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WEST CAMPUS

West Campus sees rise in burglaries By Catherine Marfin @catherinemarfin

Thirty-four burglaries occurred in West Campus residences in 2016, according to the Austin Police Department Crime Viewer database. APD’s Crime Viewer database presents crime reports based on geographic location. West Campus covers areas south of Martin Luther King Boulevard, north of 29th Street, west of Lamar Boulevard and borders Guadalupe Street. The most commonly leased apartment complexes in

West Campus housing include The Block on Campus, The Quarters, Crest at Pearl and 21 Rio, among others, according to Uptown Realty Austin. The 34 burglaries reported in the database were limited and widespread, meaning most were one-time occurrences. During 2016, two burglaries were reported each at The Castilian, The Callaway House and 21 Rio, according to the database. “21 Rio has special keys to enter the building and code access, but to be honest, neither are (the best) measures for

security,” said electrical engineering sophomore Muizz Soomar, who has lived at 21 Rio for a year. “I do feel safe in 21 Rio, since I’ve never been told of any break-ins … but I lock my doors whenever I leave my apartment and make sure my roommates do the same.” Sydney Sanders, community director for Pointe on Rio, said students sometimes don’t think there’s any risk in leaving their apartment doors unlocked because complexes are gated. Sanders said the complex hasn’t experienced any break-ins since

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Abortion legislation undecided in Senate @claireallbright

Joe Capraro | Daily Texan file photo

Thirty-four burglaries occurred in West Campus residences in 2016, according to the Austin Police Department Crime Viewer database. The 34 burglaries reported in the database were limited and widespread.

Longhorns and Aggies advocate at Capitol By Mikaela Cannizzo @mikaelac16

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STATE

By Claire Allbright

POLICY

Longhorns and Aggies set aside their differences Wednesday to lobby at the Capitol on behalf of their joint goal of sustaining affordable yet excellent higher education in the state. Texas Exes and the Association of Former Students of Texas A&M have organized this one-day event, known as Orange and Maroon Legislative Day, since 2003. This year, 240 former and current students of both universities visited all 181 legislators’ offices in addition to the offices of Gov. Greg Abbott and Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick. During a news conference hosted by the alumni associations, UT President Gregory Fenves and A&M President Michael Young emphasized their appreciation for the event. Fenves said the stories of people who have been

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Stephanie Martinez-Arndt | Daily Texan file photo

Longhorns and Aggies convened at the Capitol for Orange and Maroon Legislative Day, including UT President Greg Fenves and A&M President Michael Young. Representatives from both schools gathered to speak on their joint goal for excellence in higher education.

Three bills regulating abortions were brought before the Senate Health and Human Services Committee Wednesday, bringing about passionate testimony on both sides of the issue. Sen. Charles Schwertner, R-Georgetown, and chair of the committee said at the outset of the hearing that the bills deal with “affirming the sanctity of life.” The first bill discussed, Senate Bill 8, was authored by Schwertner. Schwertner said the motivation behind the bill came from 2015 video footage alleging Planned Parenthood had sold fetal organs. Schwertner said his bill aims to restrict elective abortions for profit. SB 8 bans the donation of fetal tissue in elected abortions, limiting tissue donations to research institutions and institutions of higher education to only non-elected abortions occurring at licensed facilities. Sen. Kirk Watson, D-Austin, was the most outspoken voice against all three pieces of legislation during the hearing and said “donation” isn’t defined clearly in the bill in regards to cases involving rape or fetal medical abnormalities. SB 8 would also extend the federal ban on partial-birth abortions, a procedure ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2003. A separate bill, SB 415, authored by Sen. Charles

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LECTURE

CAMPUS

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian discusses differing perspectives in American history

Resident Assistants talk responsibilities

By Chase Haracostas @chasekaracostas

Inverted views of history deepen understandings of society today and the current political climate, and one has to start with angles people normally overlook, said Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Steven Hahn. Hahn spoke Wednesday at the AT&T Conference Center for the annual Littlefield Lectures series, where he focused on asking people to use a holistic understanding of American history—beyond the perspective of the northeast—to comprehend society today. Redefining American expansionism as conquest and the centrality of the Mississippi River in the 19th century American South were just a few of the topics Hahn discussed. Hahn said current interpretations of the

past are becoming increasingly important, especially when it comes to analyzing our current political climate. “You could argue that the election was about historical interpretation,” Hahn said. “When someone says ‘Make America great again’ they’re talking about historical interpretation of the past and what that past looks like. So, it seems to me that history speaks to us in really powerful ways.” History Department Chair Jacqueline Jones said she brought Hahn to the University to provide students with a provocative scholar who would encourage students to think in different ways. “He’s a really fabulous historian and a lot of people have read his work,” Jones said. “I think it’s always wonderful to hear firsthand a distinguished scholar and just to hear them talk about

By Ally Ortegon @atxallyyy

Chase Karacostas | Daily Texan Staff

Pulitzer Prize winning historian Steven Hahn spoke Wednesday for the annual Littlefield Lecture Series.

their work and how they go about studying history.” Philosophy sophomore Harris Khowaja, who was required by a professor to attend the lecture, said he was immediately captivated by Hahn. “That emphasis on alternative viewpoints is

something that I find personally interesting, but it is also something that needs to be expanded further,” Khowaja said. “It’s something that absolutely needs to have interpretation in not only historical discourse but in discourse between average people.”

From planning “first day of school pictures” to being on-call in the latest hours of the night, resident assistants on campus have countless responsibilities they carry out in the pursuit of building a safe community for their residents. Justin Jaskowiak, assistant director for residence life, said there are 161 RAs dispersed among the 14 dorms on campus, acting as the first point of contact for many new students at UT. Their job includes ensuring safety for students, as well as making sure students feel comfortable during their first year at UT to transition into being away from home for the first time. “We look for that

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relationship-building skill or peer mentoring,” Jaskowiak said. “We love RAs that come with an attitude of flexibility. They have to respond to all sorts of incidents that could happen.” RAs often attribute the positive impacts their resident assistants had on their lives as a reason to get involved with the position. RAs can help students get involved on campus, provide support and build relationships with their residents. Jester West RA Sarah Austin, an accounting graduate student, said UT has a variety of students with different backgrounds and experiences, so it’s important for RAs to be open-minded and compassionate. “A characteristic all RAs should possess is compassion,”

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Thursday, February 16, 2017

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NEWS

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Volume 117, Issue 103

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor-in-Chief Alexander Chase (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Akshay Mirchandani (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Sports Office sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office (512) 232-2209 lifeandarts@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office (512) 471-7835 multimedia@ dailytexanonline.com Retail Advertising (512) 471-1865 advertise@texasstudentmedia.com

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Mathematics senior Carter Smith shouts in the face of American evangelist Brother Jed on the West Mall Wednesday afternoon.

