Dean of Science and the math department. The building was believed to be empty when the bullet struck, which prompted campus police to close Paisano Drive, a street near the university that runs parallel to the Rio Grande. No injuries or deaths were reported, and no property other than a shattered glass

BULLET continues on page 2

“If I’m only in the show for one episode, I want to leave my mark. This is what I went to school for and this is what I have been dreaming of since I was a little girl.” — Sam Wiley “Mad Men” casting call hopeful LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10

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Court ruling halts harvest of stem cells for research By Audrey White Daily Texan Staff Millions of dollars are on the line for Texas scientists exploring the potential of embryonic stem cell research to cure ailments ranging from spinal injuries to cancer, after a federal court ruling this week overturning an executive order by President Barack Obama. A federal district judge surprised researchers and scientists with an order that halted all federal funding to embryonic stem cell research. The ruling declares President Obama’s 2009 executive order allowing funding of stem cell research a violation of a law passed by Congress in 1995 that made it illegal to destroy embryos. In March 2009, Obama passed an executive order allowing funding for stem cell research and overturning former President George W. Bush’s

COURT continues on page 2

Longhorns register valuables online UTPD launches website, expands efforts to decrease on-campus property theft By Allison Harris Daily Texan Staff Facing spikes in reports of oncampus thefts in recent semesters, officers from the University of Texas Police Department were stationed around campus Wednesday to inform students about a new online property registration system. The Personal Property Registration website, which launched in June, allows the department to streamline the process of returning lost belongings. Any item with a serial number can be registered to the site, including bicycles, computers, cell phones, gaming devices and cameras. The online registration form also requires the make, model and color of the items. Robert Trojack, a UTPD guard stationed at the Perry-Castañeda Library, said that stolen property is “probably the biggest issue on campus.”

Jeff Heimsath | Daily Texan Staff

Officer Paul Maslyk tells Michelle Reid, a biology freshman, about UTPD’s new program where students can register valuables with the department online. “We’re trying to put as much material information out, make it available to the students, so they can protect their property,” he said. As of presstime, 571 UT students, faculty and staff have registered 1,471 items on the site, according to Officer William Pieper.

Before the website, there was no University-wide registration system for personal items — except for bicycles, which are required to be registered with Parking and Transportation Services.

UTPD continues on page 2

Textbook rental stores mask hidden costs

Erika Rich | Daily Texan Staff

A student exits the web order pick up center at the University Co-op.

By Mary Ellen Knewtson Daily Texan Staff Textbook sellers near campus like the University Co-op and Austin TXbooks, formerly known as Beat the Bookstore, have started textbook rental programs of their own, following the model of online textbook rental services like Chegg.com and BookRenter.com. “Students asked. We’re happy to provide the option,” said Chad Smith, director of course materials for the Co-op. The University Co-op serves as a testament to the renting fad.

Smith said 6 percent of students picking up textbooks from the Co-op rented textbooks this fall. A banner outside the store advertised 75-percent savings for students who rent rather than purchase. “[The 75-percent savings] are the best case scenario,” Smith said. “Students will pay less initially. Will there be an overall saving? In many cases, no.” The Co-op buys the books back at as much as half of the list price if it is demanded by professors. If not, then the buyback price can

vary from as high as 40 percent to as low as 2 percent. Austin TXbooks, along with other textbook stores, started its own textbook rental program after enough students requested it. “Renting is here,” owner Ken Jones said. “If you complain enough, people will give you what you think you want.” But Jones said he discouraged students from renting this semester because they lose more money than if they bought books and

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NEWS

THE DAILY TEXAN Volume 111, Number 55 25 cents

CONTACT US

Editor: Lauren Winchester (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Sean Beherec (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office: (512) 232-2209 dailytexan@gmail.com Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@dailytexanonline.com The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2010 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

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BULLET: Juarez drug violence spills over into El Paso From page 1

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pane and door frame were damaged, according to UTEP police. While drug violence in Mexico shows no signs of abating in the foreseeable future, UTEP President Diana Natalicio said she hopes similar incidents do not continue to occur on or near her campus. “We don’t expect it to happen again,” Natalicio said. “Six or 7 p.m. on a Saturday evening is probably the least active time on campus, and that was absolutely good fortune because that is a very busy street with lots of vehicle and pedestrian traffic.” While Natalicio admitted the shot was an “errant” one, she said the bullet had a direct line of sight through a narrow passageway to reach Bell Hall. Police have since sent the bullet to forensics to determine what type of firearm was used. Similar incidents, such as one on the UT-Brownsville campus and another in El Paso, have occurred in recent years. The UTBrownsville and Texas Southmost College campus was shut

down last September for a weekend when bullets from Matamoros, Mexico, hit a building and a car in the area. In late June, six stray bullets struck the El Paso City Hall building, located southeast of UTEP. The El Paso Police Department, which are still investigating the case, believe the incident was also a result of gunfire in Juarez. In all those occasions, no one was injured. “I look at [both] of them as isolated incidents,” said El Paso Mayor John Cook. “There are approximately 6,000 people that have been killed on the other side of the border over the past two years. With the number of bullets that were fired over there, to me, it’s not unusual that some have made their way across the border.” Cook said he was impressed by the rapid response and level of coordination between the police department and the U.S. Border Patrol. “Within minutes, the border patrol called the police department to take care of the situation,” Cook said. “They had the roads shut down within five

UTPD: Registration of goods

helps officers track lost items From page 1 According to UTPD, the University is the first in the nation to use a serial number registration system for items other than laptops. Pieper said UTPD’s access to serial numbers will help officers investigate thefts by allowing that information to correspond with pawn shop and criminal information databases, making it easier for the department to track stolen items.

“If officers have the serial number on property that has been stolen they can employ a number of investigative techniques,” Pieper said. While Pieper said the new program will not likely reduce theft rates in the short term, he hopes they will decrease after a few semesters of the system’s effective implementation. “Hopefully, in the long run [the registration program] will deter the person from committing more thefts,” he said. Divya Chandrasekar, a computer science graduate student, said while she is concerned about someone stealing her laptop, she worries about UTPD having access to serial numbers of her electronics. “It feels kind of like a Big Brother thing,” she said. Advertising junior Kevin Forister is not very concerned about theft on campus because it has never happened to him, although he said he knew someone whose iPhone was stolen in Gregory Gym last semester. While he supports the program, he cannot see himself using it the near future. “I’m very careful with my belongings, and don’t think I would need it as much,” he said.

minutes. That’s the type of reaction that we need.” In the aftermath of the incident, UTEP staff will re-examine policies and procedures but do not expect major changes. “We’re all excited about being back,” Natalicio said. “This is a great time of the year, so we’re not going to let that incident affect how we think about that.” As to media coverage of the stray bullet in reference to border security, Natalicio said she is saddened by the sensationalizing and politicizing of the incident. “I think there is no question that the situation in Juarez is lamentable,” Natalicio said. “A stray bullet in and of itself probably isn’t and shouldn’t be the major focus of our attention. Our neighbor [Juarez] is having difficulties at the moment, but we should really be focused on maintaining and strengthening our ties going forward because it will be for our benefit as well. I think we just have to maintain our commitments and understanding of the long-term consequences of turning our backs on a country that is next door.”

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MEXICO MAP KEY Bell Hall El Paso City Hall Portion of Paisano Drive closed due to shooting

Santa Fe St.

Source: Aziza Musa

Illustration by Thu Vo | Daily Texan Staff

Paisano Drive was closed for 30 minutes (6:10 – 6:40 p.m.) to investigate the origins of a bullet found in Bell Hall at the University of Texas at El Paso campus. The El Paso City Hall was hit with several gunshots in June.

