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SUMMER EDITION

Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

@thedailytexan

Monday, June 23, 2014

/dailytexan

dailytexanonline.com

In the past six years, undergraduate debt has increased by Top 5 UT schools with most average undergraduate debt

Liberal Arts

$25,970

Fine Arts

$25,945

Communication

$25,900

Natural Sciences Education $20,000

18%

$25,600 $24,584

$22,000

$24,000

Student debt on the rise Tuition costs have nearly doubled in the last decade, cost of living has risen, voter

support for higher education declines, and students find themselves more indebted. PAGE 6

$26,000


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Monday, June 23, 2014

CONTENTS

This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25

COVER STORY

Permanent Staff

Cost of attendance rises as public support for higher education drops by 14 percent over four years. PAGE 6

Volume 115, Issue 3

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor-in-Chief Riley Brands (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Pu Ying Huang (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Retail Advertising (512) 475—6719 lhollingsworth@austin. utexas.edu Classified Advertising (512) 471-5244 classifieds@ dailytexanonline.com The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2013 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

REASON TO PARTY

Chubby, single, and ready for a Pringle.

NEWS

SPORTS

Texas baseball heads home empty-handed, and Augie has nothing but good things to say about the team’s efforts. PAGE 3

OPINION

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Davis Jr., Noah Horwitz Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pu Ying Huang News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jacob Kerr Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anthony Green, Amanda Voeller Senior Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Olivia Berkeley, John Daywalt, Jordan Maney Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reeana Keenen Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cameron Peterson, Kevin Sharifi Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Omar Longoria Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hirrah Barlas Multimedia Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charlie Pearce, Dan Resler Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sarah Montgomery Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mengwen Cao, Jenna VonHofe, Amy Zhang Senior Videographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bryce Seifert Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Smothers Senior Life&Arts Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren, L’Amie, Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stefan Scrafield Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nick Castillo Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Hadidi Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Connor Murphy Senior Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nathan Burgess, Crystal Garcia, Isabells Palacios Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeremy Hintz Associate Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarah Stancik Senior Technical Staff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Shen, Roy Varney Online Outreach Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fred Tally-Foos Journalism Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Michael Brick

Issue Staff

Obama’s executive measure is a step in the right direciton, says McCombs associate dean. PAGE 4 Obama’s plan to help doesn’t solve the real problem, says recent alumnus. PAGE 4

NEWS

Twenty-five Young African Leaders are selected to participate in UT’s six-week leadership program. PAGE 5

LIFE&ARTS

Learn how to start acting like an adult when it comes to finances with our five-step guide to spending and saving money. PAGE 10

Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shannon Butler, Albert Lee Life&Arts Writer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sarah Montgomery Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Helen Fernandez Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christina Noriega, Claire Ricke Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drew Lieberman

Business and Advertising

(512) 471-1865 | advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Interim Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frank Serpas, III Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barbara Heine Advertising Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcasting and Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Event Coordinator and Media Consultant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindsey Hollingsworth Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Carter Goss, Lindsey Hollingsworth Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ted Sniderman Student Assistant Advertising Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rohan Needel Student Project Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Danielle Archuleta Student Account Executives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gerardo Arce, Andrea Avalos, Keegan Bradley, Edgar Hernandez, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Danielle Lotz, Destanie Nieto, Xiaowen Zhang Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mymy Nguyen Student Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dito Prado Senior Graphic Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Hublein Student Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kiera Tate Special Editions/Production Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michael Gammon

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 4711865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2014 Texas Student Media.

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Texan Ad Deadlines

COVER INFOGRAPHIC BY OMAR LONGORIA

6/23/14

Monday .............Wednesday, 12 p.m. Thursday.................Monday, 12 p.m. Tuesday.................Thursday, 12 p.m. Friday......................Tuesday, 12 p.m. Word Ads 11 a.m. Wednesday................Friday, 12 p.m. Classified (Last Business Day Prior to Publication)

ACTIVE AUSTIN Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Citizen Kane and The Third Man: Brush up on your Orson Welles movie expertise with this double feature at the Paramount as a part of its summer classic film series, starting at 7 p.m.

