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UNIVERSITY

McCombs partners with Veterans Affairs By Brittany Wagner @brittanywagner_

The McCombs School of Business recently partnered with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to help solve problems of fraud and inefficiency within the VA using data analytics. Four students within the Master of Science in Business Analytics program are working alongside an

analytics team at the VA Financial Services Center in Austin to develop a capstone project. The final ideas on how to improve VA efficiency and accuracy will be revealed in April 2017. Christopher Pate, chief of data analytics for the FSC, has been collaborating with members of the MSBA program to develop the partnership. “Ultimately, FSC sees the

collaboration as a means to improve a range of outcomes for VA aimed at improving the veteran experience from reducing wait times, reducing fraud, to identifying issues not even known at this time,” Pate said in a press release. Ramesh Rajagopalan, associate director of the MSBA program, said the FSC was attracted to a partnership with McCombs because it

would provide the FSC team an opportunity to build upon their own set of skills. The project is set to continue for the next three years, but Rajagopalan anticipates participating in more projects like this in the future. Rajagopalan said of the 53 students in the MSBA program, four are tasked with this VA project. The project is a requirement of the business analytics capstone course,

which teaches students how to use data and business skills in real-life situations. “One [objective of the partnership] is to expand opportunities for faculty and professional development activity,” Rajagopalan said. “Two [is] to create opportunities for students to engage in experiential learning through doing

MCCOMBS page 2

STATE

Advocates for stricter gun laws take action By Van Nguyen @nguyen__van

Susan Nelson was at a friend’s house in 1993 when a robber shot her in the back of the head. The gun belonged to Nelson’s friend, who had stored it away, but the robber was able to retrieve it. Today, Nelson is a member of Texas Gun Sense, an organization advocating for stricter gun laws in Texas public spaces, including universities. “Twenty-three years later we’re still talking about the same thing,” Nelson said. Nelson said she isn’t antigun; she just wants people to learn safer practices, including safe storage, when it comes to firearms. Nelson, along with other advocates, gathered on the south side of the Capitol’s steps Thursday afternoon to share their stories and to hear legislative recommendations for the 85th Legislature from Texas Gun Sense leaders for stricter gun laws. Andrea Brauer, executive director of Texas Gun Sense, said the group’s goal is to educate others and push for safe gun practices. “Gun violence [prevention] is not about disarming lawabiding citizens,” Brauer said. “It is not about repealing the

Ravin Rene | Daily Texan Staff

Susan Nelson, a member of Texas Gun Sense, stresses proper gun storage. Nelson was shot by an intruder in 1993 using a friend’s gun.

Second Amendment.” State Rep. Donna Howard, D-Austin, said gun violence is preventable through safer gun laws. She is working on filing House Bill 392, a bill to ban guns in state hospitals, as well as House Bill 391, a bill to offer Texas public

universities the option to opt out of the campus carry law. Thirty-seven private institutions, including Rice University, opted out of the law, with only Amberton University in Garland opting in. Howard is hoping to provide public institutions with the

same opportunity. Campus carry was passed in the 84th Texas Legislature in 2015, and it was implemented at Texas universities on Aug. 1 of this year. On the first week of classes, students and faculty protested the law, but since the law was put into

effect, there have been no known incidents of crimes committed by a concealed handgun carrier on campus. The UT System said at the Board of Regents meeting earlier in November, one of

GUN LAWS page 3

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CAMPUS

Target set to arrive on campus in July 2017 By Catherine Marfin @catherinemarfin

Target announced Thursday it will open a store adjacent to UT’s campus next year. The store will be located at West 21st and Guadalupe streets in the Dobie Twenty1 student apartments and retail development and is scheduled to open in July 2017. The 22,000-squarefoot store will be located in what was formerly known as Dobie Mall and will be much smaller than Target’s other retail locations, which range on average from 135,000 square feet to Super Targets that span 175,000 square feet. “Target is normally a huge physical building, but since we’re in downtown Austin, Guad has smaller buildings and it has a certain feel to it,” textiles junior Savannah Tauzin said. “A smaller store on campus like this is great for kids who don’t have cars and can’t make it out farther to the bigger stores.” Target said it will sell groceries, home and dorm items, clothing and UT apparel and accessories, among other products. “Growth on college campuses and in urban markets is a priority for Target,” said Mark Schindele, Target senior vice president, in a written statement. “We’re able to serve more guests by adding flexible-format stores near top universities across the country, including the quick-trip shopping experience we’ll bring to the University of Texas campus. We’re thrilled to open our first flexible-format store in Austin and to join the Longhorn community.” Target also announced plans to open similar stores

TARGET page 3

UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY

Invest in Texas students discuss legislative reform

Fenves speaks at final Senate meeting

By Lisa Dreher @lisa_dreher97

Representatives from each of the three UT legislative student organizations discussed the need for public and higher education funding, rising tuition rates and action concerning undocumented students for the upcoming legislative session during a panel discussion Thursday night. House District 49 Rep. Gina Hinojosa joined Charlie Henry, the co-director of Student Government’s state relations agency, Graduate Student Assembly President Wills Brown and Senate of

College Councils President Sergio Cavazos for the panel, which was held by the College of Liberal Arts Council. These representatives are part of Invest in Texas, a coalition of Student Government, Graduate Student Assembly and Senate of College Council members and 25 other student organizations which represent students by communicating with legislators. The panel framed a potential platform of issues and demands for the State Legislature, and students were allowed to submit questions

By Paul Cobler

President of the Senate of College Councils Sergio Cavazos speaks at the final general assembly of the semester. The general assembly also voted in favor of a resolution that supported affirmative action.

@PaulCobler

The Senate of College Councils wrapped up its semester Thursday as UT President Gregory Fenves spoke to the general assembly about campus issues. The general assembly also voted in favor of a resolution supporting affirmative action. Fenves discussed the Young Conservatives of Texas bake sale, plans for academics at the University and sanctuary campuses during his 30-minute question-and-answer with the Senate representatives. “I can’t listen to everybody on campus because of the numbers, but

Katarina Delarosa Daily Texan Staff

talking to student leaders regularly is very important for me to understand what is happening on campus,” Fenves said.