COURT: University research unaffected From page 1 policy. The change opened t h e d o o r f o r l a b s a c ro s s the country to move into a controversial field of study. Some researchers at UT-Austin work with adult stem cells, but not embryonic stem cells, and will not be affected by the Monday ruling, said Tim Green, spokesman for the Office of the Vice President for Research. However, the ruling caused some distress in the biomedical engineering departments at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Between the two campuses, millions of dollars of federal funding are at stake. “There are a number of grants within UT-Houston that are working with embryonic stem cells, two in my center, and that’s for multiple millions of dollars,” said Paul Simmons, director of the Center for Stem Cell Research at the Health Science Center. “If there is a halt to funding on these programs, the very promising data already beginning to emerge from those two studies will basically stay at that level: promising.” Simmons said projects at the Health Science Center are work-

ing on research related to treatments for blood and lung diseases with the funding for embryonic stem cell studies. Officials from the National Institute of Health said scientists can continue using grants already distributed but cannot distribute further funds for embryonic stem cell research until the order is overturned or new legislation is passed to allow federal funds for the research. If the ruling stands, labs and scientists may be forced to turn to private and philanthropic sources of funding, Simmons said. It will take an immediate stay of the injunction on the ruling to avoid a disruption in critical research, said John Robertson, a professor in the UT School of Law who has been active in legal academia related to embryonic stem cell research. “Obama broadened the federal funding guidelines [in 2009] and this is a major disruption,” Robertson said. “We have to see what happens on appeal and then what Congress does. I think this is going to inhibit [research] for at least a good deal of time to come.” Many researchers may be inclined to leave their institutions and continue research in other

countries where it is allowed, such as Australia, England and Israel, Simmons said. “[This gives] an impression that this is not a field of research people should want to work in because it’s difficult to engage in,” he said. “I for one would have to think very seriously if we went back to the situation we had a year ago. We won’t be recruiting people, and it has some potentially devastating effects, this ruling.” As medical research centers try to figure out how they will be affected by the ruling ahead of an appeals process already underway, some scientists may be left without an avenue to explore what they believe to be the first viable method of curing previously intractable diseases, said William Brinkley, the dean of Baylor College of Medicine’s Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. “It is not just a pastime for us. It’s a passion to try to cure some of the worst diseases in mankind,” Brinkley said. “For the first time we have a way that is very promising. We’ll have to try more for private funding and get away from federal money. We need help from citizens and educated people to get behind it.”

THE DAILY TEXAN

This newspaper was printed with pride by The Daily Texan and Texas Student Media.

Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Winchester Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sean Beherec Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Claire Cardona Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viviana Aldous, Susannah Jacob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doug Luippold, Dave Player News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrew Kreighbaum Associate News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Cervantes, Lena Price Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Collin Eaton, Kate Ergenbright, Nolan Hicks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Aziza Musa, Audrey White Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cristina Herrera Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elyana Barrera, Sydney Fitzgerald, Reese Rackets Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Veronica Rosalez Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veronica Carr, Martina Geronimo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Alexa Hart, Simonetta Nieto Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Gerson Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Kang, Peyton McGee Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeff Heimsath, Tamir Kalifa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nasha Lee, Erika Rich, Danielle Villasana Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amber Genuske Associate Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Madeleine Crum Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Layne Lynch, Allistair Pinsof, Sarah Pressley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Francisco Marin, Gerald Rich, Priscilla Totiyapungprasert, Julie Rene Tran Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dan Hurwitz Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Will Anderson, Sameer Bhuchar, Jordan Godwin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laken Litman, Andy Lutz, Jon Parrett, Bri Thomas Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Victoria Elliott Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ryan Murphy Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Carlos Medina Associate Multimedia Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pierre Bertrand Senior Video Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rafael Borges Senior Vigeographer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joanna Mendez Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

Volunteers

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Ellen Knewtson, Jennifer Ifebi, Allison Harris Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andy Lutz, Shadab Siddiqui Page Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Daniel Nuncio Copy Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Austin Myers

Advertising

Director of Advertising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jalah Briedwell Retail Advertising Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brad Corbett Account Executive/Broadcast Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus/National Sales Consultant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Assistant to Advertising Director. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C.J. Salgado Student Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charles Moczygemba Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kathryn Abbas Student Broadcast Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elizabeth Roman Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chelsea Anaya, Jared Barker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ann Marie Burnett, Derek Diaz de Leon, Justin Santilli Classified Clerks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rachel Herbeck Special Editions, Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elena Watts Web Advertising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Danny Grover Special Editions, Student Editors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jason Sears, Drew Thomas Graphic Designer Interns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Paul del Bosque, Rodrigo Maycotte Senior Graphic Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily except Saturday, Sunday, federal holidays and exam periods, plus the last Saturday in July. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified display and national classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2008 Texas Student Media.

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Trapped Chilean miners optimistic about plight Workers trapped half-mile underground in shelter; rescue could take months By Bradley Brooks Associated Press Writer COPIAPO, Chile — Put on a show. Play cards. Sing. Get exercise. And whatever you do, don’t get too fat to squeeze through the escape tunnel. Chilean officials are offering lots of advice to help 33 miners trapped underground keep their health and sanity as they wait to be rescued. One thing they’re not sharing with the men is their estimate that it could take four months to drill them out of an emergency shelter nearly half a mile below the surface. “I hope that nobody commits the imprudence of telling them something like this. We have asked the families to be careful in the letters they write,” Interior Minister Rodrigo Hinzpeter said Wednesday. “It’s going to be very hard. We’re going to have to give them a great deal of attention, care and psychological support.” The miners were trapped by an Aug. 5 collapse, and rescuers established contact with them Sunday by drilling a 6-inch-wide hole to the shelter. That hole and two others are now lifelines, delivering supplies, communications and fresh air to the miners while they wait for the escape tunnel to be drilled. Larry Grayson, a professor of mining engineering at Penn State University, said it could take just 25 to 30 days to reach the miners. Gustavo Lagos, a professor at the Catholic University of Chile’s Center for Mining, estimated the job could be done in two months if all goes well and four months if it all bogs down. Lilianett Gomez, whose father, Mario, is trapped in the mine, said she thinks the miners know their

rescue won’t be quick. “They know how long it will take for them to be rescued. As miners they know the work very well,” she said. The rescue team isn’t ready to let families talk directly with the miners yet, but Chilean President Sebastian Pinera asked their leader, Luis Urzua, in a call Tuesday what they needed. “That you rescue us as quickly as possible, and that you don’t abandon us,” the shift foreman responded. “Don’t leave us alone. ... We hope that all of Chile shows its strength to help us get out of this hell. Urzua, 54, also described the collapse. “It was frightening. We felt like the mountain was coming down on us, without knowing what happened. Thanks to God, we still hadn’t gathered together to go out to have lunch. ... At 20 minutes before 2 [their usual lunch hour], the mountain came down on top of us.” “For about four or five hours, we couldn’t see a thing. After that we saw that we were trapped by an enormous rock that filled the entire passage of the tunnel.” The miners made a two-day emergency food supply last more than two weeks as they waited for contact from the outside world, and also conserved power from their headlamps before rescuers sent them LED lights. Even though the miners have undoubtedly lost a significant amount of weight, Chilean officials are trying to ensure they don’t bulk up before their rescue. They say the miners will have to be no more than 35 inches around the waist to make it out of the tunnel. The escape tunnel will be about 26 inches wide — the diameter of a typical bike tire — and stretch for more than 2,200 feet through solid rock. That’s more than 80

Ercilia Carrizo Munoz stands next to a Chilean flag as she waits for her son Esteban Rojas Carrizo to be rescued in Copiapo, Chile. The message at left reads in Spanish “Be strong brother miners, be strong Esteban, Pablo, Tono and Ariel. Let’s go Queero”. inches in circumference, but rescuers also have to account for the space of the basket that will be used to pull the miners to safety. Chile’s health minister, Dr. Jaime Manalich, said officials are planning exercise and other activities to keep the miners healthy and trim, using some of the passages that remain accessible to the miners. Establishing a daily and nightly routine is important, the minister said, adding that having fun also will be critical. The rescue team is creating an entertainment

German law shields posts on Facebook

U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, right, joins volunteers to wave to motorists on Monday in Anchorage, Alaska.

