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THE DAILY TEXAN Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

SURE ARM

PASTAFARIAN FARE

A LONG RHODE

Rasta restaurant on Guadalupe brings Jamaican jerk to pasta plates

Freshman rebounds to lead team in saves

Track & field star shares his story SPORTS PAGE 6 XXXX PAGE XX

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10

SPORTS PAGE 6 >> Breaking news, blogs and more: www.dailytexanonline.com

@thedailytexan

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

facebook.com/dailytexan

UT recipients of Pell Grants rising as cuts threaten funds

TODAY Calendar ‘Sexuality and Hate Crimes’

By Amy Thornton Daily Texan Staff

The Brazilian Film Series presents this documentary on human rights themes in SRH 1.115 at 2 p.m.

Adhesions of Neurosurgery

The Institute for Neuroscience hosts a panel talk on the adhesions of neurosurgery in SEA 4.244 at 4:30 p.m.

Texas Baseball

Longhorns play Oral Roberts at UFCU Disch-Falk Field at 6 p.m. The theme is superheroes and tickets range from $5-$12.

Want to be a Rock Star

The Communication Council hosts Patrick Terry, the owner of the restaurant P. Terry’s, to discuss how flipping burgers can turn you into a rock star. The lecture will be held in BUR 208 at 6 p.m.

‘Internet Privacy is Here’

A panel of experts will discuss cyber safety at 6 p.m. in GEA 105. The Student Organization Safety Board will host the event.

Today in history In 2004 The Republic of Ireland becomes the first country in the world to ban smoking in all work places, including bars and restaurants.

Caleb Bryant Miller | Daily Texan Staff

Two partygoers embrace at the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity in West Campus on Saturday during Roundup, an annual festival among the Greek culture attended by high school and college students from across the state and country.

Roundup Crime Rates

By Marty McAndrews

Last weekend’s annual Roundup event for prospective members of UT fraternities and sororities may have seemed like a wild time for some West Campus residents, but it resulted in fewer arrests than last year, according to the Austin Police Department. Roundup, a weekend synonymous with neon colors, tank tops, fanny packs and free alcohol, is an annual celebration put on by the Interfraternity Council and the University Panhellenic Council, said Paul Kleiman, a member of the Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity. The event draws hundreds of pro-

spective UT students to Austin’s West Campus area to interest them in the University and the Greek system. This year, crimes in the West Campus area between Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard and 28th Street and Guadalupe Street and Lamar Boulevard totaled eight exclusively nonviolent crimes and zero public intoxication charges. The number was a decrease from Roundup 2010’s total of 31 crimes within the same area. In 2010, APD reported seven counts of public

ROUNDUP continues on PAGE 2

Porcelain gods

‘‘

Quote to note “I learned to treasure family, man. Live every day to the fullest and anything that you do, give it your all because you never know when it can be taken away from you.” — Trevante Rhodes Sprinter SPORTS PAGE 6

March 25-26, 2011

March 18-19, 2011

March 26-27, 2010

Public Intoxication

7

Assault w/ Injury

1

Burglary of Residence

1

Burglary of Vehicle

2

2

5

Criminal Mischief

1

1

7

Disturbance/Other Lost Property

3 3

Minor in Possesion Theft of Bicycle

1 2

Theft Total

8

1 1

1

4

27

Note: This data from APD represents crimes that occurred in the West Campus area between Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and 28th Street and Guadalupe Street and Lamar Boulevard.

GRANTS continues on PAGE 2

Speaker discusses drug war in Mexico

Campus Watch Jester West Dormitory, 201 E. 21st St. A UT police officer observed a UT student being carried into the dormitory by three other students. While talking to the officers the student began exhibiting signs of the onset of an extreme physical reaction to the overconsumption of alcohol. The student was rushed into the closest restroom and she began paying homage to the porcelain gods. Austin EMS was notified and treated the student at the scene for alcohol poisoning and transported the student to a local area hospital.

ROUNDUP CRIME STATS

Although many of the nation’s elite colleges are unsuccessfully recruiting low-income students, the University of Texas has experienced growth in the population of undergraduates receiving Federal Pell Grants, which are designated for low-income students. An analysis by The Chronicle of Higher Education of data from the Department of Education showed less than 15 percent of the undergraduates at the country’s 50 wealthiest colleges received Pell Grants in 2008-09, a percentage that has not changed since the 2004-05 school year. However, UT has experienced a growth of 1.7 percent, or 541 more students, on the Pell Grant. Currently, 8,542 UT students — about 21.4 percent — attend the University with the help of a Pell Grant. UT gained more Pell Grant students than its peer institutions, which include Michigan State University, University of Washington and The Ohio State University. Student Financial Services director Tom Melecki said there are strong concerns about the effects of Congress reducing or eliminating the program and the burden it will place on the University’s neediest students. “One of the University’s missions is that no qualified student should be prevented from attending the University for financial reasons,” Melecki said. “I think that it has done a terrific job to make sure that’s not the case.” The federal government gives Pell

By Yvonne Marquez Daily Texan Staff

Local Mexican law enforcement agencies must combat drug traffickers by avoiding corruption and receiving proper training to provide a network of safety to citizens, said Mexico’s security spokesman Monday. Alejandro Poiré, secretary of the Mexico’s National Security Council, discussed the country’s national

public safety strategy to an audience of about 60 people at the LBJ School of Public Affairs. He said Mexico’s federal government needs the state and local authorities to move more quickly to confront drug cartels. “These originally traditional cartels became very, very, very powerful organizations and structures that had a lot of money and lot of guns and great organizational capacity that really challenged the state institutions at the local level,” Poiré said.

Plataforma Mexico, a project to coordinate and integrate information about crime and public security, is one way the Mexican government is combating violence. Poiré said the database can hold up to 400 million public safety records to coordinate between the federal, state and city levels. Poiré said Mexico is also focusing on social development by providing

MEXICO continues on PAGE 2

Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

Ted Patzek, Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering chair, has been appointed to a federal advisory committee on offshore drilling safety.

Professor appointed to ocean safety team after oil spill in Gulf By Amy Thornton Daily Texan Staff

A UT professor will serve on the newly-formed Ocean Energy Safety Advisory Committee, a federal advisory body created to improve offshore drilling safety, well containment and spill response. After last year’s Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, Ted Patzek, chair of the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, was called to appear as an expert in front of the Congressional committee in charge of investigating the incident. He said he partly attributes his testimony about the causes and mit-

igation of the spill’s effects to his committee appointment. “This committee was formed after the realization that the industry was not prepared to deal with spills,” Patzek said. “We will be advising the Department of the Interior about how to safely drill in an offshore environment, how to contain spills should they ever happen and, even better, how to prevent spills from even happening.” The committee consists of 15 experts representing academia, federal agencies, the offshore oil and gas industry and environmental groups.

OCEAN continues on PAGE 2

Event focuses on immigrant family life By Katrina Tollin Daily Texan Staff

As a child of Cambodian refugees, Kappa Phi Lambda sorority member Cindy Tan experienced a childhood different from many of her peers at UT. With parents unaccustomed to American life, she was kept at home instead of being allowed to socialize with her friends when she was young and admits now she can be less social as a result of her strict upbringing. Tan shared her story at “I am an Immigrant,” an event hosted by Asian sorority Kappa Phi Lambda. The event invited other first-generation American students to discuss the cultural barriers they face with their parents. “They had their ways of growing up when they were in Cambodia, and it was very different then, especially what they went through — escaping genocide,” said Tan, a junior in the College of Natural Sciences. “Even now, there are still cultur-

Jono Foley | Daily Texan Staff

Allan Concepcion discusses the difficulty of being a second generation immigrant. Concepcion, a second generation Filipino, was wrongly put into Spanish ESL classes.

al and communication barriers between me and my parents.” Participants discussed how they try to bridge the cultural gap between themselves and their families. “For minorities, most of our parents are from a different country, and as first-generation Americans there

is a culture gap because we grew up in American culture, whereas our parents grew up in a different one,” said dance and radio-television-film senior Shirley Luong, the cultural chair of Kappa Phi Lambda and or-

GAP continues on PAGE 2


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Tuesday, March 29, 2011

The Daily Texan Volume 111, Number 172

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Lauren Winchester (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Claire Cardona (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@dailytexanonline.com The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. I f we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2011 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER High

70

Low

54

Never take out the weather.

