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THE DAILY TEXAN Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

Season football ticket prices look to increase from last year

Former engineer turned purveyor of spirits turns his focus domestically

@thedailytexan

>> Breaking news, blogs and more: dailytexanonline.com

Calendar ‘Just Do It!’

The Department of Art & Art History presents Howard Taylor, the director of the San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts, to discuss the philosophy of the museum at 5 p.m. in Art Building 1.120.

Band serious about style to play at Forty Acres Fest LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10

SPORTS PAGE 6

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10

TODAY

SUITE 709

TICKET PRICES

ABSINTHE FOR ALL

Thursday, March 31, 2011

facebook.com/dailytexan

University expands sale of oil leases UT-owned land sections

$150,001 - $900,000

No bids

$5 mil - $36 mil

$50,000 - $150,000

$190+ mil

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4

The Scottish-born poet Robin Robertson will be doing a reading in 2.302 at 7:30 p.m.

3 7

‘I Feel Pretty’

9

2

The Bass Concert Hall will be performing the musical “West Side Story” at 8 p.m.

5

‘It’s all in your head’

6

Red Fez is hosting Jean Claude Van Jamme at 8 p.m.

10

‘Roll It Down’

Cactus Cafe hosts Ray Bonneville at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $10.

Today in history In 1918

Daylight saving time goes into effect in the United States for the first time.

Campus Watch Grand Theft Cu

100 block E. 21st Street A UT staff member reported a non-UT subject had entered the PCL and bragged that he had taken a piece of copper piping from inside a UT vehicle. The subject then turned around and left the building. Officers responding to the area located the subject a short distance away. The subject was still in possession of a piece of copper pipe. During the investigation, the officers soon discovered the subject had an outstanding outside agency arrest warrant.

‘‘

Quote to note “We’ve been crying about this for years, that we’re crammed. Sometimes when I am giving a tour, I have to point out the storage cabinets in the hallway that the fire marshal hates, but there is no other place for them.” —Mark Bernstein Associate Dean of Student Affairs NEWS PAGE 5

By Matthew Stottlemyre Daily Texan Staff

The Office of Business Affairs, which directs University Lands, sold almost $250 million of oil and gas leases Wednesday during its most lucrative semiannual lease sale in history. The sale included oil and gas leases for 117,000 of the 2.1 million acres of Permanent University Fund land. The Republic of Texas set aside 220,000 acres of public land in 1839 as an endowment for a public university. Oil was first discovered on the land in 1923 in Reagan County, according to the UT System’s website. This sale and the last one in September 2010 collected considerably more money than any previous sales, said Stephen Hartmann, executive director of University Lands, which is dedicated to managing and leasing the lands. The September 2010 sale totaled $207

million, and the highest sale before that came in the ’80s and totaled $52 million, Hartmann said. Other sales have topped at about $40 million. Hartmann said oil and gas, drilling or brokerage companies bid on specific plots of land before the date of the sale based on the amount of oil or gas they think they can get from the area. He said the bidders have no way of knowing information about other bids for the plots they bid on. He said this forces companies to bid in relation to how much they can get from the land. “If you’re bidding on this, you take your best shot because you don’t know,” Hartmann said. “If you really want it, you better make it good. I had one guy say, ‘You ought to at least provide doughnuts for making us go through this.’ I took a look at his bids and said, ‘I should bring Wheaties instead.’”

University Lands oil/gas leases County

Winning bid

1

Andrews

$50,414

2

Upton

$52,400

3

Ward

$134,918

4

Winkler

$519,440

5

Schleicher

$649,102

6

Pecos

$893,836

7

Crane

$ 5,037,009

8

Ector

$ 5,266,078

9

Reagan

$ 35,399,122

10

Crockett

$193,864,094

SALE continues on PAGE 2

Source: UT System University Lands

Travis County statistics, UHS student assessment report high health rating Services assesses similar health factors using the American College Travis County is one of Texas’s Health Association’s National Col10 healthiest counties, according lege Health Assessment, said UHS to a study release by the University coordinator Sherry Bell. In the spring 2010 assessment, of Wisconsin. In a study from the universi- 62 percent of students self-reported ty’s Population Health Institute their health as very good or excellent, released Tuesday, Travis Coun- and 91.7 percent self-reported their ty ranked sixth in overall health health as being good, very good or outcomes and ninth in health fac- excellent. Despite the sometimes untors among the 223 Texas counties healthy lifestyle of a college student, it doesn’t often surveyed. lead to sickness, The institute said radio-televidetermined oversion-film senior all health outLindsay Hejl. comes by looking “I live alone, at levels of morand I don’t like bidity and mortalto co ok s o I ity and assessed a eat a lot of fronumber of health zen meals,” she factors, including said. “I’ve only smoking, obesibeen sick once ty, binge drinking this semester, and access to prithough. I got mary-care providers, said Kate — University of Wisconsin Population the flu, and that was it.” Konkle, an outHealth Institute A c c o r d i n g reach specialist to the assesswith the institute. ment, 65.7 per“We really look at this as an opportunity to check up cent of students reported never havon communities,” she said. “That’s ing smoked a cigarette, and 21.1 perwhere people are affected by and can cent reported smoking, but not in affect these health factors the most.” Every two years, University Health RANK continues on PAGE 2

Bill to require every student get vaccinated for meningitis By Melissa Ayala Daily Texan Staff

Illustration by Josh Barajas & Clai re Cardona

‘A Painted Field’

82ND LEGISLATURE

Jamie Schanbaum gave a tearfilled testimony before the Texas Senate Committee on Higher Education on Wednesday, recounting her sophomore year at UT, when bacterial meningitis left her hospitalized for seven months. She told senators how she felt flu-like symptoms one day that escalated to be life-threatening by the next. Sen. Wendy Davis, DFort Worth, filed a bill that would mandate all incoming students receive a meningitis vaccination prior to being able to register. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, bacterial meningitis is a contagious infection that causes inflammation of the membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord. It can have severe effects, including brain damage, hearing loss, loss of limbs and death. Current law, passed last legislative session and inspired by Schanbaum’s experience, only re qu i res i nc om i ng stu d ent s who will live on campus to get the vaccine. “Now, I’m here pleading for those who don’t live on campus,” Schanbaum said. “For those who disagree, maybe they just don’t realize what you go through.” Davis said her motivation to file the bill came after the CDC released recommendations that college-aged individuals — those 17-21 years old — get a meningococcal vaccine because they are most at risk to contract bacterial meningitis. New language added to the bill last week would add exemptions for students enrolled only in online courses and those over 30

LEGE continues on PAGE 2 A recent study has found that more attractive people are generally happier given all the economic and social benefits that come with a pretty face.

By Allie Kolechta Daily Texan Staff

6

th

Out of 223 counties, Travis county ranks 6th for overall length and quality of life.

Photo illustration by Ryan Edwards

Study finds attractive people happier By Allison Harris Daily Texan Staff

Beauty may be more than skin-deep, according to a recent study finding that attractive people are also happier than their homelier peers. Attractive individuals are generally happier than their less-attractive counterparts in large part because of economic benefits resulting from their good looks, according to a research analysis two University economics professors released Monday. The top-15 percent of goodlooking people are more than 10 percent happier than those ranked in the bottom 10 percent of looks, according to a study conducted by Jason Abrevaya and Daniel

Hamermesh, the latter of whom is also a women’s and gender studies professor. Hamermesh said the results of the research comparison, published on the Germany-based Institute for the Study of Labor’s website, should not be overestimated. “It is important to know the size of the effect, that it’s there — not tiny but not huge,” he said. “This should make less-than-good-looking people feel better about themselves — be happier.” Hamermesh and Abrevaya analyzed five studies involving more than 25,000 people in the U.S., Canada, Germany and the U.K. Interviewers asked participants about their overall life satisfaction and rated participants’ attractiveness. Hamermesh said the subjec-

tive nature of interviewers’ rankings of participants’ attractiveness is not a problem. “Of course, beauty is subjective, but people tend to agree on who’s good-looking and who isn’t,” he said. Economic benefits that come with beauty — such higher salaries, better-looking spouses with higher salaries and better terms on loans — account for the majority of this effect, according to the study. The total effects of beauty on happiness were similar for men and women. The direct effect of beauty was larger in women, accounting for 50 percent of their increased happiness, while the di-

STUDY continues on PAGE 2


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2 NEWS

Thursday, March 31, 2011

SALE continues from PAGE 1

In addition to oil and gas leases, the Land Office leases land for pipelines and fiber-optic cables, wind farms, businesses and a commercial winery. The University of Texas Investment Management Company invests the profits from the lands that make up the Available University Fund. The University of Texas System receives two-thirds of the returns on investment, and the Texas A&M University System receives one-third. For its 2010-11 budget, UT Austin received $166 million from the returns, which comprise the Available University Fund. Much of the land is leased for multiple uses, but because

the three-year oil and gas leases have different statutory requirements than the 10-year surface leases, they are sold separately, said Jim Benson, director of business operations of University Lands. Benson said all oil and gas leases are sold in sales similar to Wednesday’s and approved by the Board for Lease of University Lands, and the rest are negotiated individually and approved by the UT System Board of Regents. He said the office expected a successful sale because of high oil prices and political events worldwide. “Worldwide demand and probably the instability in some of the other oil-producing re-