Matt Thiessen Associated Press

Republican primary shaken up by Palin By Becky Bohrer The Associated Press ANCHORAGE, Alaska — As Sen. Lisa Murkowski watched the election returns come into her headquarters on primary night, she became aware of two powerful forces in politics in 2010: anti-government rage and Sarah Palin. The Republican senator trailed conservative lawyer Joe Miller by nearly 1,500 votes Wednesday, despite being favored to defeat the lesserknown candidate in the GOP primary. She is hoping that uncounted absentee ballots can swing the election in her favor. Regardless of the outcome, the primary is an indication of the influence Palin wields in midterm elections as she looks ahead to a possible White House bid in 2012. She had been on a losing streak as of late in her role as “Mama Grizzly” kingmaker, but that seems to have changed in other primaries Tuesday and the possibility of Murkowski losing. The race is the latest chapter in a political saga between Palin and the Murkowski family dating back to 2002, when then-Gov. Frank Murkowski appointed his daughter to the Senate and bypassed the up-and-coming Palin for the position. The women have denied any

Natacha Pisarenko | Associated Press

bad blood, but that didn’t stop the potshots in this latest race, including attacks on Murkowski on health care that the senator said were false. Pollster Marc Hellenthal, who often works with Republicans, blames Murkowski’s predicament on her failure to respond to the barrage of negative ads. “It was every 15 minutes, wasn’t it?” he asked of the airing of ads by the Tea Party Express. “And they literally accused her of almost everything imaginable.” Murkowski focused on her experience for much of the campaign, but finally began fighting back near the end. But by then, it was “way too late in the ballgame,” Hellenthal said. “You have to respond to a negative [ad] and those that don’t are retired. She’s about to be retired. ... The high road’s a graveyard, isn’t it?” The Division of Elections had received about 7,600 absentee ballots by Monday, but they are not part of the tally. Ballots postmakred by election day can be received for up to 10 days after the election, meaning the count of outstanding mail-in votes won’t begin for several days. “It ain’t over yet, folks,” Murkowski said Wednesday. “There is much, much yet to be counted.”

By Verena Schmitt-Roscmann The Associated Press BERLIN — Ever thought twice about posting a party picture on Facebook, fearing it could someday hurt your chance at a dream job? A draft German law is supposed to solve the problem by making it illegal for prospective employers to spy on applicants’ private postings. The draft law on employe e d a t a s e c u r i t y p re s e n t e d by Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere on Wednesday is the government’s latest attempt to address privacy concerns about online services including social networks and Google “Street View”. For example, employers will still be allowed to run a search on the Web on their applicants, de Maiziere said. Anything out in public is fair game, as are postings on networks specifically created for business contacts, such as LinkedIn. In contrast, it will be illegal to become a Facebook friend with an applicant in order to check out private details, he said, adding that some people seem to be indiscriminate about whom they accept as a friend. “If an employer turns down an application with another reasoning it might be difficult to prove” that the negative answer was based on the Facebook postings, de Maiziere said. A rejected job applicant who proves he or she was turned down based on violation of the new law could take the company to court and claim damages, he said. “Overall, the new rules passed by the cabinet keep a good balance between employees’ interests on the hand and companies’ interests on the other,” de Maiziere said. The BDA employers’ federation called the draft is too imprecise in some points, adding that it thinks some of de Maiziere’s proposals would hinder the fight against corruption and crime.

program “that includes singing, games of movement, playing cards. We want them to record songs, to make videos, to create works of theater for the family.” The Chilean government has asked NASA for advice on “life sciences” issues and technology that can help the miners, and the space agency will do what it can, said NASA spokesman Mike Curie. Outside, Chilean flags are everywhere — including the torn one that became a symbol of Chile’s resistance when a

young man was photographed holding it just after a massive earthquake rocked the South American nation last year. That flag was raised above 33 others that sit on a hill over the mine, each representing one of the trapped men. Some family members filed suit Wednesday against the mine’s owner, Compania Minera San Esteban. Attorney Remberto Valdes, representing the miner Raul Bustos, accused the company of fraud and serious injury based on

the lack of safety measures like the escape tunnel that the state-owned Codelco copper company is now preparing to dig. Four municipal governments in the area are preparing a similar claim. On Aug. 31, the men will h a v e b e e n t r a p p e d u n d e rground longer than any other miners in history. Last year, three miners survived 25 days trapped in a flooded mine in southern China. Few other rescues have taken more than two weeks.


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OpiniOn

Editor-in-Chief: Lauren Winchester Phone: (512) 232-2212 E-mail: editor@dailytexanonline.com Associate Editors: Viviana Aldous Susannah Jacob Doug Luippold Dave Player

T he Daily T exan

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GAlleRy

Perry declines to meet with editorial boards Governor Rick Perry’s campaign spokesman Mark Miner recently announced that Perry would not be meeting with the editorial boards of Texas’ major newspapers to seek their endorsements for his re-election campaign. The move is not entirely unexpected; five months ago Perry chose not to meet with editorial boards while he was campaigning against Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison in last spring’s Republican primary. The snub did not appear to derail Perry’s campaign, as he went on to decisively defeat Hutchison despite major Texas papers such as the Dallas Morning News, the Houston Chronicle and the Austin American-Statesman all endorsing Hutchison. Perry did meet with editorial boards during his last general election in 2006 against Democrat Chris Bell, and several major papers subsequently endorsed the governor. Perry’s opponent, former Houston mayor Bill White, criticized Perry’s decision. Not meeting with major editorial boards, coupled with Perry’s refusal to debate White, has drawn claims that Perry is refusing to answer tough questions. According to the Perry campaign, the governor’s refusal to debate White hinges on White’s refusal to release his personal tax returns from the years he worked for the U.S. Department of Energy and as chairman of the Texas Democratic Party. White publicly released his tax returns from his time as mayor of Houston last summer. Declining to meet with the editorial boards is primarily a symbolic gesture and will probably not have a measurable impact on Perry’s chances in the upcoming election. In the past year, pandering to the “Tea Party” has been Perry’s bread and butter, with the governor taking almost every opportunity to take shots at the federal government in Washington and other facets of the political “establishment” such as the alleged “liberal media.” That disdain seems to have trickled down to the major newspapers of his own state. We can only hope this move does not set a precedent for future candidates, both for the sake of our cities’ newspapers and the quality of future Texas elections.

UT moves up in college rankings Last week U.S. News and World Report released its eagerly anticipated and controversial “America’s Best Colleges” issue. The magazine uses criteria such as selectivity, retention and graduation rates to rank various universities, colleges and specific programs. U.S. News named UT the 45th best university in the country, tied with the University of Wisconsin, Madison. UT advanced two spots, maintained its position as the highest ranked university in the Big 12 and leaped ahead of public universities traditionally ranked higher than our school, such as the University of Florida. UT graduate schools also made a healthy showing with the LBJ school ranking number 10 in public policy and the McCombs’ School of Business snagging the top spot in Masters in Public Accounting. For some prospective students, rankings play a large part in selecting a university, and we imagine UT administrators are also pleased with the boost for this reason. We, however, don’t really care. College rankings are like dog shows: Experts may establish standards to determine what constitutes a prize-winning dog, but some people just like terriers, some prefer bloodhounds and very few would actually want the prissy and ostentatiously-groomed poodle the judges deem “best dog.” Comparison is always a good way to evaluate our school’s strengths and weaknesses, but rankings should be limited to college football and “America’s Most Wanted.”