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Fenves called the Young Conservatives of Texas anti-affirmative action bake sale a debate of issues and said it was

something the University would regulate to ensure it remained within First

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Friday, December 2, 2016

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NEWS

thedailytexan

Volume 117, Issue 79

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor-in-Chief Alexander Chase (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Jacqueline Wang (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Sports Office sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office (512) 232-2209 lifeandarts@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office (512) 471-8618 multimedia@ dailytexanonline.com The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

Emmanuel Briseno | Daily Texan Staff

Billy Marson blows glass in his shop, The Glassmith, on the corner of 26th and Rio Grande streets.

MCCOMBS

continues from page 1

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2016 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

CORRECTION The story “Muslim students protest with open prayer” in the Dec. 1 issue of The Daily Texan incorrectly stated the Israeli government passed a bill that bans mosques in Israel from announcing the adhan aloud. The bill has been introduced in Parliament but not passed.

hands-on work in the field of analytics. And three, begin to define and create jointly sponsored and conducted forums to share knowledge that is created through numbers one and two.” The students will be provided access to FSC data, analyze it, build analytics models and develop solutions to be implemented at some point when they wrap up the project, Rajagopalan said. Advertising freshman Christina Mendez’s brother and father are veterans, and she said she’s

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The McCombs School of Buisness has partnered with the U.S Department of Veterans Affairs in an effort to solve problems of fraud and inefficiency within the VA using data analytics.

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Never further rip your ripped jeans.

This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25 Permanent Staff

Editor-in-Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Alexander Chase Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Benroy Chan, Mubarrat Choudhury, Michael Jensen, Emily Vernon Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jackie Wang Associate Managing Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Megan Hix, Iliana Storch News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 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Elizabeth Hlavinka Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cat Cardenas, Katie Walsh Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Duncan, Mae Hamilton Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ezra Siegel Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tyler Horka Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Claire Cruz, Shane Lewis, Sydney Rubin, Michael Shapiro Science&Tech Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 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Joshua Guerra Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Stephanie Tacy, Daulton Venglar Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emmanual Briseño, Juan Figueroa, Zoe Fu, Gabriel Lopez, Mary Pistorius Video Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monica Silverio Senior Videographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Corey Cave, Maria Luisa Santos, Jane Zeng Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lex Rojas Associate Comics Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 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impressed that McCombs is working to improve the VA’s efficiency. “The VA has done a lot

for my family,” Mendez said. “My sister goes to school with the help of the Hazlewood Act, so I’m glad

that McCombs is partnering with the FSC to ensure ongoing service for veterans and their families.”

SENATE

continues from page 1 Amendment rights. “We do not determine what content is acceptable and what content is unacceptable within the bounds of free speech,” Fenves said. “What we will be doing — and this is a very delicate legal issue that has to do with the constitution and free speech — we don’t look at content, but we do look at action.” Fenves then said future incidents of the same nature as the bake sale would be regulated to ensure they remained acceptable, and if they were unacceptable, the University would take action. “Actions that violate rights and violate laws, we will take action on,” Fenves said. “If it is based on bias and discrimination, then we will take even stronger action. What happened with the Young Conservatives was within a free speech zone, and there was a debate about that, and that’s what happens and what should happen within a free speech zone. The boundaries for that are not precisely defined, but it’s something we will look at on a case-by-case basis.” Following the discussion with Fenves, The Senate voted unanimously in favor of Joint Resolution 1603 supporting UT’s affirmative action policy. The Graduate Student Assembly had previously voted in favor of the resolution. “Our angle is supporting students on this campus who got here under these policies and encouraging future use of these policies to ensure we have a diverse campus,” Senate President Sergio Cavazos said. “A lot of the academic conversations that go on [in the classroom] are really enriched by the different backgrounds we have on campus.” Psychology freshman Te’lon Toliver said she agreed with the legislative student organization’s support of the policy and that student support is more important than government support. “Affirmative action is a good thing, it may have its faults, but ultimately it helps the University,” Toliver said. “When students say they support it, it means a lot more. City officials and the Supreme Court can always say they support or don’t support something, but because this is directly affecting us, it matters a lot more.”


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NEWS

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Friday, December 2, 2016

CAMPUS

TreeFolks hosts UT Tree ID walk to educate students By Meraal Hakeem @meraal_hakeem

UT’s campus is home to many different types of trees; however, students don’t always stop to acknowledge them and the benefits they provide. “UT has incredible trees, including the state champion Deodar Cedar and oaks that mark important events in Texas history,” said Audrey Stewart, education coordinator of TreeFolks, a local nonprofit. TreeFolks hosted its first Tree ID walk at UT Thursday, providing students and faculty the opportunity to go outside and learn more about the world around them. The walk was co-led by STEM education Ph.D student Sarah Jenevein and TreeFolks education coordinator Audrey Stewart. “Through our walks, we hope to inspire folks to look at trees in a new way,” Stewart said. “Taking time to notice and learn about Austin’s trees helps us feel more

connected to our urban trees and appreciate all they do for us, including cool our city, clean our air and water, create habitat for wildlife, and beautify the landscape.” TreeFolks is dedicated to empowering central Texans to build stronger communities through planting and caring for trees, according the organization’s mission statement. The walks themselves strive to instill a sense of appreciation toward the vital ecological role trees play in a fun and engaging way. “TreeFolks hosts a series of free Tree ID walks and hikes around the city to teach people how to identify the trees we see around us every day,” Stewart said. “The goal of the UT walk is to introduce folks to some of these amazing trees and tree identification techniques.” Thursday’s walk surveyed trees around the Tower, starting with the live oaks outside Garrison Hall and ending at the Turtle Pond. The walk focused on identifying trees

STEM education Ph.D student Sarah Jenevein helped locals identify huisache, a native plant found in Southwest Texas and Mexico. TreeFolks, the organization that led the walk through UT, hopes to inspire and educate everyday people about local Austin plants.

Emmanuel Briseno Daily Texan Staff

based on their basic features, such as leaf shape and arrangement, flowers, fruits and bark. Participants were provided field guides of native Texas trees to help them in the identification process. “On this walk we identified

live oak, southern magnolia, Mexican buckeye, red oak, huisache, catalpa, yaupon, Bradford pear and ligustrum,” Jenevein said. “We also discuss uses for trees and the roles they play in their environment. For instance, seeds and berries

from trees provide food and cover for animals and riparian trees help secure soil, reducing flooding and erosion.” The walk was successful in raising awareness amongst its participants, including psychology freshman

Harshini Addanki. The roles trees play to our ecosystem is just so important,” Addanki said. “Even in an urban jungle like Austin, without trees, we’d be living in a more terribly polluted world.”

