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THE DAILY TEXAN Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

Hillside Farmacy creates retro atmosphere but fails to deliver food worthy of the price

Baseball pulls out victory in first conference game against No. 21 Oklahoma SPORTS PAGE 8

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 14 >> Breaking news, blogs and more: www.dailytexanonline.com

TODAY Calendar Semester in Los Angeles program info

Explore a career in the entertainment industry: live, study and intern in Los Angeles. Open to all majors. Session to be led by Phil Nemy, director of the UTLA Program in UTC 3.104 from 5-6 p.m.

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Monday, March 19, 2012

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Major athletics trumped by successes of others By Sameer Bhuchar Daily Texan Columnist

A die-hard Longhorn fan, and a friend of mine, recently complained about the “awful athletic year” Texas is having. If you are a Texas sports fan, you’ve had a few reasons to sulk

this year. Your football team bumbled and fumbled its way to an 8-5 season that left a weird aftertaste in the collective mouths of UT fans. It was kind of like the aftertaste of a cold piece of pizza the morning after it’s been sitting on the kitchen counter all night. Not good, but still somehow edible. Your basketball team played about as

well as it was expected to play. What more can you ask from a team that had one scorer, no real big men and six freshmen running the show in the second-best league in the country? Few thought Texas would end up ranked at season’s end, and the Longhorns’ firstround bow out of the NCAA tournament is evidence of that. The women’s basketball squad didn’t

even live up to its potential, and it actually has a team with experienced talent. Texas had a diamond in Chassidy Fussell, a leader in Yvonne Anderson, a post-presence in Ashley Gayle and Cokie Reed, and a bevy of young talent to build a winning team around. Well, they ended up losing in the first round of the NCAA tournament for the fourth consecutive time.

Israel’s Batsheva Dance Company presented in partnership with the Department of Theatre and Dance and the Jewish Community Center of Austin, and under artistic director Ohad Naharin, presents “Max.” The event will be from 8-10 p.m. in Bass Concert Hall and tickets range from $10-$36 depending on seating.

By Sarah White Daily Texan Staff

department’s radio system and to be on call for the entire week. “We feel that increased presence on the streets can go a far way towards preventing crime and stopping disturbances before they even happen,” Munguia said. He said the EMS, Code Enforcement and APD offices were moved to a centralized location, the Department Operations Center at the police headquarters, for the week,

The FBI and the Travis County Sheriff ’s Office are investigating the possible theft of chemical materials from a UT lab by former graduate student Karl Jasheway, 26, according to University officials. According to a University statement, Travis County Sheriff ’s deputies apprehended Jasheway for driving while intoxicated in the 3600 block of Bee Cave Road on Dec. 21. After being notified by Travis County sheriff’s deputies, UTPD conducted a search of Jasheway’s apartment, according to UTPD spokeswoman Rhonda Weldon and documentation released by University officials. UTPD officials investigating the incident found 11 vials containing a non-dangerous fragment of toxic Ricin DNA and later discovered 44 plastic vials in Jasheway’s apartment. Naturally occurring Ricin is highly toxic and is produced by the castor oil plant. Details of Jasheway’s enrollment are protected under FERPA regulations, according to Lee Clippard, communcations director for the College of Natural Sciences. “Mr. Jasheway was a graduate student in Dr. Robertus’ lab as of the end of the Fall 2011 semester. He is no longer enrolled at the University,” Clippard said. Peter Schneider, director of environmental health and safety at UT, said biochemistry professor Jon Robertus and his lab employees were

CRIME continues on PAGE 2

THEFT continues on PAGE 2

National security correspondent gives talk

Brazilian dance music

In conjunction with “Brazilian Frevo Music: From Carnaval to Concert Hall,” join musicians and dancers from the Austin Samba School, UT’s Brazilian Music Ensemble and SpokFrevo Orquestra for an international street party. The event will be held from noon-12:30 p.m. in the Bass Concert Hall Plaza.

Rebeca Rodriguez | Daily Texan Staff

Codes, a dance music DJ, begins the SXSW showcase presented by AM Only, an electronic music booking agency, at Mohawk on Friday night. The 10-day film, interactive, and music festival came to a close during the early morning hours of today.

APD handles SXSW crime more efficiently By Sarah White Daily Texan Staff

Having SXSW withdrawals? check out our Recap on page 14 SXSW Photo collage on page 12 ng! goi t i p kee

The growth of South by Southwest over the past few years has presented problems for law enforcement officers as the event has spread farther across the city, said Austin Police Department representative Raul Munguia. “SXSW used to be a predominantly downtown event, but the number of venues west of Interstate-35 has been growing rapidly over the past few years,” Munguia said. “Protecting citizens and visitors during SXSW used to be pri-

marily an effort of [APD’s] downtown sector. Now it is a department-wide effort.” Munguia said APD officials have experimented with several new policies and procedures this year to combat the growth of the festival and keep attendees safe. He said officers worked three and a half days out of the week and were off for the others. This allowed department officials to be more rested than they have been in years past. They were also required to have access to the

Today in history Gardner, Guevara hearing

In 2003

The United States, along with coalition forces primarily from the United Kingdom, initiated war on Iraq.

WATCH TStv ON CHANNEL 15 9 p.m. ‘Shenanigans’

A Rodeo Austin cowboy rides a bull at the Travis County Exposition Center during last year’s ProRodeo event, the world’s 5th largest indoor, regular season professional rodeo performance hosted by the rodeo, now in its 75th year.

to take place on March 26 By Jody Serrano Daily Texan Staff

The student body may be one step closer to electing its Student Government leaders in the next few weeks. A Travis County judge will decide on March 26 whether former presidential candidate Madison Gardner and running mate Antonio Guevara will be put back on the ballot after being disqualified. Students elected the new SG General Assembly in the Feb. 29 and March 1 campus-wide elections

with the exception of the president and vice president positions. Until students elect a new president and vice president, current SG president Natalie Butler, vice president Ashley Baker and their executive board will preside over the new assembly. Baker said the lack of a president and vice president will make the transition into a new year different and will require additional preparation, but will not affect the assembly.

SG continues on PAGE 2

It’s Valentines Day, and Michael and Gabe go on a double date on a bet. Meanwhile, Marcela can’t find a date that doesn’t involve her being pranked.

Danielle Villasana Daily Texan Staff

Austin rodeo celebrates 75 years of tradition By Rachel Thompson Daily Texan Staff

9:30 p.m. ‘The Night Nite Show’

The writers lost the show’s only sponsor, so the crew has to come up with a last minute guest to make the show work. Things don’t tend to work well when your vulgar guest dies, though.

FAILURES continues on PAGE 10

Travis County, FBI investigate toxin sample theft from lab

Batsheva Dance Company

The Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law hosts a talk titled “National Security and the War in the Shadows” with Mark Mazzetti, New York Times national security correspondent. Refreshments provided. The talk will be from 12:15-1:30 p.m. in the LBJ School Bass Lecture Hall 2.104.

Texas’ baseball team, the one group of guys you could count on to not only make an appearance in the national rankings, but be on the top of it, is a pedestrian 10-8. Isn’t this the same school that secured its own television network based primarily on its world-class major athletic programs?

Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff

Student Government candidates Madison Gardner, right, and Antonio Guevera were disqualified from the SG elections Feb. 23.

