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CITY

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Downtown growth strains police By Julia Brouillette @juliakbrou

Austin Police Department is 11 officers short of the 80 officers it needs to police the downtown area, which consistently has the highest crime rate in the city, according to APD Assistant Chief Stephen Deaton. Deaton addressed some of the challenges the department faces in policing downtown, including understaffing and an

expanded entertainment district, at a Public Safety Commission meeting in early April. Deaton cited the long training process as a reason for the shortage of officers. “It involves the hiring practices as well as the length of time it takes to get somebody from citizen to an officer out on his own,” Deaton said. APD Assistant Chief Raul Munguia said Austin City Council authorized 47 new officer positions last

year, 22 of which will be assigned to the downtown area, but it takes more than a year of training before they begin patrolling. “Whenever we get the new positions, it can be up to two or two and a half years before you actually see them on the street on their own,” Munguia said. “We used to have one cadet class per year, now we have three, so we’re trying to shorten that time frame. It has

APD page 2

Committee to determine Regent Hall’s fate in May By Madlin Mekelburg @madlinbmek

The Texas House committee investigating UT System Regent Wallace Hall will meet May 12 to vote on whether there are grounds to recommend Hall’s impeachment. State Rep. Carol Alvarado, D-Houston and co-chair of the committee, said they will meet on May 13 as well, if more discussion is needed. Hall is under investigation for potentially overstepping his bounds as a regent and has been accused by some lawmakers of conducting a “witch hunt” to oust President William Powers Jr. The House Committee on Transparency in State Agency Operations has been investigating Hall since July 2013 and has heard testimony from various UT and UT System officials, but not from Hall himself. The committee members met in executive session at their hearing Thursday and discussed the report, produced by special counsel to the committee Rusty Hardin and which indicates Hall likely committed impeachable offenses. Before going into executive session, state Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer, D-San Antonio, asked Barry McBee, UT System vice chancellor for government relations, to determine the availability of Paul Foster, charmain of the UT System Board of Regents, UT System Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa and Pedro Reyes, the System’s executive vice chancellor for academic affairs, to speak with the committee as a whole or to speak with him privately.

Daulton Venglar / Daily Texan Staff

APD Officer Robert Richman walks down Sixth Street on Thursday evening. APD is currently understaffed because of the time it takes to train from civilian to police officer.

CITY

New rules mean new look for breweries By Alyssa Mahoney @TheAlyssaM

Some local breweries are planning to make major renovations to take advantage of a recent change in the city code that allows Austin breweries to sell beer for onsite consumption. Austin City Council passed an ordinance at its April 17 meeting aimed at helping local breweries sell and distribute their products while implementing a new set of laws passed by the Texas Legislature in 2013. Jordan Weeks, owner and brewmaster of South Austin Brewing Company, said he will spend approximately $50,000 to expand the brewery to include a beer garden and event space for music, which he hopes will increase the

BREWERIES page 2

bit.ly/dtvid

Shelby Tauber / Daily Texan Staff

Dylan Vicknair, a brewer at Live Oak Brewing Company, removes hops as part of the beer brewing process. Austin City Council unanimously passed a city code amendment allowing Austin breweries to sell beer for on-site consumption on April 17.

BASEBALL

For Garrido, ‘baseball is a metaphor for life’ Coach drops ‘Augie-isms’ while making history By Evan Berkowitz @Evan_Berkowitz

Texas baseball head coach Augie Garrido is a rarity for a manager — he likes to entertain. Couple that with his constant ability to produce winners, and it puts him in the conversation as one of the top college baseball coaches of all time. Perhaps the most endearing, or notable, aspect of Garrido is his quick wit and matching personality. Garrido delivers one-liners with the best of them. Here are five quotes, or “Augieisms,” from Garrido this season that best define him. AGE “I used to have the body of a Greek God. Now, I’ve got the body of a goddamn Greek.” Garrido isn’t a youngster

anymore. He turned 75 on Feb. 6 and is in his 46th season as a head coach. That’s 48 years removed from his playing days at Fresno State and in the Cleveland Indians minor league system. Time may melt, but it has been kind to Garrido. He owns the college baseball wins record, five National Championships and six National Coach of the Year honors. “The only thing 1,894 wins proves is that you’re old,” Garrido said after setting the mark in a win against Texas State on March 25. Garrido knows he’s old, but he isn’t ready to give up the game. “I like what I do,” Garrido said. “I look forward to doing it. That’s where the reward lies.” WIT Reporter

at

opening

press conference: “How are you doing?” Garrido: “I’m not telling you anything.” Most of the time, Garrido enjoys speaking with the media. It is often tough to get coaches to open up, but not Garrido. He talks. And talks. And talks. But ask questions carefully. He’s always ready to deliver a clever retort. “Tell me about Lubbock,” a reporter asked before the Texas Tech series. Garrido responded: “I hear they have a lot of good restaurants.” When asked at the first practice how the team looks, he said, “Good so far, unscored upon.”

Texas baseball head coach Augie Garrido became college baseball’s all-time winningest coach when Texas topped Texas State 5-1 on March 25, clinching his 1,895th win.

AUGIE BALL “There are three parts to our game: get on base, advance runner, score runners.” That defines “Augie Ball.” He developed the philosophy

early in his coaching career at Sierra High School, a team that struggled to hit. “I had to find some way to get the ball in play,” Garrido said. “You can bunt for a base

hit to advance runners and to score runners.” He references 2013 national champion UCLA and World Series champion Boston Red Sox as models for

his team this year. Both won it all with low batting averages but took advantage of their opportunities.

REASON TO PARTY

Jonathan Garza / Daily Texan file photo

NEWS

OPINION

SPORTS

LIFE&ARTS

ONLINE

Foreign correspondent discusses time in Middle East. PAGE 3

We asked: Why did you choose to go to UT? PAGE 4

Texas baseball battles for Big 12 with OSU. PAGE 5

Inspire Pro Wrestling focuses on storytelling. PAGE 8

Check out our coverage of the Moontower Comedy Festival at

UT will not join graduation selfie ban. PAGE 3

Friday Firing Lines: Fivestar recruit Myles Turner. PAGE 4

Longhorn golfers seek second straight Big 12 title. PAGE 5

Nonprofit cooking classes teach new languages. PAGE 8

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AUGIE page 5

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Friday, April 25, 2014

NEWS

FRAMES featured photo Volume 114, Issue 149

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor-in-Chief Laura Wright (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Shabab Siddiqui (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@ gmail.com Sports Office (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office (512) 232-2209 dtlifeandarts@gmail.com Retail Advertising (512) 475—6719 lhollingsworth@austin. utexas.edu Classified Advertising (512) 471-5244 classifieds@ dailytexanonline.com

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The cast of Esther’s Follies performs a show on Sixth Street on Thursday evening.