Trailer Food Tuesdays: Sample all of the local food truck fare in one location at the Long Center every last Tuesday in the summer. Each week has a different food truck lineup.

Shinyribs with Tameca Jones: The third installment of KGSR’s Blues on the Green summer series brings a blend of soul and country music to Zilker Park. Bring a blanket and a bottle of wine with you.

BettyFest: Hosted by local comedian Maggie Maye, BettyFest is a comedy lineup of all female comics. Two comedy troupes and one standup comedian fill the lineup at Coldtown Theatre, starting at 8:30 p.m.

Hole in the Wall’s 40th Anniversary Celebration: Celebrate 40 years of “cheap music, fast drinks and live women” at Hole in the Wall, conveniently located just across the street from campus.

’80s Sing-Along Dance Party: Sing along to Whitney Houston at the Alamo Drafthouse at 10 p.m. Sure Thing Comedy: Enjoy free local comedy at Austin Java every Saturday starting at 8 p.m.

Living Room Live with Dana Falconberry: Feel extra fancy and enjoy free local music from Dana Falconberry in the W Hotel as a part of its Living Room Live music series.


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STEFAN SCRAFIELD, SPORTS EDITOR | @texansports Monday, June 23, 2014

BASEBALL

HEARTBREAK: TEXAS LOSES IN EXTRAS Left: After a tough 4-3 season-ending loss to Vanderbilt at the College World Series,the Longhorns sit in disappointment as the Commodores celebrate their victory.

By Drew Lieberman @DrewLieberman

OMAHA, Nebraska — Sophomore shortstop C.J Hinojosa nearly came up with the big hit in the top of the 10th inning and was unable to make the play in the bottom of the 10th, as Vanderbilt defeated the Longhorns 4-3 in extra innings Saturday. Hinojosa crushed a ball to deep right-center field to lead off the top of 10th but Vanderbilt’s Rhett Wiseman had snagged the ball with a web gem caliber catch. “Probably the best swing I had all day,” Hinojosa said. “And off the bat I did think it was over his head. He’s a good outfielder, he tracked it well and made a great play on it.” In the bottom frame, Vanderbilt rallied with two outs. Wiseman singled off of sophomore pitcher John Curtiss and stole second base, which led to Curtiss walking Vandy’s Ro Coleman. Curtiss then beaned Karl Ellison to load the bases for Tyler Campbell, who was making only his third start of the season in place of suspended Xavier Turner. Campbell hit Curtiss’ 1-1 pitch toward the left side of the infield and legged out Hinojosa’s throw to first, allowing Wiseman to score the game-winning run. “I got the first [two] guys out,” Curtiss said matterof-factly after the game. “But then they got a hit, then I walked a guy, then I hit the guy. And then I gave up the game losing infield single. That’s the way

Below: Texas coach Augie Garrido praised his team after falling a game short of the championship series.

Photos by Charlie Pearce Daily Texan Staff

baseball goes.” Texas got into trouble early against the Commodores, who took a 1-0 lead in a first inning that could’ve resulted in a lot more damage as they twice loaded the bases, but only came away with one run. The Longhorn bats were dormant in the first three innings, going a combined 1-for-8 while stranding three. Vanderbilt extended its lead to 2-0 with the help of two Texas errors in the bottom half of the third inning. But the Longhorns weren’t going down without displaying the signature grit that helped them go from fifth place in the Big 12 to one of the final four standing in Omaha. With the bases loaded, freshman first

baseman Kacy Clemens delivered a single that scored two and evened the ball game. However, the Commodores took a 3-2 lead in the bottom of the fifth when Wiseman crushed the ball deep towards the very top of the wall in right field, driving in the go ahead run. Barrera led off the sixth inning with a triple to center field and freshman infielder Zane Gurwitz delivered a one-out single to tie the game at three. Gurwitz managed to advance to second on a failed pick off, but senior designated hitter Madison Carter struck out to end the threat. And with that went Texas’ final threat to take the lead. The Longhorns never led in this one and fatally stranded 10 runners on base.