OCEAN continues from PAGE 1

ROUNDUP continues from PAGE 1

“My hope is that working with both sides will enable both sides to do a better job and reach a consensus,” Patzek said. “I hope that getting such a powerful group of people together in a room to talk about these procedures will help everybody.” The committee will enable the government to speed up the permitting process and make sure that the wells are being permitted in a safe manner, Patzek said. “This is a complicated situation,” Patzek said. “The Gulf of Mexico provides about a third of oil in the U.S., so there is enormous pressure to speed up the permitting process, both from the drilling companies who are going bankrupt and the overall need for oil.” John Ekerdt, associate dean in the Cockrell School of Engineering, said the findings of the committee could potentially impact policy and regulation of the industry. “We are always honored when one of our faculty are invited to serve on these prestigious boards, and it’s important for them to bring the thought leaders from various academic communities since they are independent and without a position,” Ekerdt said. The appointment is a two-year commitment and will require Patzek to travel to Washington, D.C., monthly for committee meetings and workshops. “This appointment is reflective of what kind of an engineering department we have,” said petroleum engineering senior Sarah Hatley. “It’s exciting to have professors who are the best in their field and are being recognized in the academic world and by government officials.”

The Daily Texan

This newspaper was printed with pride by The Daily Texan and Texas Student Media.

Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Winchester Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Claire Cardona Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Cervantes Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viviana Aldous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doug Luippold, Dave Player News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lena Price Associate News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Will Alsdorf, Aziza Musa, Audrey White Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Melissa Ayala, Allie Kolechta, Marty McAndrews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matt Stottlemyre, Ahsika Sanders Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sydney Fitzgerald Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ashley Morgan, Austin Myers, Reese Rackets Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Veronica Rosalez Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jake Rector, Martina Geronimo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Daniel Nuncio, Simonetta Nieto Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jeff Heimsath Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lauren Gerson, Danielle Villasana Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Torrey, Tamir Kalifa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shannon Kintner, Erika Rich Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amber Genuske Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Priscilla Totiyapungprasert, Gerald Rich Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katherine Anne Stroh, Francisco Marin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Allistair Pinsof, Julie Rene Tran Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Will Anderson Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dan Hurwitz Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Hummer, Trey Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jon Parrett, Austin Laymance Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carolynn Calabrese Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Victoria Elliott Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Joshua Barajas Associate Multimedia Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rafael Borges Senior Video Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Patrick Zimmerman Senior Videographer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Janese Quitugua Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

Issue Staff Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lauren Giudice, Yvonne Marquez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katrina Tollin, Amy Thornton Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thu Pham, Brenna Cleeland, Charlotte Halloran-Couch Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michelle Wainwright, Alyssa Hye Jin Kang Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jono Foley, Derek Stout Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chris Medina, Alex Endress, Julie Thompson Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Danielle Wallace, Alex Williams Editorial Cartoonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Thomas Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tyler Suder, John Massingill, Gillian Rhodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katie Carrell, Betsy Cooper, Brianne Klitgaard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sammy Martinez Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amanda Sardos

Advertising

Director of Advertising & Creative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Assistant to Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Local Sales Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brad Corbett Broadcast Manager/Local Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus/National Sales Consultant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kathryn Abbas Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maryanne Lee Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cameron McClure, Samantha Chavez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Selen Flores, Patti Zhang, Sarah Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veronica Serrato, Ryan Ford, Ashley Janik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susie Reinecke, Rachel Huey Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rene Gonzalez Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bianca Krause, Alyssa Peters Special Editions Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elena Watts Student Special Editions Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sheri Alzeerah Special Projects Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adrienne Lee

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3/29/11

intoxication, seven counts of criminal mischief and five vehicle burglaries, among other crimes. The weekend of March 18, APD reported zero public intoxication charges and one criminal mischief charge, along with several other incidents. Full data reports are not yet available from APD and the UT Police Department. Kleiman, a history and Plan I honors senior, said fraternities and sororities use Roundup as a way to advertise and lay the groundwork for future recruitment. Fraternities invited musical acts such as the Ying Yang Twins and the Academy Award-winning rap group Three 6 Mafia to interest UT students pres-

ent and future alike. Almost all fraternities have some kind of risk management policy, which includes elements such as sober fraternity brothers, using thirdparty vendors to dispense alcohol, keeping guest lists at the door and checking identification, Kleiman said. “In AEPi, we have a position on our executive board that is responsible for risk management during social events,” Kleiman said. “I think that most fraternities really do a good job at getting people the proper help that they need in case there is an emergency.” He said despite Roundup’s negative reputation among some West

MEXICO continues from PAGE 1 more drug rehabilitation services, as well as making safe school programs and more social workers available to children with a family history of drug-related violence. Poiré said the problems were originally caused by the demand of drugs in the United States, and the problem worsened when cartels gained access to guns from across the border. “We have to recognize that this is not just Mexico’s problem,” Poiré said.

Public affairs professor Peter Ward said it was important for Poiré to not focus on the death toll and violence in Mexico but what the administration what was doing about it. “Whichever party is in power for the next six years, whoever the president is, it’s going to be crucial to see the structural changes continue into the future,” Ward said. “I was very struck [by the] very dramatic improvements from the previous administration and the [cur-

GAP continues from PAGE 1 ganizer of the event. Topics included to what extent students use their native language to communicate with their parents, and if they are concerned about one day being able to pass on their culture.

“Growing up all I spoke was Spanish,” said advertising junior José Mata. “Now my mom knows English, but my dad doesn’t really, and I find myself when I talk to them forgetting my Spanish, and it’s scary.”

APPLICATIONS are being accepted for the following student positions with Texas Student Media

Daily Texan Managing Editor, Summer 2011

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2012 Cactus Yearbook Editor Application forms and a list of qualifications are available in the Office of the Director, William Randolph Hearst Building (HSM), 2500 Whitis Ave., Room 3.304. The TSM Board of Operating Trustees will interview applicants and make the appointment at 1:00 p.m. on April 15, 2011 in the College of Communication (CMA), LBJ Room #5.160, 2600 Whitis Avenue. DEADLINE: Noon, Tuesday, April 5, 2011 Please return completed applications, transcripts and all supporting materials to the Director’s Office. Interested applicants are invited to stop by and visit with the Director to discuss student positions.

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Campus residents, many fraternities and sororities also hold events during Roundup to raise money for their philanthropy. UTPD Crime Prevention Officer Darrell Halstead said his office is very concerned about Roundup weekend because of its invitation for underage drinking. He said UTPD notified APD and learned they had additional officers to cover the area during the weekend. UTPD Chief Robert Dahlstrom said the department was a little busier than usual, because of a combination of increased student presence in West Campus and copious amounts of alcohol. “I’m not a fan of anyone giving minors alcohol,” Dahlstrom said. “They don’t make good decisions. Nobody makes good deci-

rent President Felipe] Calderón administration.” Public affairs graduate student Raul Torres has not visited his hometown of Chihuahua, Mexico, since 2005 because of the drug cartel related violence. He said his family members who still live in Chihuahua are in denial about the violence. He said his family members still have to work and go to school, but they are sure to be home by 9 p.m. “My take is [Poiré] boasted what his political party in Mexico is doing and maybe play[ed] down what is still lacking,” Torres said. Student ethnicities represented included Chinese, Mexican, Korean, Cantonese, Taiwanese, Cambodian, Vietnamese and Filipino. In addition to members of Kappa Phi Lambda, the 32 participants at the discussion included members of Sigma Phi Omega, another Asian sorority; Sigma Lambda Beta, a Hispanic fraternity; and Omega Phi Gamma, an Asian fraternity. “I’m sure there are plenty of other people that feel the same way that we did as a kid, and it’s just nice to be able to talk about it and be open about it,” said Lisa Doan, a corporate communication senior and the community service chair of Kappa Phi Lambda. “It gives us the opportunity to feel like we’re not alone in this situation.”

sions when they’re drunk. An unlucky bad decision could lead to one of these kids killing someone else or getting themselves killed.” Radio-television-film senior Joseph Hassage, who lives at the House of Commons Co-op in West Campus, said he witnessed the darker side of Roundup firsthand. “The porch at my house looks out onto Rio Grande and I would just watch people go by in these crazy costumes of theirs and throw up and get into fights,” Hassage said. Hassage said that he cannot believe that crime did not drastically increase during Roundup. “I saw a guy get a beer dropped on his head from three stories up and start crying,” Hassage said. “Someone should be arrested for that.”