NEWS BRIEFLY

BREWERIES continues from page 1 The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2013 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER Low High

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olives, birds, sweet potatoes, soup, gum...everything else

number of tourists. Weeks said the construction for expansion will begin in May. “[The ordinance] will basically give us a new revenue stream that we didn’t have before,” Weeks said. “Over the next six months, you’ll be able to see huge improvements and expansions in all of the breweries in Austin.” Weeks said the number of local breweries in Austin has expanded greatly in the past three years. Weeks, who is a member of the Texas Craft Brewers Guild, said the ordinance was passed in part because of a growing number of members in the guild who are able to contribute to lobbying efforts. “We have a lot more power now,” Weeks said. “All of these other breweries are able to contribute to the guild’s

This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25 Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Wright Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala, Riley Brands, Amil Malik, Eric Nikolaides Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shabab Siddiqui Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan Rudner Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Antonia Gales, Anthony Green, Jacob Kerr, Pete Stroud, Amanda Voeller Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Julia Brouillette, Nicole Cobler, Alyssa Mahoney, Madlin Mekelburg Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Reinsch Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brett Michaels Donohoe, Reeana Keenen, Kevin Sharifi Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Mitts Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hirrah Barlas, Bria Benjamin, Alex Dolan, Omar Longoria Multimedia Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charlie Pearce, Alec Wyman Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sam Ortega Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jonathan Garza, Shweta Gulati, Pu Ying Huang, Shelby Tauber, Lauren Ussery Senior Videographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jackie Kuenstler, Dan Resler, Bryce Seifert Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Smothers Associate Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren L’Amie Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Eleanor Dearman, Kritika Kulshrestha, David Sackllah, Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stefan Scrafield Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Hummer Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Evan Berkowitz, Garrett Callahan, Jori Epstein, Matt Warden Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Hadidi Roommate to the Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riki Tsuji Senior Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cody Bubenik, Ploy Buraparate, Connor Murphy, Aaron Rodriguez, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephanie Vanicek Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeremy Hintz Associate Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarah Stancik Senior Technical Staff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Shen, Roy Varney Special Ventures Co-editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard, Chris Hummer Online Outreach Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fred Tally-Foos Journalism Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Michael Brick

Issue Staff

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wynne Davis, Leila Ruiz, Natalie Sullivan, Alex Wilts Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Helen Fernandez, Miriam Rousseau, Daulton Venglar Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Caraveo, Daniel Clay, James Grandberry, Caroline Hall, Brianna Holt, Scarlett Smith Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Taiki Miki, Cameron Peterson, Claire Yun Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alyssa Creagh, Marty Eischeid, Crystal Garcia, Albert Lee, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amanda Nguyen, Anna Pedersen, Lindsay Rojaas Columnist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Suchi Sundaram Illustrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lucy Griswold Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Iliana Storch

Business and Advertising

(512) 471-1865 | advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Interim Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frank Serpas, III Executive Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chad Barnes Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barbara Heine Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcasting and Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Event Coordinator and Media Consultant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindsey Hollingsworth Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Carter Goss, Lindsey Hollingsworth Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ted Sniderman Student Assistant Advertising Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rohan Needel Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dani Archuleta, Aaron Blanco, Hannah Davis, Crysta Hernandez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robin Jacobs, Erica Reed, Mayowa Tijani, Lesly Villarreal Student Project Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Aaron Blanco Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mymy Nguyen Student Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dito Prado Senior Graphic Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Hublein Student Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Karina Manguia, Rachel Ngun, Bailey Sullivan Special Editions/Production Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michael Gammon Longhorn Life Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ali Killian Longhorn LIfe Assistant Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrew Huygen

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lobbying efforts.” According to Teresa Ueltschey, Live Oak Brewing Company office manager, many cities in the Northeast and West Coast already allow on-site beer consumption as well as off-premise consumption, where customers can buy beer and take it home. “Texas is very slow to the path on this,” Ueltschey said. “The state changed the rules, therefore the cities have to catch up.” Although the amendment permits local breweries to allow a limited amount of on-site consumption, it restricts the size of the brewery tap room to no more than 33 percent or 5,000 feet — whichever is smaller — of the brewery’s total square footage. Additionally, the amendment requires breweries to receive a conditional use permit to sell beer on-site if they are within 540 feet of a single family home. At the April 17 council meeting, council member Kathie Tovo expressed concerns about the size of expansion allowed

[The ordinance] will basically give us a new revenue stream that we didn’t have before. Over the next six months, you’ll be able to see huge improvements and expansions in all of the breweries in Austin. —Jordan Weeks, Owner and brewmaster of South Austin Brewing Company

and said the planning commission would be in charge of approving breweries to exceed the 540foot restriction on a caseby-case basis. “We don’t want someone gaming the system to try to come up with a bar that they call a brewery and not have to go through the proper zoning process,” Tovo said. Weeks said he anticipates the company’s sales will increase by approximately 20 percent. According to Weeks, the biggest challenge was opposition to the ordinance from the major beer distributors in Texas, but Weeks said their interests are now aligned with the local breweries’ interests.

“They realized craft beer is not going to go away and [the market] is always expanding,” Weeks said. Weeks said the guild will push for additional legislation to help local breweries distribute their products. “You can buy wine in a winery, but you can’t buy beer from a brewery and take it away, and that’s what’s next,” Weeks said. Ueltschey said she thinks getting state legislation passed to allow for offsite consumption will be a major challenge. “I think it’s going to be a hard-fought battle,” Ueltschey said. “Beer distributor lobbying is hugely powerful and hugely well-financed.”

APD continues from page 1 helped, however; the number of retirements that we have is increasing.” Deaton said the expansion of the downtown entertainment district has increased the need for more staffing. “In years past, when one thought of the

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entertainment district in the downtown area, you thought of Sixth Street from Red River down to maybe Congress Avenue,” Deaton said. “The entertainment district has really exploded. We traditionally have staffed that thinking of that one little area of Sixth Street and we now have four to five different locations where we’ll have large groups of people.” The busiest times for police are Friday and Saturday nights, when there are a high number of property crimes, according to Deaton. “We have a problem with cell phone theft right now,” Deaton said. “We have people that will go to bars and target folks who have left their cell phones on the table while they go to dance, or go to the restroom, or something like that.” Lt. Troy Officer said

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another way the department is trying to conserve resources is by referring homeless people with mental illnesses to social service organizations, instead of putting them through the criminal justice system. “We want to filter out those who are consuming police services, but we’re not the answer for them, and we recognize that it benefits us in the long run,” Officer said. Bob Woody, who owns more than 20 businesses and venues downtown, said he thinks the existing security on Sixth Street and the surrounding areas is already sufficient. “There are cops whose job is to be on Sixth Street,” Woody said. “I’m extremely happy with what we have in terms of our walking beat, and I always have been.”