SIDELINE This Week in Sports Monday — World Cup: Mexico vs. Croatia

VS Group A is wide open, and a win could send either team into the next round. Mexico is atop the group with four points. A tie ensures a berth in the round of 16. Croatia must win to avoid elimination.

Thursday — World Cup: USA vs. Germany

VS The United States will close out group play against a tough German squad. Both squads will need a tie or win to advance to the round of 16. The knockout round begins Saturday.

COLUMN

Garrido praises Longhorns after loss OMAHA, Nebraska — Before any of the reporters could ask any questions, before the moderator even had a chance to introduce the Texas players in the post-game press conference, Augie Garrido dropped his bag and took a seat at the podium. “Sorry I’m late,” he said. “But we have 27 kids with broken hearts, and I thought it was important to talk to them.” Broken hearts indeed, and reasonably so. —Stefan Scrafield See full story online at dailytexanonline.com

Saturday — USL Soccer: Austin Aztex vs. Laredo Heat

VS After a 2-1 win against the Houston Dutch Lions, the Austin Aztex will look to extend their 3-game winning streak when they play the Laredo Heat. Game starts at 7:30 p.m. at House Park.


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RILEY BRANDS, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | @TexanEditorial Monday, June 23, 2014

COLUMN

COLUMN

Obama’s loan initiatives help reduce risk for students

New relief from administration misses heart of the problem

By David Platt Guest Columnist

The Obama administration recently announced new initiatives in an effort to fix the many problems of the public-private student loan system in America. These include allowing new borrowers to limit repayments to 10 percent of income above the poverty level, providing for loan forgiveness after 20 years of responsible repayment, and giving preferential treatment to those in public service. To understand the importance of these initiatives, it helps to consider student loans as an investment. In the McCombs School, all students learn about “financial leverage,” which is a tool used by companies to increase growth. This concept holds that incurring debt can be beneficial when it creates financial returns that exceed the costs imposed by the debt obligation. Simply put, if I can borrow $1,000 at a reasonable rate of interest and use it to make $2,000 in a reasonable period of time, I come out ahead. Despite all of the angst about student loan debt, a student loan can be great financial leverage. A recent article by the Economic Policy Institute notes that entry-level college graduates make $20 per hour, on average, while high school graduates make only $10 per hour. Similarly, a recent New York Times article noted that the average hourly pay for all college graduates is $32.60, versus $16.50 for everyone else. If a college graduate works 40 hours per week and pays income taxes at a rate of 25 percent, that $10 per hour entry-level difference is a return of well over $1,000 per month. With student loan rates at 4.66 percent (effective July 1),

that difference alone will pay off $100,000 in student loan debt in 10 years. But a new report by the White House Domestic Policy Council and Council of Economic Advisers notes that the average student debt at graduation is $29,400, leaving a substantial surplus after covering the loan payment. Of course, the cost of a college education is not just the cost of student loans, just as the value of a college education is not just in its financial returns. But, if taking out those loans is the difference between attending and not attending college, it’s likely to be a sound investment for most students. So, why all the angst about student loans? One important thing that every McCombs student learns about financial leverage is that it increases risk: The $2,000 that I expect to earn is hypothetical, but the $1,000 I borrowed and will have to pay back is not! The Obama administration’s new initiatives for student loan repayment help reduce that risk by indexing payments to earnings and eventually forgiving loans for those in low-paying and public service jobs who repay responsibly. So, even if a student’s passion turns out not to lead to one of those $20-per-hour jobs, these changes can help ensure that a college degree is still a good investment. Many policy issues around student loans remain to be addressed, including the promotion of excessive borrowing by for-profit colleges and the misuse of student loan funds by students. But, by helping to reduce the risk in the investment equation, the president’s new initiatives are a step in the right direction. Platt is the associate dean for undergraduate programs at the McCombs School of Business.