STUDY continues from PAGE 1 rect impact was less than one-third for men. “People just feel better about things knowing they’re good looking, independent of any effects on wages, markets and other such effects,” Hamermesh said. Psychology graduate student Jessica Jankowitsch said she works at UT’s Langlois Social Development Lab on research about how people begin to form stereotypes about attractive people beginning in infancy. “Even at a very young age, infants prefer attractive faces,” she said. “Attractive faces tend to be closer to a populational average, and because of this, they’re easier on the brain — They can be processed more rapidly.” Once a natural preference for attractive faces develops, people tend to associate more positive traits with attractive

gions in the world have driven people back to domestic oil,” Benson said. He said a few key players always influence sales, but which companies bid year to year is unpredictable. ConocoPhillips purchased tracts of land for between $500,000 and $2.3 million, according to the Land Office’s preliminary sale numbers. Official numbers will be released Thursday morning. “We are always looking for good opportunities. We believe the tracts purchased today in Crockett and Reagan counties are among them,” said Davy Kong, a ConocoPhillips representative, in a statement for the company.

RANK continues from PAGE 1

LEGE continues from PAGE 1

the past 30 days. The assessment also showed that 21.9 percent reported they did not consume alcohol, only 6.4 percent of students were classified as obese in the survey results, and 89.2 percent of students had health insurance, according to the UHS survey. The Austin and Travis County Health and Human Services Department has ongoing campaigns to counter factors that affect health in Travis County, including tobacco use, sexually transmitted diseases, the student dropout rate and improved nutrition and education for pregnant women,

years old. Davis said after discussion with UT, she also added leeway for students to have until the 10th class day of the semester to comply. “Within this year, [a] student at Texas A&M, Nicolis Williams, passed away after contracting bacterial meningitis,” Davis said. “There’s a unique vulnerability between ages 17 to 21. Students entering a concentrated population have a unique vulnerability to the disease.” There was some opposition to the bill. Along with several other community members, American studies senior Taylor Metting said that the law would infringe on the rights of those who want to attend college. “While this bill may have good intentions, it is advocat-

said Carole Barasch, a spokeswoman for the department. “In all of these areas, we are making significant progress and will continue to use these county rankings as a tool for further improvements,” she said. The department also takes socioeconomic and environmental factors into account when working to improve health trends in the county, Barasch said. “[The Health and Human Services Department’s] mission is to work in partnership with the community to promote health, safety and well-being.”

The Daily Texan

This newspaper was printed with pride by The Daily Texan and Texas Student Media.

Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Winchester Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Claire Cardona Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Cervantes Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viviana Aldous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doug Luippold, Dave Player News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lena Price Associate News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Will Alsdorf, Aziza Musa, Audrey White Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Melissa Ayala, Allie Kolechta, Marty McAndrews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matt Stottlemyre, Ahsika Sanders Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sydney Fitzgerald Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ashley Morgan, Austin Myers, Reese Rackets Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Veronica Rosalez Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jake Rector, Martina Geronimo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Daniel Nuncio, Simonetta Nieto Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jeff Heimsath Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lauren Gerson, Danielle Villasana Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Torrey, Tamir Kalifa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shannon Kintner, Erika Rich Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amber Genuske Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Priscilla Totiyapungprasert, Gerald Rich Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katherine Anne Stroh, Francisco Marin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Allistair Pinsof, Julie Rene Tran Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Will Anderson Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dan Hurwitz Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Hummer, Trey Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jon Parrett, Austin Laymance Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carolynn Calabrese Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Victoria Elliott Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Joshua Barajas Associate Multimedia Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rafael Borges Senior Video Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Patrick Zimmerman Senior Videographer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Janese Quitugua Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

Issue Staff Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Allison Harris, Huma Munir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Molly Moore, Jasmin Sun Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brenna Cleeland, Benjamin Miller Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kristin Holcomb, Allie Kolechta Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Edwards, Trent Lesikar, Shereen Ayub Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarah Beth Purdy Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Alex Williams, Ao Meng Editorial Cartoonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Thomas Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brianne Klitgaard, Sammy Martinez, Tyler Suder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emery Ferguson, Katie Carrell, Aaron West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Betsy Cooper, John Massingill Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amanda Sardos Volunteer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Dávila

Advertising

Director of Advertising & Creative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Assistant to Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Local Sales Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brad Corbett Broadcast Manager/Local Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus/National Sales Consultant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kathryn Abbas Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maryanne Lee Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cameron McClure, Samantha Chavez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Selen Flores, Patti Zhang, Sarah Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veronica Serrato, Ryan Ford, Ashley Janik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susie Reinecke, Rachel Huey Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rene Gonzalez Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bianca Krause, Alyssa Peters Special Editions Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elena Watts Student Special Editions Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sheri Alzeerah Special Projects Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adrienne Lee

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily except Saturday, Sunday, federal holidays and exam periods, plus the last Saturday in July. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified display and national classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2011 Texas Student Media.

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Texan Ad Deadlines

3/31/11

Volume 111, Number 174

people. They will then provide attractive people more opportunities and treat them better, creating an increased potential for happiness. Yet, the effect of the stereotype is small, Jankowitsch said. “It just gives an upper edge in some certain circumstances and situations,” she said. Journalism junior Doa Jafri has modeled for Spark Magazine, a publication produced by the University group Student Fashion Cooperative. Jafri said she couldn’t work at Wilhelmina Brown Model Management without her above-average looks. Yet, she said being attractive can also impair career opportunities. “Sometimes, if you’re trying to talk business with someone, they might take it the wrong way if you’re young and look a certain way,” she said. “You’re just not taken seriously.”

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Lauren Winchester (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Claire Cardona (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office: (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@gmail.com Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com

ing forced medication without people’s consent,” Metting said. “This is blatantly disregarding individual liberty. This piece of legislation is unjust.” Davis later stressed that the bill allows students to opt out if they have a religious reason or have documentation from a physician that the vaccine is harmful to the student. The Williams family also testified and said the 20 yea old’s death was preventable. His health deteriorated over the course of three days, they said. “The current law is incomplete and leaves thousands of students across the state who live off campus at risk of contracting the heinous disease that mutilates or kills within hours,” said Nicolis’ father, Greg Wil-

APPLICATIONS are being accepted for the following student positions with Texas Student Media

Daily Texan Managing Editor, Summer 2011

liams. “If [it] becomes law, no college student or their family will be subject to the devastation this disease causes. Untold lives will be saved.” University Health Services offers the vaccine for current and admitted students for $127. Associate UHS vice president Jeanne Carpenter said that staff have begun meeting to discuss the implication of the possible legislation. “Most likely, beginning spring 2012, a health bar will be placed on incoming students’ records that would prevent them from registering for classes until they have complied with the legislation, showing documentation of the meningococcal vaccination booster during the five years prior to enrollment,” Carpenter said. Carpenter said the law would serve UT as a preventative measure because it has not been a widespread issue in the past. “We’ve had some exposures in the past,” she said. “[We’ve had] students who were attending an event where one person at the event came down with bacterial meningitis within a few days. The number of students that contract meningitis disease is very small.”

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COPYRIGHT Copyright 2011 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

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Ivory Coast likely to see fighting for leadership By Marco Chown Oved & Rukmini Callimachi The Associated Press

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — Fighters supporting Ivory Coast’s internationally recognized leader seized control of the nation’s administrative capital on Wednesday, marking a symbolic victory after months of political chaos sparked when the country’s former president refused to step down after an election. The fall of Yamoussoukro caps a dramatic advance on the city from multiple directions this week by soldiers supporting Alassane Ouattara, but many believe a final bloody battle over the presidency is now destined for the commercial capital of Abidjan. Capt. Leon Alla, a defense spokesman for Ouattara, confirmed to The Associated Press on Wednesday that “the town of Yamoussoukro is in the hands of the Republican Forces.” Also on Wednesday, the U.N. Security Council voted unanimously to demand an immediate end to the escalating violence and impose sanctions on Laurent Gbagbo, who has refused to relinquish the presidency, and his inner circle. With the sounds of gunshots cracking over the telephone line, a woman at the downtown Hotel La

Residence in Yamassoukro said the rebel group loyal to Ouattara was doing a victory tour, shooting into the air. Residents came out into the streets to welcome them. The woman, who would not give her name, said soldiers and police had fled hours before the fighters arrived. When they first entered the city center, she said there were cries of alarm that turned to shouts of joy and approval when the pro-Ouattara gunmen were recognized. “Blitzkrieg seems to be the strategy, rather than fighting to clear every inch and hamlet,” said Christian Bock, senior security analyst at Avascent International. “It will take an enormous amount of restraint to hold these forces back from moving onto Abidjan.” Alla said the forces hoped for a similar lack of resistance upon reaching the country’s largest city, which is divided into neighborhoods backing Ouattara and others supporting former leader Gbagbo. “Abidjan will be the same thing,” he told the AP. “We’ll enter without firing a shot because no FDS [pro-Gbagbo] soldier wants to die for Gbagbo.” There was fighting Wednesday morning when forces loyal to Gbagbo tried to fight off the rebels for three-and-a-half hours before flee-

People walk with their belongings toward a railway station as they leave Abidjan, Ivory Coast. Rebel forces backing Ivory Coast’s internationally recognized president were advancing toward the capital Wednesday after seizing two more towns in the center of the country.