In 1938, 16 animals were featured in the Travis County Baby Beef Show at Congress Avenue and 11th Street. Rodeo Austin has come a long way from its humble beginnings, but it hasn’t forgotten its roots, marketing manager Jennie Richmond said. This year, until March 24, Rodeo Austin is commemorating its 75th rodeo, complete with seven classic rodeo events, deep-fried red velvet Oreos and a coffee table book

that Richmond said tells the story of the rodeo from the very beginning. Richmond said the rodeo evolved from its founding in 1938 as a cow show to a larger event featuring rodeo competitions, petting zoos and a carnival. In 1983, the rodeo moved to the Travis County Exposition Center and featured Willie Nelson at its first gala in 1984, Richmond said. With its long history in mind, Richmond said Rodeo Austin still managed to showcase fresh events this year, including its Super Shootout, which featured top rodeo con-

testants from across the nation competing individually and on teams. Richmond said those involved with Rodeo Austin are particularly excited about the rodeo’s history book, titled “Rodeo Austin: Blue Ribbons, Buckin’ Broncs and Big Dreams,” by Austin author Liz Carmack, who Richmond says digs into the details of the rodeo’s past to tell as complete of a story as possible. Eight hundred steers are set to compete in the Grand Champion Steer Selection, Richmond said,

RODEO continues on PAGE 2


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NEWS

Monday, March 19, 2012

NEWS BRIEFLY

THE MOTION OF EROSION

THE DAILY TEXAN Volume 112, Number 135

UTPD investigates sexual assault involving female student in taxi

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Viviana Aldous (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Audrey White (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office: (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@gmail.com Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office: (512) 232-2209 dailytexan@gmail.com

Fanny Trang | Daily Texan Staff

A tourist visits the Antelope Canyon located on the Navajo Indian reservation near Page, Arizona on Thursday. The canyon was formed by the erosion of sandstone mostly due to flash flooding.

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CRIME continues from PAGE 1

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COPYRIGHT Copyright 2012 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER High

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I never want to feel my egg sacks.

which allowed greater cooperation between the departments. He also said safety officials relied heavily on the new system of 29 security cameras, which were set up downtown last September. “Of course there have been minor glitches, but we feel that this has been a very efficient way of operating,” Munguia said. “By comparison, SXSW has been very tame this year.” Munguia said hotel burglaries and stolen wristbands were among the most prominent criminal incidents during SXSW. Police recovered stolen possessions from

SG continues from PAGE 1 According to the SG Constitution, the president and vice president serve one-year terms beginning the first Tuesday of April and are required to stay in office until their replacements are elected. Gardner filed a lawsuit against UT and UTSG on Feb. 27 claiming the Election Code the Election Supervisory Board and the SG Judicial Court used to disqualify him and Guevara was unconstitutional because the code violated their First Amendment rights to association. The Board disqualified the pair on Feb. 23 for associating their campaign with then-Student Events Center presidential candidate Car-

THE DAILY TEXAN

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Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viviana Aldous Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matthew Daley, Samantha Katsounas, Shabab Siddiqui, Susannah Jacob Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Audrey White Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aleksander Chan News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jillian Bliss Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Victoria Pagan, Colton Pence, Nick Hadjigeorge Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kayla Jonsson, Sarah White, Liz Farmer, Jody Serrano Enterprise Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matt Stottlemyre, Huma Munir, Megan Strickland Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elyana Barrera Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Alexandra Feuerman, Arleen Lopez, Klarissa Fitzpatrick Wire Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Austin Myers Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Benavides Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nicole Collins, Bobby Blanchard, Betsy Cooper, Natasha Smith Special Projects Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Simonetta Nieto Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Edwards Multimedia Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jackie Kuenstler, Lawrence Peart, Fanny Trang Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thomas Allison, Elizabeth Dillon, Shannon Kintner, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rebeca Rodriguez, Zachary Strain Senior Videographers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Demi Adejuyigbe, David Castaneda, Jorge Corona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ashley Dillard, Andrea Macias-Jimenez Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katie Stroh Associate Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christopher Nguyen Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jessica Lee, Anjli Mehta, Eli Watson, Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sameer Bhuchar Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Christian Corona Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nick Cremona, Austin Laymance, Lauren Giudice, Chris Hummer Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ao Meng Associate Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Victoria Grace Elliot Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Sanchez Senior Web Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . William Snyder, Stefanie Schultz Associate Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayley Fick Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

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Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrew Messamore, Bobby Blanchard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Leffler, Reihaneh Hajibeigi, Shreya Bannerjee, Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pu Huang, Nathan Goldsmith, Sa Wang, Rebecca Howeth, Marisa Vasquez Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rachel Thompson, Matt Warden, Kristin Otto, Blake McAdow Life&Arts Writers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Daniel Munoz, Brittany Smith Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drew Finke Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pu Huang, Edna Alaniz Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jessica Duong, Holly Wu, Sara Benner Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katie Carrell, Anne Le, Tiffany Dang, Holly Hansel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Hook, Jessica Duong, Xiu Zhu Shao, Connor Shea Web Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Michaela Huff, Omar J. Longoria

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(512) 471-1865 advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Director of Advertising & Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Business Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lori Hamilton Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amy Ramirez Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcast & Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Ford Student Assistant Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veronica Serrato Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ted Sniderman, Adrian Lloyd, Morgan Haenchen, Ted Moreland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paola Reyes, Fredis Benitez, Tyrell Elegonye, Zach Congdon Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rene Gonzalez Student Marketing Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Allison McMordie Student Buys of Texas Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindsey Hollingsworth Student Buys of Texas Assistants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Suzi Zhaw, Esteban Rivera Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aaron Rodriguez Special Editions Adviser & Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adrienne Lee Student Special Editions Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Imperatore

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the hotels by using tracking software within some items. However, Munguia said as SXSW grows it becomes harder for police to prevent these types of problems. “SXSW is such a huge event and there is such a huge influx of people,” Munguia said. “There will always be an element looking to get something for nothing and looking to take advantage of other people.” Munguia said police reacted quickly to the theft of the wristbands, deactivated the microchips inside the bands and notified the public of the bands’ serial numbers. Regardless, he said there is an aspect of inevitability to the fights, assaults and thefts that happen during SXSW. UTPD officer Darrell Halstead said the “spring break” and

Monday .............Wednesday, 12 p.m. Thursday.................Monday, 12 p.m. Tuesday.................Thursday, 12 p.m. Friday......................Tuesday, 12 p.m. Word Ads 11 a.m. Wednesday................Friday, 12 p.m. Classified (Last Business Day Prior to Publication)

issa Kelley in their printed promotional materials, videos and on their website. Judge Tim Sulak issued a two-week temporary restraining order on the elections on Feb. 28. UT and Gardner agreed to extend the restraining order until March 27 on March 12. The new assembly will hold their first meeting April 3. At the meeting, the assembly will elect the chair of the assembly and six standing committee chairs. Baker said developing a strong transition was important to her and Butler. She said she and Matt Hicks, the current chair of the assembly, have set up a retreat for the

RODEO continues from PAGE 1 the pinnacle of the junior livestock show. To pay homage to the event’s history, she said, the selection will take place atop the stairs of the capitol, the original location of the 1938 Baby Beef Show.

“SXSW” mentalities can cause students to put themselves in particularly dangerous situations. “People feel like they need to get intoxicated or get high in order to enjoy a band,” Halstead said. “It’s for this reason that we see the obvious crimes such as DWI’s and public intoxication. What we don’t always hear about are the crimes such as sexual assaults.” Radio-television-film junior Meryl Goodwin said she volunteered on the SXSW registration and utilities crew this year. “I had a friend I volunteered with who was sexually assaulted by a group of drunken men as she was trying to walk past to a show by herself,” Goodwin said. “I was also at a rap/dubstep show and there were a group of high school girls

in front of me snorting coke off of their phones. They had to leave the show early too because one of their friends was sick. And of course there’s always people smoking weed. But I think that’s pretty common at any show you’ll go to.” Despite everything she witnessed, Goodwin said she felt relatively safe during SXSW. “This year’s SXSW definitely had more people. I’ve been for the past three years and I had more issues trying to get in to shows than in years past,” Goodwin said. “But I think the na-

tional aspect is what makes SXSW so special. Bands and people come from all over the world and it’s a chance to show how great Austin is and meet and learn about new bands.”