By Will Johnson Guest Columnist

President Barack Obama recently announced his intention to expand Pay As You Earn, a student loan forgiveness program originally passed in 2012. The plan enables former college students who meet eligibility requirements to cap their monthly loan payments at 10 percent of their income, with those loans forgiven after 20 years. While this effort is a godsend for many, it is also shortsighted and only shifts the burden of this debt. Every forgiven loan must be absorbed somehow, and any true attempt to solve the burgeoning student loan crisis must attack the initial distribution of those loans. Outstanding student loan debt currently stands at more than $1.2 trillion. Of that, 14 percent is currently in default, a percentage only predicted to increase. Why are these numbers so high? Because tuition rates are skyrocketing, the job market is less than optimal, and student loans are so easy to receive. I distinctly remember signing my first UT loan. The process seemed so simple. Too easy. In just a few clicks, I had promised to pay thousands of dollars years ahead to an entity I could not visualize at a disturbingly high interest rate. The realization frightened me on impact. I was one of the lucky ones because I understood how the process worked and I had been planning my college financing for several years, but many students are not so fortunate. A study conducted last July by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, concluded that American households have a poor

understanding of the student loan process, with less than half of the respondents comprehending the consequences for defaulting on loans, even among those who had taken out loans themselves. The fact that so many students are oblivious when it comes to student loans is not surprising. Financing is not a required course in most schools, and many incoming college students know very little about loans. Students are offered far greater loans than they actually need, and without knowledge of compounding interest, they wouldn’t recognize the danger of accepting a greater loan. Once loan money hits a student’s bank account, it’s easy to lose sight of it as belonging to someone else. Between the studies and socializing that fill university life, a student can effortlessly glide through college without realizing that interest accrues on their loans even while in school. The consequences of default are surprisingly easy to remain unaware of, but wage garnishment, ruined credit and lawsuits are legitimate threats. Investing in the financial education of incoming college students is the only way to truly attack this crisis. Sacrifices will have to be made. Some will delay school in order to save. Others, even out of school, will forgo saving for retirement or other investments in order to pay off their loans. However unsavory, this is our economy, and the only way to slow this bleed is to ensure that more students understand the true cost of that money only a few clicks away. Johnson is a recent philosophy graduate from Fort Worth. He plans to pay off his final student loan before the end of 2014.

Multimedia

We asked students their thoughts about Obama’s executive measure as well as tuition at UT. Check out their responses at dailytexanonline.com. LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE OR GUEST COLUMN | E-mail your Firing Lines to editor@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words while guest columns should be between 500 and 750. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@TexanEditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


JACOB KERR, NEWS EDITOR | @thedailytexan Monday, June 23, 2014

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CAMPUS

Young African Leaders come to UT By Christina Noriega @thedailytexan

Twenty–five young leaders from Sub-Saharan Africa arrived at the University on Sunday to learn business and leadership skills for creating sustainable projects in their communities. The Obama administration launched the Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders in 2010 with the goal of empowering the next generation of African youth to foster democracy and peace. Out of 50,000 applicants, the fellowship selected 25 fellows to participate in the University’s six-week program offering entrepreneurs leadership training, networking opportunities and business courses. Teri Albrecht, International Student and Scholar Services director, said creating a space for African leaders to work together can help these young entrepreneurs face challenges such as corruption in business practices. “They’re creating their own support network that they would not have had without this program,” Albrecht said. Creesen Naiker, a fellow and director of the marketing and

Helen Fernandez | Daily Texan Staff

Ndèye Absa Gningue and Creesen Naiker are two of the 25 entrepreneurs visiting the University of Texas at Austin as part of the Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders.

management company Vision RSM, spearheaded the YoungHeroes program, an initiative to incorporate sports into South African public school systems in 2004. Through the fellowship program at the University, Naiker hopes to develop a new community project, JumpStart, which would help prepare South Africa’s youth while they search for jobs. “A lot of solutions to Africa’s problems are residing in Africa, sort of buried, much like the natural resources below the ground, where they’re there but the people don’t feel there’s enough freedom or democracy to

activate their ideas,” Naiker said. Ndèye Absa Gningue, a fellow, as well as a designer and director of her clothing company, Aduuna Boul Comprendre, said she aspires to create a renewed interest in traditional African fashion and local textiles. Gningue said she regularly encounters discrimination. “People [in Senegal] are generally quite conservative, meaning that they don’t want to give leadership to youth. Coming to gender, it’s difficult because people don’t think you can handle such a position because you’re a woman,” Gningue said.