18 student protesters released from jail

After being arrested during a sit-in protest against Shared Services outside President William Powers Jr.’s office Wednesday afternoon, 18 students from the Save Our Community Coalition spent the night in jail and were released Thursday morning. Philosophy senior Sophia Poitier said after being arrested shortly after 5 p.m. Wednesday, the students were taken to Travis County Jail. “They forced us to the back of the elevator … and then into a police car,” Poitier said. “We were taken to central booking [and] spent the night on benches.” Theatre sophomore Blake Medley, one of the arrested students, said students were released in groups from the jail from around 4 a.m. until about 9:30 a.m. Thursday. In a statement released Thursday, the University said Shared Services is a necessary measure to cut administrative costs. “In these days of dwindling higher education funding, we have to be responsible stewards of tax and tuition dollars,” the statement said. “Consolidating administrative roles that are now spread across campus … can help save $30 million to $40 million each year.” Government senior Huey Rey Fischer said arrested students were officially banned from the fourth floor of the UT Tower by UTPD, but he said that wouldn’t stop students from expressing their opinions. “We’re not going away,” Fischer said. “We’re here and we’re having our voices grow louder and louder every day, because this plan is unpopular.” The University’s statement said no final plan for Shared Services has been approved, and administrators will evaluate the effects of the pilot programs and discuss them some time next year. —Natalie Sullivan


W&N 3

NEWS

3

Friday, April 25, 2014

UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY

But first, let me stop your selfie: UT will not join ban on grad pics

Advertising appoints new department chair

By Alex Wilts @alexwilts

Despite other colleges taking action against graduation selfies, UT will not do the same, according to University commencement planners. Two colleges — Bryant University in Rhode Island and the University of South Florida — have banned students from snapping selfies as they walk across the podium to receive their diplomas. According to a statement from South Florida’s Division of Student Affairs, students were asked to refrain from taking selfies and told that a simple handshake with the president of the university was preferred. The statement said that the refusal to abide by this request could result in disciplinary action including the withholding of the student’s diploma. Since UT is a larger university, Rod Caspers, director of University Events, said selfies on the podium will not be a problem at the main graduation ceremony because diplomas are not given out at this event. “Each college and school handles their own commencement ceremony, and that’s where diplomas are handed out,” Caspers said. “I haven’t heard of any discussion [about banning selfies] when we meet with all the colleges and schools, but I think that would be handled on a school-byschool basis.” Wesley King, commencement and program coordinator for the McCombs School of Business,

Illustration by John Massingill / Daily Texan Staff

I’ve only seen a guy have a camera on his cap. He was filming his entire experience. That’s the most I’ve seen that’s close to that.

said in the six or seven McCombs graduations she has attended, she has never seen a student take a selfie while receiving their diploma. “I’ve only seen a guy have a camera on his cap,” King said. “He was filming his entire experience. That’s the most I’ve seen that’s close to that.” King said she does not expect the University to ban selfies unless it becomes an issue in the future, such as holding up the line of students waiting to accept their diplomas. Rohan Shah, American

By Wynne Davis

suasive messages are delivered and the need for creating innovative messages,” Stout said “I’m anticipating our students will be prepared and take a lead in the evolution relative to technology, communication, advertising and public relations.” Advertising senior Alysia Chen said she enjoys how professors try to make classroom knowledge applicable to real world situations, but she hopes advertising students can take public relations classes and have better access to software. “I think it could be really useful to have a class or at least more access to programs like the Adobe Creative Suite … and free printing,” Chen said. “I think that those who are not necessarily in the Texas Creative program, but want to pursue a career in that area should have the opportunity to do so.” During her time as chair, Stout said she wants to interact with students both formally and informally. “I know there are a lot of student organizations that are a part of the college and part of our department and to be able to interact with them and understand more of what the goals are for those groups,” Stout said. “Our students are really super [and] I’m very impressed with [them] at the undergraduate, masters and doctoral level.”

@wynneellyn

Patricia Stout, who has been a professor in the department of advertising and public relations since 1984, was named chair of the department Wednesday. Stout said she looks forward to taking on the new position during a time of growth in the college. “Advertising is a large department … [and] we are at a very strong point relative to the students in our major,” Stout said. “We have a really great group of faculty and I’m looking forward to working with everyone in the role of chair of the department.” Stout will replace advertising professor and current department chair Isabella Cunningham, who will return to full-time teaching. “I have done it for 20 years and I am happy to have done the job,” Cunningham said. “I’m looking forward to working with my graduate students and my undergraduate students, and I’m excited about being able to develop the internship [program] more.” Stout said she her first goal for the coming year is to focus on encouraging faculty and students in the department to keep using their strengths and adapting to new media. “Technology drives how per-

—Wesley King, Commencement and program coordinator for the Mccombs School

studies and computer science senior, said he thinks its sensible to ban selfies if they are creating problems. “I think I would be annoyed if people were taking selfies during their graduation ceremony because it would take up a lot of time,” Shah said.

Anhelo Benavides, accounting graduate student, said taking selfies on the podium is disrespectful and not necessary. “There’s going to be a professional photographer, so you can get a picture anyway,” Benavides said.

Jonathan Garza / Daily Texan Staff

Patricia Stout has become chair for the department of advertising and public relations in the Moody College of Communication.

CAMPUS

Arab-American correspondent shares life as global journalist By Leila Ruiz @LeilaKristi

Ayman Mohyeldin said he was a bored NBC news intern in the summer of 2001, questioning his career choice, until the attacks of 9/11 occurred. His life changed when a producer handed the Egyptian-born, Americanraised intern a stack of tapes of Osama bin Laden and asked him to translate them. This was the beginning of a journalism career that has since taken him to the Gaza Strip, Egypt, Iraq, South Africa and Ukraine. Mohyeldin spoke about his experiences as a foreign correspondent in Egypt in 2011 and Ukraine in 2014 in an event sponsored by the University’s Institute for Communication on Media in the Middle East on Thursday. According to Mohyeldin, who covered the Egyptian Revolution in 2011 for AlJazeera English, the Arab Spring has helped inspire the organization of protests in Ukraine. When Ukrainian protestors at a rally discovered he was Egyptian, Mohyeldin said, organizers even tried to get him to come on stage and tell them how Egyptians had done it in Tahrir Square. Mohyeldin declined. “There are incredible amounts of similarities [between the uprisings in Ukraine and Egypt] because so many of the grievances are the same,” Mohyeldin said. “Young people, very passionate about their ideals and values, disenfranchised, ignored by the state which had grown to be much more corrupt and abusive, and not meeting the basic services for the people.” Through his talk, Mohy-

On April 25th, at the end of the day Helen Fernandez / Daily Texan Staff

Ayman Mohyeldin talks about his experience as a foreign correspondent in Egypt and Ukraine. Mohyeldin has worked for Al-Jazeera and NBC news.

eldin stressed the importance of context in foreign correspondence. Because so many current events, especially in the Middle East, are caused by tens and even hundreds of years of cultural factors and history, each situation requires in-depth research and immersion into local culture. “The other thing I’ve learned about the Middle East is definitely don’t try to make sense of the Middle East,” Mohyeldin admitted. “It’s almost impossible to understand purely by just jumping into it and trying to learn little bit by little bit.” Karin Wilkins, middle eastern studies and radiotelevision-film professor and director of the Center of Middle Eastern Studies, said the institute tries to invite media professionals who emphasize giving their audience a complete context for current events in the Middle East. Wilkins said Mohyeldin’s cultural background as both an Egyptian and American have helped him to better understand both his audience and his stories. “Because the Middle East is such a complicated and

Turn off all lights Unplug personal electronics Power down computers * * Please check with your IT department first.

The other thing I’ve learned about the Middle East is definitely don’t try to make sense of the Middle East. —Ayman Mohyeldin, Journalist

important region of the world and most people in this country know so little, we really depend on media professionals to feed us information,” Wilkins said. Claire Cooley, a Middle Eastern languages and cultures graduate student who lived in Egypt for over two years, agreed that it is crucial for foreign correspondents to know the history of their stories instead of just jumping to where the latest story is happening. “It was good he talked about context, because there’s so many aspects of context people here might not understand,” Cooley said.