GRANTS continues from PAGE 1 Grants to the lowest income, highestneed students around, Melecki said. “Both state and federal financial aid programs have helped me achieve my dream of becoming the first in my family to get a college degree,” said Plan I government and history junior Philip Wiseman. Wiseman said his decision to come to UT was based off of the financial aid package and scholarships he would receive for coming here rather than elsewhere. “Financial aid, especially federal, contributes a lot to middle-class America’s ability to send its kids to college,” Wiseman said. “Without it, we’ll revert back to the time when higher education was only accessible for the rich.” Each Pell Grant is approximately one-fifth of the cost of attending UT for one semester, and the difference is made up using state financial aid and institutional need-based financial aid, Melecki said. This difference highlights the concern about the potential cuts to the state need-based programs. “We’re seeing more first-generation, low-income students applying, and we’re admitting more of those students,” said Augustine Garza, deputy director in the Office of Admissions. “Which drives the question of whether we can provide financial resources that they need to let them come to UT.”

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Tuesday, March 29, 2011 | The Daily Texan | Austin Myers, Wire Editor | dailytexanonline.com

Airstrikes hinder Gadhafi supporters President defends,

clarifies U.S. action in conflict in Libya

By Ryan Lucas The Associated Press

BIN JAWWAD, Libya — Rebel forces bore down Monday on Moammar Gadhafi’s hometown of Sirte, a key government stronghold where a brigade headed by one of the Libyan leader’s sons was digging in to defend the city and setting the stage for a bloody and possibly decisive battle. The opposition made new headway in its rapid advance westward through oil towns and along stretches of empty desert highway toward Sirte and beyond to the big prize — the capital, Tripoli. But the rebels remain woefully outgunned by Gadhafi’s forces, who swept the insurgents from positions in eastern Libya until the international intervention forced government troops to withdraw. Rebels acknowledged they could not have held their ground without international air and cruise missile strikes. Libya state television reported new NATO airstrikes after nightfall, targeting “military and civilian targets� in the cities of Garyan and Mizda about 40 miles and 90 miles respectively from Tripoli. NATO insisted that it was seek-

By Ben Feller The Associated Press

Albert Facelly | Associated Press

In this image taken during an organized trip by the Libyan authorities, an armed Libyan man loyal to Moammar Gadhafi is seen on a street under their control in Misrata, Libya on Monday.

ing only to protect civilians and not to give air cover to an opposition march. But that line looked set to become even more blurred. The airstrikes now are clearly enabling

rebels bent on overthrowing Gadhafi to push toward the final line of defense on the road to the capital. “Gadhafi is not going to give up Sirte easily because straightaway

after Sirte is Misrata, and after that it’s straight to Gadhafi’s house,� said Gamal Mughrabi, a 46-year-old rebel fighter. “So Sirte is the last line of defense.�

WASHINGTON — Defending the first military conflict launched on his watch, President Barack Obama declared Monday night that the United States intervened in Libya to prevent a slaughter of civilians that would have stained the world’s conscience and “been a betrayal of who we are.� Yet he ruled out targeting Moammar Gadhafi, warning that trying to oust him militarily would be a costly mistake. Obama announced that NATO would take command over the entire Libya operation on Wednesday, keeping his pledge to get the U.S. out of the lead — but offering no estimate on when the conflict might end. He never described the U.S.-led military campaign as a “war� and gave no details on its costs, but he offered an expansive case for why he believed it was in the national interest of the United States and allies

to act. In blunt terms, Obama said the U.S.-led response stopped Gadhafi’s advances and halted a slaughter he warned could have shaken the stability of an entire region. Amid protests and crackdowns across the Middle East and North Africa, Obama stated his case that Libya stands alone. “In this particular country, at this particular moment, we were faced with the prospect of violence on a horrific scale,� he said. “Broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake,� Obama said. “If we tried to overthrow Gadhafi by force, our coalition would splinter. We would likely have to put U.S. troops on the ground or risk killing many civilians from the air. The dangers faced by our men and women in uniform would be far greater. So would the costs and our share of the responsibility for what comes next.�

Rise in gas, food prices to restrict spending power, impede economic growth By Martin Crutsinger The Associated Press

On March 16, Larry Buckley leaves a Dollar Tree store in Batavia, N.Y. Consumer spending rises at its fastest pace since October, led by purchases of autos and gasoline. That big jump in incomes is reflected from a cut in Social Security taxes, which will give workers $105.4 billion in extra take-home pay this year.

WASHINGTON — Americans are earning and spending more, but a lot of the extra money is going down their gas tanks. Gas prices have drained more than half the extra cash Americans are getting this year from a cut in Social Security taxes. Unlike some other kinds of spending, paying more for gas doesn’t help the economy much. Most of the money goes overseas, and higher prices leave people with less money to buy appliances, computers, plane tickets and other things that can be postponed. “When food and gasoline prices are rising, it causes people to hunker down,� said Chris G. Christopher Jr., senior economist at IHS Global Insight. Consumer spending jumped 0.7

David Duprey Associated Press

percent last month, and personal incomes rose 0.3 percent, the Commerce Department said Monday. Both gains reflected the cut of 2 percentage points in the Social Security tax, raising take-home pay. They also illustrated how higher gas prices are stressing household budgets. After adjusting for inflation, spending rose just 0.3 percent. After-tax incomes actually fell 0.1 percent.

The Social Security tax cut will give most households an additional $1,000 to $2,000 this year. In December, when President Barack Obama signed it into law, economists predicted higher take-home pay would lead to more spending and stronger economic growth. But gas prices have jumped more than 50 cents a gallon this year. In late December, they hit $3 a gallon for the first time in two years. Last

week, they averaged $3.58 nationwide, according to AAA’s daily fuel gauge survey. Higher gas prices generally don’t help the economy, even though they force people to spend more. The additional money doesn’t go toward making more products in the United States. And it seldom pays for higher salaries or new jobs. It generally ends up going overseas to oilproducing nations.

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Tuesday, March 29, 2011 | The Daily Texan | Lauren Winchester, Editor-in-Chief | (512) 232-2212 | editor@dailytexanonline.com

Overview

gallery

Celebrate Cesar Chavez Thursday may be the last time Texans celebrate Cesar Chavez Day if state Republicans have their way. Cesar Chavez Day, celebrated in Texas on March 31, commemorates the famous Mexican-American worker rights and civil rights activist. It is celebrated in 10 states, according to the Cesar E. Chavez Holiday organization, and is an optional holiday in Texas. Rep. Tryon Lewis, R-Odessa, filed a bill this session that would eliminate Cesar Chavez Day and replace it with Texas Hispanic Heritage Day, which would observe “the battle for independence from Spain in Mexico, including the area now known as Texas.” The proposed holiday would be celebrated on Sept. 16. Eliminating Cesar Chavez Day, a day that celebrates one of the most prominent and influential Mexican-Americans, and instead creating a holiday ultimately celebrating the great state of Texas, is hardly a replacement. Just what is Lewis’ justification? “[Cesar Chavez’] connection to Texas was ephemeral at best, and if you think of all the Texans of all ethnicities who have made significant impacts, who are not recognized, it’s just always odd to me that Cesar Chavez was,” he told The El Paso Times. Texas is hardly lacking in holidays that celebrate the state of Texas, and based on Lewis’ thoughts on the topic, he’s much less interested in celebrating Hispanic culture than simply making a political power play by tying up the Legislature with a pointless bill. We hope legislators focus on the more pertinent issues facing the Legislature this session and that Thursday will not be the state’s last celebration of Cesar Chavez.

Good riddance to Rick O’Donnell After complaints from UT System alumni, administrators and lawmakers, the UT System Board of Regents has reassigned controversial appointee Rick O’Donnell. Why UT System chairman Gene Powell created the $200,000-per-year advisory position is unclear, especially when the job description closely matches that of Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa. But what’s more troubling is O’Donnell’s work with the Texas Public Policy Foundation, a nonprofit conservative think tank. In 2008, the foundation proposed seven radical reforms to higher education, including one that would emphasize “teaching and research as separate efforts in higher education.” While working with the foundation, O’Donnell published a paper that questioned the benefits and value of higher education research. Though it is unfortunate that the System hired O’Donnell in the first place, the reassignment was a necessary move. O’Donnell is now a non-contract System employee who works under Scott Kelly, executive vice chancellor for business affairs. O’Donnell’s employment is expected to end Aug. 31, 2011, System spokesman Matt Flores told The Daily Texan. In the meantime, he will still receive an exorbitant salary of $200,000 — money that could have instead been used to hire more associate professors, offer financial aid to students or cover 8 percent of Mack Brown’s salary.