PHOTO BRIEFLY Bass Concert Hall undergoing renovations, to reopen in fall

Helen Fernandez | Daily Texan Staff

Bass Concert Hall is currently undergoing renovations and will reopen in the fall. The hall’s 3,000 seats, which were installed in 1981, will be replaced as part of the renovation. Gene Bartholomew, Texas Performing Arts assistant director, said the updates to the venue will benefit both students and performers. —Claire Ricke

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COVER ST

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University of Texas: What

The cost of attending UT has gone up as the national student lo has surpassed the $1 trillion threshold.

Tuition rises, higher education loses su By Jacob Kerr

Illustra

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@jacobrkerr

Tuition and fees at UT have nearly doubled in the last decade while the need for higher education is beginning to lose support among Texas voters. According to the Office of Student Financial Services, the total cost of attending the University increased by $4,242 from 2008 to 2014. The total cost includes annual tuition and cost of living. As the cost of attendance has increased, so has the national student loan debt, which the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau reports is over $1 trillion. Meanwhile, a recent UT/Texas Tribune poll showed 28 percent of Texas voters think a college education is necessary. This is down from 42 percent in 2010, according to the Tribune. Wanda Mercer, UT System associate vice

chancellor for academic affairs, said tuition increases at most System institutions go toward hiring more faculty members and funding student support programs. Mercer said increases also allow for salary increases and accommodate for inflation. At the University, tuition payments also include mandatory fees, which pay for services available to all students. Despite the lack of tuition revenue bonds — which are used to fund construction projects — in recent legislative sessions, Mercer said tuition increases do not usually go toward building costs. Citing recent board decisions, Mercer said the regents have been resistant toward tuition increases. “Our regents have been very, very careful about even allowing increases to be requested, and they’ve been even more careful in approving them,” Mercer said. In 2012 and 2014, the Board of Regents decided

not to increase undergraduate in University. Both times, the regen of-state undergraduate tuition 2.6 percent, respectively. Up until these recent decisio proved significantly higher incr ten years. Supported by then-Chancello Texas Legislature passed a bill d in 2003. The bill effectively mov for the University from the legisl Since deregulation, in-state tu increased 80 percent at the Uni to $4,895, according to the Texa Coordinating Board. Mercer said the increases we commodate for reduced state fu

Student loan debt varies between colleges, sc By Amanda Voeller @amandaevoeller

During the past school year, annual tuition between University undergraduate colleges varied by $696, but, according to a report on average student debt from the Office of Student Financial Services, student debt among May graduates varied by $3,612. Students who received undergraduate degrees in May from the McCombs School of Business, which charges the highest tuition, had the lowest average debt, $22,358, while students from the College of Liberal Arts, which charges the lowest tuition, had the highest average debt, $25,970. Tom Melecki, student financial services director, said there is not one specific reason for the debt variations between colleges, but many factors could contribute. During the recession, American adults — including parents of college students — took out less loans partly because they worried about being laid off and partly because of problems with passing credit rating checks, Melecki said. “Because people were suffering … and having trouble keeping up with paying their bills, a lot more Americans had black marks on their credit rating,” Melecki said. Among undergraduate schools with more than fifteen borrowers, parents

of McCombs students took out the highest average loans in both May 2009 and May 2014, according to the report, and parents of students in the Cockrell School of Engineering took out the lowest average loans in May 2014. Melecki said other possible explanations for why some colleges have more debt than others could include that students in schools with more debt may be more likely to study abroad or graduate in more than four years, or the college may have less scholarship money than other colleges. Another possible factor is that some colleges may attract more low-income students than other colleges do, Melecki said. “My wife [who works in the School of Social Work] tells me that [some of] the students she works with … went into social work because, when they were young people, they and their families benefitted from the help of social workers,” Melecki said. The School of Social Work was the only undergraduate college decreasing in average student debt from May 2009 to May 2014, falling from $27,610 to $23,196. The average student debt among May 2014 University undergraduates was $25,216.