Powers warns of upcoming budget cuts On Aug. 12 at a UT System Board of Regents meeting, President William Powers Jr. issued a warning about the potential effects of state budget cuts. “We are already behind our competitors by very large amounts,” said Powers, adding that he expects the budget cuts “will have an impact on the quality of educational offerings and will affect time to graduation.” The budget cut Powers referenced is mandated by Governor Perry, who dictated that state agencies, including public colleges and universities, cut 10 percent of state funding from their budgets for both the 2012 and 2013 fiscal years. At the meeting, Powers told regents the cut would cost UT $29 million a year and said it would leave UT in a bad place in terms of spending per student when compared to peer institutions such as the University of Michigan. Powers expressed further concern about the toll the budget cut would take on UT’s ability to maintain its role as a premier research institution. “It has been our philosophy that what we do needs to be at a national research level,” he said. “That will be difficult to sustain. We will not be able to be a major research university in anything like the same way.” Ultimately, Powers drew the conclusion that private funding would have to make up for potentially trimmed state funding, and this may very well be the case. A 10-percent budget cut would spare no one, and Powers is right to be concerned. But the dialogue surrounding budget cuts has been ongoing for months, and the shouting match, however justified, is jading and leaves those who it will most affect — students — exasperated. Powers’ warning is not unfounded, but it may go unheard.

GAlleRy

Re-examine technology in the classroom ing as courses taught in a small laboratory, studio or intimate classroom. By reimagining large courses in light of recent As the halls and sidewalks of UT fill advances in communications technolowith students rushing from class to class, gy, the once dreaded intro course could you will likely find yourself among hun- instead be exciting and educational. dreds of other students awaiting the beginning of a large introductory lecture course. For freshmen, this may have been your first experience with an impersonal college intro course; though By re-imagining much of the class consists of seasoned large courses in upper-classmen looking to fulfill their degree requirements. light of recent Engaging professors and smaller disadvances in cussion sections can help make 300-percommunications son classes more intimate learning experiences. Under the current model howtechnology, the ever, a large lecture course could nevonce dreaded er facilitate the type of engaged learning that takes place in smaller seminar intro course could courses. And it’s exactly this type of coinstead be exciting operative, creative and thoughtful learning that students need as they move and educational. into the professional world or graduate school. As necessary budget cuts take effect across the University, more stuE-textbooks, with interactive features, dents may find themselves in these largcustomizable content, special tutoring er classes, meaning even less discussion-based, participatory learning that and quiz features — not to mention a takes place in smaller classes. Although reduced price tag compared to convenour University faces tremendous finan- tional textbooks — might make a nightcial challenges, we cannot allow our ly reading assignment more compelling school’s renowned educational quality than sleepily flipping pages and highto decline. Instead, we must re-examine lighting key terms. An e-textbook could the way large courses operate so the re- also be custom-tailored to specific classality of fewer resources and larger class- es, with built-in checkpoints that let es do not also reduce the value of a UT your professors know what to spend extra class time on before you even arrive degree. Instead of a liability, large classes in the classroom. In class, a re-examination of how we could be just as interactive and engagBy Drew Finke Daily Texan Guest Columnist

leGAlese Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees. All Texan editorials are written by The Daily Texan’s Editorial Board.

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use technology could lead to more interaction between students. Where group projects or collaborative learning may have once been impossible in a class of 300 students, online chat and collaboration services mean that you could work with other students, gaining new insights and techniques that otherwise may have gone unshared. Instead of endless e-mails requesting that someone share their notes, online communities for each class could help students study together under the guidance of their professors and teaching assistants who could use the forums to ensure their students are studying the right materials in the right way. Whether the intro class of the future realizes this dream is up to you, the student. The provost’s office has already started working on the Course Transformation Initiative, an effort to help professors redesign their classes, in part to accelerate the transformational role technology could play in collegiate learning. The Senate of College Councils also partnered with the provost’s office to provide student input regarding how students currently use technology and how they imagine using it in the classroom. Though we are all accustomed to an occasional peek at Facebook or text messages during a lecture, we should focus on technologies that enhance learning, rather than distract. If you have ideas about how technology could improve learning at UT, let us know on the UT Senate Facebook page (not while you’re in class, though!) or contact your College Council. Finke is the Senate of College Councils vice president.

Be a Daily Texan columnist ers Jr.’s desk each day, and the opinions on this page have great potential to affect Have someting to say? Say University policy. it in print — and to the entire It’s no rare occurence for campus. Texan staff members to reThe Daily Texan Editorial cieve feedback from local or Board is currently accepting state officials, or to be contactapplications for columnists ed by a reader whose life was and cartoonchanged by an arists. We’re lookticle. In such ining for talented stances, the powwriters and arter of writing for ists to provide t h e Te x a n b e as much divercomes real, motisity of opinvating our staffion as possible. ers to provide the Anyone and Your words best public sereveryone is envice possible. couraged to apcan be here. I f i n t e re s t e d , ply. please come to Writing for the Texan is a great the Texan office way to get your at 25th and Whivoice heard. Our tis streets to comcolumnists’ and plete an applicareporters’ work tion form and sign is often syndiup for an interview time. If cated nationwide, and every you have any additional quesissue of the Texan is a histortions, please contact Lauren ical document archived at the Winchester at (512) 232-2212 or Center for American History. Barack Obama may not editor@dailytexanonline.com. By You Daily Texan Columnist

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Student loan process reform to take effect at UT this fall Private lenders fall short; federal funding toward financial aid will increase By Collin Eaton Daily Texan Staff An overhaul of the federal student loan process that passed the U.S. Congress in March is finally taking effect on the UT campus this fall. The reform, which increases federal funding for financial aid programs, converts all federal loans to the Direct Loan Program, slashing the once-prominent role of private banks and institutions in distributing student loans. This semester, students won’t have to choose between going to college and avoiding high student-loan debt, Democratic U.S. representatives said Wednesday in a conference call to student publications. U.S. Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., and chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee, said that as millions of students struggle to pay for the high cost of college, the Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act will help students by investing $36 billion to increase the Federal Pell Grant Program over 10 years as well as increase funding for other financial aid programs. “The cost of college is rising all of the time, and now we’re witnessing students taking on more and more debt to complete their college education,” Miller said. “Clearly, we believe this investment [through SAFRA] is absolutely necessary for the future of our economy.”

Over the next decade, taxpayers may save $61 billion in “wasteful subsidies” as the Direct Loan Program fuels competition between private lenders — instead of banks as before — for contracts to service federal loans, according to the Congressional Budget Office, a nonpartisan agency that calculates the cost of federal legislation. Universities across the country, including UT, converted all federal loans to the Direct Loan Program this summer and continue to manage the transition this month. The average annual cost of attending a 4-year public university has risen steadily. According to recent data from the National Center for Education Statistics, which takes into account the annual cost of living, a student in 1980 would expect to pay $2,500 a year, while a decade later students faced college costs set at $5,200. In 2000, the price tag rose to $8,600, and the most recent figure places the cost at $13,400. According to data from the UT’s Student Financial Services, half of the undergraduates who graduated in May left UT with $24,488 in student-loan debt. For graduating professional students in the law and pharmacy schools this year, the average amount of debt accumulated was $75,871, ranging from $65,000 to $95,000. Other graduate students averaged $44,579 in student loan debt. Thomas Melecki, director of UT’s Student Financial Services, said the private market of student loan providers wasn’t working well for UT students

last fall — some lenders were dropping out of the federal loan program without notice as little as two days before they were supposed to disperse their loans to students. Even providers who stayed in the program dispersed their loans very late, just days before the beginning of the semester, Melecki said. “That’s a private marketplace that’s not working right,” he said. “[But] I do worry about a student loan marketplace where there’s only a single loan provider. Without the competitive forces — I mean, if the U.S. government doesn’t do a good job of delivering student loans to our students, what are we going to do, go to Canada?” But SAFRA will create incentives for contractors to improve the speed of loan dispersal, default rates and the results of customer service surveys from ex-students in repayment, Melecki said. At UT, about 5,000 incoming students had no expected family contribution last year, meaning that they relied entirely on student financial aid to pay their tuition bill. Melecki said SAFRA’s increase of the Pell Grants is very important for low-income families, as 26 percent of UT students receive the grants targeted at students with greater needs. “Frankly, I’m very proud of the fact that this institution has kept itself affordable for kids who are so poor that they qualify for that grant,” he said. “At colleges all around the country, even though students qualify for Pell Grants, they still can’t afford to go there.”