POLICE

New APD chief plans to maintain relationship with UTPD By Will Clark

Carter said. “I don’t anticipate or expect any changes to occur.” Manley called Carter one of his mentors when they worked together at APD and said they will continue that closeness in their new roles. “We’ve got a very positive working relationship already established from his time at APD,” Manley said. “And I see that that’s going to continue as I move into my new role here at APD.” Carter said he believes the new chief will continue Acevedo’s work. “A police department can’t be static,” Carter said. “It can’t simply stop. When one chief comes in after someone else leaves, the work isn’t usually finished. It’s an ongoing process that needs to be continually worked on.” Some of that work includes

dealing with a 10 percent rise in violent crimes in Austin this year and the backlog of DNA evidence. “We have to pay attention to the fact that we’re experiencing a significant increase in violent crime right now,” Manley said. “We have to tackle the issue with the DNA lab head on.” SafeHorns Vice President Joell McNew said a major consideration for APD is funding, especially with the rise in violent crime. “APD is understaffed,” McNew said. “The increase in crime and the recent K2 issue with 50 plus people needing first responders puts the city in a very dangerous public safety situation. Funding must be priority number one.” Despite the work that needs to be done, Carter said some things will remain the same.

“You still have to have a good relationship with the community you serve,” Carter said. “The incoming chief will have to work to maintain and strengthen those relationships with those folks they serve.” On Acevedo’s last day, he spoke with the Austin-American Statesman about his legacy and bringing the community closer together. “I’m proud of a lot of things,” Acevedo said. “I think the collective mindset of the department, the attitude, the personality has changed from one that was kind of an ‘usversus-them’ mentality to one where we are a part of the community, the community matters to us. Folks smile a lot more.” Manley said community engagement will be one of his priorities as chief.

“We could strengthen and improve our community policing efforts,” Manley said. “The citizens are going to continue to see a police department that is engaged, that is

respective and inclusive of all of our various segments, that is transparent and that is working to keep Austin one of the safest cities in the county when it comes to violent crime.”

INVEST

take us figuring a strategy to be heard there because I don’t think Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick’s priorities are the priorities of Texas.” Government sophomore Ardian Shaholi, who submitted a question about tuition regulation, said he didn’t believe the panelists had enough power to persuade lawmakers to increase state education spending. “Unfortunately, I expected

them to say that not a lot of progress will be made in regulating tuition just because since we have a Republican majority in both houses of the State Legislature,” Shaholi said. “It just is an issue they are not interested in, and it will continue to persist as it is now.” Another student asked how the panelists will protect Texas DREAMers, immigrant students granted relief from

deportation by President Barack Obama, from politicians vowing to crack down on illegal immigration. Cavazos, a government senior, said undocumented students should keep paying instate tuition under the Texas Dream Act, which the state adopted in 2001. Caravos said legislators should take the politics out of immigration, which he said is a humanitarian issue. He said

he lived in Mexico for the first 15 years of his life, and immigrants have a right to a better life from the violence they may be escaping. “You hear helicopters at night, you hear gunshots … it’s scary,” Caravos said. “It is life and death, and for you to prevent these students from having access to education is just blatantly unfair.” The panelists stressed how UT students fell short

in preventing the passage of campus carry during the last legislative session. Brown said dialogue sparked after the law’s passing was too late and students missed an opportunity while it was being created. “There was a lot of hoopla after the fact, which isn’t going to help anyone,” Brown said. “So please tell your friends to spread the word and get involved.”

GUN

lowed on each of our campuses and we hope to see those decisions in place,” Barry McBee, UT System vice chancellor for governmental relations, said at the meeting. UT System Chancellor William McRaven has said in the past he doesn’t support the law because guns on campus create an unsafe environment.

Elyse Avina, president of Students Against Campus Carry, is currently volunteering with Texas Gun Sense in hopes of educating others. She was one of several students on campus who believes guns do not belong on a university. “Keeping [campus carry] as is and sweeping it under the rug really isn’t going to fix anything,” Avina said.

@_willclark_

The Austin City Council confirmed Brian Manley as interim police chief Thursdeter-day morning, marking the t isofficial end of Art Acevedo’s con-nearly decade-long term as ithinAPD Chief. ech,” Under Acevedo, UTPD e willand APD worked closely and is aadapted to rapid city growth e thatwhile maintaining a relatively stitu-low violent crime rate for a — wemajor city. , but With APD’s change of command, UTPD Chief David utureCarter, who served as second e na-in command under Acevedo wouldbefore coming to UTPD, said nsurehe expects that partnership able,between the departments to cept-remain strong. would “The relationship between UTPD and APD is solid,” olate s, we enves bias continues from page 1 then ongerfor the panel via a Google enedDoc. One submitted question nser-asked Hinojosa how much of freea priority education funding thereis for the Legislature. She rethat,sponded that the Senate and pensLt. Gov. Dan Patrick’s motives hap-lie elsewhere. eech “I think it is a priority for ariesthe Texas House in my sense,” ciselyHinojosa said. “It’s going to omeon a

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scus- continues from page 1 The their goals for the next legously islative session is to keep the Reso- campus carry law as is at all rting UT campuses. ction “We believe that all of Stu- our presidents … used the pre- discretions that’s found to or of make well reasoned deci-

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@thedailytexan Follow us for news, updates and more.

TARGET

continues from page 1 on college campuses across the U.S., including the University of Florida, the University of North Carolina and Ohio State University. International relations sophomore Violeta Rivera said Target’s choice to build a store on campus is part of a larger trend.

Chase Karacostas | Daily Texan Staff

UTPD Chief David Carter answers questions about the function of UTPD at a Student Government meeting on Oct. 4.