Emanuel Ekra Associated Press

ing Tiebissou, according to a priest International observers and govreached there by telephone. Anoth- ernments around the world backed er priest said he saw the bodies of the results issued by Ivory Coast’s three dead soldiers. electoral commission which showed

Ouattara had won the November presidential election, but Gbagbo has refused to give up power after a decade in office. Up to 1 mil-

lion people have fled the fighting which several analysts are now calling a civil war and at least 462 people have been killed since the vote.

Killer whale returns to SeaWorld show after drowning trainer over a year ago By Kyle Hightower The Associated Press

ORLANDO, Fla. — The killer whale that drowned a female trainer at Orlando’s SeaWorld flawlessly performed Wednesday for the first time since the death, wowing thousands amid heightened safety that included a steel bar protecting the orca’s trainers.

Tilikum participated in the marine park’s signature “Believe” show for the first time since dragging 40-yearold Dawn Brancheau from poolside by her pony tail and drowning her during a performance Feb. 24, 2010. Trainers stood Wednesday behind a stout metal bar designed to prevent a whale from dragging a trainer into the water. SeaWorld Animal Training Cura-

tor Kelly Flaherty Clark said that returning Tilikum to performing was best for the whale. No trainer has been allowed in the water during the shows since Brancheau’s death. The closest the trainers got Wednesday was the pool deck, standing behind the steel bar, reaching over to occasionally stroke the whales when they flopped on the platform or to toss them a fish treat.

Kelly Flaherty Clark, left, and trainer Joe Sanchez work with killer whales Tilikum and Trua, right, during a training session at the theme park’s Shamu Stadium in Orlando, Fla. SeaWorld

The park is working on plans to get trainers back in the water. The federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration accused SeaWorld of recklessly putting trainers in danger. The company is fighting OSHA’s citations and a $75,000 fine. Since the death, SeaWorld officials have drawn up plans to spend millions of dollars on safety upgrades. Measures include installing rising

pool floors that can quickly lift people and the whales from the water, underwater vehicles to distract the marine animals in emergencies and portable oxygen bottles for trainers. Many of those who went to see Tilikum perform drove past about a dozen protesters gathered outside SeaWorld’s gates. The demonstrators complained that killer whales should not be held in captivity and several

held up signs reading, “Free Tilly.” Despite the lack of any special reference to Tilikum’s return Wednesday, veteran SeaWorld attendee David Wythe said the whale’s return was clearly the main draw for many. “That’s exactly why we were here,” said Wythe, a Kissimmee resident. “Me personally, I believe Tilikum should have been back in the shows a long time ago.”

Have a great green idea? Apply for Green Fee funding!

Phelan M. Ebenhack Associated Press

2011

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APRIL 15 FRANK ERWIN CENTER 6:30 P.M.

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The UT Austin Green Fee Committee is now accepting proposals for the 2011-12 academic year and beyond.

NOW OPEN! IF YOU BUILD IT, WE WILL COOK IT! STEP 1

Choose your protein

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Season your protein

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Pick your veggies

Proposal applications due Friday, April 22, 2011

STEP 5

Select your sauce

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Be sure to download and read the guidelines as well as the application. Students, faculty and staff may submit ideas! Workshops will be held on Friday, April 8 to assist applicants and answer common questions. Applications and workshop schedule available at www.utexas.edu/sustainability/greenfee.php For more information, email greenfee@austin.utexas.edu


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Thursday, March 31, 2011 | The Daily Texan | Lauren Winchester, Editor-in-Chief | (512) 232-2212 | editor@dailytexanonline.com

gallery

VIeWPOINT

Malicious intent In recent weeks, we have seen the use of open records requests for malicious and political purposes. When used correctly, such requests can provide the public with a muchneeded tool to scrutinize government and public officials. When used irresponsibly or for purposes other than transparency, public records requests can threaten the freedom of public workers. Public records requests have recently been used irresponsibly by conservatives entrenched in the ongoing union conflicts throughout the nation, most notably in Wisconsin. Wisconsin Republicans filed an open records request for emails of University of Wisconsin history professor William Cronon. The professor, a vocal critic of the anti-union measures advocated by the Wisconsin GOP, was smacked with an open records request for emails sent from his university email account containing the words “Republican, Scott Walker (the governor of Wisconsin), recall, collective bargaining, rally, union” as well as the names of various state and union leaders. Freedom of Information Act fever seems to be contagious up north, as the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, a conservative think tank in Michigan, also filed open records requests last week for the emails of several state university professors specializing in labor relations. The open records request calls for emails containing the terms “Scott Walker,” “Wisconsin,” “Madison,” “Maddow” (presumably referring to liberal television personality Rachel Maddow) and any other emails that mention the debate in Wisconsin over collective bargaining rights, according to the liberal-leaning news blog Talking Points Memo. Wisconsin Republicans and the Mackinac Center for Public Policy both argue they are investigating whether the professors violated laws that prohibit the use of state resources, such as their university email account, for political advocacy. To be clear, we completely support open records laws, and we encourage all involved to provide complete and accurate materials adhering to the requests. Open records laws are fundamental to how any investigative body, be it academic, journalistic or political, can conduct its work. In journalism, open records laws enable us to scrutinize otherwise unobtainable information such as administrator discussions about student involvement and student government spending. Both the Wisconsin and Michigan records requests are shameful and irresponsible abuses of a tool intended to provide governmental scrutiny, not political retribution. It is precisely because we place a such a premium on open records laws that we are appalled by their malicious use in Wisconsin and Michigan. Records requests should be used to gather facts and information, not to publicly identify the political views of state employees. Furthermore, while these academics are technically state employees, thus subject to the same transparency laws as elected officials, they should not be held to the same standards. They are not public servants elected by the people or even university administrators responsible for handling tax dollars. They are academics who are only open to such scrutiny because they happen to work at an institution partially funded by the state. Say the records requests reveal Cronon and the other professors mentioned Scott Walker, Wisconsin and Rachel Maddow in emails to colleagues — after all, what kind of history or labor scholar wouldn’t discuss one of the most prominent labor disputes in recent history with other academics? Then what? Who gets to determine whether these discussions amount to advocacy and campaigning? Our guess is the Wisconsin Republican Party and Mackinac Center for Public Policy will volunteer. These requests are an irresponsible use of a valuable tool. If we were inclined, The Daily Texan could request all emails containing the word “Bevo” from President William Powers, Jr.’s official email account, but we realize doing so would be a violation of his and Bevo’s privacy and not of public concern. — Douglas Luippold for the editorial board

Prioritize research By Francis D. Fisher Daily Texan Guest Columnist

Right-wing zealots are campaigning to shift money at UT from research to teaching. They assert that patent payments don’t cover the cost of research and tenured faculty should teach more. The recognition of the two different objectives of higher education is correct. But instead of reducing research by senior faculty and increasing teaching, the effort should be exactly the opposite. First, as to research, critics point out that private industry conducts more and more research, so why not cut back on the research done at universities? But it is exactly the kind of research that the private sector will not do because a clear return in patent payments is not assured that universities properly undertake: “basic” research that will underlie practical developments. To be sure, it might make sense to divide university research between that which might eventually contribute to the economy from research in fields such as liberal arts, where the value is not economic but social

or moral. Supporting research in these noneconomic areas may be even more important to society than research that underlies practical developments, but reasonable limits could be set on what the nation spends. The flow of journal articles on medieval Germanic philology need not increase just because the U.S. population has. As to teaching, critics complain that tenured and tenure-track faculty are being replaced by teaching assistants, especially graduate students. Yet no evidence is provided to demonstrate that teaching by full professors results in greater learning of introductory subjects. More seriously, the economics of higher education show a constantly increasing cost of instruction due to its labor intensity. Professors must be paid what they could earn away from the academy in endeavors where productivity does increase. According to President William Powers, Jr., the cost of instruction at UT since 1990 has increased at an annual rate of 2.8 percent after adjusting for inflation — doubling real costs in 25 years. The historic pattern of professor-taught classes is unsustainable. Fortunately,

higher education is discovering that computer-based learning may be a successful substitute to the classroom-professortextbook model. Carnegie Mellon taught a computer-based statistics course (no professor) and the same subject in the old manner. Both courses shared a final exam on which students in the computer-based course did better. Looking forward, Texas seeks a third “national public university.” It seems to be assumed, improbably, that it would resemble the UT or Texas A&M of today. More likely, by the time a new institution could be operating, it will not reflect the teaching-research balance of today but be more research oriented, like Cal Tech, Bell Labs or NIH. Student learning could be shifted to secondary schools and computer-based modules that permit students to practice individually the skills they seek. These developments would better address the problem of costly higher education than shifting researchers to classroom teaching. Fisher is a Senior Research Fellow at the LBJ School of Public Affairs.