Laura Wells, director of de School of Social Work, said t be attributed to the school wor scholarship money recently. W cause social workers generally salaries, these students will fac repaying their debt than stu starting salaries. “While our debt is lower [tha er colleges], I still think they h climb,” Wells said. “[The decre student debt] was really good n The Jackson School of Ge other school with relatively lo an average of $22,908 per stud students in debt upon gradua Jackson school formed after Jo Jackson donated funds presen than $300 million, accordin website. Nicole Evans, assistan affairs and administration, sai along with other contributio reason the school can award 150 scholarships, ranging fro

CO


ER STORY

7 7

Monday, June 23, 2014

at starts here is increasingly expensive

support

duate in-state tuition at the he regents did increase outuition by 2.1 percent and

decisions, the regents apher increases over the past

hancellor Mark Yudof, the a bill deregulating tuition ly moved tuition decisions he legislature to the regents. state tuition and fees have he University from $2,721 he Texas Higher Education

ases were primarily to acstate funding.

TUITION page 9

schools

Communication Natural Sciences Education Nursing

Percent of undergraduate students receiving federal loans at UT and schools deemed by UT to be peer institutions, similar in size and composition: Ohio State University-Main Campus

48% University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

47%

$25,600

with 522 borrowers

$24,584 $24,501

with 44 borrowers

Engineering

with 283 borrowers

Architecture

with 25 borrowers

Social Work

with 27 borrowers

Geosciences

with 6 borrowers

Business

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

$25,900

with 385 borrowers

with 218 borrowers

with 213 borrowers

$20,000

$24,331 $23,387 $23,196 $22,908

$22,358

$22,000

$26,000

$24,000

43% The University of Texas at Austin Th

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-16%

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Sources: UT Office of Student Financial Services, The National Center for Education Statistics in the U.S. Department of Education

% 13

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University of California-Berkeley

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University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

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COLLEGES page 9

5.5% Texas three-year loan default rate: 15.6% U.S. three-year loan default rate: 14.7% UT three-year loan default rate:

$25,945

with 97 borrowers

Bu

wer [than that of some oththey have a steeper hill to e decrease in social work good news.� of Geosciences was anvely low student debt, at per student, with only six graduation. In 2005, the after John and Katherine presently valued at more cording to the school’s assistant dean for student on, said the endowment, ributions, is part of the award between 100 and ng from $750 to $3,450

Fine Arts

e for orr ur se 3 b ct rea e (1 ite f inc siz ch e o ple Ar e rat l sam

r of development in the said this decrease could ool working to raise more ntly. Wells said that, benerally have low starting will face more challenges an students with higher

The average undergraduate student at UT who graduated in May 2014 left with Average undergraduate loan amounts by college $25,216 in debt, an 18% increase from May 2009. Liberal Arts with 808 borrowers $25,970

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$3,606 $3,139

Natural Sciences 14% $3,234 Engineering 13% $2,876


8 8

Monday, June 23, 2014

COVER STORY

Cost of living goes up with rising tuition and loan debt By Anthony Green

UT alumnus Nathanial Hailu sits in the living room of his apartment where he spends his time online looking for jobs. Hailu graduated in May 2014 from the communications school with a degree in RadioTelevision-Film. Hailu came out of school debt free, partially because he minimized living costs by living with his parents all four years of college.

@anthonygrreen

As the cost of living in Austin continues to rise alongside its population and infrastructure, student loan debt rates have also increased on a local and national level. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, the total amount of federal, state, local, institutional or other sources of grant aid dollars received by UT students has increased by roughly 19 percent since 2008. In 2012, $141.5 million in grants was doled out to 42 percent of undergraduates. Pitted against five institutions of comparable size and city population, UT has the third-highest number of full-time freshmen receiving federal student loans — totaling 2,930 students in the 2011-2012 school year. Hemlata Jhaveri, administrative services director for the Division of Housing and Food Services, said University dormitories consistently operate at capacity during the fall and spring semesters, with a majority of students residing in shared living spaces with community bathrooms, the most affordable student living package offered by the University. According to the Office of Student Financial Services, the average cost of attending UT for two long semesters has risen about $4,200 since 2008, despite the 2012 in-state tuition freeze. During that same time, the cost of living has remained the dominating factor in the cost of attendance. Jhaveri said the inclusion of services like wireless internet access, Bevo Bucks, meal plans