A female UT student was sexually assaulted inside a taxi cab while on her way to the main UT campus Wednesday morning, according the University of Texas Police Department. UTPD sent out a campus-wide email on Wednesday, March 14 informing students of the incident, which happened in the 21st Street and Speedway area. The student called UTPD to report the incident at about 7 a.m. UTPD Captain Julie Gillespie said aside from the driver, the UT student was the only other person in the vehicle at the time. Gillespie said UTPD had not identified which taxi cab company manages the vehicle in question as of Thursday. UTPD spokeswoman Rhonda Weldon told the Texan on Friday that there have been no updates. Weldon said officers are looking into some leads, but a suspect has not yet been identified and no arrests have been made. Gillespie said UTPD is not releasing the name of the UT student in question. She said the student did not sustain any injuries and is speaking and cooperating with UTPD on the investigation. Gillespie said she advises students to take precautions when traveling alone. “ Tr a v e l i n p a i r s o r w i t h friends,” she said. “If [students] are in a situation where they are alone, make sure there are people who know where they are and know their destination. Students should also be aware of their surroundings.” It is unknown whether the UT student was intoxicated at the time of the assault, Gillespie said. She also said UTPD is working on some leads, but a suspect has not yet been identified.

—Jody Serrano

new general assembly members on April 1 to ease the transition and teach them about assembly procedure, how to write legislation and what representatives should do within their committees. “I think [the new president and vice president] will run into issues when they appoint their executive board, executive staff and agency directors,” Baker said. “A lot of meetings with the administration happen in the summer. The beginning of term we had to decide where everyone would fit within SG.” Baker said the first few meetings after a president and vice president are elected are usually dedicated to

choosing their executive board and making external appointments, including policy directors, agency directors and other positions. She said even though the selection of the executive board will be postponed, the applications are currently available and there are already some applicants, which should expedite the process. Matt Hicks, current chair of the assembly, said he does not think the transition will hurt the new assembly if the elections happen soon after Monday’s hearing. He said the assembly will be able to operate normally without a new president and vice president for the first few meetings.

“The assembly will still be able to operate smoothly,” Hicks said. “It all comes down to how this decision impacts the executive branch or the programming arm of SG.” Gardner said he is confident a decision will be made at the March 26 hearing, and he hopes there will be an SG president before the assembly’s first meeting on April 3. “We feel confident because we know our cause is just,” Gardner said. “We don’t know what will happen, but we are hopeful [to be put back on the ballot] because I think we have a good case. Once people hear our story, they will think the same way and a judge will as well.”

Chemical engineering sophomore Dylan Guzy said this was her second time attending Rodeo Austin and she decided to bring along a few Aggies this year. “My friends from A&M were in town and they wanted to go,” Guzy said. “I think it’s a good part of Austin to show them. I would definitely go back.” For all its excellent animals, origi-

nal fried foods and rich history, Rodeo Austin chief executive officer Bucky Lamb said the rodeo is primarily dedicated to giving back to the community and Texas students. Richmond said money raised at the rodeo goes back to support the education of the youth of Texas, pursuing its goal of promoting western heritage and preserving education. “This year, Rodeo Austin hopes to award $1.9 million to Texas youth,” Lamb said.

Philosophy junior Chloe Banks said she was involved in 4-H in high school and received a scholarship from Rodeo Austin. The scholarship has changed her college experience, she said. “It has allowed me to join clubs and do things instead of having to worry about having a job and making money,” Banks said. “I joined Texas 4000, studied abroad in France and I have an internship with Rodeo Austin. It’s really allowed me to do other things besides school and work.”

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We encourage any community member who has any kind of temporary or permanent disability to contact Texas Student Media beforehand so that appropriate accommodations can be made. Anyone is welcome to attend.

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researching an antidote for the Ricin toxin. Robertus’ lab was funded by a grant from the National Institute of Health, Schneider said. Schneider said the lab was subject to regular self-inspection and an official inspection by his office at least once a year. According to the University statement, UT does not possess any biological agents that are monitored by Centers for Disease Control, because all potentially harmful toxins are held in extremely small quantities. He said University officials constantly review lab safety procedures, but the Jasheway incident has led to new precautions. “We have approved new and more strenuous rules for how small amounts of dangerous chemicals are handled in our laboratories,” Schneider said. “I consider this to be part of the process of creating a ‘safety culture’ at UT and we feel like we are making good progress.”


World&NatioN

3

Monday, March 19, 2012 | The Daily Texan | Austin Myers, Wire Editor | dailytexanonline.com

LAST WEEKLY Coptic Pope in troubled Egypt died on Saturday in his home CAIRO, Egypt — Pope Shenouda III, the patriarch of the Coptic Orthodox Church who led Egypt’s Christian minority for 40 years during a time of increasing tensions with Muslims, died Saturday. He was 88. His death comes as the country’s estimated 10 million Christians are feeling more vulnerable than ever amid the rise of Islamic movements to political power.

Santorum wins in the south, still trailing behind Romney SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Mitt Romney scored an overwhelming win Sunday in Puerto Rico’s Republican presidential primary as the two rivals looked ahead to more competitive contests this week in Illinois and Louisiana. This comes after Santorum’s wins in the South last week, taking Mississippi, Alabama and Kentucky while Romney won Hawaii, American Samoa and Guam. That padded his comfortable lead (434 delegates) over Santorum (173 delegates) in the race to amass the 1,144 delegates needed to clinch the nomination.

Syria hit by suicide bombings in the midst of uprisings BEIRUT — An explosion struck near a Syrian government security building in the northern city of Aleppo Sunday. The Syrian state news agency said one policeman and one female civilian were killed, while 30 were injured. It was the second attack in two days on regime strongholds. Three suicide bombings in the capital Damascus on Saturday killed 27 people. No one has claimed responsibility for any of the weekend attacks. — Compiled from Associated Press reports

Charges in Afghan shootings expected in a week By Deb Riechmann The Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan — Charges against an American soldier accused of killing 16 Afghan civilians are expected to be filed within a week and if the case goes to court the trial will be held in the United States, said a legal expert with the U.S. military familiar with the investigation. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales is suspected of leaving a U.S. base in southern Afghanistan, entering homes and gunning down nine children, four men and three women before dawn on March 11. Bales, a 38-yearold married father of two from Lake Tapps, Washington, is currently being held at a U.S. military prison in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. The shootings have further strained ties between the U.S. government and President Hamid Karzai who has accused the U.S. military of not cooperating with a delegation he appointed to investigate the killings in Panjwai district of Kandahar province. The Afghan investigative team also is not convinced that one soldier could have single-handedly left his base, walked to two villages, shot and killed 16 civilians and set fire to some of their bodies.

Syed Mohammad Azeen, a tribal elder from Balandi village, said Sunday in Kandahar that he and other villagers believe more than a dozen soldiers were involved. Other villagers said they saw 16 to 20 U.S. troops in the villages. It’s unclear whether the soldiers the villagers saw were part of a search party that left to look for Bales, who was reported missing. Allegations that 16 to 20 people were involved in the killings are “completely false,” according to a U.S. official familiar with the case, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the investigation. In an attempt to prove there was only one perpetrator involved in the shootings, the U.S. military has shown Afghan officials footage from a surveillance video that shows a soldier walking up to the base, laying down his weapon and raising his arms in surrender. Karzai said Friday that the video, shot by an aerial blimp above the base, was “not convincing” and accused the U.S. of not aiding Afghan investigators. The legal expert, who also spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the case, insisted that there had been good cooperation between U.S. and Afghan investigative teams and that Afghan officials had provided im-

Allauddin Khan | Associated Press

Men stand next to blood stains and charred remains inside a home where witnesses say Afghans were killed by a U.S. soldier in Panjwai, Kandahar province south of Kabul, Afghanistan, on Sunday. An Afghan youth recounted the terrifying scene in his home as a lone U.S. soldier moved stealthily through it during a killing spree.

portant evidence for the case. cause that would have violated his cials were discussing the best way to The military denied the Afghan rights as an accused in the case. compensate the relatives of the victims team’s request to interview Bales beThe expert also said that U.S. offi- and those wounded.