Remembering César Chávez’s legacy on his birthday By James C. Harrington Daily Texan Guest Columnist

Today is the birthday of César Chávez, the farm labor leader who dedicated his life to improving the wages and working conditions of agricultural workers, one of the country’s poorest and most exploited groups of laborers. Texas provides a large share of these workers. Not only did Chávez lead the historic nonviolent movement for farm worker rights, but he inspired thousands, many of whom never worked in agriculture, to commit themselves to social, economic and environmental justice and civil rights in their own communities. Chávez’s impact is reflected in the holiday designated for him in 11 states and in the parks, cultural centers, libraries, schools and streets that carry his name in cities across Texas and the United States. There’s even a statue of him on the West Mall. In Texas, March 31 is an optional

state holiday that many community-based organizations celebrate. Chávez knew well the hard life of farm laborers. He had to leave school after eighth grade to work in the fields as a migrant to support his family. Although he had a limited formal education, Chávez had impressive intellectual curiosity, read widely throughout his life and constantly educated himself. After returning from the U.S. Navy, Chávez coordinated voter registration drives and campaigns against racial and economic discrimination, but he really wanted to build an organization to protect and serve farm workers, whose lives he had shared since a young age. So in 1962, he helped found the National Farm Workers Association, which later became the United Farm Workers of America. Chávez led the first successful farm workers union in U.S. history. The union helped attain dignity, respect, fair wages, medical coverage,

pension benefits, humane working conditions and other protections for hundreds of thousands of farm laborers and won the first industrywide labor contract in American agriculture. Chávez believed in and used the peaceful tactics of Mohandas Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: fasts, boycotts, strikes and pilgrimages. People felt his love and, in turn, showed him theirs. I saw this over and over in my work with him. When he died in 1993 at age 66, more than 50,000 people of all walks of life marched in his funeral procession under the hot sun in Delano, California. Chávez’s impact on Texans extends far beyond the thousands of Texas farm laborers who worked as migrants in California. His efforts to open the doors of colleges and universities to the Hispanic community reached deep into Texas and opened to doors to economic and political opportunity. Chávez’s life was not limited to a single cause

or struggle. He was a unique leader who inspired individuals to work for social justice and civil rights for poor people. He did this through forging a national coalition of students, middle-class consumers, trade unionists, religious groups and minorities, both here in Texas and throughout the nation. We do not measure Chávez’s life in material terms. He never owned a house or earned more than $6,000 a year. Rather, we measure his life as a person who stood, and worked, for equality, justice and dignity for all Americans and who inspired thousands of others to do the same. We celebrate Chávez’s birthday, not just to honor him, but as a day on which to recommit ourselves to the struggle to make our community, our state and our country a better place for our children and grandchildren. Harrington is director of Texas Civil Rights Project. He worked with César Chávez in Texas.

legalese

reCyCle

sUBMIT a FIrINg lINe

Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange news stand where you found it.

E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline. com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.


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Thursday, March 31, 2011

Professor lectures, contributes to film about energy usage

A BIKE RE-TIRED, NOT RETIRED Bicycle mechanic Mike Dolan replaces a mountain bike tube as part of a routine tune-up Wednesday at the Peddler Bicycle Shop. The Peddler, located on Duval and 51st streets, will be celebrating its sixth anniversary next month.

Director looks realistically at future of gas, electricity

Shereen Ayub Daily Texan Staff

UT students Town hall fields questions, concerns learn activism from service organizations Topics of student questions ranged from study abroad opportunities to receiving credit for internships. The School of Journalism received particular attention concerning its recent changes in the curriculum, which will take effect in the fall of 2012. “The aim of overhaul of curriculum is to open it up so students are funneled into one area,� said School of Journalism professor Wanda Cash. “They can take photo courses. They can take media courses. We think this will be a better reflection of the current industry.� This interdisciplinary approach will maintain a focus on producing accurate and unbiased writing but with a digital twist, Cash said. Budget concerns ranked high in student interest. “With budget cuts being so big across the board, we are definitely interested in learning more about how exactly the college is going to

By Molly Moore Daily Texan Staff

By Huma Munir Daily Texan Staff

Austin is brimming with opportunities to connect with social and political activism, students and Austin residents learned at a panel Wednesday. Refugio Community Organizing Training Series is an initiative that collaborates with the Community Engagement Center at UT, which provides space for courses that help build necessary skills for civic engagement. Refugio also works with other organizations, including Mamas of Color Rising, a women of color activist group, and the Austin Immigration Rights Coalition, to address racial, religious and political issues affecting local citizens, . “We work to foster collaboration between the University’s faculty and students and community organizations, particularly grassroots organizations that have a social justice orientation,� said Shannon Speed, director of the Community Engagement Center. She said UT has an activist scholarship program, which is a pool of money from collaborating institutions that goes to students who want to do a summer activist research project with an organization. In order to receive money through the scholarship program, students must be committed to working for social justice and underserved communities, Speed said. Lydia Putnam, a women’s and gender studies graduate student, said she is interested in the activist scholarship program and finds it interesting that Refugio is collaborating with academic communities as well as other organizations to build relationships and engage in grassroots activism. Paula Rojas, a volunteer for Mamas of Color Rising, said Refugio trains people to become efficient organizers so they can help citizens take an effective role in the community. She said Austin is considered one of the most progressive cities in Texas, yet the condition of the poor is still the same as any other city. “Our analysis is that there is a disconnection between the consciousness and the practical tools and methods to make change [happen],� Rojas said. She said Refugio and UT’s collaborative courses teach people skills and awareness to collectively combat social and political issues they face such as poverty, racism and gender inequality. Rose Pulliam of allgo, a statewide organization for queer people of color, said they ask people to be practical and think about how they might serve as facilitators for the organizations with which they affiliate. She said though they are firmly situated in Austin, the conversations that happen at these panels extend beyond the U.S. border with discussions on immigration issues and the rights of illegal immigrants.

Students aired concerns about curriculum changes and budget cuts in the College of Communication at a town hall meeting on Wednesday. The Student Issues and Advisory Committee hosted the Third Annual Town Hall Meeting as part of College of Communication Week. About 100 students from within the college came with questions for deans and department chairs. The meeting has proven effective in raising awareness about students’ wants, said Eliana Ramirez, the chair of the advisory committee. “We are the College of Communication, so good communication is pretty important to us,� Ramirez said. Previous town halls led to improvements in parking, study abroad and course scheduling.

NEWS BRIEFLY APD on lookout for three men for burglary in West Campus The Austin Police Department is seeking the help of UT students in catching three burglars responsible for an attempted January robbery in West Campus, according to a Wednesday press release. Surveillance video captured the suspects — a black male, 28, and two white males, 30 and 40

— at an apartment complex on the night of the robbery. APD Cpl. Anthony Hipolito said he believes the burglars were looking for an apartment where someone was dealing marijuana but found the wrong apartment. The thieves entered the apartment at 3 a.m. and assaulted the residents. When the residents met the intruders with resistance, one resident was punched in the face, Hipolito said. — Marty McAndrews

be affected,� Ramirez said. The cuts are real, but their effect is not known, said Mark Bernstein, associate dean of student affairs. “It’s still too early to answer specifically,� Bernstein said. “There has to be some trade. Every effort is being made to protect our core services, but for now that’s all we can say.� Projects already in motion, such as the recent hire of 10 new faculty members and the construction of the Belo Center for New Media, will not be affected. The Belo Center, which is set to open in 2012, also attracted a good deal of attention. The building will include new photo and print labs as well as offices. “We’ve been crying about this for years, that we’re crammed,� he said. “Sometimes when I am giving a tour, I have to point out the storage cabinets in the hallway that the fire marshal hates, but there is no other place for them.�

of the energy production process. For example, many people are unaware of the high costs that go into creating and distributing energy, Tinker said. By Jasmin Sun “We’re really spoiled in how Daily Texan Staff cheap energy is, whether it’s U T Bure au of E c onomic the cost of electricity or the G e olog y dire camount of money tor Scott Tinker that we spend on drew nearly 300 a gallon of gas,� he people to a lecsaid. “We get excittu re on g l o b a l ed when a gallon energy consumpof gas turns to $4, tion and usage. but there’s a treTi n k e r ’s l e c mendous amount ture at the Blanof work that ton Museum of goes into bringArt on Wednesing that gas from day could apunderg round to pear on film as the consumer.� part of a docu- Trent Lesikar | Daily Texan Staff Geology senior mentar y on the M ichael NieScott Tinker present and futo attended the ture state of enerDirector of UT’s Bureau talk and said he of Economic Geology gy consumption. agrees with the The Arco Films idea that the production team ge ne r a l pu bl i c has been working with Tinker needs more education about on the 90-minute film since energy conservation. early 2009. “People in general don’t re“I have two college-aged ally take into consideration kids, and they’re always send- the effects of using day-toing me videos on YouTube,� day technologies,� Nieto said. Tinker said. “So you could “It would be good for stusay that’s kind of how the idea dents to see this video because took root.� it’s good to be more aware Putting together a video to about how your life affects showcase this research was also the environment.� a way for Tinker to get inforThe public should be able to mation to a broader audience view the documentary, which and a bigger demographic. will accompany a large website, “We wanted to show what later this year. the future of energy would be “We’ve actually screened a in a realistic world, not an ide- rough cut of the movie and had al one,� said film producer and an original score written,� said director Harry Lynch. Tinker. “We hope to be finished Lynch’s team shot more than in May, when we’ll take the fin500 hours of footage through- ished product to a distributor. out 10 different countries for Hopefully, you’ll see it as a feathe movie, which aims to show ture length film on HBO and the viewer unfamiliar aspects then on the DVD markets.�

The Harry Ransom Center and the LBJ Library and Museum present “Could the media break a story like Watergate today?� THURSDAY, APRIL 21, 2 P.M. LBJ LIBRARY AUDITORIUM 2313 RED RIVER STREET

B=<756B

Panelists include Peter Baker of The New York Times, Dana Priest of The Washington Post, Mark Miller of The Texas Tribune, Glenn Frankel, Bob Woodward, and Carl Bernstein.

The Harry Ransom Center presents

/\bV]\g5`OTb]\ FOR THE 2011 PFORZHEIMER LECTURE

Space is limited, and tickets are required.*

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Humanists with Dirty Fingers: Correctors in the Renaissance Printing Houseâ&#x20AC;?

Thursday, March 31, 2011 7 p.m.

The Legacy of All the Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Men THURSDAY, APRIL 21, 6 P.M. LBJ LIBRARY AUDITORIUM 2313 RED RIVER STREET Bob Woodward, Carl Bernstein, and Robert Redford discuss the ďŹ lm All the Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Men (1976) in celebration of the 35th anniversary of its release. Space is limited, and tickets are required.*

FREE, BUT LIMITED SEATING Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

Harry Ransom Center The University of Texas at Austin www.hrc.utexas.edu/events 512-471-8944

*Limit two tickets per person. Tickets for both panels are free and will be available for pick up beginning Monday, April 4 at the Harry Ransom Center, LBJ Library, and University Union 4.300. For information, visit www.hrc.utexas.edu/watergate or www.lbjlibrary.org.

www.hrc.utexas.edu/watergate www.lbjlibrary.org


SPTS P6

SPORTS

FIND WORK RECSPORTS JOB FAIR

6

SUCCESS

STARTS HERE

www.utrecsports.org

Thursday, March 31, 2011 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Will Anderson, Sports Editor | (512) 232-2210 | sports@dailytexanonline.com

SIDELINE NBA ROCKETS

76ERS

MAVERICKS

CLIPPERS

WHAT TO WATCH NIT Championship

Wichita State vs. Alabama The Associated Press

Left, Ranger Andres Blanco hits an RBI single against the Arizona Diamondbacks on Monday. Right, Astros pitcher Bud Norris throws against the Philadelphia Phillies on Monday.

Baseball season begins as other sports brace for pricey lockouts By Will Anderson Daily Texan Columnist

March Madness is almost over, and the NBA playoff race is heating up. That can only mean one thing: Major League Baseball is about to get underway. The MLB owns the longest regular season in American sports in terms of total games. By the time it finishes in late October, the sports world could be a very different place. The NFL, and there will be one in some form, will still be the most popular league around, but who knows exactly what it will look like and how many games might get cancelled. The NBA has lockout problems of its own to face after this season, but with the amount of money at stake, it’s also likely to be around in some form. Baseball doesn’t have to worry about that, at least for another great season, with a collective bargaining agreement in place until December. With the recent equity in MLB labor negotiations, expect another quiet renewal by then. Opening Day means something different for sports fans. The marathon MLB season begins today

openingday RANGERS

The 2011 Astros are not too different from the team that finished 32-27 last season. After trading away veterans Roy Oswalt and Lance Berkman prior to the trading deadline, a younger team gave the city of Houston a little hope looking ahead to the 2011 season, which opens Friday for the Astros in Philadelphia. There is still only a little hope for the Astros, who have not reached the playoffs since 2005 when they won the National League pennant. While other NL Central contenders made big trades and free-agent signings, general manager Ed Wade failed to make any major moves during the offseason. The announcement that owner Drayton McLane was trying to sell the team and the Astros’ late-season mini-surge are the main reasons the team has not changed much since October. Last season’s streak in August and September was powered by pitching. Starters Brett Myers and Wandy Rodriguez got on a roll. The newly acquired J.A. Happ and rookie Bud Norris also performed well enough to make up for the Astros’ struggles at the plate. The starting rotation will be no different than the way it finished last year, with veteran Nelson Figueroa rounding it out with the fifth spot. The Astros will once again have to rely on their pitching, because

RANGERS continues on PAGE 7

ASTROS continues on PAGE 7

TEXAS 6, TEXAS STATE 1

Horns stay focused on present, top Texas State with road win By Sara Beth Purdy Daily Texan Staff

her season ERA to 1.10. After four innings of work, sophomore reliever Kim Bruins went in to finish the Texas did not let its impending Big game while only giving up one run 12 road test in Stillwater, Okla., get the best of them. They faced an overmatched Texas State team Wednesday night en route to playing the Cowgirls on Saturday. The Longhorns connected for 12 hits in their 6-2 victory over the Bobcats. This extended the Longhorns’ current win streak to 13 games and improved their record to 29-3 on the season. The offense produced four home runs during its seven innings of play. Junior Courtney Craig, having just returned to action after an injury, notched her first home run of the season. Senior Amy Hooks, junior Lexy Bennett and freshman Taylor Thom produced the other three home runs of the game. Rachel Fox, the freshman right- off of one hit. Hooks leads the team hander from Sugar Land, Tex- in career home runs at 28 with sophas earned the victory for the Long- omore Taylor Hoagland and Bennett horns by allowing only one run off tied at second with 20 each. of four hits. This win improved Fox The Longhorns allowed the Bobto 12-1 for the season and lowered cats to take an early 1-0 lead in the

The offense produced four home runs during its seven innings of play.

Trent Lesikar | Daily Texan file photo

San Diego Padres @ St. Louis Cardinals

Date: Today Time: 3:15 p.m. On air: ESPN

San Francisco Giants @ Los Angeles Dodgers

Date: Tonight Time: 7 p.m. On air: ESPN

SOFTBALL

Junior Nadia Taylor prepares to swing at a pitch in Texas’ win over Texas A&M Corpus Christi last week.

Detroit Tigers @ New York Yankees

Date: Today Time: Noon On air: ESPN

After a season in which the Rangers made a complete transformation from American League bottom-feeder to league champion, there’s one question facing them as they head into an Opening Day that looms larger than maybe any other story line in the league. How in the world will Texas ever top that? Texas finished in first place in the AL West in 2010, the first time it has done so since 1999. They won a postseason series over the Tampa Bay Rays and then dethroned the New York Yankees to win the AL Championship pennant and earn a spot in the World Series. They fell just three games short of amazing, losing 4-1 against the San Francisco Giants, capping a year of improbability with mixed feelings of pride and disappointment — proud that their once-anemic team had finally gotten to the biggest stage in baseball, frustrated that they had come so close yet were unable to deliver the franchise its first ever World Series Championship. Fans want and expect a repeat of last year, but is it doable? Texas certainly returns enough of last year’s talent to make it happen. AL MVP Josh Hamilton’s bat has become one of the best in baseball in recent years; the left fielder won the league batting title last year and hit 32 home runs despite missing many games because of injury. Right fielder Nelson Cruz, who hit 22 homers last year, returns,

BASEBALL continues on PAGE 7

Opening Day Baseball

ASTROS By Dan Hurwitz Daily Texan Staff

By Trey Scott Daily Texan Staff

Date: Tonight Time: 6 p.m. On air: ESPN2

bottom of the second inning. After that, they never looked back. In the bottom of the third, Bennett reached first base on a fielder’s choice. Hooks’ home run, her fifth of the season, sent Texas ahead 2-1. Texas State was never given the chance to regain the lead after that. A late rally in the bottom of the sixth inning threatened the Longhorns’ lead, but Bruins held the Bobcats to only one run. Texas State only managed to plate two runs off of five hits. Three errors committed by the Texas defense helped in each of the Bobcat scores. The Longhorns are riding a hot streak that started in California at the Judi Garman Classic. This streak is present on both sides of the ball. This weekend, the Longhorns will face their first ranked Big 12 opponent during their first true road test. Up to this point, most of the Longhorns’ away games have been at neutral sites during tournaments. A talented Oklahoma State team supported by an enthusiastic and rowdy crowd will meet the competitive Longhorns this weekend.