We have failed our intelligent design Editor’s note: This column is in response to than those who humbly submit to faith and an opinion piece published Monday by Eric acknowledge their humanness. Pianka entitled “We have not been ‘designed’ Are we not also curious as to how the creintelligently.” ated people could so boldly question the intentions of the creator? He is the one who designed us and not the other way around. By Joel Francia Contrary to the belief that science erodes Daily Texan Guest Columnist the credibility of God and his intelligent We like to complain and think we are en- design, I would like to suggest that science titled to every benefit and every good out paints God more beautifully and credibly there. I guess that’s part of being human. As because of the natural wonders we discover soon as we find one flaw in nature that we and because of the curious minds he has can rationalize to be the poor engineering of blessed us with. God, we use it and write about how we have Consider yourself the grand designer not been designed intelligently. We find a of a city who has laid streets out a certain few more cases, because we think we are al- way and fashioned districts and houses in a ways right, and then assert that our creator certain order. You have a purpose for these has failed us once again. things, yet the people who are in it just don’t But has it ever occurred to us that perhaps see how everything goes together. They start we have failed our intelligent design and not complaining and redesigning what you have the other way around? Have we asked our- built because they think you are inept. The selves how different things could have been people feel good about their accomplishif we had lived in accordance to what God in- ments for a moment but quickly find out tended for us in the beginning? Anyone who how, because there were several designers would say “yes” to these questions would be involved in the process, their reasoning was the real arrogant and silly individual, rather not always in sync. Sounds like a familiar

scenario, doesn’t it? There is no doubt that there are things in nature that we question, their logic, processes, designs, purposes, etc. We can all come up with one if we think hard enough about the circumstances in our own lives. But in every complaint, there is something majestic about creation that we cannot deny. Just take a walk by the river or watch the sun rise. The beauty in any design cannot be seen by skeptical and questioning eyes. Only those who are open and willing to marvel at its wonder can experience it. What is so humbling in this process is that in spite of all the redesigning that we’ve done, accusations we’ve made and arrogance we’ve shown, we have a designer and a creator who is always there to fix us. We are rude intelligent creations, but we are still loved. Just think about that for a second, and maybe we can start to realize that the crux of the matter is that we have failed our intelligent design and not the other way around. Francia is a Jesuit Volunteer for Catholic Charities of Central Texas.

gallery THe FiriNg liNe Cybersafety at UT

reCyCle

sUBMiT a FiriNg liNe

Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange news stand where you found it.

E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

legalese Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Every day, we hear stories about people who have had their credit and investments destroyed within even just a few hours of a deviant individual stealing and manipulating their personal information. While you are online, even if you are operating under a username, a driven identity thief can find ways to access your full name and email, and from there they can find information about you online through popular social media websites such as Twitter, Facebook and even Myspace. With this information, an individual can build a profile of who you are and what you do, and use it to try and gain access to your private information and identity. Similarly, we hear from friends, and even friends of friends, about people who are denied a job, internship or scholarship due to information or pictures posted on their Facebook profiles. To ensure the cybersafety of the students at UT, the Student Organization Safety Board is hosting an event tonight to bring information to students about these rapidly-growing topics. The event will feature a panel of experts and an employee from Google, providing a vital learning experience for any college student in this age of instant information. The program will aim at empowering students with the tools and know-how to stay safe online while maximizing the utility of the Internet and social networks. Topics will range from networking in the workplace to having a hirable social network profile to maintaining your privacy and even preventing identity theft. If you are interested in attending this event, come to Room 105 of Mary E. Gearing Hall at 6 p.m. today.

— Andrew Ziegler Ziegler is the publicity chair for the Student Organization Safety Board and a government freshman.


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Tuesday, March 29, 2011

Women in Medicine holds annual benefit for Ghana hospital By Ahsika Sanders Daily Texan Staff

After several weeks spent volunteering at a low-income maternity ward in Ghana, former Longhorn Emily Hsu came back to the states with a strong desire to help the hospitals. Hsu traveled to Ghana after hearing about a friend’s summer teaching at a small school in Kumasi with Longhope Bodaou, a Ghana native and a teacher in Bryan, Texas. She moved to Kumasi in August 2005 and lived with Bodaou and her family where she fondly remembers having hot tea and homemade bread every morning before heading down the road to Manhyia Hospital, where she would spend most of the day in the maternity ward. Hsu said her hands-on experience was “invaluable,” recalling standing next to a surgeon as he performed a cesarean section. “I was always right there as they talked through the procedure and I experienced everything,” she said. “When I came home I wanted to give back to the people who had taught me so much.” Hsu said she remembers women having to supply their own sanitary supplies such as alcohol, cotton swabs and trash bags to lay on. She said she will never forget the day she had to watch over a baby who was born breathing weakly, and the hospital couldn’t provide an incubator. “Imagine a basket made out of bars with a little padding; that’s all they had,” she said. Hsu brought hospital stories back to the 40 Acres and in 2006 the organization, Women in

Medicine, held a pageant to raise money for Manhyia Hospital. HOPE Africa, an annual charity pageant named after Hsu’s host family friend Longhope, has raised on average $2,000 a year since its creation five years ago. The money has bought mosquito nets for the maternity ward, retiled the floor and provided blankets and other supplies. Computer sciences senior Steven Rapp, one of six contestants in this year’s pageant, and was named Mr. HOPE Africa 2011. As the only non-medicine-related major, Rapp said he felt like the odd man out, but he saw his participation as proof that anyone can lend a helping hand. “Thankfully, despite me not knowing a damn thing about anatomy, I can still help this hospital out with my contribution,” he said. Amanda Sunny, a human development and family sciences senior, said her experiences with West African hospitals have been humbling. She said she appreciates HOPE Africa and believes it’s unfortunate more light isn’t shed on the hospital insufficiencies in West Africa. “I’ve noticed on television that they tend to go for moneymaker problems, and I guess a hospital without enough beds doesn’t appeal to the public as much as other issues,” she said. Manhyia Hospital is still working to purchase incubators for the maternity ward, and Hsu said she hopes the pageant proceeds will soon help them realize that dream. “I know HOPE Africa doesn’t raise $10,000 every year but it does help,” Hsu said. “If the money can continue to help them take small strides then it will continue to be worthwhile.”

Derek Stout | Daily Texan Staff

Lindsey Newman wrestles with Anna Fleury during a performance of “Stockpile,” a play about the constant struggles of squirrels. The play, which has daily repeat performances through Friday, is part of the sixth biennial Cohen New Works Festival.

UT festival showcases student plays co-producer of the festival. “It’s so ate student Nikiko Masumoto reexciting to see how what started as enacted her thesis, “A Japanese Peran exercise way back in September formance of Memory.” She led a discussion afterward about the internPeople dressed as squirrels run- is now a full play.” She said the festival offers stument of Japanese-Americans. ning, digging and chasing one another across the LBJ Library lawn is an uncommon sight. A group of UT students performed “Stockpile,” a play about squirrels’ hoarding and their attempt to coexist and share their food, as a part of the Cohen New Works Festival. About 50 people attended the play. — Suzan Zeder, Co-producer of Cohen New Works Festival The sixth biennial festival is a weeklong showcase of new work created by students. The festival, which runs until April 2, features 37 dents an amazing opportunity to Masumoto, whose grandparents works ranging from architecture to express themselves. were relocated to an internment music to plays about squirrels. “This is a festival that was orga- camp in Arizona, gave a personal “This idea for the play actually nized by students, implemented by performance about the camps that started in a class of mine where we students, designed by students, and Japanese-Americans were forced all came out, and we watched squir- I think it shows them a sense of em- into during World War II. She rerels, and we followed them, and we powerment and that their creative told various stories such as that of did some writing on them,” said Su- voice is important,” Zeder said. a man who could barely speak bezan Zeder, a theater professor and Later, theatre and dance gradu- cause his education was disrupted By Lauren Giudice Daily Texan Staff

Medical students volunteer to raise funds for hospitals in Africa in need of supplies

It’s so exciting to see how what started as an exercise way back in September is now a full play.

by being imprisoned and a woman whose last memory of her husband was of him being dragged away by the FBI. “I am trying to perform memory in multiple capacities,” Masumoto said. “I am trying to highlight the individual experiences of Japanese-Americans and honor the experiences that they carry. But at the same time, I am trying to build bridges of understanding so that we can carry their memory — both of them as individuals but also of the event.” Theatre and dance graduate student Cassidy Browning, of the University Co-op’s Engaging Research Subcommittee, said she was impressed with Masumoto’s performance of multiple identities. “I think it was a very powerful use of her own stories, and allowing us to see those people’s stories and voices and experiences through her memories,” Browning said.