Occupy Wall Street anniversary ends with police shutting down camp By Christian Salazar The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Dozens of police officers cleared the park where the Occupy movement was born six months ago and made several arrests after hundreds of protesters returned in an anniversary observance and defiantly resisted calls to clear out. Some demonstrators locked arms

and sat down in the middle of Zuccotti Park near Wall Street after police announced on a bullhorn at around 11:30 p.m. Saturday that the park was closed. Officers then poured into the park, forcing most of the crowd out and surrounding a small group that stayed behind. Police formed a human ring around the park to keep protesters out. Several people were arrested, police

said. An unused public transit bus was used to cart away about a dozen demonstrators in plastic handcuffs. For hours, the demonstrators had been chanting and holding impromptu meetings in the park to celebrate the six-month anniversary, as police mainly kept their distance. But New York Police Det. Brian Sessa said the tipping point came when the protesters started breaking

the park rules. “They set up tents. They had sleeping bags,” he said. Electrical boxes also were tampered with and there was evidence of graffiti. Sessa said Brookfield Properties, the park owner, sent in security to advise the protesters to stop pitching tents and to leave the park. The protesters, in turn, became agitated with them. The company then asked the police

to help them clear out the park, the detective said. Sandra Nurse, a member of Occupy’s direct action working group, said police treated demonstrators roughly and made arbitrary arrests. “I didn’t see any sleeping bags,” she said. “There was a banner hung between two trees and a tarp thrown over it ... It wasn’t a tent. It was an erect thing, if that’s what you want to call it.”


4

OPINION

Monday, March 19, 2012 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Viviana Aldous, Editor-in-Chief | (512) 232-2212 | editor@dailytexanonline.com

QUOTES TO NOTE Editor’s note: From all of Greg Abbott’s lawsuits to the rejection of the state voter ID law, these are among our favorite quotes from the break.

“Don’t think I let the day go by without another lawsuit against the Federal Gov’t. One coming any minute.” — Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott on his latest lawsuit against the fed-

eral government, according to his Twitter account. On Friday, Abbott filed legal action because the federal government cut off funding for Texas’ Women’s Health Program after the state promised to exclude clinics affiliated with abortion providers from the program.

“For the Department of Justice to now contend that Texas cannot implement its voter ID law denies Texas the ability to do what other states can rightfully exercise under the Constitution.” — Abbott on the Voting Rights Act, which calls for pre-clearance of changes to election laws in states with a history of voter discrimination, according to a press release. Abbott filed suit against the federal government on Wednesday in protest of the law.

“We are going to have to spend a lot of money and time defending our right to make sovereign decisions from this administration.” — Texas Gov. Rick Perry on the decision of the state attorney general’s office to sue the federal government after it blocked a new state law that would require a photo voter ID — over Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act, according to CBS. The provision calls for pre-clearance of changes to election laws in states with a history of voter discrimination.

“Yes, I think that’s one of the things that made Austin a city that we are going to look at ... That was definitely a selling point.” — Apple representative Jason Lundgaard on whether Austin has a strong

pool of qualified potential employees, according to KUT. Apple is considering locating a facility in Austin that would create 3,600 permanent jobs.

“It’s inexcusable that the lieutenant governor does not show up to let Texans hear what he stands for. ... Is he a good guy? Maybe. But he’s right now depriving Texans.” — U.S. Senate candidate Craig James on the absences of fellow candidate and

Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst at campaign debates and forums, according to The Dallas Morning News.

“The report confirms what we know: The public education system across the board is not producing results necessary for Texas to remain competitive.” — Texas Association of Business President Bill Hammond on a new study

that found that only 20 percent of Texas eighth graders receive a postsecondary degree within six years of graduating high school, according to the Austin American-Statesman.

“We believe the intended actions will have significant negative impacts on operations and morale at the university yet are not likely to result in significant cost savings.” — A&M University’s faculty senate on the move, spearheaded by new system

chancellor John Sharp, to privatize services, according to the Texas Tribune.

“It’s a contradiction for me, you know ... that street cred’s right out the door and I get it.” — Austinite John Duffy on the divide between his Occupy Austin affiliation

and his candidacy for Austin City Council, according to KUT.

An unhealthy mix of orange and green By Drew Finke Daily Texan Columnist

As you peruse the aisles at your local grocery store, what you choose to put in your cart is just as likely to be influenced by price as it is by the brand name printed on the carton or bottle of whatever it is you are purchasing. You can make a reasonable assumption about a product’s quality based on its branding. That’s because the company represented by that brand has spent years earning your trust by selling you products of high value and quality in the past. The company has built a relationship with you by supplying the goods and services that suit your needs. A university’s reputation works the same way. Students at UT enjoy the reputation that has been built and nurtured over the University’s nearly 130-year history. Thanks to UT’s high educational quality and successful sports programs, people who are otherwise unaffiliated with the school know to associate UT with academic and athletic excellence. Part of the reason that we pay to attend school here is because students know that a UT diploma will be attractive to potential employers who can trust that students graduating from UT will be highquality employees. UT’s “brand” of excellence has lately been co-opted into an ever-increasing array of consumer goods. Now UT’s reputation is used as a marketing tool in more places than just your resume; it also helps sell everything from bottled water to wind-generated electricity. For years, UT’s Office of Trademark Licensing permitted the Longhorn logo and

UT name to appear on University paraphernalia such as T-shirts, bumper stickers and other consumer items meant to promote school spirit. Lately, though, UT’s trademark mascot and colors have been appearing on items that aren’t what one would traditionally find in the school bookstore. In 2010, UT licensed the image of the Tower for the first time to H2Orange LLC, which markets purified water in bottles shaped like the UT tower. Sales of the bottled water, which is endorsed by the Texas Exes as “the official water of the Texas Exes tailgating,” is meant to fund scholarships for UT students. Despite its benevolent intentions, the H2Orange’s launching sparked controversy among students, faculty and alumni concerned about the environmental consequences of the plastic bottles. Plans for a refillable stainless steel bottle and biodegradable plastic bottles announced by the company in 2010 have yet to materialize. Later in 2010, UT Athletics, which oversees the Office of Trademark Licensing for the entire UT system, announced a “landmark sponsorship program” that would allow a Dallas-based company to sell electricity under the name “Texas Longhorns Energy.” In return for using the University’s logo, trademark colors and mascot to sell its product, Texas Longhorns Energy donates a portion of its profits to “support sustainability initiatives of UT Athletics and the University.” Longhorn Bars are the most recent addition to the growing family of UT-licensed consumer goods and services. The company, which was founded by two UT alumnae, pays royalties to the University so that it can use the longhorn name, logo and colors in

the branding of its products. Of these royalties, 12 percent are specially earmarked to support the University’s academic mission, according to The Daily Texan. It is hard to criticize funding for scholarships, sustainability initiatives and academic expenditures, especially when budgets are being cut and funding is tight. Nonetheless, it also isn’t right to overlook the potentially negative consequences of these licensing deals just because they provide additional sources of income for the University. H2Orange was launched as concerns about the tons of non-biodegradable plastic waste generated by single-use water bottles were coming to the fore. Similarly, Longhorn Bars are being introduced at a time when the public’s concerns about the connection between processed foods and health issues, such as diabetes and obesity, are growing. So many of the products for which the UT brand is licensed seem to contribute to today’s most challenging global and domestic problems. Additionally, while all of these products claim to give people a way to show their support for UT, we should think twice before promoting a culture where you have to drink a special water or buy special electricity in order to “Bleed Orange.” People show their Longhorn pride every day upholding the University’s core values and by “contributing to the advancement of society through research, creative activity, scholarly inquiry and the development of new knowledge,” as stated by the University’s mission statement. Demonstrating school pride should not be made into yet another act of consumerism. Finke is an architecture and urban studies senior.

LEGALESE

Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

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6

NEWS

Monday, March 19, 2012

Capitol honors Tejano history By Jim Vertuno The Associated Press

Rebecca Howeth | Daily Texan Staff

Elliot Tucker-Drob, UT psychology professor, led a study which links children’s test scores and their attendance of preschool. Tucker-Drob’s results could help reduce the gap between children of privileged and underprivileged families.