TRIAL: DeLay faces criminal prosecution From page 1 wise enough to move the trial,” Priest said. “This is not that kind of case.” Travis County District Attorney Rosemary Lehmberg said she was pleased the trial would take place in Travis County but didn’t know how long a trial would last. DeLay’s defense has long insisted he could not receive a fair trial in Travis County, claiming the area’s heavily Democratic political leanings and his role in the controversial 2003 redistricting of Texas’ congressional map would prevent a local jury from presuming him innocent. “We’re going to do the best we can with what we’ve got,” said Dick DeGuerin, DeLay’s attorney. “We’re going to hope to get a fair trial and hope to get to

trial as quickly as we can.” In the moments leading up to the judge’s announcement of his decision, DeGeurin said the defense would rather have the trial anywhere else in Texas than Travis County. “I’d choose Bexar County so I can go home at night,” Judge Priest jokingly said in response. DeLay laughed and yelled back, “I’ll take it.” Much of the morning and Wednesday’s hearings took place in closed session so lawyers could argue over issues involving grand jury testimony and procedure, which are secret until trial. DeGuerin confirmed that former Travis County District Attorney Ronnie Earle testified in the closed session Tuesday, although the contents of what he said remain under seal.

Earle was investigating allegations that $190,000 in corporate campaign contributions to DeLay’s Texas political action committee were laundered through the Republican National Committee and then donated to seven Republican candidates running in Texas House races, in violation of state campaign finance laws. DeGuerin had criticized Earle’s use of multiple juries to obtain charges against DeLay in open court Tuesday morning and had filed a motion asking for the judge to dismiss charges against DeLay because of the alleged prosecutorial overstepping. Judge Priest announced at the end of the hearing Wednesday that he had denied DeLay’s motion for dismissal shortly after announcing that the trial would take place in Travis County.

BOOKS: Fees minimize savings from renting From page 1 sold them back. “Thirty to 40 percent of the money for sites like Chegg come from fees,” Jones said. Students are charged for water spots, excessive writing and late return. Jones said in the long run these fees could add up and cost students more than they would save by buying the book. International relations freshman Cameron Ford said she thinks renting books costs less than buying and selling them back. Ford rented three books this se-

mester using two different online rental companies. A friend told her about Chegg and she found BookRenter on her own. She rented “Physics of Everyday Phenomenon” for $27, or a quarter of the list price. Not all students have found success with renting websites though. Advertising freshman Christine Knueven said Chegg did not have the textbooks she needed. She ended up paying $400 for textbooks at Austin TXbooks. She plans to sell her books back at the end of the fall semester.

Recent UT alumnus Keith Warren said the Co-op was the most convenient place to shop for textbooks. “I bought all of my textbooks at the Co-op, never looked anywhere else,” Warren said. National companies like Barnes and Noble Booksellers also started offering textbook rentals in January. “Renting textbooks is just another low-cost option,” said spokeswoman Karen DiScala. “It’s for people who don’t want to keep their books. Our pilot was very popular.”

Jeff Heimsath | Daily Texan Staff

Ladies from the Zeta Phi Beta sorority perform a step dance routine at the Black Student Orientation Wednesday night.

Black Student Alliance welcomes new arrivals By Jennifer Ifebi Daily Texan Staff In a crowded auditorium in Robert A. Welch Hall Wednesday night, incoming African-American freshmen were greeted with music, dances and skits to welcome them to the University. Black Student Alliance hosted its second annual orientation that included talks from various African-American groups on campus, which urged the new students to get involved in oncampus activities. BSA President Kristin Thompson said the event is an important way for new students to get acquainted with campus leaders, especially in the minority community. “We really want the students to get involved,” she said. For the first time this year, BSA provided freshmen with voter

registration forms that allowed the incoming students to change their address in order to vote in upcoming elections. She said the idea came from the Big XII Council on Black Student Government, which held their annual meeting at UT this summer. “We plan to continue [urging black students to register to vote] up until voting day,” she said. “We will go over political issues — local, national, global — affecting African-Americans.” Most of the incoming students said they knew each other from the Multicultural Information Center’s New Student Lock-In last weekend. Student Government President Scott Parks and SG Internal Financial Director Aryele Bradford told the crowd to get involved with SG initiatives. Citing the vacant SG communications director

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position, Bradford urged the students to apply for the spot and other internship opportunities. Brenda Burt, UT’s diversity and community engagement officer, has been teaching a minority student leadership class for 25 years. She said some of the organizations involved have been helping the black community at UT since Almetris Duren’s efforts in the late 1950s, when she was house mother at an all-black women’s dorm located off-campus. “It’s an excellent opportunity for African-Americans to get together and learn about one another and their history,” she said. BSA Vice President Gabriel Sheffield said his group took a personal approach when organizing yesterday’s event, focusing on more face-to-face interaction with new students than last year’s.

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Sports Editor: Dan Hurwitz E-mail: sports@dailytexanonline.com Phone: (512) 232-2210 www.dailytexanonline.com

T HE DAILY T EXAN

2010 VOLLEYBALL PREVIEW

SIDELINE

Texas opens with tournament at home Team hopes experience pays off when Longhorns host 2010 NCAA Regional

By Andy Lutz Daily Texan Staff After a particularly tough loss last December, the UT volleyball team will finally get a chance to get back out on the court again this weekend as three other teams will travel to Gregory Gym for a round-robin tournament set to begin Friday afternoon. For the players, a trio of games may be exactly what the doctor ordered to relieve preseason anxiety and butterflies. “You can tell that there is an extra pep in our step in practice because there is a game coming up soon, so we have something in the near future we are working toward,” freshman setter Hannah Allison said. “It is really starting and we are really excited.” Returning starter Rachael Adams also pointed out that everyone is excited about the opportunity to start the season off at home for a change. In 2009, Texas played its first five games away from Gregory Gym and hasn’t opened at home in over six years.

OPENER continues on page 7

Jeff Heimsath | Daily Texan Staff

Senior Jennifer Doris, senior Juliann Faucette and junior Rachael Adams form part of an experienced nucleus at the center of this year’s team. With five freshmen and one senior transfer, the Longhorns hope to get off to a quick start with this Friday’s opening game versus TCU.

Faucette finding new role as leader By Shabab Siddiqui Daily Texan Staff In the last eight months, Juliann Faucette co-captained a national championship runnerup squad, led the U.S. A2 Blue Team to a first place finish at the USA Volleyball Open National Championship and was named the Big 12 preseason player of the year. Any other senior might don an air of complacency, but for the 6-foot-2-inch San Diego native, a reminder to continue pushing is imprinted on two words wrapped on a band around her wrist, “Keep Krankin.” “I definitely think we still have a lot of great pieces to our team. We’re a really tight-knit team this year,” Faucette said. “We just have to push harder and keep the blue collar mentality.” Faucette emerges as the Longhorns’ primary attacking threat this season. Last year, the senior outside hitter scored 330 kills and averaged about 3.8 points per set, good for second on the team. On Aug. 12, conference coaches voted Faucette the preseason MVP. She received the same honor two years ago. Now, the senior, one of only three on the team’s roster, leads a Texas team picked to finish second in the Big 12.