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I actually try to emulate Justin Timberlake.

personally impacted by either of these universities help advance legislative priorities, such as upholding the role of research in both institutions and expanding opportunities for future college students. “The Texas Legislature has supported these two universities since they began in the late 1800s,” Fenves said during the press conference. “But that commitment needs to be renewed every biennium and it gets renewed when they hear from the alumni of the two universities.” Sen. Judith Zaffirini, D-Laredo, urged volunteers to advocate for a funding plan that will allow students to receive a high quality education at an affordable cost. Zaffirini said her goal is to ensure 60 percent of 24-30 year olds receive a postsecondary education by 2030, and believes alumni

bringing this up to legislators will help eventually make it a reality. “Anybody can provide a cheap education, that’s easy,” Zaffirini said. “But can we make higher education affordable and still maintain our excellence?” The universities are at risk at losing funding for research initiatives because of a proposed cut in funding for special items in the Senate budget. Young said both UT and A&M receive significant funding for research and told volunteers to advocate against this loss before it hears a vote on the Senate floor. Daniel Becka, vice president of constituent relations for Texas Exes, said the contribution from former and current students is central to the mission of the event. “Our alumni have a different perspective than members of the Legislature often hear,” Becka said. “They often hear from folks

RA This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25 Permanent Staff

Editor-in-Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Alexander Chase Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michael Jensen, Janhavi Nemawarkar, Khadija Saifullah, Caleb Wong Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Akshay Mirchandani Associate Managing Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eva Frederick, Michelle Zhang News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ellie Breed Associate News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Forrest Milburn News Desk Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Will Clark, Hannah Daniel, Sunny Kim, Sarah Phillips, Wesley Story Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Claire Allbright, Mikaela Cannizzo, Lisa Dreher, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anusha Lalani, Catherine Marfin, Kayla Meyertons Senior Investigative Reporter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Van Nguyen Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kasey Salisbury Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jaree Campbell, Vanessa Martinez, Bella McWhorter, Colin Traver Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elizabeth Jones Associate Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Megan McFarren Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Liza Anderson, Sierra Garcia, Sunnie Lee, Rena Li Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Zoe Fu Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emmanuel Briseno, Gabriel Lopez Senior Photographer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Juan Figueroa, Joshua Guerra, Mary Pistorius, Briana Vargas, Rachel Zein Video Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monica Silverio Senior Videographer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thomas Negrete, Faley Goyette Science&Tech Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Zia Lyle Associate Science&Tech Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Julianne Hodges, Kate Thackrey Senior Science&Tech Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sarah Bloodworth, Angela Kang, Freya Preimesberger Forum Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan Shenhar, Emily Vernon Senior Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Emma Bernadier, Alyssa Fernandez, Sam Groves, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noah M. Horwitz, Josephine MacLean, G. Elliott Morris Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mae Hamilton Associate Life&Arts Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Daisy Wang, Morgan O’Hanlon Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephen Acevedo, Acacia Coronado, Chris Duncan, Justin Jones Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tyler Horka Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sydney Rubin Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alex Briseno, Vanessa Le, Shane Lewis Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Audrey McNay Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Victoria Smith, Melanie Westfall Senior Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geovanni Casillas, Albert Lee, Bixie Mathieu, Jacky Tovar Social Media Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Stephanie Martinez-Arndt Editorial Adviser. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peter Chen

Issue Staff

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ally Ortegon, Meeral Hakeem, Chase Karacostas, Eric vela Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Madalyn Marabella, Ryan Young Life&Arts Writers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gerardo Gonzalez, Jose Gonzalez Sports Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leah Vann S&T Writers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amanda Kang, Aditya Singh, Amanda Kaeni Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Macy Bayern, Josey Hill, Connor Perry Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ashley Liu, Jacob Sepulveda Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Iris Bilich, Brooke Crim, Chase Karacostas, Angel Lilloa Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Ibanez, Hyeyun Jeong, Serena Romero, Rachel Tyler Illustration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hyeyun Jeong, Rachel West

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continues from page 1 Austin said. “We’ve gone through a lot of the same struggles that they’ve gone through, and they can come to us and ask us for any type of help that they need.” A majority of RAs return to serve more than one year in the position, Jaskowiak said. For the 2016-17 school year, Jaskowiak said 106 of the total 161 RAs returned from the previous year. Each has their own reason, but many RAs expressed the importance of the impact they make on

BURGLARIES

continues from page 1 she began working in August. “We have conversations about (preventative measures) and have a section in the lease that describes safety measures and guidelines to always follow, like locking your vehicle … and your apartment, things like that,” Sanders said. “But there are maybe more valuable items here in West Campus and … students aren’t usually worried about security like that.” Four burglaries were reported along Hemphill Park, which includes The Villas on Guadalupe and several small rental houses, the most out of any complex in the Crime Viewer database. Cameron Walsh, mathematics and French junior, has lived in The Villas since August. Walsh said he has not worried about break-ins because of The Villas’ extensive security measures. “I’ve never been concerned about break-ins because of the double security at Villas;

who are involved in both of the universities, and our alumni are coming out with a perspective of having gone to the universities and having benefitted from the great education that they got at both of those institutions.” While many alumni from both schools participated in the event, Becka said students volunteered too. Student Body President Kevin Helgren said he participated in the lobbying event today because he wanted to express desires and concerns students have to legislators. Helgren said he advocated for college affordability during the majority of conversations he had with lawmakers. “For a lot of representatives, thankfully, higher education is one of their top priorities,” Helgren said. “It was nice to talk to representatives who acknowledge, and even champion, the importance of higher education and the financial underpinnings that come with it.” residents as motivation. “It’s that moment when they trust you,” said Jester East RA Jennifer Valdez, government junior. “The kids in my hall all started hanging out together after attending our program, and it was a moment when I took a step back and said, ‘Oh, I did that.’ They feel safe on our floor.” As an RA, Austin said she tries to encourage her own residents to take part in this position as well. “It is incredibly rewarding, and that’s not something I expected,” Austin said. “It’s really a second home.” residents need a (sensor) to open the gate and a key to open the apartment door,” Walsh said. “Break-ins aren’t ever completely preventable … but I make sure to lock the door to my apartment and to keep the blinds down on windows facing the outside.” While Crime Viewer is a good resource for geographic data, APD does not recommend using it as an “end-all, be-all” when looking at crime levels, because the database does have limitations. The data only includes formal reports, meaning calls for police service where a report was not written are not included, and it does not include cases where APD later determined the reported offense did not occur. APD suggests residents visit areas themselves before making a judgement solely on Crime Viewer data. “Don’t rely on statistics alone. Statistics can lead to false impressions,” APD warns on their website. “Gather a variety of information. Visit neighborhoods and observe the surroundings.”

