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SUMMER EDITION

Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

@thedailytexan

/dailytexan

Monday, June 16, 2014

The Road to Omaha For the first time since 2011, Texas is heading to the College World Series PAGE 8

dailytexanonline.com


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Monday, June 16, 2014

CONTENTS COVER STORY

This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25 Permanent Staff

Under Augie Garrido’s leadership, Texas heads to Omaha for the first time in three years. PAGE 8

Volume 115, Issue 2

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor-in-Chief Riley Brands (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Pu Ying Huang (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Retail Advertising (512) 475—6719 lhollingsworth@austin.utexas.edu Classified Advertising (512) 471-5244 classifieds@ dailytexanonline.com The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

CORRECTIONS Last issue, a graph listing fall 2014 tuition rates incorrectly labeled traditional plan rates under the guaranteed plan and vice versa. | The column on orienation misidentified where a despondent orientation student can seek solace in a pint of Blue Bell. The tubs of creamy goodness can be found at Jester City Limits, or JCL, among other places on campus.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2013 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

This is the greatest and best song in the world ... ‘Tribute’

NEWS

NEWS

Heavy spring rains cause black ground beetles to surface on campus, and the fountain turtles take a summer break. PAGE 3 Bus routes move from Congress, and a UT study indicates geothermal heat is melting the Thwaites Glacier. PAGE 4

OPINION

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Davis Jr., Noah Horwitz Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pu Ying Huang News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jacob Kerr Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anthony Green, Amanda Voeller Senior Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Olivia Berkeley, John Daywalt, Jordan Maney Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reeana Keenen Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cameron Peterson, Kevin Sharifi Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Omar Longoria Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hirrah Barlas Multimedia Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charlie Pearce, Dan Resler Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sarah Montgomery Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mengwen Cao, Jenna VonHofe, Amy Zhang Senior Videographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bryce Seifert Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Smothers Senior Life&Arts Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren, L’Amie, Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stefan Scrafield Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nick Castillo Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Hadidi Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Connor Murphy Senior Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nathan Burgess, Crystal Garcia, Isabells Palacios Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeremy Hintz Associate Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarah Stancik Senior Technical Staff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Shen, Roy Varney Online Outreach Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fred Tally-Foos Journalism Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Michael Brick

Issue Staff

County could have helped homeowners and renters if it had gotten its math right. PAGE 6 Students relate experiences from Ghana. PAGE 7

SPORTS

Women’s track and field took second at NCAA Outdoor Championship, men’s track and field placed 11th, and the Spurs are crowned NBA champions. PAGE 12

LIFE&ARTS

Research suggests yawns may be correlated with empathy, and season two of “Orange Is the New Black” delivers. PAGE 14

COVER PHOTO BY SAM ORTEGA Freshman catcher Tres Barrera looks on from the on-deck circle at UFCU DischFalk Field.

ACTIVE AUSTIN

Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cody Bubenik, Shannon Butler, Albert Lee Life&Arts Writer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Robert Starr Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joe Capraro, Sam Ortega, Shelby Tauber Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Wynne Davis, Sam Limerick, Christina Noriega, Claire Ricke Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drew Lieberman

Business and Advertising

(512) 471-1865 | advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Interim Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frank Serpas, III Executive Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chad Barnes Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barbara Heine Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcasting and Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Event Coordinator and Media Consultant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindsey Hollingsworth Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Carter Goss, Lindsey Hollingsworth Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ted Sniderman Student Assistant Advertising Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rohan Needel Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dani Archuleta, Aaron Blanco, Hannah Davis, Crysta Hernandez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robin Jacobs, Erica Reed, Mayowa Tijani, Lesly Villarreal Student Project Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Aaron Blanco Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mymy Nguyen Student Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dito Prado Senior Graphic Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Hublein Student Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Karina Manguia, Rachel Ngun, Bailey Sullivan Special Editions/Production Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michael Gammon Longhorn Life Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ali Killian Longhorn LIfe Assistant Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrew Huygen

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 4711865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2014 Texas Student Media.

The Daily Texan Mail Subscription Rates One Semester (Fall or Spring) $60.00 Two Semesters (Fall and Spring) 120.00 Summer Session 40.00 One Year (Fall, Spring and Summer) 150.00 To charge by VISA or MasterCard, call 471-5083. Send orders and address changes to Texas Student Media', P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713-8904, or to TSM Building C3.200, or call 471-5083. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713.

Texan Ad Deadlines

6/16/14

Monday .............Wednesday, 12 p.m. Thursday.................Monday, 12 p.m. Tuesday.................Thursday, 12 p.m. Friday......................Tuesday, 12 p.m. Word Ads 11 a.m. Wednesday................Friday, 12 p.m. Classified (Last Business Day Prior to Publication)

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Avery Brewing Beer Flight: Sample beer and fancy cheese at Easy Tiger starting at 5 p.m.

Whiskey Dinner: Enjoy a five course meal, and five courses of whiskey, at Little Barrel and Brown.

Sound & Cinema: The 1986 comedy, “The Three Amigos,” starts the first of the summer screenings at the Long Center. Local bands and food trucks provide entertainment and food before the show.

The Student Union: See the students of the New Movement show off their newly honed comedy skills. Admission is free for students and guests are encouraged to BYOB.

Risky Business: See the 1980s cult film for free at the South Shore District at 8 p.m.

Summer Jam: KUTX’s Summer Jam is a smaller version of their annual Mapjam Festival, except Summer Jam will focus only on Afro-Latin, Cajun and Psych-Dub music genres.

Cinema East: Every Sunday at 9 p.m., bring a blanket and a six pack of beer to the French Legation for a screening of a newly released, critially acclaimed flim.

Love and a 45 Record: Show off your collection of singles at Rio Rita at 8 p.m.

Poetry Slam: Listen to open mic poetry at the Spider House Ballroom.

Ultimate ’90s Party: Sing to ’90s music videos at Alamo Drafthouse Village.