But with the departure of top contributors Destinee Hooker, Ashley Engle and Heather Kisner, as well as a season-ending injury to sophomore outside hitter Bailey Webster on Aug. 17, the eyes of Texas will be on Faucette to lead the team both on and off the court. “I definitely would say that my leadership role has been upped more in terms of responsibility,” Faucette said. “I think last year was a really good development process for me to be captaining with Heather and Ashley — just to see how they lead — but I think this year is going to be a pretty big role for me.” Last year ’s squad depended heavily on the 6-foot-4-inch Hooker, a two-time all-American who scored more than one-third of all of the Longhorns’ points. Head coach Jerritt Elliott said the same burden will not be placed on Faucette. “We need [her] to play well, but we also need to have better balance this year,” Elliott said. “Obviously we lost some big players, but we have some great returners. We’ve got a big program. When we’re playing well, we can compete with anybody.” With five new freshman faces and senior University of Virgin-

ia transfer Lauren Dickson, the Longhorns’ starting lineup could see multiple variations. In the face of such uncertainty, Faucette said it is important for her to be a flexible leader. “I need to be able to lead by example but also be able to step back into different roles,” she said. Faucette said last year’s heartbreak in the national championship game will be a motivational tool throughout the year. The team lost in a wild, five-set final against Penn State, despite leading 2-0 to start the match. “I think you have to keep in consideration the new team that we have,” Faucette said. “That is first, but also keeping in mind what we did to get there last year. You kind of just have to start all over, knowing what it takes to get there.” For the soon-to-be graduating Faucette, the team’s season opener against TCU on Friday will be the start of a long, arduous journey to Kansas City, Mo., for the NCAA Championships. “We’re getting closer and closer every year,” Faucette said. “This could be the final step in my senior year.” Just as long as Faucette and the Longhorns remember to keep krankin’.

Preseason Volleyball CSTV/ AVCA Top 25 1

Penn State (40)

2

Nebraska (16)

3

Texas (4)

4

Stanford

5

Hawaii

6

(tie) Illinois

6

(tie) Minnesota

8

Washington

9

Iowa State

10

Southern California

11

California

12

Michigan

13

Florida

14

Kentucky

15

Florida State

16

UCLA

17

Colorado State

18

Arizona

19

Tennessee

20

Oregon

21

Dayton (Ohio)

22

San Diego

23

LSU

24

Northern Iowa

25

Saint Mary’s (Calif.)

BURNT ORANGE CLASSIC SCHEDULE 8 / 27 TCU vs. Houston Houston vs. McNeese State Texas vs. TCU

8 / 28 Texas vs. McNeese State TCU vs. McNeese State Texas vs. Houston

VOLLEYBALL DEPTH CHART Outside hitter: Juliann Faucette, Lauren Dickson, Sha’Dare McNeal (Utility), Amber Roberson, Ashley Bannister

Jeff Heimsath | Daily Texan Staff

Senior Juliann Faucette, the top returning offensive player for Texas, will use her experience to help the Longhorns in 2010.

PROJECTED STARTERS

Middle blocker: Rachael Adams, Jennifer Doris, Haley Cameron, Sha’Dare McNeal (Utility) Libero: Sydney Yogi, Sarah Palmer, Julie Olschwanger Setter: Hannah Allison, Michelle Kocher Defensive Specialist: Cristina Arenas, Julie Olschwanger

VOLLEYBALL BY THE NUMBERS

Jennifer Doris

6’5”, Senior Hometown: Houston 2009 Stats: 104 Blocks, 125 Kills

1 Number of sets the Longhorns dropped in Big 12 games at home last season.

Juliann Faucette

6’2”, Senior Hometown: San Diego 2009 Stats: 330 Kills, 360 Receptions, 152 Digs

0.338 Hannah Allison

5’11”, Freshman Hometown: Siloam Springs, Ark. 2009 Stats: High School in 2009

5’10”, Junior Hometown: Wheaton, Ill. 2009 Stats: 601 Assists, 103 Digs

Sydney Yogi

5’2”, Junior Hometown: Honolulu 2009 Stats: 237 Receptions, 167 Digs, 148 Assists

6 Straight years the Longhorns have made the NCAA tournament, including Final Four appearances in 2008 and 2009

Rachael Adams Michelle Kocher

Hitting percentage of Texas in 2009, secondbest in the country

6’2”, Junior Hometown: Cincinnati 2009 Stats: 110 Blocks, 182 Kills in 2009

TRY OUT FOR TEXAN SPORTS! Aug. 25 - Sept. 15

Illustration by Lauren Gerson and Mary Kang | Daily Texan Staff


SPTS P7

7

SPORTS

Thursday, August 26, 2010

VOLLEYBALL GAMES TO WATCH

The sixth-ranked Fighting Illini are projected to finish second in the Big 10, despite playing a very tough schedule. Junior Longhorn setter Michelle Kocher will also face off against some of her former teammates from her days playing club volleyball in high school in Illinois.

November 6

September 16

vs. A&M The Aggies are led by junior Amarillo product Kelsey Black, who played on the U.S. Women’s National A2 Program.

Any game against the Sooners is bound to ignite passions on both sides of the Red River. The Longhorns’ last home loss was at the hand of the Sooners in 2008.

vs. Oklahoma

vs. Nebraska

Either winner of the Nike Volleyball Big Four Classic semifinals will prove to be tough. The 13th-ranked Gators will be playing at home with two all-SEC starters. And a pairing with the Nittany Lions will be a rematch of last year’s emotional five-set finale in the championships that the Longhorns clearly remember.

October 27

vs. Penn State/Florida TBD @ Gainesville, Fla.

The second-ranked Cornhuskers will try to reclaim at least part of the Big 12 crown this year. The Huskers have three AllAmericans and will target the Longhorns after only winning two sets in three matches last year.

November 27

vs. Illinois

The fourth-ranked Cardinal have three senior All-Americans that will give any team trouble. The last matchup between the two teams ended with a 3-2 loss for the Longhorns in the national semifinals vs. Stanford two years ago.

September 11

September 3

vs. TCU

In the 2009 NCAA tournament, Texas and TCU played each other for the first time in program history and will now kick off the 2010 season with a rematch. The Longhorns ended the Horned Frogs’ season with a 3-0 sweep last December, so expect revenge to be on the minds of the purple and white.

September 10

August 27

Illustration by Veronica Rosalez | Daily Texan Staff

The Cyclones were the only dent in the Longhorns’ regular season last year when they stole a late season match in Ames. The Cyclones’ libero Ashley Mass was also a teammate of the Longhorns’ Juliann Faucette, Sydney Yogi and Rachael Adams at the U.S. Women’s National A2 Program Blue Team in the summer.

vs. Iowa State

OPENER: Virginia transfer could play immediately four years at the University of Virginia. Dickson came back to Austin to get her master’s in public accounting but also to play one more season of NCAA volleyball. Dickson, the 2005 Austin American-Statesman Central Texas Player of the Year and 2009 MVP and team captain of the Virginia squad, is a tall outside hitter who has one more year of eligibility due to receiving a medical redshirt after suffering an ankle injury in practice during her sophomore year in Charlottesville. With the help of one more kill master rotating up front, Texas should be able to sustain its new 6-2 formation with the op-

ing in our arena and get used to this atmosphere,” head coach “I woke up this morning fired Jerritt Elliott said. up because each day [we are] The Longhorns know that procloser to playing someone be- tecting their home in Gregory is sides ourselves,” she said. “It critical. Returning players such is even better, since we have as Sydney Yogi and Jennifer Dobeen in our gym for most of pre- ris know this best, as they helped season versus last year when we Texas maintain a perfect home retraveled a lot.” cord last year and nearly went the Aside from the support of entire season without dropping a about 4,000 loud, burnt orange- set in Austin. clad fans, the experience will also prepare the team for the postseason when Texas hosts one of Dickson brings experience the NCAA regional tournaments This season, the Longhorns got in December. a little stronger when former West“With hosting a regional here, lake High School standout Lauren we want to get comfortable play- Dickson returned to Austin after

From page 6

2010 Big 12 Schedule

in more reserved roles they helped Texas get within one set of winning the national championship. “We definitely have a lot more experience this year, and we’re ready to move past what hapLeadership material pened last year and keep getJuniors Michelle Kocher and ting better month by month,” Amber Roberson suffered a Roberson said. The team needs Roberson sophomore slump last year but both are eager to assume more and Kocher to step up because of a leadership role as upper- of the relative youth on this classmen with two consecutive year’s roster. “With three seniors gone and years of invaluable experience under the big lights. As fresh- all the freshmen without any men, Kocher and Roberson game experience, I have to go helped the Longhorns advance out and do a great job being a to the Final Four, and last year leader,” Kocher said. “We basition of an extra setter in place of the opposite side hitter. Dickson should see a lot of action on the court in her first and only season with the team.

cally just have to abide by ‘Lead, follow, win.’”