NATIONAL

Panel discusses Trump’s recent executive orders By Meraal Hakeem @meraal_hakeem

Professors, students and community members stood in solidarity Wednesday against President Donald Trump’s executive orders on immigration policies and U.S.-Mexico border relations. A “Foro Urgente” panel hosted by the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies raised awareness to issues negatively impacting the Austin Latino community. “Whether they can muster the (U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement) resources to round up 10,000 people in a weekend or 600 in a weekend, intentions matter,” educational psychology professor Ricardo Ainslie said. “On that very first day, when he came down from Trump Tower, this president started an attack against immigrants.” Carlos Gonzalez Gutierrez, consul general of Mexico in Austin, introduced the panelists, consisting of law professor Denise Gilman, immigration attorney Barbara Hines, a UT student and Ainslie. Ainslie said Trump’s executive orders have caused fear among those in the Latino community. “There have been only a few deportations, but they’ve given

ABORTION

continues from page 1 Perry, R-Lubbock, mandates the absence of a fetal heartbeat before dilation and evacuation abortions are performed. Perry said these D&E or “dismemberment” procedures make up 96 percent of all second-trimester abortions. “You are required to terminate the life of a child before you tear it apart piece by piece,” Perry said. In the same 2003 case, the Court struck down a ban on dismemberment procedures saying they pose no threat to the safety of the mother. Perry said his bill does not ban the procedures but rather protects the state’s interest in preserving potential life by putting an ‘end to these barbaric practices.’” Opposition to the bill came from Watson, who said the legislation doesn’t deal with protecting the health of the mother but obstructs the safest, most commonly practiced second-trimester procedure. Sen. Don Huffines, R-Dallas, authored SB 258, the final bill before the committee,

such a great impact of fear,” Ainslie said. “Even people with (documentation) are afraid to leave their homes.” Gilman said the border area is actually quite safe with border crossers typically being women and children. “There is no recognition of immigration having favorable aspects of relations between the U.S. and Mexico,” Gilman said. “It’s very clearly intended to be a political message of crisis and security at the border.” Anthropology senior Juan Belman, the student panelist, said his status as a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals student allows him to relate to the anxieties surfacing among Latino communities. “We need to try to speak about our rights because those little things make such a big difference here in the United States,” Belman said. Hines said the executive orders might not even be legal or constitutional, evidenced by the Muslim ban. “In these really dark times, it’s important to remember we still have the so-called judges and that we may have to go to the courts to stop what I think are some of the illegal and unconstitutional actions of the new—what should I call it?— new president,” Hines said. “We really need to do all that we can.” which would require fetal and ectopic remains to be buried following an abortion or miscarriage that occurs in a hospital. Watson again questioned how the bill protects the health and safety of the mother. “My bill is not about that,” Huffines said. “My bill deals with the dignity of the unborn, and that is a profound purpose for the state of Texas.” Watson said the decision should be left to the mother. He also raised a concern about the cost associated with this method of disposal of fetal remains. “I’m trying to make sure the bill would work,” Watson said. All invited testimony during the hearing was in favor of the bills. However, public testimony was given on both sides of the issue. Pro-regulation groups and individuals called for broader abortion bans and the need for a Senate bill similar to House Bill 948 that criminalizes all abortion practices. The Committee, composed of six Republicans and three Democrats, left the bills pending, with their next meeting to be announced.


W&N 3

ZIA LYLE, SCIENCE&TECHNOLOGY EDITOR Thursday, February 16, 2017

3

ENGINEERING

Texas steers towards hosting autonomous vehicles By Amanda Laeni @amandakknee

A future in which we are all driven by our own cars may as close as 40 years away, and testing in Texas starts soon. The U.S. Department of Transportation named Texas and eight other states as official proving grounds for autonomous vehicles. UT’s Center for Transportation joined 32 partners across the state as part of the Texas Proving Grounds Partnership, which will introduce autonomous vehicles onto public roadways. Testing locations include the UT Arlington campus, Houston HOV lanes and roads in the San Antonio, Dallas-Fort Worth and El Paso areas, as well as Austin-Bergstrom Airport/Riverside corridor in Austin. Christopher Poe, assistant agency director of the Texas

A&M Transportation Institute, said a good automated vehicle testing site safely imitates the real world with support from technology specialists. Michael Brown, an engineer at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, said that the partnership will provide a more realistic environment. “To truly test automated vehicles, you must have a diverse set of challenging environments,” Brown said. “Too often these vehicles are tested in ideal conditions in nice weather and well-marked roadways in a geographically limited area.” With such a new and fragile technology, UT Center for Transportation Research director Chandra Bhat said that safety is the most important parameter. “(When testing autonomous vehicles), it has to be done in a carefully orchestrated fashion,” Bhat said.

“Step by step, things need to start in an extremely controlled way, with a driver ready to take control at any time. From there we may learn something, and we can graduate to more autonomy — however, all these transitions need to be methodically choreographed.” Many issues arise when mixing driven vehicles with autonomous vehicles on roads. Human error causes 80 percent of automobile accidents and the most significant outcome of a community with only autonomous vehicles would be the drastic increase in safety, Bhat said. However, he said that mixing the two types of cars may pose higher rates of preventable accidents, and it would be safest with no human-operated cars on the road. “In a democracy (telling people they can’t drive) may

Smoking is banned in many public places because it is known how harmful secondhand smoke is. I think the same thing will happen with autonomous vehicles. —Chandra Bhat, Research director

not sit well, but on other hand it could be a regulation that will come down the road for the betterment of society,” Bhat said. “Smoking is banned in many public places because it is known how harmful secondhand smoke is. I think the same thing will happen with autonomous vehicles.”