Sarah Montgomery Daily Texan Staff

and tutoring through the Sanger Learning Center are examples of how DHFS tries to increase the value of on-campus living for students. “Living on campus also reduces the need and costs of gas and [personal] transportation,” Jhaveri said. “So students are able to save in those areas as well.” Rene Rodriguez, food service director for DHFS, said affordability remains a central goal of the division in the wake of a high local cost of living. According to Rodriguez, DHFS has introduced only two price increases to the resident meal plans in the past 13 years. “Our buffet-style options like Kinsolving Dining, combined with our retail and a la carte

options like Jester City Limits give students multiple dining options at different price-tiers, as opposed to some other colleges,” Rodriguez said. Rodriguez said these differing dining experiences combined with online menus and account management of Dine-In Dollars and Bevo Bucks provide students with the necessary tools to make their own learned financial decisions. “It’s just like picking which University you want to go to,” Rodriguez said. “You want to attend the place that gives you biggest benefit for your time and money.” Morgan Cardi, marketing and accounting director at Longhorn Leasing, said there is an ongoing issue of affordability in West Campus.

“A lot of the time, for students, the biggest thing is not knowing what to expect when [they] start looking for an apartment,” Cardi said. “I know that was an issue for me.” Gina Cowart, a spokeswoman for development company American Campus Communities — which has built and manages 12 housing complexes in West Campus with roughly 4,700 bed spaces — said the company offers a broad range of housing products to meet the needs of various budgets. Cowart said some of the apartments her company manages, including The Block, offer shared bedrooms for $389 per month, and private bedrooms ranging from $519 to $1,900. “We have residents living at The Block in shared bedroom

A lot of the time, for students, the bigest thing is not knowing what to expect when [they] start looking for an apartment. I know that was an issue for me. —Morgan Cardi, marketing and accounting director

accommodations paying as low as $389 a month,” Cowart said in an email. “Our properties also offer private bedrooms at rates ranging from $519 to $1,900.” 2400 Nueces, another property under the company’s umbrella, charges $1029 per person for a two-bedroom, twobathroom apartment. The company also offers off-campus resident hall accommodations. The Castilian, an off-campus dormitory, offers semesterly room and board rates

starting at $4,200, according to Cowart. Cardi said the increased number of units and competition among West Campus developers in the past year will ultimately lead to reduced rent prices in the near future because multiple high-capacity complexes are struggling with maintaining capacity. “We’ve seen that the capacities are not filling up to 100 percent even last year, and the numbers are even lower for this year,” Cardi said.


COVER STORY

9 9

Monday, June 23, 2014

TUITION continues from page 6 “The legislature pulled back on its appropriations and said to the institutions, ‘it will be market-driven,’” Mercer said. “I don’t think they had any notion that campuses would then say ‘well, if you’re not going to provide the appropriated money, we will go to the students.’” According to Mercer, System institutions would not operate as effectively as they do now if tuition was lowered to pre-deregulation levels. “We would not be able to offer the classes in a timely manner that you need for graduation,” Mercer said. “They would have to cut the offerings by a significant amount. They would have to cut services. I’m just not

sure it would move students toward graduation in most circumstances.” Mercer said a System task force formed to find ways of reducing debt recommended incentivizing students to graduate on time in 2012. Jamie Brown, Office of Student Financial Services spokeswoman, said her office encourages graduating in four years to reduce the amount students borrow. “One of the factors we’re pushing is that students need to graduate in four years,” Brown said. “For the Office of Student Financial Services in particular, it’s so that they don’t have to borrow as much.” With UT being below the

national average in terms of students who graduate with debt and the average amount of loan debt, Brown said she attributes this to the University’s overall push to increase four-year graduation rates to 70 percent by 2016. Student Government president Kori Rady was one of seven student leaders on a committee developing the University’s tuition increase proposal to the regents over the past school year. The final proposal, approved by President William Powers, Jr., called for a 2.13 percent increase for in-state tuition and a 2.6 percent for out-of-state. Rady said even if all proposed increases had been approved by the regents, the