Preschool may help children’s test scores By Bobby Blanchard Daily Texan Staff

Preschool may be the answer to reducing the achievement gap between children from privileged and underprivileged families, according to a psychological study conducted by a UT professor. Assistant professor of psychology Elliot Tucker-Drob said the study found that the environmental factors accounting for the differences in test scores between children from wealthier families and children from poorer families was about 70 percent for children who did not attend preschool. However, when children attended preschool, the percentage of environmental factors accounting for test scores dropped

to 45 percent. “That’s a pretty good reduction,” Tucker-Drob said. “But even amongst the kids who went to preschools, families were not [equal] with one another. There were still inequalities, the y just weren’t accounting for as much variation.” Tucker-Drob said the reduction in the percentage was seen after children had attended preschool, which increases the confidence that preschool is responsible for diminishing the test score gaps. He said he got the idea for the study from previous research that showed the achievement gaps on test scores between kids from privileged and underprivileged families grew during the

summer and shortened during the school year. “Not everyone goes to preschool, it is a choice that parents make,” Tucker-Drob said. “A lot of kids do, but there are some that don’t.” While Tucker-Drob said the results did not surprise him, he said others have argued that children who benefit the most from preschools are the ones who already have an economic advantage, therefore increasing the achievement gap. “It’s kind of a rich-get-richer hypothesis,” Tucker-Drob said. “My rationale is the children from the poor families are getting something so much better than they would have otherwise gotten if they stayed at home;

therefore, the achievement gap should shrink.” Amand a Hig hf i l l, applie d learning and development sophomore, said the results of the study did not surprise her. “The lower-income families are normally kids who don’t speak English as their first language, so it also helps them start speaking that in the schools and preparing them for the grades to come,” Highfill said. Avana Bree Garza, applied learning and development sophomore, said she thinks required schooling should start at preschool instead of kindergarten. “I can see why they give parents the option because some parents like to prepare their children their own way, but I think it would be helpful if it was mandatory,” Garza said.

AUSTIN, Texas — The memorials around the Texas Capitol grounds have long honored heroes and moments of Texas’ storied past, from the Alamo to the Confederacy to fallen soldiers in foreign wars. Joining them this month is a tribute to Texas’ earliest pioneers, Tejano settlers who trail-blazed what would become the Lone Star State. On March 29, a massive granite and bronze memorial to those early Spanish and Mexican explorers, settlers and their descendants will be formally dedicated on the South lawn of the state Capitol, the culmination of a decade-long effort to honor their history. “We’ve been here for 500 years. For 500 years, we’ve ignored that chapter of Texas history,” said Renato Ramirez, CEO of International Bank of Commerce in the border city of Zapata and one of the leaders of the nearly $2 million project. Ramirez’ family gave $125,000 to the effort. The creation of the monument also coincides with the rising political importance of Tejanos, as whites drop below 50 percent of the Texas population and Hispanics now make up more than 50 percent of young people. Tejano history dates to the 1500s, when Spanish explorer Alonso Alvarez de Pineda first mapped the Texas coastline. Spanish missions were established in the 1600s. A group of Tejano settlers led by Jose Bernardo Gutierrez de Lara declared the first Republic of Texas in 1813. The descendants of Spanish and Mexican settlers established a thriving cattle and agriculture industry, became the first cowboys and also fought at the Alamo. But some historians say these contributions have been overlooked by a popular history that focuses on when whites started moving to Texas from the United States. Andres Tijerina, an Austin Community College history professor and author of the book “Tejano Empire,” says the new monument enriches Texas history by

recognizing the settlers who were in Texas before Lone Star State icons like Stephen F. Austin and Sam Houston. “It expands Texas history before 1821 which is what the public narrative has always used as the starting point for Texas history, when Stephen F. Austin arrived,” Tijerina said “Those families, who are such an important part of Texas, are still here.” At 525 square feet, the monument will be among the largest on the Capitol grounds. Mounted on a 250-ton slab of pink granite, bronze statues depict a Spanish explorer, a vaquero (cowboy) on his mustang, a longhorn bull and cow and a family of settlers. A series of plaques will tell the story of Tejano history. The slab was cut from the same quarry in Marble Falls that was used for the Capitol building. The sculpture was designed by Laredo artist Armando Hinojosa, a descendant of Don Tomas Sanchez, the founder of Laredo. Project architect Jaime Beaman, whose family on his mother’s side lived along the Texas-Mexico border for generations, said the original design depicted a Roman-style monument with arches and columns and was quickly scrapped. “We’re not Roman, we’re Tejano,” Beaman said. “This is art.” The Tejano monument is not on the Great Walk, the 500-foot, treelined promenade that leads from Congress Avenue to the South steps of the Capitol, but occupies a prime piece of land just inside the southern gate, a popular entry point for tourists and Capitol visitors. Getting it there required a change in state law. New monuments have been banned on the south lawn ever since the completion of a major restoration project in the early 1990s. The Tejano monument was destined for the less-visible north side of the Capitol until 2009 when the Legislature passed a special exception. The monument sits about 50 paces east of a massive tribute to the Confederacy topped by a statute of Jefferson Davis. A monument to African-Americans is planned for the west side of the grounds, but that project is still in development.

www.cactusyearbook.com

Congratulates the following winners of the 2012

Outstanding Student Awards: Simeon P. Bochev Derin Kiykioglu James Salazar Andrew Townsell

Cactus Goodfellow Awards: Ashley Baker Andrew Taylor Nash Preston L. Nix Shreeya Popat

TEXASNT STUDDEIA ME


7 NEWS

NEWS

Monday, March 19, 2012

7

Professional, college StarCraft II players compete at UT event By Shreya Banerjee Daily Texan Staff

Protoss, Zerg and Terran factions waged a galactic war last weekend to gain dominance in the world of StarCraft. The Lone Star Clash: Gauntlet of Champions was a tournament for the military science-fiction video game StarCraft II put on by the Texas E-Sports Association and their sponsors. The event was held Saturday and Sunday at the Student Activity Center. The tournament consisted of a professional invitational with a prize pool of $10,000 and a collegiate tournament with a prize pool of $1,500. The professional invitational featured 16 players from around the world, while the collegiate bracket consisted of 14 teams from other universities. Adam Rosen, TeSPA co-president and aerospace engineering senior, said the organization aimed to invite the best and most popular players to participate in the tournament. “There’s a hierarchy of players in the gaming world,� Adam said. “We look at the results from other tournaments, and we see who wins consistently and the people who are well-liked.� Adam said TeSPA has held the tournament four times in the past two years, and the group has gotten better at organizing the event with time. Jim Tai, coordinator for the University of Houston’s team, said he has seen obvious improvement in planning and logistics with each tournament held. “We’ve come to this tournament every time it has been put on, and it has grown from an amateur competition to a highly professional one,� Tai said. “It’s gone from college students trying really hard, to college students being adults.�

♲

We wanted to transform into the premiere gaming organization in the state — Adam Rosen, TeSPA co-president

Adam said he and his twin brother Tyler Rosen, fellow copresident and aerospace engineering senior, founded TeSPA in 2010 with the goal of drawing the gaming culture of UT together to share their love of playing, and the organization quickly grew in size. “We soon realized that we wanted to do more than just talk about video games,� Adam said. “We wanted to transform into the premiere gaming organization in the state.� TeSPA currently has about 600 members at UT, and this success has motivated organizations at other schools to grow. “We have about 30 members at the moment, but we would love to become as large as TeSPA soon,� said University of Houston team member Eric Liu. Adam said his involvement in TeSPA and passion for gaming has inspired him to consider pursuing an MBA and become involved in the industry. “Our next project is to create a state-wide gaming board with UT, Rice and University of Houston,� Adam said. “I think the greatest thing about TeSPA is that we can put on tournaments similar to what professional gaming companies put on at a fraction of the cost.�

R E C YC L E your copy of The Daily Texan

Marisa Vasquez | Daily Texan Staff

Elyse Sens talks to customers about the water stones she creates and sells at the Lady Bird Johnson Arts and Artisans Festival, Sunday afternoon. The festival was held in honor of Lady Bird Johnson’s 100th birthday and featured various local artists that highlight nature in Texas with their work.