Illustration by Albert Lee | Daily Texan Staff

As these vehicles are tested in the coming years, Bhat said the next steps will include proving ability, improving technology,

questioning ethical, societal and liability issues and opening up a dialogue. The partnership plans to start testing cars by Jan. 2018.

INNOVATION

Texas Convergent aims to help students create their own start-ups By Jack Stenglein @thedailytexan

A new club on campus aims to help students jump-start their own startups. Texas Convergent, which started this semester, will teach students about startups and technology while also helping them develop tech prototypes. The club has general meetings every week, during which the officers give lectures on various startup techniques, such as efficient development, and technologies, such as virtual reality and machine learning. “It’s about building the students, making them powerhouses in technology before they’re even out of college,”

said Arjo Mozumder, senior finance major and co-founder of Convergent. “It gives them a huge advantage over basically anyone who doesn’t do that.” Members can also apply to be part of an incubator hosted by Convergent, which helps startups reach a prototype in eight weeks. After members submit their proposals online, officers will select eight ideas to be presented at a monthly pitch meeting. From there, one or two of those ideas will be chosen for the incubator. Mozumder said Convergent would like to have about four projects in the incubator at a given time and that the first group will be selected in three weeks.

“One very interesting proposal that we’ve received is a virtual reality education tool,” Mozumder said. “For example, underclassmen could experience engineering ‘externships’ and virtually visit oil rigs. Engineering is a more visual field, so technology like that would make learning more tangible.” Once a project enters the incubator, four of Convergent’s officers will serve as product manager, architect, business analyst and tech analyst on the project. Mozumder said this is like bringing on a team of consultants. Dilan Hira, finance and computer science junior and co-founder of Convergent, said the members who want to work on projects but aren’t

ROBOTICS

Robotic nurses extend Seton hospital staff a helping hand By Aditya Singh @thedailytexan

There’s a new robot in town. Poli, a robotic hospital assistant tasked to save nurses’ time, is now making the rounds at Austin’s Seton Medical Center. Poli was developed by Andrea Thomaz, a UT electrical and computer engineering associate professor and CEO of Diligent Droids. She said Poli will mainly provide logistical support for the nursing staff and will not interact with patients. “Nurses are spending 30 percent of their time just running around doing things that don’t require their license,” Thomaz said. al Thomaz said Poli is designed beto do simple non-patient inonteracting tasks, like gathering insupplies, building kits and autonomously navigating the edhalls of Seton. She added that ththis will reduce the workload of healthcare staff and allow t,”nurses, doctors and therapists alsto spend more time working n,with patients one-on-one. se Kristi Henderson, vice president of Virtual Care and Innoonvation at the Seton Healthcare h-Family and the lead clinical rnresearcher at Seton, said Poli’s thdevelopment has been driven ofby and for nurses. “Our whole focus around hethis is to allow our healthd. care team to focus on what’s nyimportant to us: the paintients,” Henderson said. “The er,possibilities are endless.” en Henderson said Poli’s priue.mary capability right now is ndfetching supplies for nurses. erShe added that Poli receives edvoice commands and is able toto assemble new patient kits al-using its mechanical arm. Max Svetlik, recent comedputer science alumnus, eeworked with Thomaz to help d-develop Poli. He said the intonovation behind Poli is its

Illustration by Rachel West | Daily Texan Staff

machine-learning algorithm, which allows the robot to learn from demonstration and observation, similarly to how humans learn. “If a human wanted to teach Poli something new, like how to pick up socks for instance, the human would direct Poli over in front of the socks, and move its arm to the socks, tell Poli to close its hand, and move the arm back,” Svetlik said. He added that Poli is able to replicate this task after just learning it once. Thomaz said she hopes designing robots in this way will allow robots to easily follow instructions from anyone, not just their programmers. The inclusion of robots in a hospital setting creates an ethical discussion about who is liable for Poli’s actions, Henderson said. She related this problem to a similar dilemma with self-driving cars: If a car swerves

into your lane, and a child runs out into the road, which is the car programed to hit? “As humans, we can process all of that and make decisions for which is the least impactful,” Henderson said. Thomaz said Poli solves this ethical dilemma by either only performing human-directed tasks or tasks that function within its “explainable interface.” This “explainable interface,” which Thomaz designed, means Poli is programed to logically explain the reasoning for each of its actions. Thomaz said the future of artificial intelligence and robots is much simpler than what is portrayed in the media. “I want robots in society doing more to help people achieve their goals, doing more to empower people, to have the job they really want and to live the life they really want,” Thomaz said.

accepted to the incubator can still get involved through Convergent’s open-source initiative. “The purpose of the opensource division will be to build UT and work on projects that help the Austin community,” Hira said. “So, we’ll be taking projects from charities, for example. We’re working on an application that anyone can use (to submit project ideas).” Mozumder and Hira first formed the idea for Convergent last summer, after they attended a summit in New York City for student leaders. They said other students at the summit reported better startup collaboration at their schools. “Other universities already had these kinds of

organizations,” Hira said. “We realized we had no interdisciplinary collaboration here. There was a gap at UT, and we wanted to fill that gap.” However, Mozumder said that getting the various UT departments on board was difficult. He said McCombs doesn’t affiliate with a student organization unless 60 percent of its members are business majors. As an interdisciplinary organization, Convergent has a broad student base, and the department would not let them market inside the building at all. “The departments would tell us they had tried to work together, but it didn’t sound like they tried that hard,” Mozumder said. “One thing

about academia is that people are very focused on their own fields, and the forces at work are not extremely geared toward working with another department. We don’t believe that should be the case.” Mozumder said that despite the difficulty in marketing, Convergent received 200 sign ups in its first week. He said that the organization needs to build a dedicated membership base from that group, and if its success continues, it could eventually expand beyond UT. “We aren’t just trying to build a student organization,” Mozumder said. “We’re trying to build this into something that can scale and service a pretty wide audience.”