University would have had a competitive tuition compared to peer institutions. “I really do believe UT is one of the highest-valued colleges in the nation,” Rady said. “We’re definitely very competitive in terms of affordable colleges.” Mukund Rathi, a computer science junior who has been vocal against tuition increases, said he thinks comparing the University’s tuition rates to peer institutions’ should not factor into increase proposals. “It’s pretty much irrelevant where other universities are right now,” Rathi said. “We should be doing what makes sense, regardless of how bad other universities are doing.”

COLLEGES continues from page 6 each semester. “We have very, very active alumni,” Evans said. “A lot of that translates into financial support being given to the school for our students.” Melecki said he encourages students to continue searching for scholarships while they are in college, instead of only while they are in high school. The freshman class, which is the smallest undergraduate class, accounts for 44 percent of undergraduates’ outside scholarship money, according to Melecki. According to Melecki, students who graduate in six years rather than four accrue an average of 67 percent more debt, partly because many scholarship and C

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MY

CY

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grant programs limit the number of renewal years. Melecki also said he thinks the federal and state governments should increase grant funding. “If members of Congress or legislators want to know why college students have to borrow so much, one of the reasons is that the federal and state grant programs have not kept up with inflation … forcing [students] to rely more heavily on loans,” PPGT Daily Texan Summer Melecki said.

Students who earned a bachelor’s degree and graduated with student loan debt: National: 71% UT: 50%

Average student loan debt at graduation: National: $29,400 UT: $26,097 Source: Office of Student Financial Services Illustrations by Connor Murphy | Daily Texan Staff

MULTIMEDIA Student debt is on the rise, but how much does it impact UT students? Check out the stats in the multimedia section of dailytexanonline.com

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You’re a grown person now. You buy your own groceries, do your own laundry and go out on weekends without asking for permission. It’s time to pass the threshold into adulthood by taking the final step: financial independence. These steps will help you take control of your financial future. 1. Pay your own bills The first step in the journey of monetary independence is using your own money to pay for your own expenses. It’s simple, really — get money and spend the money. As a 20-something wanting all the freedom of adulthood, you are not truly free until you are relying on yourself to pay the bills. Until that day, mom and dad will be able to hold that car payment over your head as leverage. 2. Save Adulthood

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dawning of a new era of things to buy: cars, adventures abroad and nice work clothes. Having a savings account allows you to save up for all the big things. The best tip is to have two savings accounts: One for those big purchases and another for emergencies. 3. Get a credit card and use it well Everyone needs a credit card. Why? Because everyone needs credit. Credit simplified is a little score that says a buyer is reliable, and it is used for the purchase of cars and houses and also gets you things like discounts and better loans. Having a good credit score is the equivalent of walking around with a sign that says, “I’m a responsible adult who has my life together” — you can do anything you want. 4. Learn how to do taxes It’s time to stop relying your accountant — your mom. Get Turbo Tax, follow the instructions and file for yourself. At the college level, taxes are difficult

because income is usually not consistent, or is nonexistent, and dealing with college loans and financial aid can be complicated. It’ll take time to learn about all the different exemptions and things that are tax deductible. 5. Make a budget It’s Excel spreadsheet time. Keep track of income and spending as accurately as possible. Calculate the average amount you spend on groceries and add in irregular costs such as birthday presents or vacations. Once you begin paying your own bills, taking on a savings account and a credit card and start filing your own taxes, things can get hectic. Lay it all out organizing spending into categories such as eating out or entertainment. A template to help you get started with creating a budget is UT’s financial aid website. The financial aid office also offers a “Cash Course” which is a free online program to learn about how to manage your money.


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The Daily Texan 2014-06-23  

The Monday, June 23, 2014 edition of The Daily Texan

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