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JACOB KERR, NEWS EDITOR | @thedailytexan Monday, June 16, 2014

PHOTO BRIEFLY

CAMPUS

UT pest control: April showers bring large amounts of beetles By Wynne Davis @wynneellyn

Photos by Jenna VonHofe | Daily Texan Staff

Turtles removed from campus for pond draining, cleaning accumulation of organic debris, sediment and algal growth,” Hillis said. “Eventually it gets to be too crowded for them, so they have a hard time getting enough sunlight.” Volunteers, including students, faculty and staff from the University’s Texas Natural History Collections met to transport the turtles to the Brackenridge Field Lab. Kelsey Hornung, Texas Natural History Collections research associate and volunteer, said approximately 40 of the turtles will be returned to the pond to allow for repopulating. The other turtles will remain at the Brackenridge Field Lab. —Claire Ricke

I got super grossed out. I also wondered, ‘Where the hell did they all come from?’ —Janette Chairez, Human development and family sciences junior

offices or those unfortunate enough to step on one and suffer the echoing crunch, these beetles are harmless, Legge said. “They don’t do anything,” Legge said. “They’re just kind of an invasive insect that we’re going to have to deal with right now.” With a lifespan of 10 to 30 days, Legge said the heat will cause them to die faster than if the campus were sprayed, and if people turn their lights off, especially near the ground, the beetles are less likely to be attracted to buildings. “[Keeping lights off would] probably be the best way to keep them from invading the buildings right now,” Legge said. “We’re almost at the end of the cycle, but it’s going to be a hit or miss with us this year because, if we keep getting the rain, they’re going to keep breeding.” Illustration by Isabella Palacios Daily Texan Staff

It’s summer vacation for more than just UT’s students — the inhabitants of the Turtle Pond will be taking a trip for the month of June while the pond is cleaned. David Hillis, an integrative biology professor involved in the cleanup, said more than 140 turtles were removed from the pond on June 9. Out of the three ponds on campus, the cleaning crew is cleaning and draining the largest pond. Hillis said the dirty pond does not pose a health risk to the turtles but does create an annoyance for them as algae begin to grow on their shells. “Right now there has been a lot of

Creatures of the night, black ground beetles have become a summer norm on campus as they have surfaced to feed and breed. UT pest control technician Candace Legge said her office started receiving calls approximately 20 days ago requesting the beetles be exterminated, and even she was surprised by the amount of beetles on campus. “I’ve been in pest control for 20 years, and I’ve never seen these guys in the numbers we’re having right now,” Legge said. “But we’ve gotten a lot of rain this spring, where it’s heavy rain and has saturated the ground. A heavy downpour will make them emerge a lot faster.” Janette Chairez, human development and family sciences junior, said she first noticed the night crawlers three weeks ago, while walking from campus to McDonald’s. “They were everywhere,” Chairez said. “Like getting right outside of Jester all the way to McDonald’s … They were on top of bushes and all over the driveway [at McDonald’s].”

Chairez, who is working as an orientation adviser this summer, said she does not enjoy the beetles’ sudden presence. “I got super grossed out,” Chairez said. “I also wondered, ‘Where the hell did they all come from?’ and I wish they could be exterminated.” According to Legge, these particular ground beetles are native to Texas and are always living beneath the campus, but the bouts of rain Austin has received lately have brought them to the surface. “A lot of rain in the spring caused them to emerge to look for better shelter,” Legge said. “Basically, they live real far in the soil — a kind of crack-and-crevice type bug.” Because of the ongoing drought in Texas, students who have been on campus during previous summers may not have encountered the beetles. “I probably have [seen them] before because they don’t look unnatural or anything,” civil engineering senior Christina Wait said. “But I’ve never really noticed them that much until recently.” While the beetles are somewhat of a nuisance to those who find them in their


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Monday, June 16, 2014

CITY

Bus routes move off Congress to increase options for commuters By Sam Limerick @sam_limerick

As part of Capital Metro’s 10-year effort to improve the quality of public transit in Austin, Cap Metro moved most downtown bus routes from Congress Avenue to Guadalupe and Lavaca streets in June. According to Cap Metro, which planned the changes in February 2010 as part of a plan to improve its services, the change will allow for faster travel from bus-only lanes on both Guadalupe and Lavaca, which prioritize public transportation and allow buses to avoid traffic in the entirety of the downtown area. “The change off Congress does offer a more direct trip between the UT area and downtown, as well as easier transfers,” Cap Metro spokeswoman Melissa Ayala said.

The change, which went into effect on June 3, coincided with parts of Congress being closed for downtown X Games events. All routes except for the MetroAirport Route 100 will adhere to the move. Realigned buses will stop near Fourth, Eighth and 12th street. According to Cap Metro, 80 percent of its riders to the downtown area eventually transfer routes. Ayala said the goal of these efforts is to ultimately ease the process of transferring between local bus stops, MetroRapid stops and Express stops. Additionally, the new route is home to upgraded stops, with new benches and shelter overhangs. In an email, Samantha Alexander, spokeswoman for the city’s transportation department, said the changes offer more options for downtown commuters. “The Guadalupe Street/ Lavaca Street transit corridor

provides numerous opportunities for travelers, including dedicated bus lanes, motor vehicle lanes, bike lanes, bike share and wide sidewalks,” Alexander said. Computer science sophomore Andy Hannaman said he thinks the changes will allow for quicker commutes through downtown. “I think it’s great,” Hannaman said. “The bus lanes on Guadalupe and Lavaca will really help alleviate downtown traffic, especially at rush hour.” Other students, including public health junior Amtul Asad, expressed concern over the changes because the new stops are further away from the East Sixth Street district than before. “It’s a bit of a long walk from sixth street,” Asad said. “It’s a safety issue. It’s dark, and you don’t know who’s out there.”

Amy Zhang | Daily Texan Staff

Capital Metro passengers load the 7 Bus at the Guadalupe and Sixth Street station Thursday afternoon. Cap Metro bus routes operating along Congress Avenue were relocated to a new transit corridor along Guadalupe and Lavaca streets.

NEWS

RESEARCH

Illustration by Shannon Butler | Daily Texan Staff

UT study: geothermal warming causes Antarctic glacier to melt By Christina Noriega @thedailytexan

Warm ocean waters are not the only factor leading to glacier erosion. According to a UT study published Monday, unusual amounts of geothermal heat are causing an Antarctic glacier to melt from below. The UT Institute of Geophysics team spearheaded by recent geological sciences graduate Dustin Schroeder and senior research scientist Donald Blankenship studied the heat currents affecting Thwaites Glacier, one of the fastest disappearing glaciers in the world. “Thwaites isn’t just any glacier,” Blankenship said. “It is the one glacier in the world that everybody believes has the most potential to raise the sea levels quickly when it goes away.” A University of Washington report released in May estimated sea levels could rise four feet. When the Thwaites Glacier will erode is still uncertain, as the report’s estimates range from 200 years to 1,000 years.

Schroeder said his research can help scientists form better models for estimates and determine the rates of sea level increases. “When it comes to preparing for the effect of sea level rising — which is one of the most important effects of climate change — you really would want to know whether it’s 100 or thousands of years, so our results are also part of the story,” Schroeder said. According to Blankenship, tectonic shifts spanning more than 100 million years have forced the Earth’s crust to lift, creating unusual levels of volcanic activity that are heating the 13,000-foot thick glacier. While the average heat flow is less than 65 milliwatts per square meter on the rest of the continents, heat currents underneath Thwaites Glacier have peaked at 200 milliwatts per square meter. Blankenship said a rise in sea levels could greatly affect Texas’ coastline, particularly centers of the petrochemical industry, such as Beaumont and Houston.