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4 OPINION

4

ALEXANDER CHASE, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | @TexanEditorial Thursday, February 16, 2017

COLUMN

UT must reassure its international students By Ratnika Batra

Daily Texan Columnist

President Donald Trump’s executive order attempting to ban citizens of seven majority Muslim countries affects more than just Muslims. It makes many international citizens fear they could become the target of another such order. This order may not have intentionally targeted people of other religions, but it is part of Trump’s effort to publicize people from other countries as insignificant and unwelcome in this country. Currently, Trump’s point of view on superior races does not matter — at least until he comes up with another absurd order. What matters is the local support international citizens receive to live peacefully and as equal humans. Gregory L. Fenves has already voiced his support for the UT members who are directly affected by this order. “I am proud to say we have 110 students, faculty members and scholars who are citizens of the seven affected countries,” Fenves said in an email to the campus on Jan. 29. “To those who are abroad, please exercise caution and know that we are doing everything we can regarding your return to UT.” Even though this executive order was overturned soon after it was put into effect by two federal judges, many prospective students see the U.S. as dangerous under Trump’s presidency. They are opting to go

to Canadian universities over American ones. Naturally so, as many other universities around the world offer equally good education without meticulous questioning from the immigration officers, triple the tuition rate compared to the in-state rate, and lengthy wait times for just an appointment for a U.S. student visa. This is the fear amongst the students who are only thinking of coming to the U.S. This fear increases by a thousand for those who are already here. Fenves may have shown his support, but the international office at UT that directly deals with the international students and staff is quiet on the issue — only one email was sent out on Feb. 6 concerning this issue by Anna Tutum, the Support Service Advisor at the International office. “Current events, including the recent executive order on immigration, may be affecting you or your loved ones in a variety of ways,” Tutum said in the email. “The Counseling and Mental Health Center with International Student and Scholar Services invite you to join us in a safe space to process recent events and connect with other students.” To start with, one email is not enough — there needs to be a follow up. More importantly, this is not the time to remind us of the mental health counseling that we already know about. It’s time to show their support and, hopefully, act behind the

COLUMN

I am sure there aren’t many people who need a monetary reason to help other humans, but for a few who do — who do not care about international citizens — about $32 billion per year comes just from international students across the United States. All of that is at risk if these students do not feel safe coming to the country.

scenes to reassure students of their choice to come to United States and, in particular, to UT. I am sure there aren’t many people who need a monetary reason to help other humans, but for a few who do — who do not care about international citizens — about $32 billion per year comes just from international students across the United States. All of that is at risk if these students do not feel safe coming to the country.

We must understand the magnitude of this order and we must start by making efforts locally. These are hard times for many of us. But we need to unite, voice our support, and most importantly, work against racist and xenophobic actions. As the highest representative of UT, Fenves should now address all of our university’s 6,404 international students. Batra is a computer science and rhetoric and writing junior from New Delhi.

COLUMN

UT students should take steps to reduce water consumption By Madalyn Marabella Daily Texan Columnist

You are probably well acquainted with the cartoon raccoons in the Kinsolving and J2 Dining halls that lightly shame you for wasting food. But their judging stares neglect one of the biggest sources of waste on campus: water. A study from Arizona State University revealed that college students use approximately twice as much water as the typical American to cover the same necessities. Although the study did not delve into the cause of the excess water usage, our demographic obviously has room for improvement. Awareness alone could cut down on much of the waste. Since most college students do not pay their own water bills — and do not have parents to scold them into conservation — they do not have to face their own indulgence. Merry Klonower, Director of Communications at the Texas Water Development Board, emphasized that small actions by individuals can “accrue into more impactful changes.” The condescending raccoons did not miss the mark entirely. Agriculture uses a lot of water. Producing one loaf of bread, for example, requires 150 gallons of water. According to a study by the Texas Water Development Board, of all the water used by Texas in 2014, 76 percent of groundwater and 27 percent of surface water went to agriculture. Though this percentage will continue to decline as agriculture becomes more efficient and other industries consume more water, food production will likely use more water than the domestic sector for decades. That said, forgoing a week’s worth of sandwiches will not pump 150 gallons of water back into the Edwards Aquifer. Consuming less food will only reduce water usage if accomplished on a large enough scale to noticeably reduce

the state’s demand for agricultural products. Although important, mindfully consuming food probably will not cut down on water use as much as actually using less water. Water conservation could become increasingly important to the Austin area in the future. Although the Edwards Aquifer has recharged recently, we do not know when the next drought will hit. The Austin area depends on the aquifer for a large portion of its water, and we do not have an easily accessible alternative. Texas as a whole will likely struggle with water shortages as well. Klonower said that the greatest challenge going forward will be providing water for Texas’ rapidly growing population. The state should successfully reach its goals, however, if it follows conservation recommendations from the Texas Water Development Board. So far, most Texan municipalities, including Austin, have successfully reduced water usage in recent years. But legislative action on state and city-wide levels is not enough. This brings us back to the issue of individual awareness. A study from Vanderbilt University found real-time metering technology that provided frequent feedback on water use successfully encouraged students to conserve water and electricity. Such technology would take years to implement, but hopefully the University will move in that direction. Until then, individual initiative is key, and the University must do everything it can to constantly promote mindfulness. I want raccoons above the water fountains. I want raccoons silently judging you as you refuse to use a sponge and try to wash your dishes using water pressure alone. I want raccoons in your shower. Marabella is a business honors, Plan II and Spanish freshman from Austin.

GALLERY

Illustration by Yulissa Chavez | Daily Texan Staff

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Illustration by Rachel Tyler | Daily Texan Staff

365’s new Cedar Park location excludes low-income residents By Alyssa Fernandez

Daily Texan Senior Columnist @blancoalyssa

Whole Foods recently announced that they will open their budget-friendly 365 by Whole Foods Market subsidiary store in Cedar Park on April 26. This store is an attempt by the Austin-based company to fulfill its dream of making organic food appeal to everybody and tackle its decline in sales, which have dropped in the past six consecutive quarters. Unlike the original store, that often lives up to its nickname of ‘whole paycheck’ by selling overpriced products such as $6 asparagus water, the 365 store is designed reach a younger demographic through its affordably-priced products. It’s well worth wondering who really benefits from the affordability of a 365 store when Cedar Park has a median household income of $90,762 compared to the state average of $55,653. In this case, it’s a matter of choosing convenience over accessibility. The fact of the matter is, opting to place the new 365 location in Cedar Park taps into a market of customers who already have the financial means to purchase these products rather than seeking out low income communities to serve. Texas has the 10th highest adult obesity rate in the country, and it’s no secret that there is a relationship between poverty and obesity. Although there is not one direct cause for obesity, a predominant factor is accessibility to healthy food. And many Texans are left without reasonable options — Texas has the largest grocery gap in the U.S., and low-income communities in both urban and rural areas have limited access to supermarkets. The public is no longer in a position to remain passive about obesity since the Comptroller of Public Affairs estimates