Local art festival displays Texas nature By David Leffler Daily Texan Staff

The annual Lady Bird Johnson Artists and Artisans Festival allows people to view exhibits and purchase artwork that highlights the beauty of Texas’ environment. Over 20 art vendors and several hundred visitors attended the event, which took place at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower center on Saturday and Sunday. The exhibits featured many different styles of art, including watercolor, origami and mixed media collage. Joseph Hammer, director of product marketing at the Wildflower Center, said the festival serves as part of the center’s commemoration of the former first lady’s centennial. “She would have been 100 this year, so we have special e vents to commemorate her life,� he said. “She liked art and collected some herself, and this event gave her a chance to interact with people who shared those sentiments.� Hammer said the festival al-

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l ow s p e opl e to v i e w natu re in a different way than they normally would. “It’s kind of ironic. Sometimes p e ople s e e more w hen t he y look at a painting than when they look at the real thing,� he said. “I’ve often thought some of these wildflower paintings make people view plants a completely new way.� Hammer said the festival displays the wildflower center’s values in a fun, interactive way that many people enjoy. “We want to help people appre c i ate t h e ar t i n n atu re,� he said. “It’s great that people recognize this is an important place. This center is not just about Austin or Texas, it’s part of a North American environmental organization and we

pride ourselves on that.� Sue Kemp, an artist and watercolor paint instructor in the art school of Austin Museum of Art at Laguna Gloria, has shown her paintings at the festival for more than 10 years. Kemp said depictions of nature in artwork can touch people deeply. “Art allows people to discover a story within a piece they relate to and find a deeper meaning,� she said. “In turn, nature lets you get away from the business of life and routine of things.� Kemp said artwork that depicts nature can affect someone positively just as much as the real thing. “In between our busy lives, n atu re i s a g o o d e s c ap e — whether you do so in person or through artwork,� she said.

Kelly Fisher, who attended the festival, said she was blown away by the different artistic styles present at the festival and how they portrayed nature. “It’s great to see local Texas artists here, I’ve been very impressed,� she said. “It’s nice to see what people are doing locally with materials and the wildlife here.� Fisher said having nature and artwork depicted side-by-side helps people take a close look at its beauty and appreciate all its qualities. “It’s nice to be able to have the inspiration and product of human creativity close by each other,� Fisher said. “It’s great to be here and have the opportunity to view nature in such a unique way.�

ATTENTION FACULTY AND STUDENTS

NOMINATIONS SOUGHT Roy Crane Award for Outstanding Creative Achievement in the Literary Arts Spring 2012 The 2012 Roy Crane Award in the Arts is given to a student at UT Austin for unique, creative effort in the literary arts. An undergraduate or graduate student may compete for the award. The committee, which selects the winner, will give no weight to any entrant’s grade point average or other academic achievement.

There are two $3,000 awards. To compete for the award, a student must be recommended by a faculty member of The University of Texas at Austin. All forms of writing that fall within the two most basic written literary categories of fiction and nonfiction, such as novels, novellas, poetry, plays, screenplays, short stories, philosophical literature, collaborative writing, in addition to creative nonfiction such as historical literature, journalism, epistles, essays, and autobiography submissions will be considered. Please limit entries to 5000 words or less. Applicants may submit excerpts or chapters of longer works. Research or analysis does not qualify. The award must be for one’s creative effort while a student at UT Austin.

Timeline Fri. 23 Mar. through Mon. 26 Mar. Fri. 30 Mar. through Mon. 2 Apr. Fri. 6 Apr. through Mon. 9 Apr.

The deadline for nominations is

April 1, 2012 at noon.

Wed. 28 Mar. through Sun. 1 Apr. Outpatient Visits: 4 & 11 Apr.

Mon. 9 Apr. through Sun. 15 Apr.

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For nomination form and submission guidelines visit http://www.utexas.edu/provost/initiatives/undergraduate_awards/crane/


8 SPTS

NOW OPUAEN TIC COMPLEX RELAXATION

SPORTS

8

OUTDOOR AQ

STARTS HERE

www.utrecsports.org

Monday, March 19, 2012 | THE DAILY TEXAN | Sameer Bhuchar, Sports Editor | (512) 232-2210 | sports@dailytexanonline.com

Texas fizzles in NCAA tournament

SIDELINE

ON THE WEB: Check out more photos from Friday’s second-round game against Cincinnati @bit.ly/dt_ut-uc_2012qr_ut-uc-2012

ON THE WEB: Photos from the other second-round NCAA tournament games in Nashville @bit.ly/dt_ncaa-r2_2012qr_ncaa-r2_2012

LONGHORNS IN THE NBA LaMarcus Aldridge Lawrence Peart | Daily Texan Staff

-15 points -6 rebounds

Clint Chapman battles Cincinnati forward Yancy Gates for a rebound during Texas’ 65-59 loss on Friday in the second round of the NCAA Tournament. Chapman pulled down a areer-high 14 rebounds in the defeat. The fifth-year senior added 10 points in the final game of his UT career.

Kevin Durant

MEN’S BASKETBALL

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Youthful team was exposed in close games, hopes growing pains will translate to wins

Longhorns failed to reach their potential leaving Goestenkors on coaching hot seat

By Austin Laymance Daily Texan Staff

NASHVILLE, TENN. — The Longhorns truggled all season to win close games, and that’s why Texas will watch the rest of the NCAA Tournament from home. The Longhorns’ season ended Friday with a 6559 loss to Cincinnati at Bridgestone Arena in the econd round of the NCAA Tournament. It was Texas’ (20-14) ninth loss by six points or fewer. “We’re always going to be in close games and we have to find a way to finish,” said UT head oach Rick Barnes. “We had chances 10 or 14 imes this year and we didn’t.” The 14 defeats were the most in 14 years under Barnes. The previous high was 13 in 1998-98,

J’Covan Brown leaves the court after Texas was bounced from the NCAA Tournament with a 65-59 loss to Cincinnati on Friday. Brown scored 19 points to lead UT.

Senior forward Ashley Gayle, 22, ended her career with an early exit from the NCAA Tournament. Texas has one win in the tournament in five years under Gail Goestenkors.

Elisabeth Dillon Daily Texan Staff

Steve Helber Associated Press

his first season at Texas. Part of UT’s inability to win tight games was its youth. The Longhorns’ rotation consisted of six freshmen out of nine scholarship players. Barnes and his rookies were rarely on the same page during the final minutes. There were defensive lapses, poor shots and miscommunication. That was expected. “We knew coming into this year that this would not be a one-year proposition with this team,” Barnes said. “We knew we had to try to establish a mentality. They’ve been resilient, maybe as resilient as any team we’ve had in a long time.” The six Texas freshmen learned firsthand what it takes to win in the Big 12 and the

YOUTH continues on PAGE 10

By Nick Cremona Daily Texan Staff

Although her seat is hotter than ever after another early NCAA tournament exit, head coach Gail Goestenkors has to be somewhat relieved that her fifth, and perhaps most turbulent, season at Texas has reached a conclusion. The Longhorns’ 68-55 loss to No. 8 seed West Virginia Mountaineers in the first round of the NCAA tournament was a fitting end to yet another disappointing season under Goestenkors. In its final game, Texas scored a season-low 18 first half points and converted on less than a third of its overall field goal attempts, not exactly the performance expected out of a team that started the season ranked in the top

25 with plenty of NCAA tournament experience among its key players to boot. Senior guards Yvonne Anderson, Ashleigh Fontenette and post Ashley Gayle had reached the tournament in each of the past three seasons, only to be sent home in the first round every time. Anderson and Fontenette, along with sophomore Chassidy Fussell were looked often for scoring production due to a rash of injuries that plagued the team all year. Fussell led the team in scoring all season at over 16 points per game. She also became just the second player in UT history to shoot over 90 percent or better from the free-throw line.