“Many stores feel that a location like this wouldn’t be a benefit because they’re aware that students are buying food on campus or going to fast food, but the need for more fresh food options has been coming up,” Rivera said. “It’s just part of the trend.” Economics junior Chris Vasquez said while Target can be more expensive than other stores, he doesn’t think

this will deter students from shopping there. “Walmart and HEB are miles away, and even though the prices may be higher [at Target], the cost of not wasting gas and time will be worth it,” Vasquez said. “Most students at UT come from the suburbs and are familiar with Target supplies. Smaller businesses just don’t offer the same products.”

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4 OPINION

ALEXANDER CHASE, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | @TexanEditorial Friday, December 2, 2016

4

COLUMN

Cooperative housing avoids apartment troubles By Audrey Larcher Daily Texan Columnist @veg_lomein

Now is the time when most students are thinking about housing options for next fall. While many are signing leases or putting down their deposits for a dorm room, there is another alternative that affords opportunities to students : co-ops. Although most students know them for their parties, cooperative living spaces provide great opportunities for students to save money, gain responsibility and enhance social skills. The most basic advantage of co-op housing is the price. While the cheapest rate for on-campus room and board is $10,223, the most expensive option at the Nueces Co-op in West Campus is $7,592.40. The perks of affordable housing are a no-brainer for young adults. The money not spent on the roof over your head is money that doesn’t have to be taken out on a loan or can go towards a savings account. Co-ops are a home for students representing a wide swath of economic backgrounds and make living in Austin an option for students whose tuition bills are already close to breaking the bank. Co-ops can offer such great rates because of the labor requirements, which offer their own merits for students. Residents are expected to complete around four hours of group labor a week, ranging from cooking to maintenance to waste disposal. This foundation is what keeps co-ops running, but it is also extremely important in many students’ growth. While on-campus residence and dining halls take care of most chores, apartments force young adults to take care of all issues themselves. Co-ops present a healthy medium in learning the basics of life as an adult. Your fellow residents contribute just as much to the upkeep of your living space, but you still have an

Illustration by Victoria Smith Daily Texan Staff

important responsibility to make sure things stay afloat. There is room to learn new skills to equip students for life after school. Co-ops such as 21st street and New Guild are well known for their festivities, but for residents, parties are only a fraction of the social opportunities found in these spaces. “There are very few things I wouldn’t be willing to share with any random member regardless of how long I’ve known them,”

COLUMN

Anand Pant said in a Facebook message. Pant, a management information systems junior and resident of Taos Co-op, shared that “while not everyone is ideologically identical...they all share a common basis of positive ethical consideration. And of course discrimination of any form can trigger a membership review so there is no tolerance for that.” Such a culture that supports freedom of expression is crucial for students’ emotional

growth. The experimentation with new ideas and exposure to the thoughts of others helps students to develop their own ideas and learn how to deal with others. Co-ops end up becoming a wonderful home for many students. If you’re still not settled on where to live next academic year, consider joining the co-op community. Larcher is an economics and Plan II freshman from Austin.

COLUMN

Political correctness debates Reflection spaces allow for safe falsely implicate censorship prayer for student of all faiths By Alyssa Fernandez

Daily Texan Senior Columnist

There are a lot of things that divide Americans — Coke or Pepsi, Apple or Android, or if political correctness violates freedom of speech or not. The political correctness debate is no small misunderstanding. According to the Pew Research center, 59 percent of Americans believe that “too many people are easily offended these days over the language that others use.” However, the center of this debate does not revolve around word choice, rather, a misunderstanding of what political correctness is trying to accomplish. Hint: It’s not about limiting your rights. It is easy to think that political correctness has gone too far with attention-grabbing stories such as a group of women boycotting a pub for playing “Blurred Lines” or a Frisco elementary school banning the colors red and green and Christmas trees during their winter party. The reaction against these extreme examples promotes a misconception that political correctness is synonymous to censorship. However, this is not censorship in the literal sense of a government regulating the passage of information. Rather, this political correctness is censorship to the silent majority, which are a group of Americans beginning to feel excluded in their country for the first time. The Trump campaign took note of this and even built a platform over the supposed violations of political correctness, extending

their claims to suggest that politicians are so preoccupied being politically correctness that they ignore the actual issues at hand. It also supports the idea of translating political correctness as violation of their first amendment rights since they are not allowed to say or do things that they were previously entitled to. Despite their arguments, reasoning or backgrounds, it should not be forgotten that the negativity towards political correctness stems from the fact that the silent majority feel, well, silenced. According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, political correctness is “conforming to a belief that language and practices which could offend political sensibilities (as in matters of sex or race) should be eliminated.” What this reveals is a common point between people who are for and against political correctness — silencing. The silent majority believes that they are being threatened of their culture at the face of increasing diversity and representation — they are facing a fear of change. Whereas on the other side, political correctness is not about getting revenge and limiting the dominant group’s rights but about respect. At the end of the day, both groups want respect. The conservative side asks for respect for how things were in the past, while the liberal side asks for respect for their own identity and culture. It is time to think of political correctness the way it was meant to be — a call for respect. Fernandez is a rhetoric and writing and Spanish senior from Allen.

By Mehraz Rahman Daily Texan Columnist @mehrazr

As part of the Five Pillars of Islam, Muslims must bow their heads in prayer five times a day. Now that the days are growing shorter, this means most of the prayers happen before 7 p.m. For Muslim students in college who are at the mercy of their class schedules, returning home to pray can become difficult. Muslim students must often resort to studying for extended periods of time on the fourth floor of the Texas Union since that is the only place where they, or students of any faith, can go to pray with the protection of a reflection space. Economics junior Saad Maqsood said, “Sometimes I need to go between classes. Walking all the way to the Union and all the way back is a hassle since I only have 10 minutes between classes.” As a result, Maqsood and other Muslims often miss prayers. To overcome this obstacle, these students must often find new ways to pray on campus. According to Maqsood, there is a GroupMe message that consists of around 150 Muslim students specifically for the purpose of gathering for prayer. He said, “We just congregate wherever we are.” There are a few spots on campus that Muslim students often utilize for their religious needs. At the Flawn Academic Center, students have found secluded spots on the third and fourth floors where they can go to pray. At the Perry-Castañeda Library and other buildings, students hide prayer rugs in stair-

wells so that they can step away from their studies to perform prayer. Physics senior Abdulkarim Bora believes that, as a campus, “We can do better.” He has been working with Student Government and UT staff in order to create more reflection spaces. After polling with the Muslim Students’ Association, Bora found that the PCL would be the most ideal location for a reflection space. “We met with some staff,” Bora said. “According to them, a long-term plan is to remodel PCL to include a reflection space. Temporarily, there’s going to be a space on the third floor where they’re going to clear some books. We don’t know what it’s going to look like, but it’s going to be a designated area.” “We want it to be a quick process, an easy process and a cheap process,” Bora said. Moreover, the addition of reflection spaces on campus would benefit all students. “It’s a quiet space for students to go to. The purpose is to help students with their mental health and provide space for reflection,” Bora said. As a college campus in a country that promises religious freedom, it is a shame that a large portion of UT students are forced to express this freedom by touching their heads to secluded stairwell floors that generations of college students have walked on with dirty shoes. The University must provide more spaces where students can feel comfortable practicing their respective religions without causing discomfort to their fellow classmates. Rahman is a Plan II and management information systems sophomore from Austin.