The Energy and Water Conservation Program energysteward@austin.utexas.edu


4A OPINION

4

LAURA WRIGHT, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / @TexanEditorial Friday, April 25, 2014

EDITORIAL

We asked: Why did you choose to come to UT? Editor’s Note: In light of the May 1 deadline for high school seniors to decide where they’re attending college, we asked UT students why they chose to come to this University, and how they feel about their decision looking back. Rebecca Dockall, radio-television-film senior DT: Why did you choose to come to UT? RD: It’s really funny, my whole family is Aggies, so I’m kind of the black sheep of the family. I decided to come to UT because UT has one of the top-ranked film programs in the nation. And it has such a big diversity. I was actually supposed to go to Virginia, but the main reason I decided to come to UT was because the level of education and the cost worked itself out. So yeah, Hook ’em Horns! DT: How do you feel? Do you have any regrets? RD: Well, to be completely honest, I don’t think the level of education was what I received. But I think UT is a university that

And it has such a big diversity. I was actually supposed to go to Virginia, but the main reason I decided to come to UT was because the level of education and the cost worked itself out. So yeah, Hook ’em Horns! —Rebecca Dockall, radio-television-film senior

doesn’t spend its money very wise. Because I’ve been here for four years, and I don’t think … I really value my education, and I love learning. But I don’t think that UT gave me everything that I hoped. But, at the same time, I think it takes a student who wants to attain what they want and seek after it. So I think UT provides resources, but it takes students who go them themselves. UT’s not going to handfeed people. But to be completely honest, I love UT. Hook ’em Horns, but I think my … coming in as a freshman, it wasn’t what I expected.

one seemed pretty cool, so I was like... DT: How do you feel about your decision? VH: I think I made the right decision. I’m glad I came here. I met a lot of awesome people. I regret that I am not closer to a beach! But besides that it’s alright.

Alex Bean, cell and molecular biology graduate student DT: Why did you choose to come to UT? AB: Well first and foremost, I really liked Austin. So that was a good reason to come to Austin. They do a lot of really good scientific research here, and it just seems like the kind of large campus community that I could really see myself being a part of. DT: How do you feel about your decision? AB: Let’s see. I love how much there is going on at all times. Like, no matter what day of the week it is, or what you’re interested in, there’s tons of stuff going on. Almost too much sometimes.

Robert Ma, business honors and finance senior. DT: Why did you choose to come to UT? RM: The main reason I chose to come to UT is that I felt like it was a good, diverse mix of education and academics as well as sports and extracurriculars. For me, the schools that came down to it was here, University of Chicago, Georgetown, Carnegie Melon and UT. I think, out of those schools, UT gave me the best opportunity to explore myself because I felt like I wasn’t really sure what I wanted to do. I felt that UT gave me the best choices. DT: Do you have any regrets? RM: No, no regrets. I feel like I made the right decision. I’m really happy to be at this school, and looking back I wouldn’t change anything. I wouldn’t change where I’d want to go to school. It’s where I belong. It’s where I found my community. It’s where I figured out what I want to do.

Victoria Hollingshead, chemical engineering senior DT: Why did you choose to come to UT? VH: It was a pretty simple choice. It’s warm here. It’s a pretty awesome city, and it has an exceptional engineering program. So I was like, let’s do it. DT: Where are you from? You said it’s warm here? VH: Yeah, I’m from Japan. So I was looking at a couple of schools in America, and this

Toni Cirlos, international relations and global studies senior DT: Why did you choose to come to UT? TS: I chose to come to UT basically because when I came to the University and visited it seemed really diverse, and there were a lot of resources on campus, and because I knew about as far as standings and rankings about professors in the different programs and it was one of the top universities in the nation. DT: How do you feel about your decision?

TAKE YOUR SHOT

TS: I’m really glad that I came. I almost went to a small private school and I came from a very small high school, so I really enjoyed it. I don’t ever feel overwhelmed by the amount of people at all. DT: Do you have any regrets? TS: No. I mean maybe my freshman year becoming more involved in GPA standing and everything. But other than that I don’t have any regrets. Ajay Srivastava, Plan II Honors and unspecified business freshman DT: Why did you choose to come to UT? AS: First of all, it’s a fantastic school especially with what I wanted to study. Great business school. Plan II was an awesome program that allowed me to take a well-rounded, interdisciplinary program. Instead of pursuing a myopic path of science, there are a lot of different things I could pursue here. Obviously, UT is huge, so I have the benefits of this huge community and a small tight-knit community with the honors program. And in-state tuition really helps. DT: How do you feel about your decision? AS: I just think that there is a learning curve. First semester you’ll come here and kind of be reserved to academics. That’s the kind of pattern I see. And then second semester you kind of like to over commit, at least that’s what I did. So I think there is definitely a learning curve, and if I had known this earlier, I would have made a healthier balance between the two. That’s all.

Multimedia

Check out the video online at dailytexanonline.com.

TAKE YOUR SHOT

Friday firing lines: Five- BBA Legacy Campaign star recruit Myles Turner should change its focus Every Friday, the Daily Texan editorial board will publish a selection of tweets and online comments culled from the Daily Texan website and the various Daily Texan Twitter accounts, along with direct submissions from readers. Our intention is to continue the tradition of the Firing Line, a column first started in the Texan in 1909, in which readers share their opinions “concerning any matter of general interest they choose.” Just like in 1909, the Texan “will never express its approval or disapproval of opinions given under the [Firing Line] header.” In other words, take your shot. Submissions can be sent to editor@dailytexanonline.com. Submissions are edited for length.

I was beyond amazed when my friends told me that a student writing for The Daily Texan posted an article berating the University. … Berkowitz suggests that: 1) Longhorn fans do not care about basketball 2) Basketball gets little to no attention in Austin 3) Rick Barnes is an inferior coach.

I was hoping to get an explanation as to why a university-endorsed publication would publish articles dissuading an elite athlete from attending said university. I’m not sure if this is a troll job to get more people to read The Daily Texan, but if so, it worked today. However, if this is the type of content I can consistently expect from your publication, the troll tactic will not work again.

I will not dignify Mr. Berkowitz’s dishonest journalism with responses to these illconceived points — it is not worth my time. Honest to goodness, I have absolutely no idea what Mr. Berkowitz is trying to accomplish with this article, other than calling The University of Texas an inferior school. Presumably, Mr. Berkowitz is a Longhorn, writing to other Longhorns. Given this assumption — and I haven’t quite ruled out that Mr. Berkowitz is an Aggie or Sooner — there is absolutely no legitimate reason as to why he should bad-mouth his own school…

— Aaron Gregg, via email in response to the column “Why five-star recruit Myles Turner should not choose Texas”

— Ben Danna, via email in response to the column “Why five-star recruit Myles Turner should not choose Texas”