“That’s why it matters when people argue whether the sea level is going to change 50 centimeters in a century, or a meter,” Blankenship said. “If people are replacing infrastructure for a sea level change and the sea level change is twice that much, then their nice investment that was supposed to last 50 years lasts only 25 years. Then it becomes a problem.” David Adelman, a law professor who teaches climate change policy and environmental law, said despite Texas’ resistance to federal environmental regulation, cities such as Houston have been more receptive to policy changes. He said that the daily effects of climate change, not research, will affect policies in Texas. “It’s things like the West Texas drought continuing as severe as it is, or cities like San Angelo have to start trucking in water. It’s the actual evidence on the ground gradually accruing that will probably change public opinion and the politics of the state,” Adelman said.


NEWS

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6

RILEY BRANDS, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | @TexanEditorial Monday, June 16, 2014

EDITORIAL

Illustration by Connor Murphy | Daily Texan Staff

County could have done more to help homeowners, renters Texas government officials don’t always have the greatest aptitude for math. Take Comptroller Susan Combs, for instance: Before the last legislative session, she underestimated the state’s revenues, which state legislators must not exceed in crafting a budget, by nearly $17 billion. Sorry, kids, indigent population and anyone else who could have used the extra money. More recently, the incompetence has trickled down to the county level. Last week, the Travis County Commissioners Court decided not to challenge the 2014 commercial property tax rolls. For years, commercial property owners have taken advantage of a state law that allows them to pay taxes on values much lower than their holdings are worth. While residential property owners can challenge their appraisals, they have not enjoyed the same boondoggle as businesses have.

That means that anyone who doesn’t live in a commercially zoned area is picking up their slack. According to Real Values for Texas, a property tax reform group, Texas commercial property owners are paying property taxes on just 60 percent of the value of their properties. While this group has an agenda, its estimate is buttressed by a finding by Harris County that vacant commercial lots might have been appraised at 62 percent of market price. But when that glaring inequality, which really shouldn’t come as news to anyone at the county, was brought before the commissioners, they did nothing. County Judge Sam Biscoe, who just a few weeks ago seemed poised to act on homeowners’ behalf, cited two reasons: a lack of time to prepare such a large challenge before the June 17 deadline and insufficient savings to homeowners (or landlords).

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

A lack of time is laughable for the longevity of the commercial-residential disparity. But how about those savings? Just how insufficient were they, you might ask? $5, maybe $10, according to a memo produced at Commissioner Bruce Todd’s request. That’s based on the assumption that the county could add either $500 million or $1 billion to its tax rolls. But according to Laura Pressley, a candidate for the Austin City Council, the current appraised value of commercial property in Travis County is $56 billion. If we assume that Real Values for Texas is right, that would mean the county is being shortchanged to the tune of about $22 billion every year. Assuming the county’s predicted savings of $10 is correct for an increase of $1 billion, about $220 should be freed up for the actual figure. And that’s just for the county alone, leaving out the taxing districts for the city, the

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to editor@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

public hospitals, Austin Community College and the Austin Independent School District. All told, taxpayers could save upwards of $1,000 annually, not $10. Why, then, did the commissioners obscure the real benefit of restoring fairness to the taxation system? Sure, one might argue that they were being conservative, but to wager a guess of as low as $500 million seems overly pessimistic and dismissive of homeowners’ concerns. It’s bad enough that the commissioners didn’t even try to do anything, but even worse that their action was based, in part, on such a stingy and obfuscatory assumption. (To its credit, the Austin City Council, which also didn’t take any official action this time around, promised to act next year.) Sorry, Travis County homeowners and UT students who rent their properties. You’ll see the inaction in next month’s rent.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@TexanEditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


OPINION

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Monday, June 16, 2014

GALLERY

COLUMN

O’Bannon case could mean a number of changes for university athletes By Thomas Hunt & Anne Mueller Guest Columnists

Illustration by Kate Barbee | Daily Texan Staff

POSTCARDS FROM ABROAD

Ghana trip unites strangers By Ignacio Cruz & Cortney Sanders Guest Columnists

Editor’s Note: This is the first in a summer series of columns written from abroad. GHANA — Who would have thought that we would step into a royal palace in the middle of West Africa? This past Friday, our Maymester cohort was welcomed to the village of Agogo, located in the Ashanti Region of Ghana, by Nana Afrakuma Serwaa Kusi Ododum, the Queen Mother of Agogo. Palms began to sweat as we made our way into the palace courtyard. The rhythm of drums and traditional dancing welcomed us as we followed the Queen Mother to her royal stool. Shades of red, gold and green adorned her robe. As is the custom, we greeted a host of regional chiefs and other queen mothers that were in attendance at this durba, or “celebration” in Twi. “Akwaaba,” or “welcome” in Twi, followed every handshake, and medase, or “thank you” in Twi, followed every step we took. The young children of the village welcomed us with a traditional African dance called adjua, and within minutes our entire

group was moving to the beat of the drums. The words of the Queen Mother, “Welcome home, my brothers and sisters,” still resonate with us as the durba continues. Some of the key components of the celebration began, such as the pouring of libations, a ritual that acknowledges ancestors of the living dead through prayer. Later, we stated our mission to the village. The 2014 Ghana Maymester’s mission for the village of Agogo is to continue the annual reforestation efforts and build relationships with community members such as the local junior high school in the region. Our purpose for going on this trip was to gain an experience that we could not find in our own backyards. We had the chance to come together with the people and experience Ghanaian roots in a village. We had the chance to be one. Cruz is a corporate communication senior from Mission. Sanders is a recent government graduate from Houston. Cruz and Sanders are currently studying abroad through the Maymester Social and Community Development led by social work professor Dorie Gilbert.