COLUMN

Service dog scams trivialize disabilities for limited benefits By Giselle Suazo

Daily Texan Columnist @giselle_suazo

Spending time with your pet can be as rewarding and as great as spending time with any human — sometimes even better. It is natural to want to bring your dog everywhere you go, but unfortunately not every place will welcome pets with open arms. Pet owners have found a loophole to this issue by buying fake service dog vests and downloading fake certifications so that their dogs are allowed in public places. This is harming actual service dogs that have gone through training to help people with real needs. Don’t scam the service dog system just because you love being with your dog.

Differentiating real service dogs from fake ones can be tricky, but a dog’s behavior is a big indicator. Dogs selected to become service animals are put through an 18-month training period that starts when they’re two days old. Service dogs won’t bounce around a restaurant or snap at people around them. If a dog is behaving badly and not following its owner’s directions, then it’s probably not a trained service animal. This scam is a large contributor to business owners denying entry to all dogs, service animal or not, to avoid bad interactions with customers. It puts a strain on people who actually need service animals around. “The people who are out there misrepresenting service dogs is one of the [largest], if not the largest problem we have,” said Yancy

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Baer, an Army veteran who needs assistance from his two dogs, Verbena and Beanz, in an interview with KXAN. “You have dogs who don’t have public access rights who aren’t trained to responsibly behave in public. They bark, they growl, they lunge at other dogs or people even.” Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, service dogs are not required to have identification that proves they have been through proper legal training. The act defines service animals as dogs that are individually trained to do work, such as guiding someone who is visually impaired or performing tasks for people with disabilities. This leaves out service animals that are prescribed for emotional support. If an employee or business owner determines that

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | Email your Firing Lines to editor@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

the service animal isn’t providing a task or doing work for their owner, they can be subjected to further questioning. This is where a method of proper identification would be useful — one that isn’t easily downloaded by scammers from the internet. Dogs that complete the required training under current laws should also be required to have IDs that confirm their service animal status. The reality is service animals provide vital assistance to people with real needs, such as veterans and people with disabilities. The connection between a service dog and its owner is unique and special — nobody should be exploiting that just because they don’t want to leave their dog at home. Suazo is a communication studies senior from Honduras.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@TexanEditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


CLASS 5

LIFE&ARTS

5

Friday, December 2, 2016

Alumnus shows reality of war with photos By Morgan O’Hanlon @mcohanlon

Images captured by a cheap plastic camera allow veteran Alan Pogue’s memories of violence in Vietnam to remain as clear as the day he took them. While training to become a combat medic in 1966, Pogue prepared himself for the deaths of soldiers and civilians he would witness in the fight against Viet Cong. But Pogue said upon arriving in Vietnam, the abuse, rape and murder of the Vietnamese people committed by his fellow soldiers was something he never could have prepared for. “After a number of these kinds of incidents, it was obvious to me that there was no concern about the health and welfare of the Vietnamese people,” Pogue said. “I asked, ‘What in the world are we here for?’ Nothing that I had been told justified anything that was going on. We were morally lost.” When Pogue, a UT alumnus, returned to his native Texas, he found his disillusionment with

MCNEALY

continues from page 8 It was surprising because here was a person who didn’t have to get involved, but would put her life on the line for someone like me. That was incredible.” But at times, leading the demonstrations turned violent, and McNealy was faced with threats of lynching and being shot. “Naturally, as a mouthy, skinny black boy leading chants, I stood out,” McNealy said. “The man was soft-spoken, and he just said to me, ‘If I ever see you at an integrated place, I’ll kill you.’”

Military veteran and photojournalist Alan Pogue attended UT following his time in the Vietnam War. While at UT, he photographed anti-war protests for the alternative newspaper the Rag.

the war effort reflected in the student body through anti-war groups such as Vietnam Veterans Against the War and Students for a Democratic Society, as well as the alternative newspaper The Rag. “The draft was what brought this issue home to young people,” said Thorne Dreyer, UT alumnus and co-founder of The Rag. “In the past, when people had been drafted into wars, they at least believed in the cause. But in Vietnam, they saw people dying for no reason.” Pogue, now a documentary photographer, began his professional career taking pictures for The Rag. As one of the era’s most successful underground papers, The Rag provided Pogue with an audience who benefited from learning the realities of anti-war protests. “I asked myself what would happen if other people could see what I saw,” Pogue said. “I realized that if I argue other people with words, they’ll argue back with words. But if I could show them a photograph, it’s harder to argue with.”

Pogue said UT most needed a voice of truth after the 1966 election of John Economidy as editor-in-chief of The Daily Texan. Economidy, a prowar advocate later exposed as a police informant against his peers, alienated a large portion of the student body. Sarito Neiman, another co-founder of The Rag, said the newspaper provided a community where students could have their voices heard. During one protest involving Society members and The Rag writers,

Soon after, McNealy ate at a recently integrated restaurant called Hank’s Grill. As McNealy finished his meal and stepped outside, the same young man sped up his car and ran him over. Although McNealy said his recollection of the events is hazy due to the concussion he received, he recalls that two other boys carried him to their house after he was rejected treatment at a local hospital. “I think I was already pretty realistic about the kind of country I lived in, and this incident confirmed my ideals,” McNealy said. “As a minority, you live or die

whether the country wants you to or not.” Despite the various acts of violence, McNealy never considered stopping his activist work. He said the social networks and people he’s encountered made it all worth it. “The most rewarding thing has just been keeping in touch with my old friends,” McNealy said. “The people I met out there have become my closest friends. On one hand, I could say, ‘If I had to do it all over again, I would’ve never gone to the University of Texas,’ but on the other, I know if I hadn’t, I would’ve never met these people.”