A Texas-sized challenge With five freshmen on a healthy roster of 14, some newcomers such as Hannah Allison and Haley Cameron are expected to contribute right away in the new Texas scheme. The new players hail from Arkansas, California, Hawaii and the University of Virginia, in addition to two freshmen from Texas, meaning this year ’s team will be an eclectic one and, if all goes well, an effective blend of different playing styles.

Big 12 Preseason rankings

Date

Opponent

Date

Opponent

09/16/10

at Texas A&M

1.

Nebraska (9)

09/18/10

vs. Baylor

2.

Texas (2)

09/22/10

at Missouri

3.

Iowa State

09/29/10

vs. Iowa State

4.

Oklahoma

10/02/10

at Nebraska

5.

Missouri

10/06/10

vs. Colorado

6.

Baylor

10/09/10

at Kansas State

7.

Texas A&M

10/13/10

at Oklahoma

8.

Kansas

10/16/10

vs. Texas Tech

9.

Kansas State

10/20/10

at Kansas

10.

Texas Tech

10/22/10

vs. Kansas State

11.

Colorado

10/27/10

vs. Nebraska

10/30/10

at Colorado

11/06/10

vs. Oklahoma

11/10/10

at Baylor

Award

Player

11/13/10

at Texas Tech

11/17/10

vs. Missouri

Player of the Year

Juliann Faucette, Texas

11/19/10

vs. Kansas

11/24/10

vs. Texas A&M

11/27/10

at Iowa State

Preseason awards

summer concert series

FRIDAY, AUG. 27

doors open @ 6 p.m. / music ‘til 1 a.m.

Newcomer Justine Young, of the Year Texas Tech Freshman of the Year

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COMICS P8

8

COMICS

9 3 9

8 6 3 5 6 3 2 1 8

Yesterday’s solution

4 3 2 6 1 3 6 9

9 7 4 3 2 1 6 8 1 4

1 3 5 6 8 7 4 2 9

2 7 9 3 1 4 8 6 5

4 8 6 9 2 5 3 7 1

7 9 8 5 3 6 1 4 2

5 6 1 2 4 8 7 9 3

3 4 2 7 9 1 6 5 8

6 2 3 8 7 9 5 1 4

8 5 4 1 6 2 9 3 7

9 1 7 4 5 3 2 8 6

Thursday, August 26, 2010


ENT/CLASS P9

9

Life&Arts

Thursday, August 26, 2010

wiley: Award-winning series

holds retro-styled competition From page 10 going to fire him if he doesn’t get me auditions. This is the closest thing to an audition he has gotten me.” The competition was more than two weeks in when Wiley saw the link. By then, the top contestants were already ahead with tens of thousands of votes. “I hate that I got such a late start,” Wiley said. “It is discouraging because I can only wonder how many votes I could have had had I entered the contest when it started.” Wiley said she still tried because she wants to take advantage of every opportunity she has to succeed as an actress. Participants in the contest were required to pick up a “Mad Men” style guide from Banana Republic. While some purchased the clothes in the guide for their entry, others used the catalog to inspire their own costume ideas. Wiley decided to take the creative and thrifty route by creating her own ’60s style by tucking in the suspender straps on a jean jumper to create highwaisted shorts and borrowing a blue blouse from her sister’s closet. Since Wiley’s sister, Anna, a nursing sophomore, is a big fan of the show, Wiley asked her for advice on how she should look. “I just told her to look at Betty Draper,” Anna Wiley said. “I can see her in Betty Draper because they both have blonde hair ... and that kind of sweet, pure-faced look.” Anna Wiley said she would be jealous if her sister won. “I want to meet [the cast] but I would be very excited for her.” Wishing to look sexy without revealing too much, Sam pulled her hair back into a classic low bun, applied some eye shadow, eyeliner and mascara to bring out her aquamarine eyes and red lipstick for a day, month day, 2008

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dramatic touch. Because there is constantly a cigarette and drink in the hand of at least one character in every scene of Mad Men, Wiley decided to add a lipstick-stained glass to her ensemble. The first outlet Wiley used to promote her profile was Facebook. She created an event, a group, continuously posted the link to her voting page on her status and sent out reminder messages to her friends. “I think there is some research that proves people have to see or hear something seven times before it actually sticks with them,” she said. “I plan on promoting this more than seven times. I need all the help I can get.” Wiley said she doesn’t think she can win with just the people she knows voting for her, but will also depend on the support of strangers. She even posted her voting link and picture on Craigslist asking the community for a helping hand. As of Wednesday, Wiley has more than 2,000 votes. Wiley said winning the contest and getting a walk-on role might not fully showcase her acting skills, but it would at least get her into a room of powerful people and her name and face out to casting directors. “In this business, it really is all about who you know, and the “Mad Men” gang seem like the right people to know,” she said. “If they like me, maybe they will even write me into the show as an actual character.” Wiley said she doesn’t want just 15 minutes of fame. “If I’m only in the show for one episode, I want to leave my mark,” she said. “This is what I went to school for and this is what I have been dreaming of since I was a little girl.”

Erika Rich | Daily Texan Staff

Cystal Nguyen, a freshman in the school of human ecology, and Courtney Sweebe, a biology freshman, choose food from the menu of the Arpeggio Grill.

Grill: Tomato Shack serves familiar eats From page 10 decent and cheap. For $5, you can walk out of the restaurant with a very filling sandwich. The falafels weren’t too dry and gritty and the meats were all savory and moist. The tzatziki sauce had that semi-thick creamy consistency with a cool dill-flavored finish, though the overly peanut-buttery 1 tasting hummus isn’t anything to write home about. The pita for the sandwiches is also great.

Although the thin dipping pita dries out rather quickly because it’s not wrapped in any tin foil, the pitas for the sandwiches are fluffy, soft and warm. Additionally, customers can choose more familiar foods such as pizza and hamburgers from the Tomato Shack — a mini-restaurant inside Arpeggio that is accessed from the walk-up, outdoor window. The double restaurant aspect was another shock at first, but its attempt is understandable.

Classifieds

The addition to Arpeggio retains TerraBurger ’s fast-food aspect and ability to use the to-go window. Still, the restaurant might be better off just dropping the unnecessary Tomato Shack and adding its options to Arpeggio’s menu. The most that can be said is that this is classic Middle Eastern foods done right. The flavors aren’t necessarily complex, but the food is satisfying, especially for such cheap prices. Nevertheless, one of the best

CLASSIFIEDS THE DAILY TEXAN

things to come out of this restaurant is all of their halal food. Take a look on the Drag and you’ll notice a dearth of halal-friendly restaurants, leaving practicing students at a loss. However, the variety of dishes available offers a slight reprieve for students who have to buy and cook most of their food or drive off campus if they want to keep halal.

Grade: B

3B

ADVERTISING TERMS There are no refunds or credits. In the event of errors made in advertisement, notice must be given by 10 am the fi rst day of publication, as the publishers are responsible for only ONE incorrect insertion. In consideration of The Daily Texan’s acceptance of advertising copy for publication, the agency and the advertiser will indemnify and save harmless, Texas Student Media and its officers, employees and agents against all loss, liability, damage and expense of whatsoever nature arising out of the copying, printing or publishing of its advertisement including without limitation reasonable attorney’s fees resulting from claims of suits for libel, violation of right of privacy, plagiarism and copyright and trademark infringement. All ad copy must be approved by the newspaper which reserves the right to request changes, reject or properly classify an ad. The advertiser, and not the newspaper, is responsible for the truthful content of the ad. Advertising is also subject to credit approval.