The recent start of the O’Bannon v. National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) federal trial comes on the heels of several major legal announcements regarding intercollegiate sports. The first concerned an agreement by Electronic Arts Inc. (EA) and the Collegiate Licensing Company, the NCAA’s licensing agent, to pay out $40 million to those college football and basketball players who appeared in EA Sports’ video games after 2003. EA Sports and the NCAA ended their licensing agreement last year. Moreover, the NCAA announced this June 9 that it had agreed to a settlement of $20 million to end similar claims against it regarding the video games. In addition, Northwestern University scholarship football players were recognized early this spring as employees with a right to unionize by the Chicago regional arm of the National Labor Relations Board. A win by the athletes in the O’Bannon case would accelerate this strong momentum toward change in intercollegiate sport. In the class action lawsuit, former UCLA basketball star Ed O’Bannon argues on behalf of his

fellow plaintiffs that the NCAA violates U.S. antitrust law by profiting from the use of athletes’ names, images and likenesses in various media outlets. The NCAA maintains that student-athletes are just that — students first, and athletes second and that they are fairly compensated through scholarships, stipends and the opportunity to compete. The athletes, on the other hand, believe they are entitled to compensation far beyond those benefits given the level of financial success enjoyed by the NCAA and its member institutions. As it currently stands, NCAA athletes sign a waiver relinquishing their intellectual property rights upon entering college. The landscape of intercollegiate sports — including athletics here at UT — will change dramatically if the NCAA loses the O’Bannon case. And most legal experts believe that athletes will indeed come out on top if the trial proceeds to conclusion. This makes a multi-million dollar settlement highly likely. By agreeing to such a painful sum, the NCAA might just put off what many are already calling its day of reckoning. Hunt is an assistant professor of kinesiology and health education. Mueller is a graduate student in the same department.

EDITORIAL

Don’t throw money at border In an effort to combat the problem of illegal immigration, Attorney General Greg Abbott has proposed a band-aid solution. On Thursday, the gubernatorial hopeful, who proudly boasts that he has sued the federal government 29 times, made a request to the federal government for emergency funds of $30 million in order to bolster manpower along the U.S.-Mexico border. Among his reasons for soliciting aid was a recent surge of undocumented minors coming across the border. Rhetoric regarding illegal immigrants of all ages has been strident among GOP candidates as the election draws nearer, but Abbott’s request, if granted, will do nothing to resolve the issue of illegal immigration. Among the many issues behind controlling the influx of undocumented immigrants that Abbott referenced in a letter to Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson, the lack

of transparency in the border protection system leads one to wonder how border security funds are being used. Despite a lack of criteria that measure success and failure of border patrol efforts, less than 3 percent of funding, which includes over $100 million for the biennium, was determined to have been helpful last year in increased apprehensions of undocumented immigrants and drug seizures. If Abbott wants to secure the border, he should request that the Legislature and the Department of Public Safety address internal problems concerning the current use of tax dollars instead of asking for federal money to contribute to a $300 million border security proposal, which he has said was supposed to be supported by state funds. Maybe then we can bring the situation in the borderlands under control.


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COVER ST

Texas’ journey back to th Strong team bond key to By Nick Castillo @NCHammer74

Joe Capraro | Daily Texan Staff

Freshman catcher Tres Barrera looks at a pitch in a 3-1 loss to UC-Irvine in the opening game of the College World Series. Texas will have to win out if it hopes to win its seventh national championship.

Three whole years — that’s how long it took for the senior Longhorns’ to return to Omaha for the College World Series. After making the trip to Omaha as freshmen, Texas’ senior class assumed the journey to the Midwest would be an annual occurrence. But the last couple of years haven’t been too kind to Texas baseball. After the 2011 season, it seemed as though all success had evaded the team. “I took [success] for granted,” senior pitcher Nathan Thornhill said at a press conference. “Baseball kind of came back to get me.” For Thornhill and fellow senior Mark Payton, the sense of unfinished business brought them back to Austin for their senior years. Both players passed up the opportunity to turn pro after being drafted in the 2013 MLB draft, but there was never any doubt that they had made the right decision by staying in school. “It was worth it before we were going to Omaha,” Thornhill said. “It was in the fall knowing that we were doing everything we could to get going in the right direction. Going to Omaha and having an opportunity to compete for a national championship is icing

on the cake.” Those fall workouts were grueling, b prepared the team to battle through ficult Big 12 schedule — a conferenc two other teams in the College Wor ries. The workouts got the team ready through a tough regional that include and rival Texas A&M, and they also Texas sweep Houston to advance to O But most importantly, fall training b the players together and helped them strong bond. “A great group of guys: That’s one thi helps it,” Thornhill said. “We’ve suffer gether. We’ve won together. That’s what you brothers, and that’s what makes us team. We still love each other, and it’s lot of fun.” So now more than ever, the team wi to each other to make their run at a n championship, a feat that has not be complished since 2005. Head coac gie Garrido wants his team to focus o another rather than worrying abou uncontrollable things. “It’s still about staying focused on o other and playing the game the way you how,” Garrido said. “Play the game th have. Don’t try to create a new one no

SUCCESS AT THE SERIES

Photo by Shelby Tauber | Daily Texan Staff

Photo by Sam Ortega | Daily Texan Staff

Photo by Sam Ortega | Daily Texan Staff

After two disappointing seasons, the Longhorns are back in the College World Series for the first time since 2011. Texas has gone through plenty season, but the Longhorns found their rhythym again in the NCAA Tournament. It is Texas’ 35th trip to Omaha, the most of any college baseball p


ER STORY

he CWS

to Texas’ success

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9

Monday, June 16, 2014

you’re in a different environment.” While nerves may factor into the games, the environment the Longhorns will be playing in won’t be overwhelmingly different. TD Ameritrade Park plays incredibly big, much like Texas’ UFCU Disch-Falk Field. The competition won’t be any more difficult than the teams they had to get past to get to this point. The key to the Longhorns success in Omaha will be whether they trust themselves and don’t overthink the game. “That’s all you can ever do, we teach that from the very beginning,” Garrido said. “It’s about the game. You have to have respect for the game itself and you have to play the game and not the opponent.” Now that Texas has played a game in Omaha, a 3-1 loss to UC-Irvine, the younger players also know how it feels to make it to college baseball’s biggest stage. Despite the new environment for most of the players, Texas will continue, as it has all season, to rely on each other throughout their championship run. “As a team we’re going out there for each other,” Payton said. “That’s what we’re doing right now, just going out playing for each other, playing for the coaches, playing for the guy next to us and not letting each other down.”

Photo by Sam Ortega | Daily Texan Staff

plenty of ups and downs throughout the 2014 ball program in the country.