Chase Karacostas

Daily Texan Staff

Neiman masqueraded as a reporter to get into a speech by Secretary of State Dean Rusk. Although she opposed his role in the continuation of the war, when Neiman finally laid eyes on Rusk, his exhausted expression allowed her to view him in a different light. “I had this kind of internal conflict inside of my head: ‘Should I whack him on the side of the head with my notebook and call him a baby killer? Or should I see this human being who, in a way, is as trapped in the system as everyone

GOMEZ

continues from page 8 Chicano Caucus to shed light on the unfair treatment of LGBT Latinos. From there, she said the caucus “kicked off [the next] 10 years of activist work.” Gomez’s momentum carried her to D.C., where she served on the National Lesbian and Gay Health Association, the Latino Civil Rights Task Force and founded the National Latino/a Lesbian and Gay Organization. After 40 years of activist work, Gomez said she’s proud of how much community engagement she has accomplished.

else?’” Neiman said. Although this moment didn’t change her disdain for Rusk, Neiman said it reminded her of the importance in capturing the humanity of subjects she wrote about. This was a key step in completing The Rag’s mission: to report the truth. “It taught me that I had to find some way to communicate on a deeper level about what we’re all about,” Neiman said. “This is really a human problem as well as an institutional problem and you will probably never fix the institutional problem unless you can begin to engage people on the human level.”

“So much has changed,” Gomez said. “It has a lot to do with organizing and activism, supporting the institutions in the gay and lesbian community that have helped advance those causes.” Following Trump’s election, Gomez said she fears a more conservative Supreme Court will threaten that progress. “We just have to be vigilant,” Gomez said. “We spent the last 30 years fighting for these things — now we have to make sure they aren’t taken away. It’s so important for us to speak out and use the avenues of protest if we see something that is unfair or unjust. That’s something I learned at UT.”

EMBREE

continues from page 8 beginning of Austin’s cultural renaissance, and it’s what really started making Austin weird.” Starting in 1970, Embree became actively involved in the women’s liberation movement and contributed to one of the first anthologies of feminist writings, “Sisterhood is Powerful.” Eventually, she moved back to Austin and began an organization for working women called Austin Women Workers and a women’s press titled Red River Women’s Press. “I see myself as having been brought into activism before women’s liberation, but when women’s groups began, my voice just changed,” Embree said. “It was a more personal issue for me because it wasn’t about the rights of others, it was about the rights of women. It took a while, but women slowly began to see how these things we all felt were personal were actually political.” After the Red River Women’s Press was flooded in 1981, Embree decided to return to her roots at UT. There, she began working as a clerical worker in Spanish and Portuguese, and in 1982, she obtained her degree while eight months pregnant and balancing work and school. Despite the adversity she’s faced, Embree said she has no regrets in the activism work she’s done and continues to advocate for what she believes. “In the long haul, I would not trade my life for another one at all,” Embree said. “You feel a solidarity with people around the world who are doing the same thing, and what you gain from this is more than the losses you may feel along the way. It’s worth it.”

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EZRA SIEGEL, SPORTS EDITOR | @texansports Friday, December 2, 2016

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL | TEXAS 67 - 76 SOUTH CAROLINA

Foul trouble causes Texas to fall at home By Sydney Rubin

HORNETS

CLIPPERS

CAVALIERS

TOP TWEET Andrew Jones @DrewdotCash

Joshua Guerra | Daily Texan Staff

Senior center Kelsey Lang led the Longhorns with 15 points and 12 rebounds in a losing effort to South Carolina on Thursday night at the Frank Erwin Center. Texas has now dropped three games to top-15 teams this season.

often, gliding to the bucket for a career-high 31 points. Wilson carried the load for South Carolina on both ends of the court as she snagged 12 rebounds, four blocks and three steals. The game wasn’t as lopsided as Texas’ previous losses to then-No. 11 Stanford and then-No. 10 Mississippi State. Head coach Karen Aston said although the loss is disappointing, she saw legitimate improvement from her young team.

“I really thought they did a great job preparing,” Aston said. “We’ve grown in one week.” The Longhorns gained an early lead in the first quarter, sparked by Lang’s aggressiveness in the post. Despite a 33-30 deficit at the half, Lang and freshman forward Joyner Holmes got the ball rolling for Texas in the second half. A couple of stops and some quick shots tied the game at 42 apiece halfway through the third.

Lang led Texas with 15 points and 12 rebounds, enough to capture her second career double-double. Holmes and junior guard Ariel Atkins also posted double-digit points for Texas with 11 and 14, respectively. But every time the Longhorns made a push, the Gamecocks struck right back. South Carolina reclaimed the lead entering the final quarter and never looked back. Aston said these are the kind

of teams the Longhorns need to play in order to get a sense of what it will take to win down the stretch. “That’s what this schedule is all about,” Aston said. “Somewhere down the line, this is gonna be a great learning tool for this team, and it doesn’t seem fun right now, but hard is not fun.” Texas will hit the road to take on No. 2 Connecticut, the reigning national champions, on Sunday at 3 p.m.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

VOLLEYBALL

Sophomore guard Tevin Mack has been a consistent scorer for a struggling Texas offense. He boasts a team-high 73 points with 13 made threes.