FUSSELL continues on PAGE 10

BASEBALL

UT completes three-game sweep of Oklahoma to begin conference season By Chris Hummer Daily Texan Staff

Conference play is the start of a ew season, and for Texas it was a much needed fresh start. The Longhorns (10-8, 3-0 Big 2) began Big 12 play with a three ame sweep over No. 21 Oklahoma 11-9, 0-3 Big 12). Coming into the series the Longorns were under .500, and strugling at the plate. But it seems hat all it took was a three-game et against the rival Sooners o get going. The key to the turnaround eemed to be the confidence gained rom Friday’s extra inning nail-bitr, in which Texas pulled out a 7-6 ictory in 12 innings. The game started out slow for he Longhorns as they quickly fell ehind 4-0 in the first inning, but hey crawled back throughout the

After two scoreless innings in the 10th and the 11th, Mark Payton came up with one out in the top of the 12th and snuck a bunt down the first baseline for a hit starting the rally. Tim Maitland then hit a single back up the middle at the pitcher to put runners on first and second. After Erich Weiss made an out, junior Jonathan Walsh came to the plate and delivered, knocking a double down the left field line to score both runners and put Texas ahead 7-5. The hit is particularly impressive considering Walsh had made outs in two bases loaded situations earlier in the game, but he came up big when it really mattered. Oklahoma did not go quietly, though. Catcher Tanner Toal lofted a home run over the left field fence against reliever Hoby Milner, with one out, to put the Sooners with-

the bullpen and looked to freshman Parker French to close out the game. That is exactly what he did, inducing two quick outs to end it. In game two, Texas dropped the dramatics and instead pounded Oklahoma for 15 hits in a 9-5 win. Weiss led the way for the Longhorns going 4-for-5 at the plate, with two RBI and two runs scored. Mark Payton also had an excellent day at the top of the order pacing the lineup with three hits. Walsh, senior Jordan Etier and sophomore Jacob Felts each contributed two hits apiece as well. On Sunday, Texas completed the sweep with a 9-4 win. The victory marks 14 consecutive series in which the Longhorns have toppled Oklahoma and gave the team its first sweep of the season. The game saw the offense once again pace the team — a welcome

-26 points -6 assists

Tristan Thompson -7 points -6 rebounds

Daniel Gibson - 3 points -8 rebounds

Maurice Evans -7 points -3/4 field goals

TWEET OF THE DAY Augie Garrido @AugieGarrido

“On the way back from Norman. Good week for the Horns. It starts over Tuesday. Hook em.”

WHAT TO WATCH NBA Mavericks @ Nuggets

Date: Tonight Time: 9:30 p.m. On air: TNT

Bulls @ Magic

Ryan Edwards | Daily Texan Staff

Date: Tonight Time: 7 p.m. On air: TNT

Jacob Felts stretches for first base in a recent game for Texas. The catcher had two hits and one RBI in Sunday’s win over Oklahoma.

mances earlier in the season — with 13 hits making it three consecutive games that the team has reached double digits in the category.

contest, scoring two runs in the first and added one in the second and the fourth, putting it ahead 4-0 — a lead the Longhorns would nev-

ON THE WEB: MEN’S TENNIS SOFTBALL COVERAGE


9 SPTS/CLASS

SPORTS

Monday, March 19, 2012

WEEKEND RECAPS

WOMEN’S TRACK

Sophomores shoulder load at NCAA Championship By Kristin Otto Daily Texan Staff

WOMEN’S TENNIS WOMEN’S GOLF

Rain delays tournament, UT hopes to get on track By Blake McAdow Daily Texan Staff

Despite being known for its sunny skies and beautiful weather, San Diego has not been kind to the women’s golf team the last two years. The Longhorns’ first round was postponed Sunday due to unusual hail and inclement weather at the Battle at Rancho Bernardo Inn. The teams will tee off today instead. At last year’s event, then-junior Nicole Vandermade had a great outing, finishing 13th overall to lead Texas to a team finish of 8 out of the 18 teams competing. Vandermade struggled at the last tournament in South Carolina, but she should feel better about this familiar course. “This course favors Nicole because there are some par 5s that she can reach in two [strokes],” head coach Martha Richards said. “There’s a lot of golf courses where Nicole doesn’t get to use her driver because she hits it so long, but this golf course allows

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the High Jump. Briana Nelson and Stacey-Ann Smith, who finished tenth and sixteenth, respectively, were unable to push past the prelims in the 400-meter dash. Nevertheless, the trio of top-8 finishing Texas sophomores racked up 17 points, propelling Texas to the top of the pack at the end of day one. With only one race left in the meet, the Longhorns went into day two knowing that they would be surpassed in the ranks. Ultimately, they would finish fourth with a total of 25 points. However, Saturday’s sole event for UT was perhaps the most critical race not only of the meet, but of the season as well. It was the 4x400meter relay, the last race of the 2012 Championships. And it was Texas’ last stand. Going into Nationals, the Longhorns were ranked fourth behind Kansas, Texas A&M and LSU, respectively. With the memory of being beat out of a Big 12 title by the Aggies in College Station still fresh in their minds, the Longhorns were determined not to fall again to the soonto-be SEC school. Trailing LSU by less than one second, Texas clenched second with a time of 3:32.36, breaking its season-best from the conference championship and besting A&M before its departure from the Big 12 conference.

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Spring break saw a bittersweet symphony play an impressive but tough tune for the longhorns. Despite a close loss to No. 4 ranked USC, the team claimed victories over No. 16 Michigan, and conference foes Iowa State and Missouri. Against Michigan, All-American Aeriel Ellis played a hard-fought match with the No. 10 ranked player in the nation, but eventually came away with the win after dropping the first set. Great performances by Cierra Gaytan-Leach, Krista Damico and Elizabeth Begley produced three more points for the Longhorns. In their next match, USC proved to be too much as the Longhorns fell in all three doubles matches to give the Trojans the deciding match point. The women split the singles matches as Gaytan-Leach, Lina Pa1 degimaite and Damico all emerged victorious in three sets, respectively. “USC is a very tough team with

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a lot of good players, but for the girls who were on the court to get those wins was great,” head coach Patty Fendick-McCain said. “We get on a plane tomorrow and go to Iowa State and Missouri, and we are looking forward to getting out there and starting conference play.” In their first Big 12 match of the season, the duo of Padegimaite and Noel Scott won their doubles match in straight sets against Iowa State. In singles competition, Scott, Padegimaite and Damico each claimed victory as the women took five out of six from the Cyclones. To close out the break the Longhorns topped Missouri by sweeping all three doubles matches on their way to a decisive 5-2 win. In singles play Damico, Padegimaite, Gaytan-Leach and Begley all won their matches. With two notable victories to begin Big 12 play, the Longhorns look to be a tough opponent for any conference foe.

By Matt Warden Daily Texan Staff

More than 300 schools across the country traveled to the Potato State to compete at the 2012 NCAA Indoor Track and Field Championships in Nampa, Idaho last week. Out of hundreds of athletes, seven Longhorn women were on a mission to make a big impression, and they did, with the sophomores leading the way. In the 200-meter dash, Christy Udoh fell short of her 23.46 seasonbest performance from the conference meet; her time held her to twelfth place and denied her a spot in the finals. It was a different story for sophomore Allison Peter who earned her way to Nationals with a personal record of 23.11 at the Big 12 Championships. In the finals, she excelled to 22.95 but it was not enough to hold back LSU’s Kimberlyn Duncan, who held Peter to second place. In her first appearance at an NCAA Championship, sophomore Sara Sutherland made school history in the 5-kilometer, taking fifth in the event. With a 15:53.73 run, Sutherland shaved just over six seconds off her personal best and beat the 22-year standing UT record by more than three seconds. Ye t anot h e r s oph om ore had a top-5 performance. A 1.81-meter mark landed Shanay Briscoe in fourth place in

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her to have an advantage on the par 5s and a couple of the longer par 4s.” Richards said he understood the team’s frustration in trying to get their scores on the board. “They played hard the whole time and never gave up, so I know we are very close to playing good golf,” he said. Fellow Big 12 rival Texas A&M is among the six other teams currently ranked ahead of the Longhorns in the field this week. The last time Texas saw the Aggies was in the 2011 season opener in Bryan, Texas, where the Longhorns took home the championship trophy, besting Texas A&M by 36 strokes. Texas A&M has finished in the top five in four of the last five tournaments, and is coming off their first win of the season in Hawaii. “Hopefully the last couple weeks of work will pay off. You just never know when it’s all going to click,” Richards said. “If we just get a little better each day, it’s going to start showing up in the scores.”