9

Stellar pitching drives Texas back to Omaha By Drew Lieberman @DrewLieberman

These Longhorns likely won’t go down as Texas’ best team under Augie Garrido. In fact, of the eight Texas squads he’s brought to the College World Series, this team may finish with the least wins. Currently, they have the lowest batting average, .267, of the eight teams. Regardless, this team is clicking at the right time, and thanks to an impressive start to the postseason, this year’s pitching staff has the lowest ERA, 2.33, of any Texas team during Garrido’s tenure. After finishing last in the Big 12 in 2013, the Longhorns started this season 21-6 — their best start since they last won the national title in 2005. They won their first conference series in nearly two calendar years by taking two of three from Texas Tech early on in conference play. Texas followed that up with sweeps of Baylor and Oklahoma, as the Longhorns

By the Numbers Number of times UT has appeared at College World Series:

35 82

6th

(the most by any team) game wins in all of UT’s World Series appearances

rose up to No. 4 in the polls with a record of 30-8 with half their conference games left to be played. During that 15-2 stretch, Texas averaged 2.88 extra base hits per game, which was more than double their average during the first 21 contests. Over this period the Longhorns scored over 6.5 runs per game while the pitching staff ’s ERA was a paltry 2.02. But the Longhorns were overmatched by TCU, only scoring one run while being swept in three games at home. This marked the beginning of Texas’ troubles as the Longhorns would go 8-10 to limp into the NCAA Tournament. In their losses, Texas only hit .226 while committing 1.4 errors per loss. These struggles extended to the mound, as the team’s ERA of 4.29 in those losses raised the staff ERA to 2.45 overall for the season. Texas pitchers also allowed two extra base hits per game in the 10 losses, after giving up only 1.13

LONGHORNS page 11 UT’s national titles:

1949, 1950, 1975, 1983, 2002, 2005 ... 2014?

2.33 ERA

national rank of UT’s pitching staff, with a (the lowest of any Texas team during Garrido’s tenure)

1.41 ERA in NCAA tournament play .226 batting average 1,917 number of Augie Garrido’s career victories 15 times Augie Garrido has appeared in the CWS 1979, 1984, 1995, 2002, 2005

years Augie Garrido has won a national title — at least one in each decade

Source: Texas Sports


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Monday, June 16, 2014

Thornhill, Payton lead young Texas team to CWS The Longhorns’ journey to this year’s College World Series didn’t start on Valentine’s Day in California, when Texas opened its season against the California Golden Bears. It didn’t start last fall, when the team was barred from its own clubhouse and forced to feel like visitors in their own ballpark as they went through exhaustive workouts and team bonding exercises. No, the Longhorns’ surprising run to Omaha began last

summer, when their two veteran leaders, Nathan Thornhill and Mark Payton, passed on the opportunity to go pro and elected to return to Austin for their senior season. “Getting to the College World Series was one of our goals when we decided to come back together,” Payton said. “We’re not done with our job yet. We have a lot more

Mark Payton, center fielder Photos by Sam Ortega

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

COVER STORY

By Stefan Scrafield @stefanscrafield

work to do, but it feels good spark plug has come up with The word selfish is used a lot in baseball to know that we’re get- countless clutch hits and is and this kid is the complete opposite of ting close to what we came as sure-handed as they come back for.” in center field. His incomthat. [Payton] is always looking out for While Thornhill and Payton prehensible 101-game onthe guy next to him. both attribute their return to base streak finally came to a mutual desire to bring the an end in Saturday’s 3-1 loss —C.J. Hinojosa, Texas baseball program back to UC-Irvine in Omaha, but Center fielder to the national powerhouse it Payton’s consistent play has has long been known as, head been vital to Texas’ success and enjoy the experience You just have to go out and coach Augie Garrido said it all season. “The guys who haven’t have fun doing it. wasn’t that easy. “[Payton’s] a very selfless been are just going to have to Now settled in at the Col“It took four months person,” sophomore short- hop in and do what they’ve lege World Series, Thornhill of begging on my part,” stop C.J Hinojosa said. “The done to get us to this point,” and Payton have certainly had Garrido said. word selfish is used a lot in Payton said. “You just have to time to reflect on their final No matter how much baseball and this kid is the jump in and play your game season wearing burnt orange. pleading it might have tak- complete opposite of that. He and have fun doing it. Obvi- It’s been an incredible ride, but en, there’s no doubt Gar- is always looking out for the ously, you can’t take going there is still work to be done. rido’s efforts were worth it, guy next to him. That’s part to the College World Series “It is,” Thornhill said when given how much of an im- of what’s good because he is for granted. asked whether this NCAA pact the two seniors have our senior leader along with Tournament run has been had on his ball club. Nate [Thornhill].” somewhat of a fairy tale endThornhill, a Cedar While Thornhill and Paying. “Not yet though. Being Park native, has been ton’s respective contribu[in Omaha] is one thing, Texas’ most efficient tions to the team’s success on but winning there is a whole and dependable pitcher the diamond can’t be overother thing.” this season, taking the stated, it is their leadership mound in several of the off the field that has helped Longhorns’ most impor- the younger players overtant contests. As the anchor come the struggles of the last of perhaps the best pitching two seasons. staff Garrido has coached at As two of only four players Texas, Thornhill’s 8-2 record left from the 2011 team that and 1.57 ERA entering the made it to Omaha, ThornCollege World Series are an hill and Payton have worked obvious explanation of why all season to instill in their his manager gave him the teammates an understandball in the opener. ing of just how much effort it Nathan Thornhill, Payton, who hails from takes to get to that point. pitcher Chicago, has meant just Now that they’ve made it, as much to the Longhorn the two veteran leaders have a lineup as Thornhill has to simple message for their young PPGT Daily Texan Summer Edition ad.pdf 1 6/6/14 11:50 AM their pitching staff. The 5’8” teammates: Just play ball, relax

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COVER STORY

11 Monday, June 16, 2014

11

and

Colnhill had final nge. but ne. hen Jonathan Garza | Daily Texan file photo AA Texas head coach Augie Garrido is appearing in his 15th College World Series as a coach and eenis looking to win a national championship in a fifth different decade. ndeing continues from page 9 ing, holeper game in the team’s first enough offense, Texas was trip to Omaha, the Long-

LONGHORNS

38 contests. The Longhorns dropped seven of nine conference games during that span, until it won its final conference series of the season by taking two of three from last place Kansas State. It won its first two games of the Big 12 Championship with relative ease, only to blow a pair of one-run games to Oklahoma State to end Texas’ run in Oklahoma City. Since the start of the NCAA Tournament, however, the Longhorns seem to have figured out the cure to their woes. Using a combination of dominant pitching, solid defense and just

able to return to Omaha after a two-year interval. Dominant may not be doing the pitching staff ’s performance justice so far this postseason. Texas’ pitchers had posted an ERA of 1.15 and allowed only two extra base hits in six tournament contests prior to the College World Series. Texas committed three errors in its loss to Texas A&M but has only committed three errors in its five postseason wins to further emphasize the importance of defense in the tournament. In the six tournament games before they made the

horn offense averaged more than four runs a game, which was enough to win, thanks to the stellar play on the mound. Longhorn fans have to be happy with this team’s performance in the tournament. Texas seems to have finally found its groove and managed to turn a disappointing season into another trip to Omaha. If the offense can continue to find a way to score four or five runs a game, Texas’ pitching should be able to hold up and carry this squad to the program’s seventh national championship.