GALLERY

Illustration by Lucy Griswold / Daily Texan Staff

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

By Suchi Sundaram Daily Texan Columnist

“Our legacy belongs to us.” That is the phrase the BBA Legacy Program coined to describe its official student-giving program, which was spearheaded by a student-led committee in 2009 and which recently completed its spring campaign. The program still makes use of that phrase, which is supposed to inspire and foster a community of giving among business students. But has it? The program claims that the ultimate mission of the legacy campaign is to increase student participation in the donation process. McCombs reasons that its alumni giving-rates, as a mainly undergraduate business school, are lower — at 8 percent — judging from other major graduate business schools such as Dartmouth or the University of Virginia. McCombs’ solution to this perceived problem was to encourage students to give to the school while still enrolled at UT, both to increase the school’s student-participation rate and in the hopes that those students who participated before graduation would feel more inspired to give as alumni. A great solution in theory, but practically there are many flaws. Besides the initial flaw that McCombs compares its alumni giving-rate to those of successful MBA business schools with a pool of fewer, more affluent students, this program targets all business students. In the past two years as a business student, I have passed by the legacy campaign tables many times. The students sitting behind those tables, some of them my friends, would offer two-minute spiels about the importance of alumni giving to students, like me, who still have several years until we become alumni. Based on their logic, it would make more sense to expand the “Make a Mark” campaign, which motivates seniors to donate. Or, the campaign could target upperclassmen, rather than all undergraduate students, who have used many of the resources McCombs has provided and therefore have more reason to donate. The Legacy Campaign believes that increased participation of student donors will ultimately lead to higher alumni giving-rates, so concentrating on students that are closer to becoming alumni is more beneficial. The second inherent flaw is the execution of such a program. In 2014, there was an event called “Midnight Munchies,” in which

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to editor@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

From my experience, there has never been an active McCombs community due to a lack of large-scale community-building events. the committee members would offer food from Panera Bread in return for a suggested $1 donation at midnight in McCombs. Essentially, it was a bake sale fundraiser. But how does paying a dollar for a donut inspire me to donate as an alum? If I were hungry at midnight in the Reliant Productivity Center, I would be making that suggested donation out of hunger, not as a commitment to the campaign. Similarly, the Legacy Campaign was offering many T-shirts and tie pins with suggested donation amounts, but students were not donating to the campaign as much as buying a T-shirt. But the biggest flaw with the program is the community that it doesn’t build. From my experience, there has never been an active McCombs community because of a lack of largescale community-building events. The three events that bring students together are a freshman retreat, a legacy program and sporadic town halls. McCombs does not offer events designed to bring students together except through a giving campaign to increase alumni giving-rates and improve rankings. If McCombs truly wanted to improve rankings,it should offer more programs that benefit students. I understand the importance of alumni giving-rates. As a future alum, I would be inspired to give back to a program that has helped me. Without question, I would give back to McCombs, but not because of a legacy campaign that offers me donuts at midnight. Rather, I would give back for programs such as Millennium Lab, the career services department or events that can build a better and more inclusive community among McCombs students. I would give back for a better executed student-led alumni giving-campaign that actually helps foster the McCombs community. Rather than asking students to participate in this program, McCombs should increase the number of events that build a community for students and give them a reason to participate. Why not create a legacy that actually belongs to us? Sundaram is a business honors, finance and international relations sophomore from Austin.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@TexanEditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


SPORTS 5

5

STEFAN SCRAFIELD, SPORTS EDITOR / @texansports Friday, April 25, 2014

BASEBALL

Texas battles for first place in Big 12

SIDELINE NBA Playoffs PACERS

By Matt Warden @TheMattWarden5

If Texas wants to capture the Big 12 title this season, it has to do it this weekend. The No. 10 Longhorns (31-11, 9-6 Big 12) will host No. 21 Oklahoma State (2912, 11-4 Big 12) in a threegame series that will likely determine the conference champion. TCU swept Texas last weekend, and Texas will enter this weekend two games behind the Cowboys for the Big 12 lead. The Longhorns’ hitters were baffled by the Horned Frogs pitching staff last weekend but rebounded with a 5-4 win over UT-Pan American on Tuesday night. Oklahoma State doesn’t boast a dominant pitching staff, but its offense will truly test the Texas pitching staff, which leads the Big 12 with a combined 2.15 ERA. OSU hitters are hitting a combined .267 for the season while averaging just more than six runs per game. Texas pitchers are holding opposing offenses to just a .223 average this season and will need to be as sharp as they have been all season with three hitters batting over .300 for the ’Pokes. While the Longhorns were being throttled by TCU, scoring only one run the entire series, Oklahoma State swept the Jayhawks with 18 runs in three games. OSU

AUGIE

continues from page 1 “Runs determine the outcome of the game, not hits,” Garrido said. As of April 20, Texas leads the nation with 63 sacrifice bunts. “[You] got to get the bunt down anytime,” Garrido said. “The scope of our offensive game is good enough to beat anyone. We just have to execute. We aren’t anxious to make a lot of changes.” MENTAL TOUGHNESS “It’s the players’ minds and their ability to use them. That’s

HAWKS

THUNDER

GRIZZLIES

MLB METS

CARDINALS

ASTROS

Pu Ying Huang / Daily Texan Staff

Freshman first baseman Kacy Clemens has dazzled with his defensive play this season, currently holding a .988 fielding percentage on the season. Clemens is also hitting .236 at the plate.

WHAT TO WATCH OSU @ Texas

has lost only two of its last 14 conference games and will head into this series with the momentum to prevent Texas from winning a conference title. Although Texas will honor its seniors Sunday before game three, sophomore left fielder Ben Johnson will enter Friday as the hottest hitter in the Longhorn lineup. Johnson is coming off of a

2-for-3 and two RBI performance against UTPA and is currently third on the team with a .292 batting average. He also leads the team with five home runs this season. Senior star center fielder Mark Payton and pitcher Nathan Thornhill will be playing their last conference games at home this weekend. Payton leads the team with a .342 batting average while

leading the conference in onbase percentage (.471) and walks (34). Thornhill, who has been spectacular all season long, leads the Big 12 with a .97 ERA to go along with his 6-1 record. Each team has two more conference series after this weekend, but a solid showing from Texas could be the difference between a conference

title and a good year entering postseason play.

what makes the use of a bat, a ball and a glove, brilliant.” This offseason, Texas did not spend much time as a team in the cages or working on its defense. Rather, Garrido had them work on a bigger issue. “We spent all fall attacking our biggest problem from last year: the word ‘entitlement.’” Garrido is adamant about the importance of the mental side of the game. “They’ve been tested and the weaker and self-centered mentalities are gone,” Garrido said. For a group that finished

27-24-1 last season, it may not have been what they wanted to hear. But they embraced Garrido’s methods. “[He’s helped us on] being mentally tough,” sophomore outfielder Ben Johnson said. “He is also very inspiring. He can convince you to run through a brick wall.” After mastering what Garrido calls “the art of losing the one-run game” last season, Texas baseball is 8-2 in those games this year and 3-0 in games that go into extra innings.

than another classroom in the educational process. Really, baseball is a metaphor for life.” Garrido has developed 119 major league players and 16 of them were selected in the first round of the draft. He has coached 52 AllAmericans, four national players of the year, six College World Series MVPs, one Rhodes Scholar and four academic All-Americans at Texas. But Garrido says baseball is more than laying down bunts and hitting the cutoff man. He wants his players to

develop skills for life. “Baseball offers the opportunity to communicate on how to solve problems,” Garrido said. “That’s what matters. Baseball is a game of failure. Some of that is in life too.” Not only does Garrido teach life lessons, but he says he builds relationships with his players. “I recognize realities of where we are, what we are doing, problems they have,” Garrido said. “It’s about keeping the game fun. There is so much failure in baseball, you have to help them release.”