Communication Week kicks off College Board president to quit; leaves legacy of higher standards

Students wrote in colorful chalk on the plaza outside the Communication building Monday morning to kick off College of Communication Week. The annual showcase will host events to help promote student unity and display students’ work, said committee chair Elizabeth Rives. Today Patrick Terry, founder and owner of local burger business P. Terry’s, will speak at 6 p.m. in BUR 208. “We’re trying to amp this year and make it really awesome because we’re really proud of what the students do here and not a lot of people know about what goes on here,” Rives said. Meet the Professor Night was Monday and featured four professors from the College of Communication holding a “life raft debate.” They used their major-specific skills to debate who would be more fit to escape an island, said Grant Schaefer, an advertising freshman and Communication Council member.

Caperton gives up position after overseeing ‘golden age’ for education organization By Lauren Giudice Daily Texan Staff

Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

Micaela Neuman leads Meet the Professor Night: The Life Raft Debate, a way for students to learn about the different departments and majors in the College of Communication. The winner, communication and journalism professor Tracy Dahlby, received an oar to autograph and keep for the year until the next debate.

Tomorrow, there will be a town hall meeting with the deans and department chairs of the college. — Yvonne Marquez

College Board President Gaston Caperton announced he will step down from his position effective on June 30, 2012. The search for his replacement will begin in the next few months. “I am deeply grateful for the opportunity to work on these important issues with such a talented and dedicated staff and board,” Caperton said in a March 25 statement. In 1999, he was appointed the eighth president of the College

Board, the organization that oversees SAT and Advanced Placement testing. During his tenure the SAT added an essay to the reading and math portions of the exam. “During a time of great economic crisis, I am especially proud of the work we have done to open the doors of college to underserved students and I am committed to continuing this important work for the next 15 months,” Caperton said. Bruce Walker, UT’s vice provost for special projects, has held several roles on the Board and was on the College Board’s board of trustees while Caperton was president. “When he took over as president, the College Board was a rather stale organization that was focused mainly on tests,” Walker said. “He raised the

sights of the members to look more nationally at educational issues.” UT is a member of the College Board, which allows the University to influence board actions. Walker said there is a strong reGaston Caperton lationship beCollege Board President tween the College Board, UT and students. “We’ll look back at his presidency as sort of a golden age of the College Board in terms of advocacy for students, particularly those who do not have access to higher education,” Walker said.

Opening for an At-Large position with the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees The Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees has reopened their search for an At-Large Place 6 student board member. This is a 2-year term from June 2011 to May 2013. This board oversees the largest student media program in the United States. Your job as a board member? *Adopt annual budget *Review monthly income and expenses *Select KVRX station manager, TSTV station manager, Texas Travesty and Cactus yearbook editors, The Daily Texan managing editor *Certify candidates seeking election to TSM board and for The Daily Texan editor *Review major purchase requests Time commitment? About five hours per month (one meeting, reading before meeting, committee work). Pick up an application at the Hearst Student Media building (HSM), 25th and Whitis Ave, Room 3.304, or print a application from our website: http://www.utexas.edu/tsm/board/ The Board will appoint a student to that position at their next meeting on April 15, 2011.

Deadline is noon on Tuesday, April 5, 2011.


SPTS P6

6

SPORTS

Tuesday, March 29, 2011 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Will Anderson, Sports Editor | (512) 232-2210 | sports@dailytexanonline.com

SIDELINE WHAT TO WATCH Heat @ Cavaliers

Date: Tonight Time: 6 p.m. On air: NBA TV

TWEET OF THE DAY Jordan Hicks @JHicks_3

Surgery day.. Beginning of the road to recovery!

Ryan Edwards | Daily Texan Staff

Texas sprinter Trevante Rhodes runs in last week’s tri meet against Arkansas and UCLA. Rhodes has faced many obstacles in his life, including Hurricane Katrina, a torn ACL and his grandmother passing away.

RockyRhodes

LONGHORN SPOTLIGHT Jordan Hamilton #3 Position: Guard Height: 6’7” Class: Sophomore Hometown: Compton, Calif.

By Chris Medina

Hiding behind a smile that brightens any room lies a journey that would make any normal man crumble.

S

mall towns tend to affect people differently. Some cannot wait to leave to find a new way of life, never to look back again. Others depend on that way of life and become crippled by it, causing them to stay forever. Trevante Rhodes chose a middle ground. “Living in such a small town really helped me treasure family,” Rhodes said.

“I didn’t really spend that much time with other people. I am really influenced by the people I’m with and I was usually with my family, who are great people.” Rhodes, a junior sprinter for the Longhorns, grew up in Ponchatoula, La., a tiny town with a population of little more than 6,000 that lies 45 minutes north of New Orleans. His family, a lot like him, is known for their optimism.

“I feel like they have helped me become who I am now,” Rhodes said. “They are bunch of happy-go-lucky people. They don’t have a care in the world other than just trying to see everyone happy and successful.” This state of mind forms and secures strong bonds, yet does not always protect one from obstacles in life that test the very strength of those family ties. In 2005, Hurricane Katrina stormed through the Gulf of Mexico and ripped through the heart of Louisiana, changing the lives of its citizens forever. Rhodes, a freshman in high school at the time, had his and his family’s emotional and psychological strength tested

during the disaster. “I had a couple of family members affected by that,” Rhodes said. “We actually had to go find one of my cousins at the Superdome. It was devastating knowing that my family was in that position, but we found a way to make it work. Luckily, there were no deaths.” Through this experience, Rhodes learned some important lessons. “I learned to treasure family, man,” Rhodes said. “Live everyday to the fullest and anything that you do, give it your all because you never know when it can be taken away from you.”

RHODES continues on PAGE 7

FOOTBALL

BASEBALL

Defensive back Aaron Williams runs out of the tunnel prior to a loss against Baylor last season. Williams is expected to be drafted in the first round of the NFL Draft.

Freshman pitcher excels coming out of bullpen

Former Longhorns perform for scouts today four weeks to get ready. Sam Acho, DE/LB Here are some of the Longhorns The biggest draw from the comwho stand to improve their draft bine was Acho’s versatility, which Despite a full-fledged work stop- stack the most today: led to teams looking at him both page in the NFL, one inevitability of as an end in a 4-3 formation or a summer is drawing ever nearer: the linebacker in a 3-4. He has lots of 2011 draft. Aaron Williams, DB room to improve, especially if he The draft begins April 28 in New Williams’ numbers were adegets under the bench press on TuesYork City and the Carolina Panthers quate at the combine but his perday. Acho set one of the best times are on the clock first. Everything is formance in individual drills unever for a defensive lineman in the less certain without a new collective derwhelmed those in attendance. three-cone drill but could help himbargaining agreement, but that isn’t He should fare better practic- self out with a faster 40-yard dash. stopping Texas prospects from following a rigorous schedule to pre- ing here on campus. If he shows The biggest factor might be whethpare for it, including the school’s pro that he’s gotten bigger and stron- er Acho shows up positioning himger over the past month, he could self as a quick, blitzing linebacker or day today on campus. Professional scouts, league exec- even become an interesting safe- if he’s more focused on getting bigutives and members of the media ty prospect. His biggest assets re- ger in preparation for some time on will all watch the Longhorn hope- main his athleticism and natu- the line. fuls go through a number of drills, ral instincts in coverage, meanincluding position drills and indi- ing he should be a valuable draftee at a number of positions or Michael Huey, OL vidual workouts. Many of the Texas players were even as a special teams starter Huey, who was not invited to the also scrutinized at last month’s NFL and he should have no problem combine, needs to show he has the combine, but the Texas pro day of- coming off the boards in the later same size and strength that fellow fers them a second shot at improv- rounds. The junior’s performance ing their numbers, with the added on Tuesday will determine exactly benefits of familiarity and an extra when that happens. NFL continues on PAGE 7 By Will Anderson Daily Texan Staff

Corey Knebel came into pitch for Texas in the 12th inning of a 4-4 tie with Hawaii on Feb. 26. It was only the freshman’s second time seeing action on the season, but his coaches had confidence he could throw three innings. He could throw three, but he couldn’t throw four. Knebel surrendered a single and threw two wild pitches to lose the game in the 15th inning for Texas. There were two outs when Knebel made the mistake. “I had that freshman mentality of trying to get that last batter, and I overthrew it,” Knebel said. “I’ve learned to relax now and calm down in those situations.” He’s certainly seen more of those situations. Knebel was named the Longhorn’s closer a week after the

TRIVIA TUESDAY

?