MULTIMEDIA Get caught up with Texas baseball before the College World Series in a video in the multimedia section of dailytexanonline.com

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LIVE ON

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12

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STEFAN SCRAFIELD, SPORTS EDITOR | @texansports Monday, June 16, 2014

TRACK & FIELD

NBA

Ryan Crouser won his third consecutive national championship in men’s shot put, with a toss of 69-3 1/2 inches. The men’s team finished 11th in the overall standings.

Leonard, Spurs burn Heat, win 5th NBA championship By Nick Castillo @NCHammer74

Photo courtesy of Texas Sports

Texas women finish second, men 11th at Championships By Nick Castillo @NCHammer74

No. 1 Texas women’s track and field team fell just short of winning the title, finishing second, at the NCAA Track & Field Championships in Eugene, Oregon. Although senior Marielle Hall won the 5,000-meter and the women’s 4x400 relay team took first in its event, their efforts came too late for the Longhorns as Texas A&M had already clinched the team championship. The Texas men’s team wasn’t as successful as the women’s, however. The men finished 11th in the overall standings. Despite the teams’ finishing positions, first year head coach Mario Sategna is happy with the outdoor season and is looking forward to the future. “I think this is a great starting point, with this being a very historic year for the University of Texas,” Sategna said at a press conference. “We knew at the beginning of the season we had the people to win a championship ….”

As for Saturday’s events, Hall was phenomenal, winning the 5,000 with a time of 15 minutes, 35.11 seconds. “I’ve been feeling really good since cross country and I haven’t had a [5,000-meter] race [lately] and haven’t been able to show that,” Hall said in a press conference after the meet. “So to come out here and have it come together — I’m obviously really excited — but I knew that I had it inside me.” The 4x400-meter women’s relay team also gave a strong performance at the NCAA meet; the team set a meet record, running the event in 3:24.21 seconds, the secondfastest time in collegiate history. The 4x100-meter women’s team finished third. Also competing at the meet, Texas’ sophomore Courtney Okolo won the 400 championship Friday. “It feels really good. I’ve been dreaming about this all year,” Okolo said. “To know that it’s finally here, it feels so amazing.” Freshman Fabian Jara Dohmann was the only member of the Texas men’s

team who competed Saturday, finishing 18th with a javelin toss of 211-4. The men had plenty of competitors in other events. Junior Ryan Crouser successfully defended his national shot put title. Crouser’s toss of 69-3 1/2 won him a third straight national championship. Sophomore Johannes Hock failed to defend his decathlon title after struggling in the 1,500 and finishing second. “He’ll walk away from here feeling defeated, but the decathlon is a different beast,” Sategna said. “He went into the 1,500 — not one of his strong points — in the lead. He gave it a shot for three laps and kind of fell off the pace at the end.” Also competing for Texas was sophomore Reese Watson who finished seventh in the pole vault. The NCAA Track & Field Championship concludes the track and field season. The team will now enter the offseason before starting again in the fall with the cross country season.

The San Antonio Spurs are NBA champions once more. For the fifth time in franchise history, the Spurs hoisted the Larry O’Brien trophy Sunday night. San Antonio overcame a horrendous start to defeat the Miami Heat, 104-84, in game five of the NBA Finals. After struggling in the first two games of the series, Spurs forward Kawhi Leonard turned things around and played phenomenally the rest of the series. Leonard sealed the series with 22 points and nine rebounds in the series-clinching game, earning the NBA Finals Most Valuable Player. “Right now it’s surreal to me,” Leonard said. “They all pushed me. The fans pushed me, Coach Pop pushed me, the fans pushed me.” After losing to the Heat in the 2013 NBA Finals, the Spurs used the heartbreaking series to fuel them throughout the season. San Antonio won 62 games in the regular season and captured the top

seed in the Western Conference and home-court advantage in the Finals. But the playoff road wasn’t easy. The Dallas Mavericks took the Spurs to seven games in the first round but San Antonio prevailed. The young Portland Trailblazers didn’t give San Antonio much of a challenge as the Spurs were able to win that series in five games. The final team standing in the way of a return trip to the finals was the Oklahoma City Thunder, a team which kept San Antonio out of the finals in 2012. The two teams battled, trading blowout victories in the first five contests. But Game 6 proved to be the ultimate challenge. The Thunder took San Antonio into overtime, but the Spurs emerged victorious yet again. In the finals, the Spurs got revenge in five games. San Antonio blew out the Heat in three of its five victories and won the series in San Antonio. The Spurs will raise their fifth NBA championship banner when the 2014-2015 season begins in October.

SIDELINE This Week in Sports Monday — World Cup: USA vs. Ghana

VS Led by Jurgen Klinsman, the United States opens its World Cup journey against Ghana which has knocked the U.S. out of the last two World Cups.

Thursday — Calder Cup Finals: Texas Stars vs. St. John’s Ice Caps

VS The AHL’s final series returns to Cedar Park for game 6 between Texas, the Dallas Stars affiliate and St. John’s, the AHL affiliate of the Winnipeg Jets.

Sunday — World Cup: USA vs. Portugal

VS The United States takes on Cristiano Ronaldo and heavily favored Portugal in its second game of the 2014 World Cup. Tony Gutierrez | Associated Press

The San Antonio Spurs won their fifth NBA championship since 1999 Sunday, beating the Heat, 4-1, in the NBA Finals.


13 OFFICE OF THE SENIOR ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS AND DEAN OF STUDENTS 100 West Dean Keeton Street A5800

Austin, Texas 78712-1100

512-471-5017

Fx 512-471-7833

deanofstudents.utexas.edu

Date: June 16, 2014 To: All Students at The University of Texas at Austin From: Dr. Soncia Reagins-Lilly, Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students Subject: Texas Hazing Statute Summary and The University of Texas at Austin’s Hazing Regulations The 70th Texas Legislature enacted a law concerning hazing. Under the law, individuals or organizations engaging in hazing could be subject to fines and charged with a criminal offense. According to the law, a person can commit a hazing offense not only by engaging in a hazing activity, but also by soliciting, directing, encouraging, aiding or attempting to aid another in hazing; by intentionally, knowingly or recklessly allowing hazing to occur; or by failing to report, in writing to the Dean of Students or another appropriate official of the institution, first-hand knowledge that a hazing incident is planned or has occurred. The fact that a person consented to or acquiesced in a hazing activity is not a defense to prosecution for hazing under this law. In an effort to encourage reporting of hazing incidents, the law grants immunity from civil or criminal liability to any person who reports a specific hazing event in good faith and without malice to the Dean of Students or other appropriate official of the institution and immunizes that person from participation in any judicial proceeding resulting from liability that might otherwise be incurred or imposed as a result of the report. Additionally, a doctor or other medical practitioner who treats a student who may have been subjected to hazing may make a good faith report of the suspected hazing activities to police or other law enforcement officials and is immune from civil or other liability that might otherwise be imposed or incurred as a result of the report. The penalty for failure to report is a fine of up to $1,000, up to 180 days in jail, or both. Penalties for other hazing offenses vary according to the severity of the injury which results and include fines from $500 to $10,000 and/or confinement for up to two years.