TWEET OF THE DAY Jermichael Finley @JermichaelF88 Frozen yogurt is not supposed to be in my diet but its so good!

CHECK OU T K OUT CHECCHECK OUT List of Fiesta Bowl benefits on page 7


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Thursday, March 31, 2011

Fiesta Bowl chairman John Junker ousted amid illegal benefits The Associated Press

An investigative report outlines several perks and expenditures by Fiesta Bowl officials, including ousted CEO John Junker:

COUNTRY CLUB MEMBERSHIPS

Corey Leamon | Daily Texan file photo

Texas fans cheer during a football game last season. Longhorn faithfuls have less to cheer about with ticket prices increasing for next season.

Longhorn ticket prices set to increase By Jon Parrett Daily Texan Staff

Ticket prices for Texas’ 2011 home football games will increase on average by $8, Ed Goble, UT’s associate athletic director for business, announced Tuesday. According to the Austin American-Statesman, Goble told members of the Men’s Athletics Council that tickets for the Longhorn’s six games will cost a total of $395. Tickets for last season’s seven home games cost $400, increasing the average price of

a single ticket from $57 to $65 Prices for Texas baseball postseason games will also increase. If the Longhorns host a regional this season, reserved seats will cost $70, up from $60 last year. General admission seats will increase from $45 to $50. If Texas hosts a super regional, reserved seats will cost $40, a $5 increase from last year, and general admission seats would increase $4 to $26. “Demand is huge when we’re in the postseason,” Goble told the Statesman.

BASEBALL continues from PAGE 6

and with it, the specifics peculiar to professional baseball — the extra-inning nights, awaygame road trips and doubleheaders we’ve come to love. These traditions sustain the MLB. With 169 regular season games, the most important statistics in baseball are averages. Hitting a baseball isn’t nearly as important as sustaining a level of consistency over six months, and allowing a base-clearing grand slam hurts but in the long term means lit-

tle if you can keep your earned runs low. You see it in baseball fans too, who are some of the most dedicated in sports. That’s because professional baseball requires a special type of endurance. That endurance breeds a certain type of competitor. You can’t be a selfish baseball player and expect to find success. It just doesn’t work that way. Actually, that’s not entirely true. It might be better to say you can’t be a selfish baseball player,

2011 SEASON HOME TICKET PRICES

Rice (Sept. 3) $70 BYU (Sept. 10) $85 Oklahoma State (Oct. 15) $85 Kansas (Oct. 29) $75 Texas Tech (Nov.5) $95 Kansas State (Nov. 19) $75

fielder Hunter Pence as the main run producer as the third batter in the lineup. Pence, who is now the face of the franchise with Oswalt and Berkman gone, has consistently hit around .280 with 25 home runs the past three seasons. Left fielder Carlos Lee returns and looks to get his offensive production back to where it was in the prime of his career. Now a .287 career hitter, Lee’s numbers have continued to decline since he arrived in Houston in 2007. He hit .246 last season and is still a defensive liability, even in Houston’s shallow left field. Outside of Lee and Pence, the Houston lineup is mostly a handful

STRIP CLUB

Junker was reimbursed for $110,000 in credit card charges for attending a Celebrity Fight Night and bidding on a golf date with Jack Nicklaus. Junker later billed his travel and expenses for the golf date to the bowl.

BIRTHDAY PARTY The bowl spent $33,188.96 on Junker’s 50th birthday party in 2005, held over four days in Pebble Beach, Calif.

VACATIONS The bowl paid for at least 27 trips Junker took with his family, including a 16-day trip to Santa Barbara, Calif., and San Diego with his entire family in 2008. Other trips included $2,600 for Junker and his wife in San Francisco and a trip to Florida for a spaceshuttle launch.

The bowl was charged more than $1,200 in 2008 for a trip to the Bour- RELIGIOUS CAUSES bon Street strip club in Phoenix by The donation of an executive suite Junker and two others. The report at a bowl game valued at $25,000 went shows expenses included food, drinks to a local convent for a fundraiser. and dances from strippers. Junker was also reimbursed for “frequent meals” with an executive with St. Vincent de Paul’s Phoenix chapter, AUTO STIPENDS and more than $5,000 in membership Junker, his wife and other Fies- dues for Legatus, an organization for ta Bowl executives received General Catholic business leaders. Motors cars while GMC was a bowl sponsor. Junker received $8,500 from the bowl for a new car. Other exec- FLOWERS The bowl paid for $75 in flowers utives received lesser amounts for new cars. Junker continued to receive sent to an admissions official at the money for cars, including $27,000 in University of Texas in March 2010. 2009. Wisneski received an annual Junker’s daughter was accepted to an honors program at the school. car allowance of $16,800

RANGERS continues from PAGE 6 expect to find success and have an untarnished legacy. See Jose Canseco, the recently embattled Barry Bonds or Pete Rose. Baseball means buying in for the long haul. You don’t play 169 games each season for yourself. Yes, auto racing and golf take place nearly year round, but their major contests are spaced out in order to highlight the individual achievements of their athletes. And sure, professional poker is technically a full-time gig, but the grind of card playing makes

running a 90-foot base path look like an Ironman competition. Major League Baseball is a sport that sometimes looks like a chore. Boredom sets in and the scoreless innings can seem tedious, the stranded runners agonizing reminders of what runs used to look like. Then, a one-out shot to left field just makes it over the left-field wall, and a game is changed. A hero is formed. Baseball is all about the anticipation. Dear MLB fans, the wait is over.

of unknowns to the common baseball fan. Third baseman Chris Johnson and first baseman Brett Wallace are back for their second season as big leaguers. Johnson was a rare offensive spark in the Astros’ lineup last season. In 94 games, Johnson hit .308 with 11 home runs and 52 RBIs. The Astros need a similar performance from him to balance out the middle of the lineup. It is still unknown what Wallace is capable of. He came in as a result of the Oswalt trade and immediately started at first with hopes of becoming the next Berkman. In only 51 games, Wallace hit .222. He

struck out often and only walked eight times. He is still a work in progress and a part of Houston’s youth movement. The Astros are expected to finish among the worst teams in baseball. There are question marks at every position. At the same time, they have potential. It will be a season of ifs for Houston. If everyone stays healthy and Wallace, Johnson and Lee have solid seasons, things should be all right. If Rodriguez and Myers return to their 2010 form, Houston should win more games. If they don’t, Minute Maid Park will be empty come the hot months of the Texas summer.

ASTROS continues from PAGE 6 the offense made little improvement during the offseason. The biggest additions were new middle infielders Bill Hall and Clint Barmes. Hall is expected to start at second base and bring a little more power to a team that finished last in the NL in home runs. Barmes was supposed to be the starting shortstop but suffered a broken hand last week and will miss the first month of the season. Barmes’ injury was minor compared to starting catcher Jason Castro’s torn ACL from a spring training game. Humberto Quintero is expected to replace him as the everyday starter. The team will depend on right

The Fiesta Bowl paid for Junker’s memberships at four high-end golf courses: Whisper Rock Golf Club in Scottsdale, Ariz.; Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club in North Plains, Ore.; Biltmore Golf Club in Phoenix; and Karsten Creek in Stillwater, Okla. The bowl also paid for a golf course membership at Chaparral Pines in Payson, Ariz., for Chief Operating Officer Natalie Wisneski.

NICKLAUS GOLF

Opening for an At-Large position with the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees The Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees has reopened their search for an At-Large Place 6 student board member. This is a 2-year term from June 2011 to May 2013. This board oversees the largest student media program in the United States. Your job as a board member? *Adopt annual budget *Review monthly income and expenses *Select KVRX station manager, TSTV station manager, Texas Travesty and Cactus yearbook editors, The Daily Texan managing editor *Certify candidates seeking election to TSM board and for The Daily Texan editor *Review major purchase requests Time commitment? About five hours per month (one meeting, reading before meeting, committee work). Pick up an application at the Hearst Student Media building (HSM), 25th and Whitis Ave, Room 3.304, or print a application from our website: http://www.utexas.edu/tsm/board/ The Board will appoint a student to that position at their next meeting on April 15, 2011.