LIFE “Baseball is nothing more

MEN’S GOLF

@_JGrand_

Day: Friday Time: 7 p.m. On air: LHN

SOFTBALL

The regular season is over for the Longhorns, and, from this point on, all roads lead to Kansas, the site of the 2014 NCAA Men’s Golf Championships. First on the agenda for Texas, though, is this weekend’s Big 12 Championship at Whispering Pines Golf Club in Trinity. Texas heads into the weekend as the reigning Big 12 champion after it beat Oklahoma State by a 4-stroke margin in 2013. Freshmen Beau Hossler and Gavin Hall take

on their first collegiate championship in Trinity this weekend, but, if the regular season is any evidence, the two youngest golfers are ready for the challenge. Hossler, especially, demonstrates this preparation, coming off his first top-five finish ever two weeks ago in Santa Cruz, Calif., where he lead the Longhorns to their eighth-place finish. Senior Toni Hakula and junior Kramer Hickok return to the championship looking to stretch their Big 12 streak to two years, but the team’s veterans aren’t letting the

Daulton Venglar / Daily Texan file photo

Toni Hakula Senior

postseason pressure dictate anything for them. “I don’t feel like there’s any kind of extra pressure on my shoulders,” Hakula said. “Obviously, I want

GOLF page 7

WEEKEND PREVIEW

WOMEN’S GOLF / CAROLINE HALL Texas will host the 18th annual Big 12 Championship this weekend at the University of Texas Golf Club with first tee set for Friday morning. Currently at the peak of their season, the Longhorns are poised to make a strong showing this weekend, coming off of two consecutive top-10 finishes against ranked opponents at the SDSU Farms Invitational and the PING/ASU Invitational. The team, made up of

consistent season starters junior Bertine Strauss, sophomore Natalie Karcher, freshman Julia Beck, sophomore Tezira Abe and freshman Laura Weinstein, will face a tough lineup of strong Big 12 teams. Texas is the sixth seed, with Oklahoma, Oklahoma State and Iowa State rounding out the top three. Following the top three, who will kick off the action Friday at 8 a.m., Texas tees off at 8:50 alongside No. 4 Baylor and No. 5 Kansas.

Bertine Strauss Junior

No. 7 TCU, No. 8 Texas Tech and No. 9 Kansas will follow at 9:40 a.m.

Senior catcher Mandy Ogle has put together a stellar final campaign as a Longhorn, currently boasting a .309 batting average and seven home runs.

Horns look to make up ground in Big 12 By Scarlett Smith @ScarlettRSmith1

Texas returns to Big 12 competition Friday when it plays host to unranked Oklahoma State. Both teams enter the series above .500 on the season, with the Longhorns boasting a better conference record (7-3) than the Cowgirls (4-9). OSU looks to end a threegame skid after dropping consecutive games to Baylor and then Tulsa at home. Texas is coming off a 15-6 win over Texas State on Wednesday evening and hopes to continue its aggression at the plate against a vulnerable OSU pitching staff that has surrendered 18 runs in the past three games combined. Meanwhile, Texas batters are hitting a combined

TOP TWEET Mack Brown @UT_MackBrown

Longhorns seek their second consecutive conference title By James Grandberry

ATHLETICS

WHAT TO WATCH OSU @ Texas

Day: Friday Time: 4:30 p.m. On air: LHN

.345 against Big 12 opponents with seven of the nine regular starters hitting above .300. Offensive production figures to be key in a series where both pitching staffs have proven susceptible to late game collapses. The Longhorns are an impressive 21-0 when scoring at least six runs and 19-5 when recording 10 hits or more. Senior catcher Mandy

SOFTBALL page 7

“The problems of the world cannot possibly b solved by skeptics or cynics..We need men & women who can dream of things that never were.” JFK

SPORTS BRIEFLY Cowboys add veteran QB Hanie to roster

The Dallas Cowboys have added another quarterback with starting experience in Caleb Hanie. The signing of Hanie on Thursday gives the Cowboys three quarterbacks behind Tony Romo. Kyle Orton was Romo’s backup last year, and Dallas signed Brandon Weeden last month. Hanie, who didn’t play last year, spent four seasons with Chicago after signing as a non-drafted free agent in 2008. He started four games for the Bears, throwing for 679 yards with three touchdowns and 10 interceptions. The former Dallas-area high school quarterback spent the 2012 season as Denver’s third QB. Baltimore released Hanie at the end of training camp last year. He was on Cleveland’s roster for a week in December. —Associated Press

Rangers to promote, honor formor players

The Texas Rangers have appointed retired pitcher Darren Oliver as a special assistant to the general manager and announced plans to honor career-hits leader Michael Young. Oliver retired last fall after 20 major league seasons, 10 of them over three different stints with Texas. Oliver will work in a variety of areas with an emphasis on pitching. Even before Thursday’s announcements, Oliver had already been involved with the Rangers, including time at spring training. Young will be recognized in a pregame ceremony May 17 before a game against Toronto, the organization that traded him to Texas in 2000. Young made his major league debut at the end of that season and spent all but the last of his 13 years in the majors with the Rangers. —Associated Press


6 COMICS 6

Friday, April 25, 2014

COMICS

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Friday, April 25, 2014

Edited by Will Shortz

Crossword ACROSS 1 Spa supplies 7 Sir Henry ___, pioneer in steelmaking 15 Sulky 16 Getting-off point 17 Household 18 Drink made with tequila, rum, vodka, gin, bourbon, triple sec, sweet-andsour mix and Coke 19 Contractor’s fig. 20 Edward who was dubbed “The Dark Prophet” by Time magazine 22 Invoice nos. 23 Actor/director Schreiber 25 Standouts 26 2014’s “The ___ Movie” 27 Contribute 29 Mauna ___

30 Figure skater Kadavy 31 Breaks away from a defender 33 Feature of many a Duchamp work 34 Follow every rule 38 N.B.A.’s Gibson 39 Became tiresome 41 Formal dress option 44 Bush beast, briefly 45 “A Midsummer Night’s Scream” author 46 What can help you toward a peak performance? 47 Barbed spears for fishing 49 Classic work in Old Norse 50 Many Ph.D. candidates 51 Assesses 53 End: Abbr. 54 One learning how to refine oils?

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56 ___ Mouse 58 Renaissance woodwind 59 Fasts, perhaps 60 Nonviable 61 Engage in horseplay DOWN 1 Skype annoyance 2 Very unbalanced 3 Had the itch 4 Sustainable practices grp. 5 Durability 6 Anagram of “notes,” appropriately 7 Funny or Die web series hosted by Zach Galifianakis 8 Semicircular recess in Roman architecture 9 High rolls 10 Pollster Greenberg 11 High rollers 12 Big name in colonial Massachusetts 13 Cabinet department 14 “The natural organ of truth”: C. S. Lewis 21 Well-pitched 24 Tourist 26 1961 Michelangelo Antonioni drama 28 Away from 30 High rollers’ rollers

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32 Popular sandwich, informally 33 ___ usual 35 Dances onstage 36 “Hmm, ya got me” 37 More sympathetic 40 Most smart

41 Paper-clip, say 42 Pizza chain since 1956 43 Raise by digging

48 Shrub that produces a crimson-colored spice 51 Comic Mort 52 Kind of bread

44 Some T.S.A. confiscations

55 Abbr. on a letter to Paris, maybe

47 Enemy of Cobra

57 National Adoption Mo.

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CLASS 7

SPORTS

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Friday, April 25, 2014

TRACK & FIELD

WEEKEND PREVIEWS

Sophomore Courtney Okolo, pictured here during the Texas Relays n March, competed for the 4x400-meter Texas relay team that placed first in Thursday’s Penn Relays.