Who is Texas baseball’s all-time leader in saves? Answer. Huston Street 41

Andrew Torrey Daily Texan Staff file photo

By Jon Parrett Daily Texan Staff

Texas sophomore Jordan Hamilton was named to an Associated Press Third Team All-American. Hamilton was first on the Longhorns in scoring with 18.6 points per game and second in rebounding with 7.7 per game.

VS. Date: Tonight Time: 6 p.m. Place: UFCU Disch-Falk Field

Hawaii series, following two saves he picked up against then-No. 9 Stanford. He now leads the team with five saves and is second in appearances. He will look to add to those totals tonight as No. 8 Texas (17-7) hosts Oral Roberts (8-9). Knebel has had a pretty good start to a career that almost wasn’t played at Texas. Growing up in nearby Georgetown, he’d always wanted to come to Texas, but wasn’t recruited highly by the Longhorns. Knebel was ready to play at An-

KNEBEL continues on PAGE 7

Lawrence Pert | Daily Texan Staff

Texas closer Corey Knebel pitches in the ninth inning in a win against Kansas State.

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SPTS/CLASS P7

SPORTS 7

Tuesday, March 29, 2011 Men’s BAsketBALL

Former Missouri head coach Mike Anderson will coach at Arkansas next season.

Missouri begins search for head coach Denmon. “But you also have to wish Colorado reaches NIT semifinals him the best.” One Big 12 team is still competAnderson went 111-57 at Missouri Purdue head coach Matt Paint- and led the Tigers to the Elite Eight ing in postseason play, but it’s not the er is on the wish list for Missouri’s in 2009, the same year they won their team most experts predicted. Colorado plays Alabama tonight vacant coaching position and will first Big 12 tournament title. in the NIT semifinals at Madison meet with school officials WednesSquare Garden in New York City. day, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reKansas upset again ported Monday. The Buffaloes defeated Kent State Missouri is looking to replace Kansas’ 71-61 loss to Virginia last week to set a school record for Mike Anderson, who took the Ar- Commonwealth in the Elite Eight of victories in a season (24) and reach kansas job last week after five seasons the NCAA tournament Sunday was the semifinals of the tournament for with the Tigers. an all too familiar situation for Jay- the first time since 1991. Colorado Missouri offered Anderson a con- hawk fans of late. won its only NIT title in 1940, when tract extension and raise for seven VCU became the latest school from there was a six-team field. years at almost $2 million per year a mid-major conference to knock off Guards Cory Higgins and Alec before he jumped ship for Arkansas. Bill Self’s squad in the NCAA tourna- Burks have carried the Buffaloes in Those figures are more than Paint- ment, joining Bucknell, Bradley and the postseason, combining to average er currently makes at Purdue and Northern Iowa. The Jayhawks haven’t 45.7 points on 57 percent shooting could be a deciding factor in the made it to the Final Four since their from the field in three games. coach’s decision. championship run in 2008. Higgins, a senior, needs just 14 Missouri’s season ended with a Kansas became only the third points to become Colorado’s allsecond-round loss to Cincinnateam in NCAA tournament history time scoring leader and the sevti in the NCAA tournament, but to win 35 games and fail to reach the enth Big 12 player to surpass the the Tigers are ready to move on Final Four. 2,000-point plateau. without Anderson. “When you put yourself in a posiBurks has set the Buffalo’s sin“Hopefully, we get somebody here tion to cash in, you’ve gotta take adgle season scoring record with 759 who’s really good and our senior vantage of it, ” Self said. “Bottom line, points, good for sixth on the Big 12 leadership will carry us to the promised land,” forward Laurence Bow- as much as I’d like to think it, these season chart and just 35 points shy of ers told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. opportunities don’t happen every former Oklahoma Sooner Blake Grif“We’re still planning on winning a year. You’ve got to make the most fin’s sophomore scoring record. It’s been a wild postseason run for national championship, although he’s of them.” It will be the first Final Four with- the Buffaloes after they were surat Arkansas.” Anderson’s departure left the Ti- out a No. 1 or a No. 2 seed. VCU prisingly left out of the NCAA tourjoins Kentucky, Connecticut and nament. Should they win, Coloragers with mixed feelings. “You have to be kind of mad and Butler in Houston for a shot at the do would face either Wichita State or disappointed,” said guard Marcus national title. Washington State in the NIT Finals. By Austin Laymance Daily Texan Staff

Beth Hall Associated Press

RHODES continues from PAGE 6 That wasn’t all life had in store for the young athlete. Rhodes stumbled over a new obstacle his senior year of high school. He tore his ACL, suffering the one injury every athlete has nightmares about. “I was a football cat,” Rhodes said. “I was going to go play cornerback at OU and then that happened. Everyone who was looking at me immediately dropped me after that. It was a reality check.” Oklahoma released Rhodes from his commitment, but Rhodes attacked this impediment with a full-steam optimism. “I thought I was top-notch,” Rhodes said. “It was a very humbling experience. Everything happens for a reason and I feel like I was getting too bigheaded. I needed it.” By 18, Rhodes had suffered two nearly unimaginable tragedies, but his toughness both physically and mentally saw him through.

lineman Kyle Hix displayed in Indianapolis. A four-year player who missed the final four games of his senior season with a knee injury, Huey has plenty of experience and field sense, indicating he could play on either side of the line. Plenty of players end up getting drafted without attending the combine, but Huey will have to be near perfect on Tuesday to improve his standing with scouts.

James Kirkendoll, WR Kirkendoll has flown under the radar since the end of the football season, even though he was the team’s leading receiver — although that’s not saying much, with 52 catches for 707 yards. He spent the winter training with strength and conditioning specialist Danny Arnold of Plex in Houston, alongside pro prospects Andy Dalton of TCU and Nick Fairley, Auburn’s monster defensive tackle. Arnold helped turn Donnie Avery, a former University of Houston Cougar, into an NFL-ready wideout. day, month day, 2008

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— Trevante Rhodes, Sprinter

lege career, tragedy struck once again. He received news that his grandma died. “Everything seemed so bad,”

CLASSIFIEDS

gelina College, when Texas called in April. “Texas came along and it was like a dream come true,” he said. Once Knebel arrived on campus over the summer, Texas had questions surrounding who would take over as closer, as Chance Ruffin departed for the major leagues. Set-up men Andrew McKirahan and Stayton Thomas were both early candidates for the job, but Knebel beat them both out with his strong arm and focused mind. “I just go in there and throw strikes, and that’s what every closer has to have,” Knebel said. “I don’t try to do anything, I just go in there and I know I’m going to do it. That’s just the mindset that I have and it helps me a lot.” Texas pitching coach Skip Johnson said that Knebel even reminds him of Ruffin, in the way that he carries himself. “He gets in there and gets after it when he gets in the game,” Johnson said. “He competes one pitch at a time, and you’ve got to have a guy

that finishes the game when you’ve got a one- or two-run lead at the end of the game.” Nicknamed “Bird Dog” by associate coach Tommy Harmon for the way he’s always smiling, Knebel takes a lighthearted approach to life and baseball. His intro song is “Numa Numa,” the Romanian dance song made popular by an overweight guy sitting in front of a computer screen, blasted by the speakers at Disch-Falk Field every time he enters the game. “It gets me fired up. In my head I’m thinking, ‘I want to dance so bad’,” Knebel said. “I’m a happy person, and dancing makes me happy, so I just think about that and it gets me pumped up.” Knebel’s goal this season is to win the college national championship, but a more personal one he’s set for himself is to tie Ruffin’s record of 10 wins and 10 saves in a season. “It’s something I’ve talked with my parents about, but if it doesn’t happen, at least I’m still helping the team,” he said.

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Everything happens for a reason and I feel like I was getting too bigheaded.

Rhodes said. “First my ACL and now this. She raised me. I had gotten really close to her throughout my life and it was really devastating. I still haven’t really coped with that.” After misfortune that seemed never-ending, Rhodes has found ways to stay positive throughout. Selflessness remains one outlet. Rhodes has volunteered for the Special Olympics and other community service endeavors. “It’s always good to give back,” Rhodes said. “Especially with the Special Olympics, when you see other guys with disabilities going out and loving the same thing you do and seeing their faces, [there is] no feeling like that.” In a life of unexpected twists and turns, Rhodes shines despite tragedy. When asked what 1his next step was, he laughed. “That’s a great question,” he said. “I really don’t know. Wherever God takes me.”