Longhorns ready for another playoff run By Leah Vann

@Vanntastic_Leah

On a chilly Sunday evening, Texas’ players, coaches and family members went to head coach Jerritt Elliott’s home dressed in burnt orange. The team gathered for the NCAA’s postseason selection show, where teams from around the country learn their spots on the NCAA Tournament bracket. “We didn’t do it last year, but we’ve done it in the past.” Elliott said. “I like it. I want to create a family atmosphere and people comfortable being a part of it.” Volleyball players sat with their dinner, chatting about everything but volleyball. Unlike teams on the tournament’s bubble, Texas had nothing to stress about with a 22–4, 14–2 Big 12 record. The team knew it would host the first and second round of playoffs as the No. 4 seed in the country. When the clock struck 8:00, coach called for the team to move upstairs to his home theater. NCAA Final Four chairs lined the back wall, facing the television. In front of them, volleyball players squeezed themselves into reclining brown leather chairs to watch the NCAA selection show. Before he turned on the TV, Elliott had an announcement for the freshmen’s first time watching. “One match at a time and respect those opponents,” Elliott said. “Amongst teammates, make sure you stop [from] talking about future opponents and all that stuff, let’s focus on who we have Friday night here.” It was a live show. Every time Texas’ name was called as the No. 4 seed, the girls cheered on camera for the rest of the nation to see. Senior outside hitter Paulina Prieto Cerame had been anxiously waiting after each team was called to see who the Longhorns would take on first. “The tournament is

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Fouls plagued the Longhorns once again Thursday night. The No. 14 Longhorns fought until the very end but ultimately fell to No. 3 South Carolina, 76-67. The loss marks Texas’ third defeat against a top-15 team this season and first at the Frank Erwin Center. The Longhorns out-rebounded the Gamecocks, 40-37, and played with more aggressiveness on the defensive end, but their season-high 29 fouls were too great a toll to overcome. Six Longhorns finished the night with three or more fouls, giving the Gamecocks 30 points off of free throws. Moving forward, senior center Kelsey Lang said the team needs to work on boxing out without fouling. “We are so capable of doing that,” Lang said. “We just need to focus on that in practice.” Foul trouble was also an issue for South Carolina’s leading scorer on the season, senior center Alaina Coates. Coates only saw five minutes of play in the first half after committing two early fouls that put her on the bench. Coming into the game, Coates led the Gamecocks with 16.6 points per game and 12.8 rebounds per game. Texas held her to six points and seven rebounds on the night. But the Longhorns couldn’t stop junior forward A’ja Wilson. She made her presence known on the court early and

SIDELINE

We didn’t do it last year, but we’ve done it in the past. I like it. I want to create a family atmosphere and people comfortable being a part of it. -Jerritt Elliott, Head coach

probably the funnest part of the year,” Prieto Cerame said. “It’s our December madness. You get to play teams that you normally wouldn’t play in conference, and there’s a lot at stake.” Finally, former Longhorn middle blocker Nell Fortner, announced on screen that the Longhorns would take on UT Rio Grande Valley in the first round at home. The winner of the match would take on either Texas A&M or Southern Methodist University in the next round. The players applauded, but not for the team they’ll face on the other side of the net. The excitement highlighted another chance in the tournament; another chance at a national championship. Junior libero Cat McCoy captured a Snapchat of Texas’ name on the big-screen bracket, while senior defensive specialist Nicole Dalton ran to the front of the room to take a team selfie. Freshman outside hitter Micaya White sat quietly, watching the rest of the bracket. “I’m actually really nervous, but it’s good nerves.” White said. “I need to work on just being comfortable being uncomfortable because in playoffs that’s probably the biggest thing to worry about.” White and the Longhorns take on the Vaqueros at Gregory Gym on Friday at 6:30 p.m. With a win, they will play their second-round game on Saturday at 7 p.m.

Stephanie Tacy Daily Texan Staff

Texas faces off with Alabama By Claire Cruz @claireecruz5

The Crimson Tide will roll into the Frank Erwin Center on Friday for an 8:30 p.m. contest against Texas, the first between the two programs since 1971. The Longhorns look to break a three-game losing skid and right the ship before hitting the road for a marquee matchup with Michigan. They haven’t shot the ball well lately, finishing Tuesday’s loss to UTArlington with a field goal percentage of 39 and just three makes in 23 attempts beyond the arc. Head coach Shaka Smart said the poor shots are starting to result in lackluster defense on the opposite end of the court. “When your offense isn’t going the way you want it to go, as a team or as an individual sometimes, there’s a residual effect that it has on your defense,” Smart said. “And that’s not acceptable. We’ve got to get better with that, and

we will.” Not having a true point guard on the court has accentuated Texas’ offensive struggles. Guard Eric Davis Jr. was expected to emerge as one of the team’s go-to scorers, but so far, he’s suffered from a sophomore slump. Davis was held scoreless against UTArlington, finishing 0-for-8 from the field and 0-for-6 from three. He’s shooting 27.4 percent on the season and has been letting his poor shooting affect his aggressiveness on defense. “In practice he’s a killer, he’s knocked down contested shots,” sophomore guard Kerwin Roach Jr. said of his teammate. “I guess his first couple shots don’t go in, and he kind of gets down on himself. I know for a fact that as the season goes he’s going to get over it and he’s just going to be the old Eric Davis.” Until Davis Jr. finds his shot, Texas will continue to lean on the hot hand of sophomore guard Tevin Mack. He currently leads the team with

73 points and has hit 13 threepoint shots. But Alabama boasts a bevy of three-point shooters of its own. The Crimson Tide has made 50 buckets from beyond the arc, led by junior guards Riley Norris and Ar’Mond Davis, who both have nine. They have a deep, experienced roster and will challenge the Longhorns defensively. Despite their 3–3 record, the Longhorns aren’t pressing the panic button yet. Roach Jr. said Texas knows it’s going to take some time for the young team to figure out the issues. Smart said the Longhorns will continue practicing hard and grow stronger from the adversity. “As a team we’re going to have to find a way to show a level of resolve,” Smart said. “When you go through experiences like this, it can be something you can really learn from or you can repeat it if you’re not willing to understand as a team what you need to do differently.”