HAZING DEFINED The law and the University define hazing as any intentional, knowing or reckless act, occurring on or off the campus of an educational institution, by one person alone or acting with others, directed against a student, that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student for the purpose of pledging, being initiated into, affiliating with, holding office in or maintaining membership in any organization whose members are or include students at an educational institution. Hazing includes but is not limited to: A. any type of physical brutality, such as whipping, beating, striking, branding, electric shocking, placing of a harmful substance in or on the body or similar activity; B. any type of physical activity, such as sleep deprivation, exposure to the elements, confinement in a small space, calisthenics, or other activity that subjects the student to an unreasonable risk of harm or that adversely affects the mental or physical health or safety of the student; C. any activity involving consumption of food, liquid, alcoholic beverage, liquor, drug or other substance which subjects the student to an unreasonable risk of harm or which adversely affects the mental or physical health or safety of the student; D. any activity that intimidates or threatens the student with ostracism, that subjects the student to extreme mental stress, shame or humiliation, that adversely affects the mental health or dignity of the student or discourages the student from entering or remaining registered in an educational institution, or that may reasonably be expected to cause a student to leave the organization or the institution rather than submit to acts described in this subsection; E. any activity that induces, causes or requires the student to perform a duty or task which involves a violation of the Penal Code.

UNIVERSITY DISCIPLINARY RULES This law does not affect or in any way limit the right of the university to enforce its own rules against hazing under Chapter 14 of the Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities.

DANGEROUS OR DEGRADING ACTIVITIES Activities which under certain conditions constitute acts which are dangerous, harmful or degrading, in violation of Chapter 14 and subsections 6-303(b)(3) and 11-404(a)(8) of the Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities include but are not limited to:

• calisthenics, such as sit-ups, push-ups or any other form of physical exercise; • total or partial nudity at any time; • the eating or ingestion of any unwanted substance; • the wearing or carrying of any embarrassing, degrading or physically burdensome article; • paddle swats, including the trading of swats;

deanofstudents@austin.utexas.edu

• pushing, shoving, tackling or any other physical contact; • throwing any substance on a person; • consumption of alcoholic beverages accompanied by either threats or peer pressure; • lineups for the purpose of interrogating, demeaning or intimidating; • transportation and abandonment (road trips, kidnaps, walks, rides, drops, etc.); • confining individuals in an area that is uncomfortable or dangerous (hot box effect, high temperature, too small, etc.); • any form of individual interrogation; • any type of servitude that is of personal benefit to the individual members; • wearing of embarrassing or uncomfortable clothing; •assigning pranks such as stealing, painting objects, harassing other organizations; • intentionally messing up the house or a room for clean up; • demeaning names; • yelling or screaming; and • requiring boxing matches or fights for entertainment.

DISCIPLINED ORGANIZATIONS, INCLUDING THOSE RESOLVED VIA MUTUAL AGREEMENTS In accordance with requirements of the Texas Education Code Section 51.936(c), the following organizations have been disciplined for hazing and/or convicted for hazing, on or off campus, during the preceding three years:

• Alpha Epsilon Pi Penalty issued August 17, 2011 (Probation extended through August 17, 2014). • alpha Kappa Delta Phi* Conditional registration is three (3) years (Completed June 10, 2013). • Alpha Kappa Psi-Business Found in violation. Penalty pending. • Alpha Rho Chi-Architecture* Conditional registration is three (3) years (May 29, 2015). • Alpha Tau Omega* Conditional registration is two (2) years (August 15, 2014). • Delta Sigma Phi* Conditional registration is two (2) years (September 3, 2015). • Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Penalty issued November 10, 2009 (Suspension completed December 31, 2009; Probation completed October 30, 2012). • Delta Tau Delta* Conditional registration is two (2) years (Completed September 9, 2012). • Kappa Phi Gamma Sorority, Inc.* Conditional registration is two (2) years (Completed April 30, 2014). • Lambda Phi Epsilon Penalty issued December 20, 2005 (Cancelled through December 19, 2011; Suspended through May 31, 2014; Probation through May 31, 2015). • Omega Phi Gamma* Conditional registration is three (3) years (July 12, 2014). • Phi Chi Theta-Business* Conditional registration is two (2) years (July 7, 2014). • Phi Delta Theta Found in violation. Penalty pending. • Phi Kappa Psi* Conditional registration is two (2) years (December 12, 2015) • Pi Kappa Alpha Found in violation. Penalty pending. • Pi Kappa Phi* Conditional registration is two (2) years (Completed February 27, 2014). • Sigma Alpha Epsilon* Conditional registration is five (5) years (Completed April 7, 2013). • Sigma Alpha Mu* Conditional registration is two (2) years (Completed April 20, 2014). • Sigma Phi Epsilon* Conditional registration is two (2) years (Completed September 1, 2012). • Silver Spurs* Conditional registration is two (2) years (Completed July 13, 2013). • Texas Cheer and Pom* Conditional registration is two (2) years (Completed July 23, 2011). • Texas Iron Spikes* Conditional registration is three (3) years (Completed March 7, 2014). • Texas Omicron (formerly known as Kappa Alpha Order)* Conditional registration is three (3) years (April 11, 2015). • Zeta Beta Tau Found in violation. Penalty pending. *Resolved via Mutual Agreement To report an act of hazing to the Office of the Dean of Students, visit deanofstudents.utexas.edu/complaint. php. For further information or clarification of probationary member activities, please contact Student Activities in the Office of the Dean of Students, Student Services Building (SSB) 4.400, 512-471-3065.