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | Email your Firing Lines to editor@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

It’s well worth wondering who really benefits from the affordability of a 365 store when Cedar Park has a median household income of $90,762 compared to the state average of $55,653. In this case, it’s a matter of choosing convenience over accessibility. that taxpayers will pay $32.5 billion per year by 2030 if no action is taken. This problem isn’t limited to any one industry, a viable solution involves everyone’s participation, including private businesses like Whole Foods. States such as California have already taken initiative to address obesity through their FreshWorks Funds, a program designed to bring healthy food retailers to under-served communities. Texas should follow suit and create a similar program to incentivise corporations such as Whole Foods to bring 365 locations to low income areas. This isn’t just a social program, but a means for Whole Foods and similar companies to open doors to unexplored markets that could increase sales. But extending the accessibility of healthy food retailers isn’t a quick fix or solution to obesity. It won’t erase a lifetime of poor eating habits, but it does provide options to make those lifestyle changes. It also addresses accessibility and that in itself is a strive, so we transform how we think of healthy foods as an expectation and not a privilege. Fernandez is a rhetoric and writing and Spanish senior from Allen.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@TexanEditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


LIFE&ARTS

5

Thursday, February 16, 2017

BUSINESS

Forbes’ 30 Under 30 given to UT researcher By Angela Kang @angelaa_kang

Charlie Upshaw was pleasantly surprised when he opened an email this January to find that Forbes had named him one of their 30 Under 30 recipients. The 30 Under 30 award recognizes innovative and entrepreneurial individuals enacting change in their community. Forbes recognized Upshaw, a mechanical engineering postdoctoral fellow, for his work in energy research. For his postdoctoral research, Upshaw designed a home system that collects and cools rainwater during the night to help reduce air conditioning energy loads during the daytime. Upshaw said he wants to build smart residential buildings capable of efficient energy use. “What I see is a move towards smarter, more self-sufficient buildings,” Upshaw said. “I think that the older model of meeting demand only through centralized infrastructure will change over the next

PODCAST

continues from page 8 open a Kickstarter to pursue something new. Though they initially aimed for $30,000, that amount was soon quadrupled with overwhelming support. “Double Toasted” was soon born and currently has over 64,000 subscribers. Double Toasted is a culmination of Coleman and Thomas’ partnership since their time on The Reel Deal in the late 90s. Their lasting

several decades.” Upshaw said he has been talking with local companies about commercialization of his invention while continuing development. “I was born and raised in Austin. I have an inherent sense for the summertime heat and the potential for drought,” Upshaw said. “That’s a huge motivation for working on the rainwater system.” Joshua Rhodes, also a mechanical engineering postdoctoral fellow, described Upshaw’s invention, which is currently housed at the Pickle Research Campus, as a battery for thermal energy instead of electricity. “He’s built a residential sized energy storage system … that you can use to air condition your house during the afternoon so you don’t have to be pulling electricity from the grid,” Rhodes said. Upshaw was nominated for the award by mechanical engineering professor Michael Webber. He, Rhodes and Upshaw co-founded a consulting and research company called IdeaSmiths

in 2013 to support advances in local technology. Upshaw said IdeaSmiths started as a reaction to community demand for research consultation. Webber, Rhodes and Upshaw had done some consulting projects outside of their routine research, but ultimately formed an official company when film studio Paramount came to Austin to work on “Transformers 4” and needed a wind turbine as a prop. Upshaw said companies and individuals come to IdeaSmiths to brainstorm and test concepts. “Our main focus is in start-ups in water and technology,” he said. “If an inventor has a technology that has a question about how it works on a fundamental level, we check up on it.” Rhodes added that there’s no shortage of talent in Austin. “Particularly in Austin, there’s a ton of ideas and a ton of people with money who are trying to link up with people with ideas,” Rhodes said.

According to Forbes senior editor Chris Helman, the selection process is lengthy and competitive. “I had a really nice conversation with (Charlie) during the nomination process, and I thought he was a very good nominee for us,” Helman said. “Only 4 percent of people who are nominated end up making the final cut … It’s still a very hard award to win for sure.” Helman said the combination of Upshaw’s inventiveness, drive for commercialization and community involvement represented the ideals that Forbes looks for when selecting recipients for the 30 Under 30 award. “We’re very much looking for self-starting individuals who have entrepreneurial spirit,” Helman said. “We are about entrepreneurs, people who are go-getters trying to create something out of nothing. That’s who Charlie is. He’s an inventor always trying to come up with new ideas.”

power, especially in today’s digital age, surrounded by so much white noise from media content, involves more than talent. “With technology how it is now, there are so many things that’ll come into your sphere that’ll just drop off,” Thomas said. “It’s a matter of outlasting.” The pair also highlighted the importance of remaining consistent with work ethic. Despite having to simultaneously run the cameras

and keep the stream running smoothly while the show is on air, Coleman feels having more creative freedom is worth it. “There’s an entrepreneurial level to this now,” Coleman stated. “There’s a lot that comes with ownership that I’m glad I have now and took for granted before.” As “Double Toasted” expands further, Coleman said he sometimes finds it difficult to strike a balance between pleasing paying

subscribers and staying true to the show’s mission. Regardless, Coleman’s top priority is making a good show. “The most offensive thing to me is coming into to the studio and not trying our best,” Coleman said. Ian Butcher, a longtime fan of the crew’s work since the Spill.com days, drove all the way down from Corvallis, Oregon to Austin to pursue a career in film making. He said he was captivated with the way “Double Toasted”

RECYCLE

Courtesy of Charlie Upshaw

Charlie Upshaw, mechanical engineering postdoctoral fellow, was recently named a Forbes 30 Under 30 recipient in energy.