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KNEBEL continues from PAGE 6

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Tuesday, March 29, 2011

TV continues from PAGE 10

movie review

i saw the devil

Film reinvigorates revenge theme

cessor “The Office,” a show which continues to excel even into its seventh season. Showrunner’s even have their own stylistic trademarks and niche followings the way an artist, poet or novelist might. The most obvious example of this kind of stylistic hallmark is nerd favorite Joss Whedon’s unmistakable brand of low-budget, high-imagination genre mashing and irresistibly witty dialogue in such shows as cornerstone series “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” and the tragically short-lived cult classic “Firefly.” Arguably, the king of artistic television at present is AMC, a channel that used to solely air classic movies before adding its own original programming. AMC premiered its first original series, “Mad Men,” to modest attention in 2007, yet was eventually met with critical praise, a doubling in viewership and winning the Emmy for Outstanding Drama Series three years in a row. The network premiered its follow-up orig-

By Alex williams Daily Texan Staff

The South Korean film industry continues to crank out some of cinema’s oddest, most disturbing genre films with “I Saw the Devil.” In the last decade, South Korea has produced instant classics such as 2003’s unshakable “Oldboy” and, more recently, “The Good, the Bad, the Weird,” an eclectic remake of Sergio Leone’s classic western. Now comes the brutal and entertaining “I Saw the Devil,” another blood-soaked South Korean classic. When secret agent Soo-hyeon’s (Byunghun Lee) fiancee is murdered, he takes some time off to get revenge on her killer, a serial rapist named Kyung-chul (Min-sik Choi). The film slowly begins to settle into the familiar rhythm of the typical revenge thriller before suddenly throwing the characters together and having them fight it out before the first hour is out. Then it veers off in an unexpected direction as Soo-hyeon lets his enemy back out into the world, engaging him in an elaborate, violent cat-andmouse game. While this may seem like an odd route for the story to take, it makes for a gripping, entertaining ride as Kyung-chul tries to kill again and Soo-hyeon thwarts him, wounding him more severely with each encounter. While the film’s complex, bloody backand-forth sequences keep its central dynamic interesting and unpredictable, the themes the relationships drudge up about the morality of revenge are done to death. However, the innovative execution of a tired idea breathes a bit of new life into it, as do the compulsively watchable performances by Lee and Choi. The latter is especially great, departing from his determined, devastating performance in “Oldboy” to create a gleefully sadistic presence in Kyung-chul, a character of equal parts confidence and bloodlust. Choi brings an unpredictable sense of energy and

SUPER

I Saw the Devil Jee-woon Kim

@dailytexan online.com

Grade: A-

DT: With all these references in your music, do you consider it to be smart? JW: The smart part is that we chose from everything, from 1930s jazz music remixed with modern techno. But the not-smart part of it is that I quit school at 15, and I don’t regard myself as an intellectual. I don’t want anyone to feel excluded from our shows. IE: We did a “King’s Speech” remixing his stutter, and someone joined Vimeo just to write a comment about how he didn’t appreciate it. He thought we were just making fun of stutters like in the sense of Porky Pig. But if you follow that video and write down the text, it’s a battle between him and the world, and at the end, it’s a positive message.

ON THE WEB: Get a taste of eclectic Method’s videos and read the full interview @dailytexanonline.com

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The Daily Texan • TSTV • KVRX • The Cactus • The Texas Travesty

DT: So why do all these pop culture references? JW: Basically we’ve been touring for 10 years, and we just want to have fun. Most DJs set up their stuff in advance, and that would be so boring for us. So we made it into a game we play. Sometimes we get it wrong; we’re jamming. But the reason you hear us getting it wrong is because we’re on the fly, dropping samples. IE: When we first came up, there was a lot of genre fascism when people played in clubs. Even record shops would say that

Check out the trailer

Genre: Thriller runtime: 144 minutes For those who like: “The Good, the Bad, the Wierd,” “Oldboy”

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IE: And then the audience’s iPhones could manipulate the videos. Also a big, Death Starlike console so we can do everything. Sometimes it takes both of us to do one thing. JW: Most DJs are playing a tune and picking what they’ll do in the next three or four minutes. We’re picking what we’re going to do in the next three or four seconds, all the time. Sometimes people will talk to us while we’re playing and something will stop, and we’ll be like, that’s because I stopped to talk to you.

time commitment is more than rewarded. “I Saw the Devil” is certainly not a film for everyone. It’s brutal to the point of vulgarity and packs a dark sense of humor about its violence to boot. Nonetheless, it’s an immensely entertaining, fast-paced revenge story that makes old ideas seem new and fresh thanks to the sheer insanity of its characters and plot. ON THE WEB:

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TEXAS STUDENT MEDIA

MUSIC continues from PAGE 10

Courtesy of magnet releasing

The enormously watchable Min-sik Choi contemplates his next move in “I Saw the Devil.”

doom to the screen whenever he’s on it, offset only by the intensity and fury that drives Lee’s character. While the film’s content is uncompromisingly dark, the fun the actors seem to be having with the characters and their reprehensible actions lead to a few moments of pitch-black comedy. It helps that the film takes place in an exaggerated reality, one where any stranger could be (and probably is) a knife-wielding psychopath and several blows to the head with a hammer do about as much damage as a heavy night of drinking. This is never clearer than in a standout sequence where Kyung-chul finds himself in a cab with two men just as bloodthirsty as him, leading to a visceral, brutal knife fight. The film’s hilariously twisted violence is another asset, lending it many memorable moments over its lengthy runtime. Not a minute is wasted, and by the time the film reaches its ending, things have taken on such an biblically epic tone that the viewer’s

inal series, “Breaking Bad,” in 2008. The powerfully acted, sickeningly suspenseful story about high school chemistry teacher-turneddrug lord Walter White has more than lived up to its predecessor, garnering lead actor Bryan Cranston three Emmys for his breathtaking performance. The goal of art is to elicit a visceral, emotional response from its audience, and television has proved again and again that viewers who seek out this kind of cathartic, meditative programming will easily find it. True TV fans, those who held parties for each new season premiere of “Lost,” raged against the abrupt and polarizing blackout finale of “The Sopranos” and mourned the unjust cancellation of “Firefly,” can vouch for the medium’s profoundly touching storytelling potential. In the meantime, entertainment snobs will continue to be woefully ignorant in their disregard for TV’s potential for brilliance.

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COMICS P9

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

COMICS 9 SUDOKUFORYOU

SUD OKU FOR YOU

9

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5

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4 1

Arrr matey. This scurrvy beast is today’s answerrrrrr. Crop it out, or it’ll be the the fishes for ya!

1 9 2 6 7 4 3 8 5

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7 8 4 5 9 1 6 2 3

8 2 1 4 6 7 5 3 9

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9 2 3 5 4 6 7 8 1

1 6 5 8 7 3 4 9 2

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Yesterday’s solution

6 4 2 3 5 1 9 7 8

5 1 7 4 9 8 3 2 6

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ENT P10

10

LIFE&ARTS

Tuesday, March 29, 2011 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Amber Genuske, Life&Arts Editor | (512) 232-2209 | dailytexan@gmail.com

Well-crafted shows, Culinary cultures collide at pasta shop sophisticated writing aid case for TV as art RESTAURANT REVIEW

RASTA PASTA

By Danielle Wallace Daily Texan Staff

Tucked into its newly renovated niche on the Drag near the corner of 21st Street since its March 5 opening, Rasta Pasta offers hungry restaurant-goers a modest selection of eye-catching pasta dishes paired with a heaping helping of reggae and a Caribbean-inspired atmosphere. While the menu, crafted by founder and Cordon Bleu Swiss chef Dan Gnos for the original restaurant in Colorado, is definitely a far cry from the Caribbean’s authentic fare, it does provide intriguing new flavors in a comfortably laid-back atmosphere. It’s clear from its somewhat daunting name that Rasta Pasta doesn’t take itself too seriously. While this isn’t always a drawback, the fact that its reference quickly reduces actual Rastafarian culture to little more than rhymes and bright colors does leave a bit of a bitter taste. The origins of its handle are vague. The restaurant’s website hints that the founder — who is not Rastafarian — was “‘high’ly inlfluenced” by his “love for certain Rastafarian traditions.” The restaurant sets the mood many might expect from a place with “Rasta” in its name: Bob Marley is everywhere. It’s hard to find a surface without the music icon’s face. This, paired with the blocks of bright color on the walls, the thatched, miniature roof over the bar and the constant, pleasant stream of reggae music gives Rasta Pasta’s interior an undeniable, playful liveliness. At

TV TUESDAY

By Katie Stroh

Derek Stout | Daily Texan Staff

Microbiology major Nick Nguyen and public health major Cindy Le order dinner at Rasta Pasta on Monday night. This was Le’s second trip to Rasta Pasta and Nguyen’s first.

the same time the references to the Rastafarian movement seem stereotype-driven. With 12 generously-portioned dishes under $10 served with garlic bread at lunch, modest prices make Rasta Pasta ideal eats for the pastacraving college student. Come dinner time, meals come accompanied by a side salad as well as the garlic bread, hiking the cost of a meal up to around $15 at the most. The actual pastas on the menu don’t change. Specialties such as the Tortellini Jamaica Mon leave no variety wanting for even the adventurous diner.