Deadline is noon on Tuesday, April 5, 2011.

as does second baseman Ian Kinsler, a career .281 batter and two-time allstar selection. Those three are some of the best talents in the game, but they have all had a hard time staying out of the training room so far in their careers — with Hamilton missing 29 games last year, Cruz with 54 and Kinsler with 59. The Rangers will need them to stay healthy, because life without Cliff Lee might be pretty difficult. Lee was acquired in a midsummer trade from the Mariners last season and, as the staff ace, propelled his new team to the World Series. Texas was unable to sign him over the offseason — Lee chose the Philadelphia Phillies over the Rangers and Yankees — and his presence at the top of the pitching rotation will surely be missed. C.J. Wilson, the former relief pitcher, will take over Lee’s spot. The lefty was 15-8 last year in his first year as a starting pitcher for the Rangers. Colby Lewis, Tommy Hunter (who will begin his season on the DL for the third-straight year), Derrick Holland and Alexi Ogando are the favorites to fill out the rest of the rotation. Their win-loss records, a combined 32-22 last year between the four of them, might not blow anybody away, but it’s a young staff of pitchers yet to reach their high ceilings. Manager Ron Washington has

chosen to keep last year’s AL Rookie of the Year Neftali Feliz in the closer role for now, which ensures that, at the least, the Rangers will have their flamethrower to count on in save situations, though Feliz would have been terrific addition as a starter. Keep an eye on Brandon Webb, who won a Cy Young in 2006 but has only pitched four innings the past two years because of an injured shoulder. Webb hopes to be available for the Rangers by May. Then there’s the Michael Young situation. Texas’ career leader in hits publicly requested a trade after the Rangers signed third baseman Adrian Beltre over the offseason, a move that pushed Young out of his position. The Rangers didn’t budge, and Washington plans to also use Young as a DH and utility infielder. Young will see plenty of at-bats, but you can’t blame the six-time allstar and fan favorite for getting fed up with changing positions; it will be the third time in his career he’s had to do so. The Rangers have the pieces to duplicate last year’s run, but it won’t be easy. The young pitching staff will experience growing pains, the Young dilemma could be a distraction, the AL West will be a more challenging division than last year as the Anaheim Angels and Oakland A’s both made offseason upgrades and there’s the constant threat of injuries that have plagued Texas in the past.


CLASS/SPTS/ENT P8

8 LIFE&ARTS

Thursday, March 31, 2011 Love Inks, an indie-pop group based in Austin, will release its fulllength album E.S.P. this May on the City Slang and Hell Yes! record labels.

Courtesy of City Slang

Love Inks plays clean synth-based pop bers of Love Inks to talk about the but I’ll have to check it out. “emotionally nude” lyricism in their SL: No! It’s buried and hidden album E.S.P. (set for a May release), away forever. [laughs] Lead singer Sherry Leblanc of how the band first got together and Adam Linnell: It’s actually five Austin indie pop group Love Inks is why the band is straying from lo-fi. songs from the album, but it sounds bubbly and enthusiastic as she name lo-fi because when we recorded that, drops her favorite female singers The Daily Texan: I want to talk we said, “Let’s make it as clean as we before the band takes the stage at about Love Inks and how it all start- can,” but it still ended up lo-fi. Our Cheer Up Charlie’s on a brisk March ed — how did it come together? friend Marco said we could clean it evening before South By Southwest. Sherry Leblanc: It started in up a lot more, so we rerecorded it. Leblanc’s mood almost betrays January 2010. Kevin [Dehan] and Kevin Dehan: I think the perfect the nature of Love Ink’s music. May- Adam [Linnell] were already play- word for the production we wanted be because the band is starting to see ing in two other bands together. is “nude.” the fruits of its labor — an upcom- The three of us were hanging out a ing tour, a blog-viral single for its lot and talking about what we wantDT: You know, I really like that. dazzling “Blackeye” and top billing ed to do musically, and since Kev- In a way, I feel like the lyrics are with artists such as Dum Dum Girls in already had a backlog of songs very emotionally nude, too. and Austin’s very own Boy Friend. he had written, we just got togethSL: I love that. I totally feel that. The hype is more than warrant- er and played them. But it’s fucking scary to play it like ed, considering Love Inks’ refreshthat live because it’s like, “Hey, here ing take on indie pop, which lateDT: I was surprised to find out are all my emotions ...” [laughs] ly has taken a turn toward complex that a friend either produced or arrangements and lo-fi production. mastered the tracks for the album, DT: I have sort of a weird quesLove Inks, conversely, decided that and I thought it was really well tion, but I feel like it tells a lot the best way to show- done and polished, which is some- about the people I’m interviewing: case its brand of thing you don’t expect much of How would you describe your persy nt h-b as e d nowadays considering everyone’s fect sandwich? ON THE WEB: pop was to doing lo-fi production. AL: I got this. There would be clean up the Check out the full SL: It’s funny that you say that about sweet peppers, mayonnaise, musinterview and to production. lo-fi because in May 2010 we released tard, salami, ham. hear their track The Dai- an EP on Bandcamp, and it was reKD: My perfect sandwich is a “Black-Eye” ly Texan sat corded, mixed and mastered by us. Subway sandwich. There would be @dailytexan d ow n w it h bread, pepperoncinis and jalapenos. online.com the three memDT: OK, I haven’t heard that yet, [Everybody groans] By Francisco Marin Daily Texan Staff

SUITE continues from PAGE 10 are also roommates, with four of the eight band members living together in one house. When the band first came together in suite 709 in a city and hotel they declined to name because of events similar to those in the movie “The Hangover,” they wanted to create a sound that embodies each member’s musicality. “We weren’t exactly sure how to vocalize exactly w hat we ON THE WEB: wanted,” he said. “But View one of Suite we knew we 709’s SXSW just wanted performances @dailytexan to make muonline.com sic people can day, month day, 2008

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move to.” The band debuted at last year’s South By Southwest Study Breaks Magazine Party, playing a 45-minute set of nine songs. Greene said though the crowd didn’t know the lyrics to the songs, you could have sworn they had heard it before. “I can just remember us being extremely anxious [and a] little nervous, because we hadn’t played any of the songs for anyone before,” Greene said. Titled as the ninth-best new Austin band by Austin Music Awards, Suite 709 played six shows this year at SXSW and was recently asked to perform at the Hollywood movie premiere of Cougars, Inc. The quality of Suite 709’s sound is

SOURCE continues from PAGE 10 Gyllenhaal said the film’s sense of humor shaped his performance. “It’s not a wink at the audience, but it’s like an acknowledgement of the absurdity of the situation,” Gyllenhaal said. “There are always absurd situations where you’re angry or sad or frustrated, but if you step back from it, even traumatic experiences have funny things that happen. There’s a moment where he wanted me to say a line like a superhero. It would be amazing if we

could use that.” While the film is certainly funny, it’s even more emotionally affecting. Much of its heart is based in Gyllenhaal’s character’s desire to speak to his father. “It’s a character story,” Gyllenhaal said. “For me, it’s about a guy just wanting to make a phone call, but who ends up on a train in somebody else’s body trying to find a bomber, and he never made that phone call.” Jones was also drawn to the

not the only thing that’s turning heads. Hotel guests couldn’t help but stare at the fancily-dressed gentlemen, whose clean looks included pompadour hair cuts and suspenders. “It pays off to look iconic, people see the hair and they see the clothes — It’s almost like a lure,” he said. 1 “They see how we look and they go, ‘Hey, check these guys out,’ and then that’s when we attack them.”

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DT: Do you have any other advice for students? GW: Going back to the college experience, one of my investors is one of my fraternity brothers. Make a good impression on the people you know, that way you’re not just some drunk guy at a party. Those are real relationships that should be incubated as such. It’s something I wish I had known earlier in life, because who knows how many contacts I would have had. Then again, there’s nothing against having a good time. As long as you treat people how you want to be treated, there’s no reason why you can’t work together in the future.

script’s emotion, especially the dynamics between Gyllenhaal and his co-stars, Michelle Monaghan and Vera Farmiga. “Since the script had been worked on for such a long time, my job became about maintaining an emotional connection for the audience with the characters,” Jones said. “The heart of the film is about the relationship between Colter Stevens and this woman he finds himself across from on the train.”

Lauren Gerson | Daily Texan Staff

Director Duncan Jones walks the red carpet at the South By Southwest world premiere of his film “Source Code” at the Paramount Theatre. The film, starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Vera Farmiga and Michelle Monaghan, opens in theaters nationwide Friday.

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GW: I think a lot of it can be attributed to the way I was raised. I was lucky in that sense. But when I went to college, I wanted to go to a different university than the state school, Penn State. I also joined a fraternity. We managed $100,000 budgets, and if I wouldn’t have pushed myself outside my comfort zone, I wouldn’t have gotten that similar experience to running a business. It’s all the experiences that have built up and allowed me to believe in myself.