described Austin. “Listening to them and talking about Austin all the time kind of implanted it in my head,” said Butcher in regards to the podcast. “Austin was the first place on my radar.” Butcher recently went from being an intern at the studio to co-hosting alongside Sammy Gonzalez for “Sammy Ain’t Seen Sh*t”, a segment that focuses on classic movies. Though being on a live podcast makes him

anxious, he said he appreciates the comfort he feels bantering with co-hosts. As the “Double Toasted” crew begins to bounce off quips and ideas, Butcher suddenly forgets the cameras are even there. As a fan, Butcher still attends the live shows and admires the camaraderie of the crew. “That’s the thing that got me into these guys in the first place,” Butcher said. “Listening to them was like having a conversation—like being at a party

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6 SPTS

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TYLER HORKA, SPORTS EDITOR | @texansports Thursday, Febuary 16, 2017

SOFTBALL

Longhorns gear up for Texas Invitational By Wills Layton @willsdebeast

The Longhorns continue action this weekend as they host the Texas Invitational. Texas will take on Indiana, South Carolina and Louisiana Tech in its second week of spring action. After hitting the mound in last weekend’s season opener against Colorado State, junior pitcher Paige von Sprecken is excited to see how her team stands up to the competition. “I’m really excited to see how we face up against another Big 10 team and an SEC team,” von Sprecken said. “I think it’ll be some good competition and I’m just excited to see how our hitting and our pitching will keep moving forward from last week.” The Longhorns finished their season-opening weekend at 3-2—with both losses at the hands of a high-caliber

Minnesota team. Texas scored 33 runs over the five-game span and looks to continue the high-powered offense as the season progresses. Senior first baseman Kelli Hanzel stressed the importance of learning from in-game experiences and continuing to grow on offense. “I think we had a really strong outing, a lot of runs scored, a lot of good looks,” Hanzel said. “I would say going into this weekend we’re just going to keep competing at the plate, making those in game adjustments and really executing the plans that we have going to the plate.” All five Texas pitchers will see starting action this weekend. At last weekend’s Texas Classic, the Longhorns utilized a wide-range of pitching combinations. Each game featured a unique starter-reliever combination.

Head coach Connie Clark said they are looking to explore different tactics on the mound this weekend. “We are actually going to go with starters and then just go to relief if we need it,” Clark said. “If we’re putting up runs, we won’t make a quick move, but if they’re struggling and we’re not putting up runs, we’ll make a quicker move. So it’ll be a little more traditional this weekend.” The Longhorns face undefeated South Carolina and a Louisiana Tech squad who looked sharp in its first week of play. South Carolina has scored 35 runs over five games, while only allowing one opposing runner to score. Louisiana Tech has shown a similar display of dominating play, having outscored opponents by 21 combined runs through six contests. The team

Confidence is not easy to come by and it definitely isn’t easy to regain. The Longhorns know this. Confidence wasn’t exactly at an abundance following the 8-2 loss to TCU in last year’s Big 12 Tournament, capping off a disappointing sub .500 season. But Texas seems to have found the right guy to restore confidence on the 40 Acres. It’s no coincidence that the team has swagger again following the hiring of head coach David Pierce. “They’re buying into

everything we do and I think that’s helped them relax,” Pierce said. “The expectations at The University of Texas adds that little pressure. You feel like you have to do something different. I’m just trying to constantly get them to trust who they are.” The term ‘rebuilding period’ is thrown around a lot after a new hire, but players are saying that Pierce has no intention of entertaining that excuse. “He said there is no rebuilding period. We want to win now,” junior catcher Michael Cantu said. “The fact that he came in and said we’re going to win a lot of

games and we’re going to win them now—the confidence he has in us...as a player you love that.” Pierce has coached at Houston, Rice, Sam Houston and most recently at Tulane before he came to Austin. The veteran coach’s approach may seem unorthodox to some, but it appears to be working just fine so far. “From the get-go he’s made this field really inviting, and an exciting place to come to everyday,” junior pitcher Connor Mayes said. “We’re learning every day and we’re excited to be here. He’s been very personal with us.”

SOFTBALL

Hanzel eyes national championship as collegiate career comes to a close By Leah Vann

@Vanntastic_Leah

Senior captain and first baseman Kelli Hanzel got her start playing baseball with the boys at the age of 5. “I have an older brother and he played baseball,” Hanzel said. “So, I pretty much wanted to be just like him. And baseball, I just went for it. I kind of wanted to pitch a little bit, so that’s when I made the transition over to softball.” Hanzel made the change to softball when she was eight. Over time, Hanzel excelled at other spots on the diamond. She is currently listed as both a first and second baseman on Texas’ roster. “I was predominately a pitcher growing up, but it’s always good to be versatile and play multiple positions,” Hanzel said. “So I played a little bit of second base, as well as first base, going into high school and select ball. That’s kind of

my home now.” But her versatility is not the only thing reflected in her baseball roots. Hanzel is a vocal leader of the team. “She’s black and white,” head coach Connie Clark said. “She’s a real good voice and a sense of a little bit of fire under her teammates when you need it. And sometimes she’s not afraid to be the bad guy. That’s especially not easy for female athletes to do and it’s something they have to learn.” As one of seven seniors on the team, Hanzel is fired up for her last season at Texas. She loves the thrill of a rivalry game, noting a walk-off win at Baylor her freshman year and a 5-0 shutout of Texas A&M last year as her favorite moments. But she’s looking to make even better memories. “As a senior class, we haven’t had a Big 12 championship,” Hanzel said. “We haven’t had a national championship and that’s two things that we really

want so that’s what I’m really looking forward to.” The last time Texas had seven seniors on its roster was in 2005, when the team advanced to the Women’s College World Series and fell to UCLA, finishing third place overall. For the past three years, Texas has lost in the postseason regionals. “We do have a lot of seniors and I think that speaks to a lot of leadership,” Hanzel said. “Even though we are seniors, sometimes, we need to know when to lead and when to follow. Sometimes the younger ones will be the ones to step up and we’ll be behind them.” Hanzel’s “taking care of business” personality carries over to her studies. She’s currently studying accounting and hopes to continue her studies in a master’s program at Texas after she graduates. “I just think that graduating from the University of Texas there is so much tradition and so much legacy,” Hanzel said.

Gabriel Lopez | Daily Texan Staff

Senior first baseman Kelli Hanzel leads a veteran-laden Longhorn squad. The team features seven seniors and looks to compete for a Big 12 title and more this spring.