14 HANNAH SMOTHERS, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR | @DailyTexanArts Monday, June 16, 2014

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

14

TELEVISION | REVIEW

‘Orange Is the New Black’ kills it with second season By Robert Starr @robertkstarr

Illustration by Albert Lee | Daily Texan Staff

Research suggests correlation between yawning and empathy

By Robert Starr @robertkstarr

Babies yawn. Animals yawn. In a way, fish yawn, and so do fetuses, though there’s some debate on the subject. You yawn when you’re bored in class or when you’re tired at the end of a long night of studying. There’s even a good chance that you’re yawning right now from reading about yawning. And, yet, we’re still not sure why we yawn. The popular explanation is that we forget to breathe when we’re tired, so the body performs an involuntary action to take in fresh oxygen, but this doesn’t hold up to experiment. Putting subjects in an oxygen-rich environment, where each breath brings more oxygen to their brains, does not reduce the

rate or intensity of yawns. Personal experience also refutes this idea: Situations where our brains don’t get enough oxygen do not result in more yawning. Run a mile on the treadmill or do twenty jumping jacks and you don’t yawn; you pant. Quick breaths bring oxygen to the brain faster than a larger yawn-induced breath. As far as hypotheses go, the most compelling — and this is likely only a partial explanation — is social. Perhaps yawning is just a means to convey to other members of a group that the conversation has turned dull, in much the same way that smiling and laughter imply the opposite. And, much as we smile, cry and laugh alone, it’s a side effect that we also yawn when others aren’t around. Contagious yawning has been confirmed in the lab, with empathetic people and species more prone to the effect, and this supports the social explanation since smiles, laughter and tears are similarly contagious. The effect extends across species, with empathetic monkey yawns

Perhaps yawning is just a means to convey to other members of a group that the conversation has turned dull, in much the same way that smiling and laughter imply the opposite. relating to the amount of time that the two spend grooming each other. Additionally, in several animals, higher status individuals are more likely to initiate contagious yawns than those with a lower status. But, far and away, the most significant implication of yawning, compulsive or otherwise, is that it’s a sign of mental exhaustion. If yawns are getting in the way of your all-nighter or preventing you from singing along with the radio while taking that long drive on I-35 toward Dallas, your body’s probably saying that it’s time to take a break or call it a night.

For whatever flaws “Orange Is the New Black” may have had during the first season — and there weren’t many — the diversity and energy of the cast weren’t among them. We spent the 13 episodes of season one with a huge ensemble of faces representing a wide range of ages, backgrounds, races and genders and could have easily spent several more seasons getting to know these colorful characters. So what does show creator Jenji Kohan and her wonderful cadre of writers bring us for our second go-around at Litchfield Prison? Two new characters who turn out to be the most memorable in the bunch. The first, Brook Soso (Kimiko Glenn) more or less fills the hole left as the show’s main focus, Piper Chapman (Taylor Schilling), becomes more accustomed to prison life. Soso, ever the Pollyanna, starts her stay in Litchfield hoping to make

new friends and soon faces the reality that she’s in prison, not summer camp. The writers don’t have the same obligation to make Soso identifiable the way they did with Chapman, and yet, ironically, she ends up becoming more endearing. Glenn’s energetic performance elevates what could have been a stereotype into a real individual, whose naivete is simultaneously hilarious and heartbreaking. The second new addition to the cast not only steals every scene she’s in but threatens to run away with the show. Lorraine Toussaint as Yvonne “Vee” Parker is, without a doubt, the best thing to happen to the second season, and fortunately, the show, knowing a good thing when it sees it, is never stingy with her screen time. Vee’s the kind of person you’d hate to see in real life but love to watch on TV. Vile, cold-hearted and manipulative as all hell, she’s the perfect villain, the flame to the oily rag of Litchfield

whose sense of calm allows her to be even more ruthless. Soso and Vee add life to an already diverse ensemble and allow us to see the other inhabitants of Litchfield in a new light. Unfortunately, they also make the show’s main flaw even more apparent: The protagonist, Chapman, can’t compete with her supporting characters. On paper, “Orange Is the New Black” is a fish-out-ofwater story about what happens if an average person finds herself in prison. In reality, the show gets almost no mileage out of that scenario and, instead, focuses on the individuals who inhabit the prison world. Season two of “Orange Is the New Black” is an improvement over the already strong first season, and as we look on to season three, we can only hope that Kohan is smart enough — and she very likely is — to reduce Chapman’s screen time to nearly nothing and that Netflix is brave enough — and it just might be — to allow it. New characters in “Orange Is the New Black” add value to an already strong series but overshadow the performance of Taylor Schilling, left.

Photo courtesy of Netflix


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16-Comics 16

Monday, June 16, 2014

COMICS

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Monday, June 16, 2014

Crossword ACROSS 1 Secret stash 6 Doorframe’s vertical part 10 Water, in Latin 14 Buenos ___ 15 Dial button sharing the “0” 16 Big oafs 17 Samsung Galaxy or BlackBerry 19 1953 Leslie Caron musical 20 Number after Big or top 21 Two cents’ worth 22 CBS police drama that debuted in 2003 23 Be hot under the collar 26 Green ogre of film 28 Carriage puller 31 Where oysters and clams are served 34 It’s beneficial

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37 Beneath 39 “___ your head!” 40 “That’s rich!” 41 Devious trick 43 When repeated, a Latin dance 44 Turkish official 45 Jimmy who works with Lois Lane 46 Worker with an apron and a white hat 48 Go carousing with a drinker, say 50 Archaeologist’s find 52 Trails 54 “Sic ’em!” 58 Makes a pick 60 Book of the world 63 Guy’s date 64 It’s beneficial 65 What an optimist always looks on 68 ___ of Sandwich 69 Comfort

70 Witty Oscar 71 Unit of force 72 “___ the night before Christmas …” 73 Does as told

DOWN 1 Selects for a role 2 ’Til Tuesday singer Mann 3 Machine at a construction site 4 “Tell Laura I Love ___” (1960 hit) 5 Suffix with winning 6 Chief Justice Roberts 7 Individually 8 Hostess’s handouts 9 Fellow members of a congregation 10 Never-beforeseen 11 Easily made profit 12 Hybrid citrus fruit TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE 13 In its existing O M C M A N S I O N state C C R A Z Y B O N E 18 Dockside S D O N T P A N I C platform C U E D I N T 24 Start of many M S H A K M A Y A band names E Q U E L M I N E R 25 Hurry, with “it” R U N T B O N S A I G A S L A N T E R N 27 Melted cheese on toast E D W O R K A S E 29 Figure (out) S H E B R E W B A B E Y A L T A 30 Go in H E R S P O O R 32 Tennis legend Y L L I S Z I P P O Arthur P L A T E A T E A M 33 Backside O I N E S P I Z Z A 34 Vengeful captain

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35 Long, involved story 36 Abrupt left or right 38 All over 42 Kindergarten learning 47 Statute 49 Give a hard time 51 Mascara target

53 Something to stick in a milk shake

58 Newspaper think piece

55 Able to move well

61 Bart’s intelligent sister

56 G.M. luxury car, informally

62 Years on end

59 ___ on words

66 Number of points scored by a 57 Some German/ safety Swiss artworks in 67 Bro or sis MoMA

Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.


The Daily Texan 2014-06-16