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had a long journey working his way ball games. I wasn’t introduced to the out of the corporate sector. high-end cocktail world until I had a job and could afford nice drinks or The Daily Texan: When did you had other people paying for me. But first conceive of Tenneyson? as soon as I got that taste, I quickGraham Wasilition: I traveled to ly changed to liking good drinks and and from Korea while I was working food. In college, I was a regular old with Samsung and had a great ex- guy, and I’m still a regular old guy. posure to a different culture. There I wish I was exposed to [food and were a lot of things over there for drink] sooner, but I wound up findme to eat and drink that I had never ing it or it found me. been exposed to, and I thought ‘Why was that the case?’ At the time, it was DT: Any suggestions you have 2006, right before the U.S. absinthe for college students: mistakes not laws were updated, and I thought to make or to make? ‘We’re in America, and we could GW: I think everyone should have access to anything we want.’ It make mistakes. It’s not like we’ve kind of got my head thinking about been a mistake-free company; we’ve what could I bring over that would made mistakes. My brother once be new, different and fun. I was an said to me that there’s an idea of paabsinthe fan though, so I thought ralysis by analysis: You’re analyzing ‘Why not put off the Asian idea and all the time therefore you never do bring in something that was simply anything. If you do that, then you new to the market — something you just are doing status quo managedon’t see behind bars?’ ment. But if you get rid of the idea of a mistake being necessarily bad, you DT: So, were you the one guy can get out there and meet people. who brought a hip flask of ab- You’re not going to do anything sitsinthe to the party? ting in your apartment. GW: [laughs] No, I wasn’t. I was more stereotypical — drink your DT: Where did this extroverted light beers and whiskey during foot- “can do” attitude come from?

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COMICS P9

XXday, Month XX, March 2010 Thursday,

31, 2011

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XXXX

SUDOKUFORYOU

SUD OKU FOR YOU

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Arrr matey. This scurrvy beast is today’s answerrrrrr. Crop it out, or it’ll be the the fishes for ya!

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ENT P10

Life&Arts

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Thursday, March 31, 2011 | The Daily Texan | Amber Genuske, Life&Arts Editor | (512) 232-2209 | dailytexan@gmail.com

Sci-fi film uses psychology, humor for realistic effect By Alex Williams Daily Texan Staff

Austinite sells absinthe Produced and bottled in Pontarlier, France, Tenneyson Absinthe Royale is now sold in Texas and New York. the Austinite and creator of this Swissstyled absinthe, Graham Wasilition, was awarded gold in the absinthe category at the San Francisco World Spirits Competition on Tuesday.

Source Code

Duncan Jones’ “Source Code” is an engaging, smart follow-up to his debut sci-fi film, “Moon.” Its world premiere at South By Southwest earlier this month was one of the festival’s biggest events, with thousands of fans lining up for a chance to see the film and its stars. The Daily Texan participated in a series of roundtable interviews with writer Ben Ripley, director Jones and star Jake Gyllenhaal after the film’s premiere. When asked what drew him to “Source Code,” Jones replied, “It’s more about the personal issues. The idea of identity, of not knowing who you are and having that change your worldview. It’s more about the psychology than the technology.” The film sends Captain Colter Stevens (Gyllenhaal) into the source code, a program that allows the last few minutes of someone’s life to be recreated. Stevens inhabits ON THE WEB: a man’s consciousness Visit our website for the on a train trailer and a review of that’s al“Source Code” ready been @dailytexan bombed in online.com order to fig-

Duncan Jones

Genre: Sci-fi Runtime: 93 minutes For those who like: “Groundhog Day”, “Moon”

grade: B ure out how to stop a terrorist attack. Ripley discussed the challenges of avoiding getting lost in the scientific aspects of the film. “The technology’s implied,” the writer said. “I grew up surrounded by technology, and a big thing in making science fiction believable is removing a lot of the explanations. The early drafts were belaboring. By taking the science out, it became much more like real life and believable.” The film’s story provides sensible explanations for its obscure technical basis but relies more on the heart and humor. “Humor helps you connect with people, and I think if you can get your audience on your character’s side using any tool, but particularly humor, they will go along with it,” Jones said.

weekend Head Over Reels Film Festival

As part of College of Communication Week, Communication Council will host the Head Over Reels film festival featuring student work from the college. The festival will be judged by UT professors and is the first in the college’s history. Students from all majors are welcome to attend the show. WHAT: Head Over Reels Film Festival WHERE: BUR 108 WHEN: Thursday at 6:30 p.m. HOW MUCH: Free

The Vagina Monologues The College of Liberal Arts will present “The Vagina Monologues,” a show to promote awareness about sex, relationships and feminism. The monologues are part of V-Day, a global activist movement to stop violence against women. WHAT: “The Vagina Monologues” WHERE: Student Activity Center WHEN: March 31 - April 1 HOW MUCH: $10 CONTACT: yoona.lim.1001@ gmail.com for more information

SOURCe continues on page 8

Comm Get Your Act On

Photo Illustration by Shereen Ayub

Creator makes drink ‘more floral, citrus-flavored’

THIRSTY THURSdaY

Andrew Edmonson | Daily Texan Staff

Suite 709 plays at The Parish on Sixth Street on March 26. They will be performing at the Forty Acres Fest on April 10.

Band succeeds with mixture of music genres, visual style By Julie Rene Tran Daily Texan Staff

Though evidently exhausted from spending nearly 100 hours in its first week at the recording studio for its debut EP, the night was still young on Saturday for funk-, souland rock-infused band Suite 709. Crammed hip-to-hip on a stiff, vintage sofa in the lobby of The Driskill Hotel, the band managed to perk up for their second interview of the evening. An hour later, they took the stage at The Parish to perform their seventh show this month. But as all burgeoning bands must, Suite 709 had to go back to the grind after the weekend was over. They returned to the recording studio on Monday and are set to perform at Forty Acres Fest on Saturday. Named after the hotel room where the band came together and wrote music for the first time, the music and energy of Suite 709 sound like

the brainchild of John Legend, Stevie Wonder and Janelle Monáe. Lead singer Jirod Greene, guitarist David Butler and bassist Ross Falcon grew up together near Lake Jackson, just outside of Houston. Keyboardist Dietrich Schmidt, drummer Zach Boston, saxophonist David Dalton, his younger brother and trombonist Joey Dalton all attended local Pflugerville high school, John B. Connally. “It’s sort of like salt,” Dalton said. “When you take individual chemicals that make up salt, they’re individually poisonous. But when combined together, they create something that’s edible.” Years of friendship has given the band a sense of camaraderie, Boston said. And if spending 80 to 100 hours a week in a recording studio wasn’t enough, the band members

By Gerald Rich

Walk into any career counseling office on campus, and you won’t find pamphlets telling you how to start selling your own absinthe. Nevertheless, that’s what Graham Wasilition, 26, did. On Tuesday, Wasilition took home the gold in the absinthe category at the San Francisco World Spirits Competition for his swiss-styled Tenneyson Absinthe Royale. Tenneyson only started selling this January in the first two mar-

kets that were easiest for him to get into, Texas and New York. Aiming for an enjoyable absinthe that doesn’t overpower you with the black licorice flavor, the engineer wanted to introduce Americans to a more floral, citrus-flavored absinthe blanche, or white absinthe. Three years ago, he was in Austin building semiconductors, a material used in all electronics to control the flow of electricity, after he graduated with a degree in materials science and engineering from Virginia Tech. When he sat down with The Daily Texan, Wasilition noted that he keeps a semiconductor hanging on his wall to remind him of the world he has

left far behind. Now ON THE WEB: he talks more Watch the traditional about absinthe ritual and learn t h e the difference between carewhite and green absinthe ful en@dailytexan online.com gineering of packaging so that the intricate floral latticework on his bottles doesn’t get scratched during shipping. Still wearing leather shoes, shorts and clean-cut shirts reminiscent of his days in Pi Kappa Alpha more than five years ago, Wasilition has

THIRSTY continues on page 8

Talent show! Come and watch students from the College of Communication play, dance and sing to end College of Communication Week. The show will be judged by UT professors and will have free food and drink. WHAT: Comm Get Your Act On WHERE: Jester Auditorium WHEN: April 1 HOW MUCH: Free

Bike Noir The University Co-op will host Bike Noir as part of the Cohen New Works Festival. Bike Noir is a show performed on bicycles. Mystery and drama ensues when a mysterious bike arises that wasn’t meant to be found. Audiences are encouraged to bring their own bikes to get in on the action. WHAT: Bike Noir WHERE: Meet in front of the Winship doors WHEN: April 2 at 2 p.m. HOW MUCH: Free INFO: coopnwf.org

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The Daily Texan 03-31-11