SPURS

MAVERICKS

PISTONS

Mary Pistorius | Daily Texan Staff

Junior pitcher Paige von Sprecken takes a crack at a pitch. von Sprecken and Texas take on Indiana on Thursday.

took its first loss Wednesday. Texas looks to stay focused despite the records of its opponents. “I personally didn’t know that they were undefeated,” said von Sprecken. “I try not to think about who we’re playing—I feel like if you let the name distract you it can alter

the way you play. I think that we just need to play Texas softball—no matter who’s on the other side of the field.” The Longhorns will take on the Hoosiers Thursday night to kick off their weekend action. The first pitch is slated for 6 p.m. at the Red and Charline McCombs Field.

Pierce bringing swagger, confidence back to Longhorns @AlexxBriseno

NBA

MAGIC

BASEBALL

By Alex Briseno

SIDELINE

However, the calm aura is no substitute for criticism—of course that, too, is given in a positive, constructive manner. “We try and make sure that when something happens in the course of a practice that it’s not always just yelling at the kids,” Pierce said. “Usually there’s something within the clubhouse where it’ll come up and it’s usually humorous.” Pierce says he thinks the light-hearted critique is often quite effective. “When we do it that way I think everybody relaxes a little more and realizes that it is a game and that we are

going to fail,” Pierce said. “So we got to be able to laugh at ourselves.” Although Pierce has yet to coach a game for the Longhorns, he seems to be quite in sync with his club. “They’re fun because they want to get better,” Pierce said. “They don’t feel like they’re trying to keep up with something else. They’re trying to be themselves and we’re really seeing their talents come out. They’re going to make some dumb mistakes at times, but we’re willing to take that chance because they are talented and their mentality is right.”

HEAT

ROCKETS

TODAY IN HISTORY

1972

76ers center Wilt Chamberlain hits the 30,000 point mark in a game against the Phoenix Suns.

TOP TWEET ‘Lil’ Jordan Humphrey @@LJ_Humphrey23

“Stunt or get stunted on” -‘Lil’ Jordan Humphrey

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MAE HAMILTON, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR | @thedailytexan Thursday, February 16, 2017

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Angel Ulloa | Daily Texan Staff UT alumni Korey Coleman, and Martin Thomas met through mutual friends in college, and paired up to start their own movie review podcast. Their podcast, “Double Toasted”, streams online everyday.

Podcast gives unique toast to movie reviews By Joe Gonzalez @Jose_thewriter

“Better than Sex” isn’t a rating most critics tend to give out to movies, but when it comes to their reviews, the “Double Toasted” crew has a

style all of their own. In 2014, Korey Coleman and Martin Thomas launched “Double Toasted”, a subscriber-based podcast that focuses on film and entertainment. The podcast streams a different segment

every day, each with its own purpose and personality, but their most popular segment is Wednesday night’s “Movie Review Extravaganza”, led by Coleman and Thomas and two other rotating members. “Double

Toasted” uses an innovative, raunchy ratings system that ranges from “Better than Sex”—for any movie that’s off the charts—to “F*ck You!”— movies so awful they’re downright insulting. “It adds to the

conversational nature of how we talk about movies,” Coleman said. Coleman and Thomas’ rating system is a remnant of a previous project, Spill. com, a website launched in 2008 that gave movie

reviews in the form of cartoon skits. After their website was bought by Hollywood. com, and a subsequent brief hiatus Coleman and Thomas were pressured by fans to

PODCAST page 5

LEGACY

ACLU chapter promotes civil rights on campus By Gerardo Gonzalez @thedailytexan

Growing up with her eyes glued to the television, soaking up the banter of newscasters on CNN, Nali Shah got her unofficial education in politics. Now a government senior, Shah has continued her lifelong commitment to justice by founding the UT student chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union. Shah said after spending two years under the care of CPS, she grew to be fascinated with civil service structures. She said she founded the chapter because she wanted to be involved with the legal innerworkings of these civil rights issues. “I wanted to do something that felt like I was making a real difference,” Shah said. “Of course, I was through research but I (also) just wanted to be involved with the plumbing of issues.” The ACLU is a national, non-profit organization that provides legal support for civil rights violation cases. Although ACLU of Texas provides volunteer opportunities to assist with lobbying at meetings, to monitor town council meetings and plan community education events, Shah said she created the UT chapter to promote the ACLU’s mission within the student community and to provide opportunities for student organizers to collaborate. “The times that I’ve seen the biggest change and the most creative thinking is when we have people

Betsy Joles | Daily Texan Staff

Senior Nali Shah started the UT Austin chapter of ACLU with help form sponsors in the government department. The group held their first event last Thursday with upcoming meetings throughout the semester.

from all social, economic, racial and academic backgrounds,” Shah said. “I think engineers have just as much to contribute to the conversation as political science junkies, and I think we’re doing ourselves a disservice by not including and not encouraging those voices.” Before starting the chapter, Shah reached out to Victor Cornell, the ACLU of Texas Statewide Advocacy Manager who was on board to move forward

with the chapter. Cornell previously worked with a previous ACLU chapter at the UT Law School which is no longer active. “It will be great to have a presence back on UT Austin campus and I look forward to working with them for many years to come,” Cornell said. Members of the UT branch have plenty of opportunities to get involved. The chapter’s various teams are responsible for communications, events,

recruitment and working together with team leaders to organize projects. Advertising sophomore Garrett Mireles joined the chapter this year and is now a member of the communications team. He said once the chapter gets more traction at UT, UT Austin members will volunteer for ACLU of Texas to attend council meetings and observe protests. “You are certainly able at this school to walk to the capitol and have a

face-to-face conversation with your representative,” said Mireles. Other planned events coming up for the chapter include “What’s Donald Trump Doing in Your Neighborhood: Immigration in Austin,” a workshop outlining the legal rights of immigrants under President Trump’s current immigration ban and a “Reproductive Rights Conference at UT Law.” Shah said she is confident the chapter will be

kept busy. Within the past month alone, the new administration at Washington has commenced changes to policies regarding civil rights. Though the current political climate is unstable and leaves the future uncertain, Shah said she looks forward for the chapter to take on the challenges ahead. “I think it is a time of great threat,” said Shah. “But I also think it’s a time of great opportunity.”


The Daily Texan 2017-02-13