Texas begins Big 12 play with impressive victories

9

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10

SPORTS

Monday, March 19, 2012

WOMEN’S SWIMMING

Texas comes up short in final meet

Todd J. Van Emst | Associated Press

California proved too much for the Longhorns to handle at the NCAA Championships and the Golden Bears took home first place for the second time in as many years. It was Cal’s third title in four years. By Rachel Thompson Daily Texan Staff

Texas finished in ninth place at this year’s NCAA Championships in Auburn, Ala., as California won its second title in a row. Texas has finished in the top 10 in 11 of its past 13 seasons and capped off this year’s championships with 201 points and 20 All-America honors. Swimmers Bethany Adams, Kelsey Amundsen, Karlee Bispo, Kelsey LeNeave, Ellen Lobb, Lily Moldenhauer, Katie Riefenstahl, Laura Sogar, Samantha Tucker and diver Diana Wilcox were all recognized for top 16 performances. The Longhorns kicked off the meet on a strong note by breaking a school record in the 200 freestyle relay. Bispo, Adams, Lobb and Amundsen combined for a 1:27.65, outdoing the previous record of 1:28.06 set at last year’s NCAA Championships. Senior Bispo finished a strong last season with 47 points at the end of the three-day meet, mak-

ing her the seventh highest individual scorer at the championships. Bispo broke school records in the 100 freestyle, 200 freestyle and 200 freestyle relay. Bispo’s second place finish in Thursday’s 200 freestyle race was a mere second behind Georgia’s Megan Romano, who broke the NCAA record with a time of 1:41.21. Junior Laura Sogar placed in the top eight in both breaststroke events this weekend and said the chemistry of the team provided moments of lightheartedness in what could have been a stressful atmosphere. “Any time I am with my teammates I have a good time,” Sogar said. “It was a good competition and we had some good swims. It was a lot of fun and a great experience.” Bispo, Amundsen, Adams and Tucker earned sixth place in the 400 freestyle relay, clocking in at 3:14.41. In the last race of her career as a Longhorn, senior Katie Riefenstahl swam for eighth place in the 200 backstroke consola-

tion B final, earning one point for the team. “I didn’t do what I wanted to do but at the end of the day what places I get in swimming don’t mean as much as the experience I have gotten from swimming and going to school at Texas,” Riefenstahl said. “I have so much more waiting for me and am excited for what is next.” Diana Wilcox also picked up a team point in the platform diving consolation finals, tallying a score of 232.8 for eighth place. “I had a really good experience and learned a lot about myself and competing,” Wilcox said of her experience at the NCAA Championships. “I improved on some things and look forward to being better in the future.” The meet capped off a tough but rewarding season, complete with the expected highs and lows but marked by determination and team dedication. “It was fun to battle and the team fought hard,” head coach Kim Brackin said. “I thought the team performed extremely well in an incredibly fast meet.”

YOUTH continues from PAGE 8 Big Dance. That gives the Longhorns confidence heading into next season. UT will still be young when they take the court again in November. Texas will have five freshmen, headlined by center Cameron Ridley from Fort Bend Bush in Richmond. “I feel good with where we are as a program right now because I know what we’ve got coming back and I know what we have coming in,” Barnes said. Texas knows it won’t have forwards Clint Chapman and Alexis Wangmene. The fifth-year seniors enjoyed career highs in points and rebounds. But it’s unclear if leading scorer J’Covan Brown will return for his senior season. Brown averaged 20.1 points, 3.8 assists and 3.4 rebounds in 34 starts. The leading scorer in the Big 12, Brown showed the ability to play at the next level. The NBA is there for him should he choose to leave Texas. He has a daughter that will turn

FAILURES continues from PAGE 1

2 in July. “I’ll make the decision, talk to coach, talk to my parents and see what the best thing is for me,” said Brown, who scored in double-figures 32 times this year. “At the end of the day, I have a family to take care of.” Freshman point guard Myck Kabongo will also have a decision to make regarding the NBA Draft in June. In three of the last four NBA Drafts, three Longhorn point guards were selected in the first round: D.J. Augustin (2008), Avery Bradley (2010) and Cory Joseph (2011). The Longhorns can build around swingmen Julien Lewis and Sheldon McClellan. Lewis started 25 games, the most for a freshmen other than Kabongo. McClellan averaged 11.3 points, second on the team. “Those two guys are extremely talented but they’re just learning how to play,” Barnes said. “Sheldon’s athletic ability is off the charts. I think both of those guys have a great future.”

Aren’t these Longhorns supposed to be the Joneses of the college sports block? Turns out there are programs on campus that still run the streets, it’s just that few fans have taken notice. Connie Clark’s No. 6 softball squad is a cool 23-2 though this first part of the season. The expectations were always high for this team, but after last year’s meltdown, no one predicted they’d play this well, this early. The only games the Longhorn softballers have lost all year were to the top two squads in the country. Her team boasts the best batter in the Big 12 in Lexy Bennett and conference-leading pitchers up-and-down the rotation. Head coach Clark is up for a revised contract at the end of this season, and somewhere in that mix should be a thank you note and a cash bonus for her from the Longhorn Network. After all, the network is broadcasting 31 of the team’s games this season, and they are the only ones living up to the “Texas” hype. There was once a time where the tower shined burnt orange every Saturday in the fall. Lately, one of the only athletic programs increasing UT’s electric bill is the men’s swimming and diving team. Coach Eddie Reese has laughed his way past conference competitors in the pool for 33 straight years, never losing a league title during that span. He’ll take his No. 2 ranked squad to the NCAA championships this Thursday and it’d be wise to follow their times online through ESPN3 or on ESPNU, because if you blink, you just might miss them. Those are just some of the sports that deserve their due from Texas fans. So if you’ve been dragging your feet because Texas didn’t beat OU in the Cotton Bowl, or it busted your bracket this March, then quit it. You’ve got the No. 13 and 8 men’s and women’s tennis teams respectively, the topranked men’s golf team and many other programs that may not rake in the top-cash, but are cashing in on their real talent. Pick your shoulders up friends. The Joneses still exist, and schools are still trying to keep pace, but perhaps you sulkers should too.

FUSSELL continues from PAGE 8 Fontenette and Anderson both averaged a shade under 12 points per game and are both a part of the 1,000-point club. Gayle finishes her career as the all-time leading blocker in Texas history with 370 blocks. One positive to take away from the Longhorns’ less than spectacular season is the fact that there is a tremendous amount of talent that is stashed away deep down on Goestenkors’ bench. And there’s more coming in this year’s recruiting class as well. Freshman guard standout Cassie Peoples was limited to just six games this year after failing to heal properly after leg surgery last summer. Peoples was ranked as the No. 7 guard in her class by HoopGurlz. Sophomore guard Shanice McKoy was also unable to play this season after undergoing reconstructive knee surgery in the summer. McCoy played in 14 games in her freshman season.

Sophomore guard Tiffany Moore also played in just four games before her season was ended by a serious allergy problem. Couple in the intermittent injuries of two more sophomores: lightning-quick guard Chelsea Bass and dominant (when healthy) post Cokie Reed, and you can start to understand the magnitude of the injury situation that befell the team this year. Goestenkors has also hauled in two pretty massive recruits in 6-foot-7 post Imani Stafford and top guard Empress Davenport that will join the team. Both bring even more depth to the Texas roster. Texas women’s athletic director Chris Plonsky has pledged to keep Goestenkors under her current seven-year contract that is set to expire in two seasons, but if Goestenkors doesn’t turn things around in a big way, she could be in jeopardy of losing what she has deemed her “dream job.”

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11 COMICS

COMICS 11

Monday, March 19, 2012

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The Daily Texan 03-19-12