God will never put you in a situation you aren’t ready to handle. Keep faith and embrace the process

SPORTS BRIEFLY Texas swim teams rack up victories

Texas swimmers had a big day in the pool Thursday at the Texas Invitational as many Longhorns looked to punch their ticket to the NCAA National Championships. The Longhorn men started strong in the 10 a.m. preliminary round with senior Clark Smith taking the 500-yard freestyle preliminary with a time of 4:12.83, fast enough to qualify for nationals. Smith again came out on top in the event final during the 6 p.m. session. In the 200-yard freestyle relay, sophomores Tate Jackson and John Shebat, junior Brett Ringgold and senior Jack Conger emerged triumphant with a winning time of 1:16.73. The mark was enough to qualify for nationals. In the 50-yard freestyle final, Conger came in third. The Longhorn women took down three school records and earned wins in the 200 and the 400yard medley relay. Senior Madisyn Cox won the 200-yard medley by three seconds and broke the school record in the event with a time of 1:52:83. The 400-yard medley relay team also beat a school record with their time of 3:29:77. Senior Tasija Karosas led off with a time of 51.08, breaking her own school record in the backstroke split. Cox followed with the breaststroke, sophomore Remedy Rule swam the butterfly portion and junior Rebecca Millard sealed the deal with the freestyle split. Texas also placed second in the 200-yard freestyle relay. Sophomore Joanna Evans placed fourth in the 500-yard freestyle, and Millard and Rule placed No. 3 and 6, respectively, in the 50-yard freestyle. The Invitational continues on Friday at the Lee and Joe Jamail Texas Swimming Center with preliminaries starting at 10 a.m. and finals at 6 p.m. —Wills Layton, Turner Barnes


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ELIZABETH HLAVINKA, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR | @thedailytexan Friday, December 2, 2016

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Rise up. Illustration by Victoria Smith | Daily Texan Staff

Laticia Gomez By Cat Cardenas @crcardenas8

In the late ’80s, much of the LGBT community was cloaked in fear and sadness. President Ronald Reagan continued to ignore the mounting AIDS crisis while the Supreme Court upheld sodomy laws, referring to homosexual sex as “the infamous crime against nature” in 1986. One year later, hundreds of thousands of people participated in “The Great March” on Washington D.C. to draw national attention to LGBT rights. In the sea of people was Letitia Gomez. She arrived in D.C. 11 days before the march, ready to begin a life of activism that took root 10 years earlier at UT. “There was a lot of sadness, a lot of anger,” Gomez said. “The government wasn’t doing

much about HIV/AIDS — it felt so urgent. To me, it was just important [for LGBT people] to be visible, to see other people like me there. It was so wonderful just realizing that I wasn’t the only one.” Raised in a Catholic household on the west side of San Antonio, Gomez knew her mother expected her to grow up, get married and have children. When she came out to her mother, Gomez said they had a “big cry” together. “I really thought she was going to disown me,” Gomez said. “I feel really grateful that she decided it was most important just to love me and accept me as I was. But she was always afraid that I’d be harassed or killed. When Texas reinstated the sodomy law, she called me crying, saying ‘You’re a criminal in Texas.’” She left San Antonio to transfer to UT in

1976 and witnessed the discrimination of LGBT people firsthand. Even within that community, Gomez said Chicanos struggled to find acceptance. At bars, one of the few places Gomez said LGBT people felt safe hanging out openly, Latinos were often asked for two types of ID were turned away. “It felt like the government didn’t care about us, and many of us felt that about the larger, white gay community as well,” Gomez said. “We just didn’t have any of the rights we have today.” Gomez and her friends began marching with the Texas Farm Workers Union and discussing LGBT rights, inspired by her mother’s involvement with Latino civil rights organizations. She eventually moved to Houston, where Gomez and her friends formed the Gay

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Patsy Lynch | Daily Texan Staff

Leon McNealy By Daisy Wang @daisyxwang

When Leon McNealy and fellow student Chet Helms petitioned against the University’s annual blackface minstrel show, neither one could have anticipated its impact. For McNealy, this act of defiance soon turned into something greater: a lifelong fight against oppression. Though McNealy had already been aware of the racism surrounding him, it wasn’t until he was 17 and riding the bus home from school that he started to act against it. A white man boarded the bus and demanded an elderly black woman give him her seat. When she didn’t move, the driver began to insist she do so.

“Racism is not so much about a seat, which he was entitled to by law, it’s about power,” McNealy said. “He could have any seat, but he wanted that one.” From then on, McNealy began to get involved in civil rights work. In 1960, McNealy, Sherryl Griffin Bozeman and Mary Simpson went to thenUniversity President Logan Wilson’s office to discuss the elimination of segregation on campus. When they arrived, they were quickly turned away. But the trio wouldn’t be ignored and refused to leave until President Wilson spoke to them. Soon, over 5,000 people joined them to chant the University’s maxim, “Ye shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free.” A few years later, Students for a

Democratic Society began orchestrating stand-ins for the integration of local theaters on The Drag. McNealy and other protesters would stand in line, ask to buy a ticket only if the establishment was integrated and if it wasn’t, they would go back in line and ask again. They drew so much attention that Eleanor Roosevelt and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. offered their support. “It was a very powerful movement, and it had the seeds of something we saw around the whole country,” McNealy said. “I remember we were having an allblack meeting when Joann Cope, a white woman, wanted to join the movement.

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Coutersy of Marshfield Clinic | Daily Texan Staff

Alice Embree By Daisy Wang @daisyxwang

Set to take part in a Chilean Exchange Program, Alice Embree was shocked when Frank Erwin canceled the trip. Even more surprising was his reason why: In Erwin’s words, it was “the Embree girl.” After the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963, Embree’s interest in political organizations spiked. She joined Students for a Democratic Society, a student activist movement, where she soon became a prominent female figure and anti-war activist. “It was inspiring that people were taking their lives into their own hands,

sitting at restaurant counters and saying ‘We want to eat,’” Embree said. “Instead of waiting around for change, we were taking direct action and building a social movement to make things happen.” But the activists faced many obstacles. Prolific figures such as Erwin, a UT System Regent, greatly disliked them. In 1967, during a meeting held by the society at the West Mall, Embree was one of six students singled out and placed on disciplinary probation for allegedly holding a meeting in an unapproved location. Originally, the students were meant to be suspended from the University, but based on a free speech defense, the charges were dropped. “In 1964, we were really a small

number of students bucking up against a power structure that didn’t want to hear us,” Embree said. “You felt kind of embattled, but it made for a very cohesive community of activists who all knew each other.” Soon after its creation, Embree joined The Rag, an underground, progressive newspaper. Although she was one of the publication’s first members, as a woman, she was confined to typing. “Austin had these growing New Left and counter-culture communities that we wanted to sort of bring together,” said Thorne Dreyer, the original editor of The Rag. “[The Rag] was the

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Yifan Lyu | Daily Texan Staff

Infographic by Becca Rios | Daily Texan Staff


The Daily Texan 2016-12-02