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840 Sales

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860 Engineering-Technical

SyStemS AdmiN/dAtABASe dvlPer near UT. Troubleshoot, document, backups, programming, security, database development. FileMaker exp. a plus. Flexible hours, casual dress, small office, benefits if long-term. www. LawyersAidService.com Apply online!

890 Clubs-Restaurants

NoW HiriNg Red Mango frozen yogurt & smoothies is now hiring for all positions. Coming to West Campus FALL 2010! apply online at: www.redmangousa.com


ENT P10

Life&Arts

10

Thursday, August 26, 2010

Life&Arts Editor: Amber Genuske E-mail: dailytexan@gmail.com Phone: (512) 232-2209 www.dailytexanonline.com

T he Daily T exan

FOOD REVIEW

Arpeggio grill

Grill offers halal Mideastern foods, American classics By Gerald Rich Daily Texan Staff Arpeggio Grill (and the Tomato Shack hidden within the restaurant), albeit common and cheap Middle Eastern cuisine, also serves up classic American dishes such as pizza and hamburgers, according to halal standards. However, the restaurant still has a couple of kinks to work out when it comes to their atmosphere and plating. Halal literally translates to “legal,” and when applied to dietary laws, it basically means your meat has been slaughtered according to Islamic law. It has not come in contact with “haram,” or forbidden foods like pork, and the animal was killed by a quick incision to the neck with a sharp knife. Walking in the restaurant, you’re immediately hit by a wave of heat that makes you feel like you are in the Arabian peninsula. The restaurant’s poor air conditioning doesn’t provide much relief from Texas’ or the kitchen’s heat. If you can get past its temperature

issues, the restaurant’s decor is quite spacious and appealing. Not much is left over from the previous restaurant’s — TerraBurger — decor other than their trash cans; Arpeggio has made full use of their space by packing in as many tables as they can. They’ve even repainted the inside a warm Mediterranean orange and added a wall mural of the countryside. After grabbing your drink — the ahmed hot green tea is brewed perfectly without that burnt grass flavor that improper steeping can leave — your food is served on a Styrofoam plate. Though Styrofoam cups and plates are not an uncommon thing in restaurants, the drastic change from TerraBurger’s eco-friendly attitude comes as a bit of a shock. The change of attitude is even further compounded when you see the entire restaurant tossing away the nondecomposable material. The food itself, though, is

GRILL continues on page 9

Erika Rich | Daily Texan Staff

Gyros, baklava and falafel are some of the items on the menu at the recently opened Arpeggio Grill.

Contest hopeful captures votes UT alumna Sam Wiley aims to win walk-on role in hit drama ‘Mad Men’ By Julie Rene Tran Daily Texan Staff With a half-empty glass to her red lips, Sam Wiley stares seductively with her piercing green eyes. Her sweet, pale face contrasts her come-hither pose and sassy ’60s demure appearance. Wiley, a recent UT Theatre and Dance alumna, is one of nearly 4,500 participants in a photo contest hosted by the popular AMC drama series “Mad Men” and Banana Republic. The competition is a call for “mad fans” to submit a photo of themselves in their best “Mad Men” look, and the winner will receive a walk-on role in season five and a $1,000 gift card to Banana Republic. “Mad Men” takes place in the 1960s but still comments on contemporary issues. Set in the world of advertising, the show follows the fictitious firm Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce and their main man, the mysterious Don Draper, played by Jon Hamm. With detailed costumes, sets and storylines with dramatic crescendos, “Mad Men” is AMC’s most popular show. It is currently the most award-winning drama on TV‚ having earned a Golden Globe Award for Best Television Series Drama three times in a row and an Emmy for Outstanding Drama Series twice. This Sunday, “Man Men” will compete for the Outstanding Drama Series Emmy award again. Though Wiley is a working actress and is featured in an upcoming web series titled “Beasts of Burden,” she said “Mad Men” could be her big breakthrough if she won the competition. Wiley found out about the Mad Men competition after her friend Derek Dahmann, an economics senior at UT, posted the casting call link to her Facebook wall. “He likes to pretend he’s my agent,” she said. “So sometimes he shares these things ... it’s a running joke with us that I’m

WILEY continues on page 9

Bobby Longoria | Daily Texan Staff

UT alumna Sam Wiley dresses in ‘60s attire for a “Mad Men” casting contest. The popular AMC show will award the winner a walk-on role on the fifth season of the show in addition to a $1,000 Banana Republic gift card.

‘Gourmet Meals’ cookbook helps tackle space constraints Experiences in restaurants, small apartment kitchens inspire chef to write book By Kate Ergenbright Daily Texan Staff Jennifer Schaertl knows a thing or two about cooking in crappy kitchens, something many college students must deal with on a daily basis. In “Gourmet Meals in Crappy Little Kitchens” Schaertl gives readers advice and recipes specifically tailored to cooking extraordinary meals in small kitchens with inadequate equipment. While working as an office manager in New York, Jennifer experienced cooking in her first crappy kitchen in her apartment in Brooklyn. “It was just such an extreme version of one,” Schaertl said. “They took a tiny little bedroom and slapped a little sink and little stove and little refrigerator against the wall, so I started doing a whole lot of crazy stuff in that place trying to make meals.” Schaertl said that her experience cooking in her small kitchen in Brooklyn influenced her

decision to go to culinary school. “The whole time I lived there I was just making the best meals because I was two blocks away from this really great farmers market,” she said. “It was a great place to learn to cook and whenever I decided to move back to Texas I decided if I was going to start over, I might

‘‘

Brooklyn apartment inspired her to write “Gourmet Meals in Crappy Little Kitchens.” “When I moved to Dallas and started working in restaurants, I learned that most restaurants have crappy little kitchens and that’s where a lot of the mechanics of cooking in a small kitch-

Cooking tips • Only buy things the day you’re going to cook them “Then you don’t have to worry about storing it in your fridge.” • Utilize your microwave “I did a cooking demonstration at UT Dallas in a dorm room where I steamed crab legs and I steamed artichokes and made white rice and chocolate truffles all inside a microwave.”

There really aren’t any space constraint cookbooks out there.”

— Jennifer Schaertl, Author of “Gourmet Meals in Crappy Kitchens”

as well start completely over.” Schaertl received her culinary training from El Centro College and went on to work at top Dallas restaurants such as Savory Catering, Taste and The Grape Restaurant. Her experience working in these kitchens combined with her experience cooking in her small

en came from,” she said. “In the book, I adapted that to living at home.” Schaertl saw a gap in the cookbook market that “Gourmet Meals in Crappy Little Kitchens” could fill. “There really aren’t any space constraint cookbooks out there,”

• Don’t have multiples of the same equipment she said. “Everything is time constraint or health constraints or monetary constraints, but no one really talks about what to do if you don’t have storage for equipment, or even food.” In her book, Schaertl assures readers that their surroundings do not have to restrain what they can make in their kitchen. She offers the following tips in her book and extends them to college students living in the dorms.

“You need a chef’s knife, you need a bread knife, you need a paring knife, a saute pan, a stock pot, and a sauce pot — that’s all you need.” • Use what you have available and what’s local and fresh “The great thing about food is that when it’s at its best quality is when it is most affordable also. That, I think, is truly the key to gourmet cooking. It’s got nothing to do with gadgets, it’s got nothing to do with space, it has everything to do with your raw materials.” Source: “Gourmet Meals in Crappy Little Kitchens”

Join us for a live concert, FREE pizza, ice cream & broomball! Thursday, August 26 at 7pm Turtle Pond

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The Daily Texan 8-26-10