WOMEN’S TENNIS / CHRIS CARAVEO

Lauren Ussery Daily Texan Staff

Runners sprint their way to solid first day at Penn Relays By Daniel Clay @dclay567

Thursday marked the beginning of the Penn Relays in Philadelphia, which provides the Longhorns with their final big challenge three weeks before the start of postseason competition. Senior sprinter Danielle Dowie kicked off the meet for the No. 3 women with a third place finish in the 400-meter hurdles. Dowie already held the ninth best 400-meter hurdle time in the nation coming into the meet, but her strong finish against some elite competition shows flashes of the

consistency that head coach Mario Sategna expects for his top athletes this weekend. “There is a long history of Texas attending Penn Relays,” Sategna said in a statement. “For us, this is a meet that helps put the final touches on getting ready for the championship portion of our season.” The 4x400-meter relay team of senior Briana Nelson, sophomore Courtney Okolo, freshman Kendall Baisden and junior Ashley Spencer showed that the team is ready for the postseason. The team had a score to settle with Oregon after the Longhorns fell just short of an indoor national championship after

finishing second to the Ducks in the 4x400. Fueled by its past loss, Texas trounced Oregon by almost three seconds en route to a first place finish in the 4x400-meter heats. The men did not compete until late Thursday evening with the 3,000-meter steeplechase. Senior distance runner Austin Roth got the men started off with a 10th place finish in the field of 34 competitors. The men also competed in the 5,000-meter and the 10,000-meter late Thursday night, and will see the bulk of their action as the Penn Relays continue Friday and Saturday.

GOLF continues from page 5 to do great and I want to finish strong in my college career, but I know that putting too much pressure on myself is just [going to] hurt myself and the team.” Gaining the No. 3 seed, the Longhorns’ fifth conference title is not going to be a simple stroll to

UNS AD IRNE FOR ONL

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the 18th hole, with tough such competition as No. 1 Oklahoma and No. 2 Oklahoma State gunning for the same prize. “We know it’s [going to] be a tough test,” Hakula said. Texas isn’t looking back anymore, though. That

time has passed, and winning is the only objective left; an objective that, according to Hakula, is within their grasp. “That’s our only target — to go out there and win this week,” Hakula said. “And I feel like we can do it for sure.”

After a back-andforth regular season, the Longhorns head into the Big 12 Tournament this weekend as the No. 3 seed when they meet sixth-seeded TCU. Texas (11-11, 6-3 Big 12) may be heading into the tournament with two consecutive conference losses, but the team has a couple of reasons to be confident that it will be a factor in the tournament. First, they have won the last two Big 12 Championships as either the

third or fourth seed. Also, their losses to Oklahoma State and Baylor could have gone either way with both matches ending in a 4-3 decision. A rematch against either or both teams in the tournament might also be close. The Horned Frogs, who defeated Texas 5-2 in the conference opener, stand in the way of the Longhorns advancing past the quarterfinals. This match between Texas and TCU was also close, as the Longhorns had an opportunity

Lina Padegimaite Junior

to win the doubles point. Texas and TCU will begin play Friday in Fort Worth at 3 p.m.

MEN’S TENNIS / BRIANNA HOLT The regular season of the Big 12 Conference has come to an end, but the Longhorns are not finished competing. Saturday will mark the beginning of the Big 12 Men’s Tennis Championship in Fort Worth. Just last week Texas defeated Texas Tech 5-1, sealing the Big 12 regular season title, along with Baylor and Oklahoma. Texas has only lost two of its last 13 matches, bringing the team to an

No. 7 ITA ranking. The team has been in the national top-10 in nine of the last 10 ITA polls. In addition to their ranking, the Longhorns have earned the No. 2 seed in the Big 12 Championship. “All the guys are excited about the opportunity this weekend and we are looking to carry the momentum from the regular season into the conference tournament and come away with another

David Holiner Senior

Big 12 title,” junior Jacoby Lewis said.

SOFTBALL continues from page 5 Ogle has been on a hot streak as of late, hitting .500 over her last nine games. Most recently against Texas State, Ogle went 2-for-4 with a double and two RBIs while extending her hitting streak to nine games. Sophomore outfielder Stephanie Ceo is also coming off a big night at the plate where she went 1-for-3 with an RBI to add to her 19 for the season. Texas currently sits in second place in the Big 12, trailing Oklahoma by four games. Baylor and Texas Tech are

close behind with six wins apiece, while OSU ranks second-to-last just above Iowa State. Butn Texas leads the league in team batting average and ranks fifth in pitching with a combined ERA of 2.98 through 10 games. Freshman pitcher Tiarra Davis is likely to get the start for the Longhorns, continuing her impressive rookie campaign. Head coach Connie Clark remarked prior to opening Big 12 competition against Baylor that Davis was the team’s ace and

CLASSIFIEDS THE DAILY TEXAN

would be relied on as the primary pitcher. Davis has delivered so far, pitching the Longhorns to a winning record and within reach of the conference title. Davis has recorded 145 strikeouts over 147.1 innings pitched to lead the team. With only Kansas and Baylor remaining for the Longhorns following this weekend’s action, Clark’s squad could very easily move into first place if Oklahoma falters down the stretch.

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HANNAH SMOTHERS, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR / @DailyTexanArts Friday, April 25, 2014

FOOD

Nonprofit teaches language through food By Kritika Kulshrestha

Members of the nonprofit Cooking Up Cultures learn different languages from the recipes they use in their cooking classes.

@kritika88

Daniel Heron has no interest in being a commercial cook. The UT alum and Austin-based entrepreneur believes that food goes beyond the industry — it is a platform for different cultures to connect and understand each other. Heron is an instructor at Austin-based Cooking Up Cultures, a nonprofit that offers a fusion of language and cooking classes. These classes allow participants to learn a language in a kitchen environment, using food as a way to understand the basics of a language quickly. When he studied at UT, Heron co-founded The Food Lab, a UT think tank that generates awareness about food systems, food justice issues and food politics. He also created the UT Food Studies Project, which allows students to focus on how food can be used to control nations and how to think about food from different angles. Heron, who considers himself a food-loving global citizen, said he first discovered his passion for languages and culture during his time in Latin America. “From my experience in Brazil, in poverty, some of the foods that we eat in abundance and with ease here in the U.S. can be really used as a method of helping your brain deal with your economic status,” Heron said. Heron is also the brainchild behind a monthly soup party called “Global Soup,” which he said he started to celebrate Austin’s diversity.