The thick sauces present in many are fun and interesting to try. All of of the dishes at times work a bit too the dishes can be prepared vegan hard to drown out the mediocrity of and gluten-free upon request. the actual pasta, which is consistently overcooked, and flavors are ofWHAT: Rasta Pasta ten busy with numerous ingredients and spices. In The Natural Mystic, WHERE: 21st and Guadalupe the strong, rich flavors of curry and streets jerk chicken pack a powerful punch, WHEN: 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., but the use of pineapple pieces falls Monday-Sunday flat several bites in. WEB: $4.95 to $9.95 for lunch, Regardless of these setbacks, Ras$6.95 to $14.95 for dinner ta Pasta provides a refreshing and light-hearted venue with a friendly GRADE: Bstaff and exciting pasta dishes that

Band’s sampling, mashups tread gray area of copyright

It’s not uncommon to overhear someone pretentiously bragging that they don’t own a TV and never watch television, as if expecting praise for what cultured and sophisticated people they must be. To this, enlightened TV junkies respond: “You have no idea what you’re missing.” In an era where “American Idol” has remained the most-watched show in the nation since 2004 and “Jersey Shore” made overnight celebrities of a bunch over-tanned, overmuscled and over-liquored buffoons, it’s incredibly easy to write off television as a purely hedonistic medium manufactured for an audience of hypnotized viewers. It’s true that television, in and of itself, is not art. Rather, TV is a medium that allows for an incredible range of programming, from the mindless guilty pleasure of Bravo’s “The Real Housewives,” all the way up to the absolute masterpiece of storytelling that is AMC’s “Breaking Bad.” It’s this second level of thoughtful, serialized television that is pertinent to a discussion of TV as art. HBO opened the doors for modern television to be argued as an art form with its revolutionary 1999 mobster series “The Sopranos” and subsequently followed up on that argument with thoughtfully written shows like “Six Feet Under,” which explored the profound human fear of death. “Six Feet Under” was one of the first shows to feature a prom-

inent, complex gay character, portrayed to perfection by “Dexter” star Michael C. Hall. HBO’s 2002 series “The Wire,” often praised by critics as the best television drama in history, focused on the many corruptions and bureaucratic entanglements of the city of Baltimore. Over the past decade, other networks (including those on basic cable) have followed suit, producing thoughtfully written series that looked as well produced as any Hollywood film. Aaron Sorkin’s witty, high-energy political sandbox “The West Wing” explored the pressures and pitfalls of the executive office on NBC. ABC’s “Lost” brought J.J. Abrams’ trademark mind-bending mystery and stunning production values, while also posing religious and philosophical questions that its intensely loyal following parsed out every week on internet message boards and podcasts. It’s not just dramas that can claim the artistic label of television. TV comedy is currently undergoing a renaissance, with NBC’s (mostly) stellar Thursday night comedy lineup leading the charge. The semi-surreal wackiness and strong leading duo of Tina Fey and Alec Baldwin carry “30 Rock.” The unexpected ambition and sheer inventiveness of “Community” continues to astound viewers week after week. Amy Poehler’s gung-ho public servant character Leslie Knope in “Parks and Recreation” leads an outstanding ensemble cast out of the shadow of prede-

TV continues on PAGE 8

By Gerald Rich Daily Texan Staff

To get a sense of Eclectic Method, imagine Girl Talk’s performance on the South Mall last year on speed. Ian Edgar, Jonny Wilson and Geoff Gamlen’s audio-visual mashups are best summed up by an older motto, “Slash, Barack, Britney, Robocop.” Nothing within the realm of the last 100 years of our culture is off limits to them, from dubstep to Sesame Street or Quentin Tarantino to ‘30s jazz. With that kind of scope and millions of collective views across their Vimeo and Youtube pages, sometimes their mixes feature meta-commentaries, mashing up Charlie Sheen’s all-consuming media presence this past month. Others are simply a private conversation, cutting and looping tracks referencing Wilson’s school. Eclectic Method grabbed lunch with The Daily Texan during South By Southwest, minutes after they’d gotten the call from Jimmy Fallon that they would be playing tonight’s show with Chuck D from the Wu-Tang Clan and The Roots.

Courtesy of Eclectic Method

The Daily Texan: Sorry to start off strong, but the big question on my mind is how have you not been shut down by lawsuits over copyright issues? Ian Edgar: It’s a changing landscape on the Internet of what people are allowing to happen.

We’re operating in a gray area, and we don’t sell last night, so obviously they’re not angry. anything. We perform shows, put stuff online and get it taken down on YouTube. But everyDT: If you had all the money in the world, one gets takedowns, so we just put it on Vimeo. what would your dream show look like? Jonny Wilson: Why would anyone be anJW: Holograms and fog screens. gry? RZA came across our mixtape, and he even retweeted us. We played with [Wu-Tang Clan] MUSIC continues on PAGE 8

Photo courtesy of AMC

CD REVIEW

Femme Fatale

FEMME FATALE

Pop princess drops album By Christopher Nguyen Daily Texan Staff

As Britney Spears went through one of the worst celebrity breakdowns this side of Courtney Love (quick recap: hair shaving, umbrella throwing and gurney carrying), she ended up releasing her most real and consistent album in 2007, Blackout. For her newest album, Femme Fatale, she — or her management, really — seeks to recapture the club-ready feel of Blackout. Whereas Blackout thrilled with its subversive wink to the tabloids, Femme Fatale coasts along with faultlessly produced pop songs devoid of urgency and personality. It has always been a stretch to call Spears a vocalist, but now she’s not even trying. Producers auto-tune, mix, mash and dub her “singing” to fit into their pop confections. Her job is to insert her high-pitched ‘coos’ and ‘ohs.’ Also, among the 35 producers and writers on the album, Spears’ name is noticeably absent, a first since her debut. Before Britney fans get their pitchforks ready, the question has to be asked: What does Spears bring? If not the vocals, production or writing, then what? The subpar

Britney Spears

AMC’s original series “Breaking Bad,” starring Bryan Cranston (Walter White) and Aaron Paul (Jesse Pinkman), sets the precedent for current broadcast television as an art form.

ON THE WEB: Check out Britney Spears’ latest single

@dailytexan Genre: Pop online.com Tracks: 12 For those who like: Ke$ha, Robyn, The Black Eyed Peas

dancing seen in her latest video for “Hold It Against Me”? These songs in the hands of any other singer Grade: B would sound just as good. It’s the production quality that apparently doesn’t seem to care. It’s keep on dancing until the world makes Femme Fatale an addicting unfortunate for Spears from a cre- ends, as she says on second single and ultimately successful pop al- ative perspective, but listeners can “Till the World Ends.” bum. Dr. Luke breaks down “Seal It With a Kiss” into a dubstep bridge while Benny Blanco adds urgent Eurodisco-tinged blips on “(Drop Dead) Beautiful.” Bloodshy & Avant, who produced “Toxic,” continue to bring the goods on the clipping, glittering electro-fuzz of “Trip to Your Heart” and the pulsating, playful chant of “How I Roll.” Despite being a non-partying mom of two in a monogamous relationship, Spears sings a lot about partying and anonymous sex. With their heavy reliance on cringe-inducing puns (“You must be B.I.G. because you got me hypnotized”), the less said about the lyrics, the better. More than a decade into her career, Spears remains as much of a creative cipher as when she rolled out in her Catholic schoolgirl uniform. Femme Fatale is an album by someone who has the opportunity to direct her creative career but

STUDENT RUSH AVAILABLE!*

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Tickets available at BroadwayAcrossAmerica.com, 512.477.6060 and all Texas Box Office Outlets. Due to the nature of live entertainment dates, times, prices, shows, actors, venues and sales are subject to change without notice. All tickets subject to convenience charges.

The Daily Texan 3-29-2011  

The March 29, 2011 edition of The Daily Texan

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