Photo courtesy of Miguel Angel Lopez

Each month, Heron and the team at Cooking Up Cultures choose one language and cuisine to highlight, and a local chef prepares a soup based on a recipe from that chosen culture. This month, “Global Soup” celebrates Latin American culture with chefs from Austin’s El Naranjo restaurant cooking a black bean soup with pasilla de Oaxaca chiles. The soup party will be Sunday at in.gredients, an East Austin zero-waste microgrocer. “We wanted to do more outreach events,” Cooking Up Cultures founder Casey Smith said. “Even if you don’t want to sign up for an

entire class, you can still experience the cross-cultural influences through one monthly event.” Currently, Cooking Up Cultures offers language learning classes in English and Spanish with “Cooking Up Arabic” beginning in May and other classes in French, Russian and Chinese that will be launched soon. “We have so many languages in the world today, so we were thinking about which ones we are were going to focus on,” Heron said. Smith and Heron decided that the easiest way to choose the languages they wanted to offer would be by choosing

the six official languages of the United Nations. Food, for Heron, is a way to overcome the common fear of other cultures. “Moving to Texas was a radical change for me,” Heron said. “I was an obese person for most of my childhood. I knew my mom wasn’t going to cook for me anymore. Once I began cooking, I started seeing the world through the lens of food, in everything that I did. I now want to use food as a platform to build community and bridge cultures.” Immersion-styled language learning is what makes “Cooking Up English” and

“Cooking Up Spanish” a fun experience, according to Heron. “This way, no matter where you are at, you are always going to get something out of it,” Heron said. The five-week classes have been structured to allow people to start learning recipes from day two of the class. Participants are discouraged from translating from English or Spanish to their native languages and are allowed to do so only when they truly do not understand what the instructor is asking them to do. Spanish instructor and Cooking Up Cultures board member Adriana De La

GLOBAL SOUP When: Sunday, 5 p.m. Where: in.gredients Cost: $5-$15

Cuadra said the whole idea of the class is to learn as you go along. Cuadra, an Austin entrepreneur, is also co-founder of Lista, a web application to make it easier for people to cook at home. “Language brings you closer to cultures,” Cuadra said. “The combination of cooking and language classes brings out the complexity of a culture through cooking.”

Netflix lands its first Storytelling defines pro wrestling group US cable agreement CITY

By David Sackllah @dsackllah

Professional wrestling can serve as a medium for writers to compose elaborate stories, much like books or films. Even though it is presented to audiences as if they are watching a live sport, the setting is more of a backdrop for authors to craft compelling and entertaining tales that happen to take place within a ring instead of on a stage. For Max Meehan, creative director for the Austinbased company Inspire Pro Wrestling, the challenge of crafting story lines in a constrained environment is part of what drew him to that world. “There are arcs and tropes and things that are common with what you’ll see on any screen,” Meehan said. “When it’s done right, the characters grow and evolve through the stories you tell.” Justin Bissonnette and Joshua Montgomery founded Inspire Pro Wrestling in 2013. Montgomery, who has worked in wrestling since he started performing and booking shows at age 17, had the idea to start his own company after he became frustrated working with other organizations. In his experience, shows would often throw six or seven matches together on a given night without implementing any sense of continuity in the storytelling that would hook audiences in to returning. “A lot of places weren’t giving me or my really talented peers a good creative outlet to express a good story line or deliver something that the fans could really get into,” Montgomery said. Montgomery came up

with the idea to start Inspire Pro in 2012 and reached out to Bissonnette, who had been working with the Austin-based company Anarchy Championship Wrestling since 2007. Originally, the idea was to put on shows in small oil towns, but the logistics didn’t quite work out. That’s when Bissonnette came up with the idea of putting on the shows in Austin. He reached out to Meehan, who had experience running concerts in Austin as a manager at Beerland, and the three started Inspire Pro. They worked to innovate Inspire Pro by focusing on storytelling and physicality. “There’s a way that everyone in the wrestling business had decided how things should be done, and they just kind of stick with that cookie-cutter mentality,” Bissonnette said. “When I got together with Max, he started challenging me to try something out of the box.” The way Meehan explained it, being a pro wrestler is a lot like being in a band. “Say a guy in New York or Pennsylvania has a gig they book down here,” Meehan said. “A lot of those guys will hit different promotions as they make their way down to Texas and make money along the way.” While the storytelling and continuity is an integral part of how Inspire Pro operates, Montgomery stresses that the shows are fairly selfexplanatory and easy to pick up on for newcomers. “If Sunday is your first inspire Pro show that you attend, you may not understand what’s going on at first, but by the end of it you’ll have a clear understanding of who’s who,” Montgomery said. “It’s not like a Stephen King novel,

Photo courtesy of Joel Loechman

Inspire Pro Wrestling seeks to intertwine the wrestlers’ backstories into matches to increase entertainment value.

where you open it up in the middle of the book and have no idea what’s going on.” The wrestling matches are filled with diverse characters such as The Great Depression and The Red Scare, two masked figures with elaborate and mysterious backstories. A typical fight will feature multiple matches with characters like these taunting each other before fighting, much like larger pro wrestling organizations such as World Wrestling Entertainment. What Bissonnette believes Inspire Pro is doing differently from other independent wrestling organizations is focusing on theatricality. “It’s a little goofy, but we present it in a very serious manner,” Bissonnette said.

As for Austin, the company has found success in what the owners see as a growing market. They had just more than 100 people at their first show a year ago, and their most recent show in February brought in over 350 people. All three of the owners believe that the market in Austin for wrestling is making a comeback. While some wrestling companies seek to take their show on the road as they grow larger, Bissonnette explained that they want to focus on their core market in the city. “We really think that everything we need is here in Austin,” Bissonnette said. “The Austin wrestling community is one of the best wrestling communities in the world, and I want to see that continue to grow.”

SAN FRANCISCO — Netflix’s Internet video service is about to join the programming lineup of three small cable TV providers in the U.S., a breakthrough that acknowledges the growing popularity of online entertainment. The agreements with Atlantic Broadband, RCN Telecom Services and Grande Communications gives Netflix’s subscription service a channel on the TiVo boxes that the three cable services provide their customers. Netflix will debut on Atlantic and RCN on Monday and then will expand on to Grande’s service by end of next month. Netflix already had landed spots on the cable TV boxes of services in England, Denmark and Sweden, but hadn’t been able to make similar inroads in the U.S. until now. The company’s nearly 36 million U.S. subscribers typically have to buy a separate device, such as video game console or a player from Roku or Apple Inc., if they want to stream video on to their TVs. Now, Netflix will be like any other channel on the cable TV dial except that it

relies on a high-speed Internet connection to deliver its video. “We think this signals a new generation of cable TV service of offerings,” said David Isenberg, Atlantic’s chief marketing and strategy officer. “It’s a watershed moment.” He likened what Netflix is doing for Internet video to what HBO did for cable TV when that service began transmitting through satellites in the early 1970s. Netflix has been striving to become more HBO-like since it expanded upon its DVD-by-mail service and began offering Internet streaming seven years ago. In the past two years, the Los Gatos, California, company has been featuring more original programming, such as the critically acclaimed “House of Cards” and “Orange Is The New Black,” to persuade more U.S. subscribers to pay $8 per month for its service. To help pay for its rising programming costs, Netflix plans to raise its prices by $1 or $2 by July. The higher prices initially will only affect new customers. —Associated Press

Nathaniel E. Bell / Associated Press

Kevin Spacey (left) as Francis Underwood and Robin Wright as Clair Underwood in “House of Cards.” Netflix will join the lineup of three cable providers, including Grande Communications.


The Daily Texan 2014-04-25