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NEWS PAGE 3

SPORTS PAGE 6

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Tuesday, April 8, 2014

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CIVIL RIGHTS SUMMIT

Local police prepare for arrivals of presidents By Julia Brouillette @juliakbrou

Marisa Kent, co-director of the Queer Students Alliance and marketing junior, said she was happy with Obama’s support for gay marriage and believes the summit will educate students about gay rights. “I think we’re at a pivotal moment for the future of the queer movement right now, with a lot of the legislation

In the weeks leading up to the Civil Rights Summit, city and campus police have worked closely with each other and the Secret Service to plan security procedures for every moment of the presidents’ trip to UT. The summit, which will be held in the Lady Bird Johnson Auditorium, will feature 46 panelists and speeches by Presidents Barack Obama, Bill Clinton, Jimmy Carter and George W. Bush. Bob Harkins, who serves as associate vice president for campus safety and security, said security preparation began immediately after the event was announced about a month ago. “It’s the type of thing where you always say, ‘I wish we’d had more time,’” Harkins said. “But you do what you’ve got to do in the time limits you’re given.” Harkins said UTPD will use all available resources over the course of the threeday summit.

SUMMIT page 2

SECURITY page 2

Pu Ying Huang / Daily Texan Staff

(From left) Maureen Clark, global chair for Against Cruel Trafficking, Reva Davis, Black Student Alliance president, and Heriberto Perez, historian for the University Leadership Initiative, all feel the Civil Rights Summit provides an opportunity to talk about rights as they relate to a wide range of groups.

Students use summit to speak up By Nicole Cobler @nicolecobler

As the University prepares for the Civil Rights Summit, a number of student organizations agree that civil rights — including issues of immigration, LGBTQ rights, human trafficking and equality for African-American students — are still a topic for discussion today.

Heriberto Perez, historian for the University Leadership Initiative and radio-television-film and computer science senior, said he hopes students will consider immigration issues after the threeday-long event, in which Presidents Barack Obama, Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush will reflect on the history of civil rights since the Civil Rights

Act passed 50 years ago and discuss what can be done to improve the rights of Americans today. According to an investigation by The New York Times published Sunday, since Obama took office, two-thirds of the two million deportation cases involve people who had committed minor infractions or had no criminal record at all. Perez said this number

was alarming to him and needed to be discussed at the summit. “President Obama is giving a speech on Thursday, but it’s pretty pointless if he is talking about civil rights but not doing anything about it,” Perez said. “President Obama’s administration deported so many people, and that, to me, is violating their civil rights.”

UT’s first LGBTQ group set precedents By Eleanor Dearman @EllyDearman

After complaint, panel to represent disabled By Adam Hamze

While pursuing a psychology degree, Wendell Jones, a member of UT’s first gay student organization, was told by his adviser he should not pursue the degree since being gay made him unfit to give psychological advice to others. This type of discrimination led to the formation of the Gay Liberation Front, also known as GLF, UT’s first gay student activist group in early 1970. In addition to protests and rallies, the group hosted the first GLF conference in spring of 1971, which brought together gay liberation groups

@adamhamz

Photo courtesy of Cactus Yearbook

In this 1972 photo, five members of the Gay Liberation Front remained in the Union BallLGBTQ page 8 room against police orders.

After the National Council on Disability released a statement Friday addressing the lack of a panel on disabilities in the upcoming Civil Rights Summit, Mark Updegrove, director of the LBJ Library and Museum, announced Monday that a speaker is being added to the “Social Justice in the 21st Century” panel to address discrimination against citizens with disabilities. Speaking at a press briefing, Updegrove said the Civil Rights Summit will now include Lex Frieden, who played a significant role in the formation of the Americans with Disabilities

Act and will speak Thursday at 2:05 p.m. Updegrove said the summit originally did not address citizens with disabilities because of time constraints. “I can say [that], when we were fleshing out the agenda for this, we had limited slots for different panel positions,” Updegrove said. The statement posted on the National Council on Disability website expressed the group’s displeasure with the summit’s original decision to not include representation for the community of Americans with disabilities. “The National Council on Disability, an independent

DISABILITY page 3

WEST CAMPUS

Storm causes collapse of unfinished West Campus complex By Julia Brouillette

People on the street were yelling at us, ‘Come out! Come out! It’s safe to get out,’ so we jumped over a lot of scraps of metal to get out of the car.

Scaffolding on a construction site collapsed in West Campus near 24th and San Gabriel streets Monday evening, trapping a vehicle underneath the rubble. The scaffolding was attached to the Regents West at 24th apartment building, which is currently under construction. Austin Police Department Cpl. Michael Chancellor said inclement weather may have caused the collapse.

“They’re not sure right now if it’s weather related. … Apparently, they had another scaffolding collapse downtown as well,” Chancellor said. “I don’t know the extent of it.” Four Austin Fire Department units, one Travis County ambulance and multiple APD officers arrived on the scene, but no one was hurt, Chancellor said. Four people were inside the vehicle when the scaffolding gave way. Madlyne Rodriguez, who sat in the back seat, said the incident happened

in a matter of seconds. “It was windy, very windy,” Rodriguez said. “The light was green, so we were just driving by when we heard a booming noise, and we heard the first piece of wood hit the car. I told my husband

to hurry up and drive, but we got caught and the whole thing just collapsed.” Rodriguez said she and her family exited the car through the passenger side doors.

NEWS

OPINION

SPORTS

LIFE&ARTS

ONLINE

Report: Regent Hall may have overstepped duties. PAGE 2

We Asked: Is civil rights discussion still needed? PAGE 4

Texas baseball prepares for rematch with Rice. PAGE 6

LG candidate Van de Putte holds West Mall rally. PAGE 3

Students shouldn’t rely on UT for housing help. PAGE 4

Senior Mark Payton on his way to join Texas greats. PAGE 6

Two UT students discuss their lead roles in UT’s production of “In the Heights.”

Watch a primer on the Civil Rights Summit that will be taking place over the next three days.

PAGE 8

dailytexanonline.com

@ juliakbrou

—Madlyne Rodriguez, Passenger in vehicle

COLLAPSE page 2

Jonathan Garza / Daily Texan Staff

Scaffolding attached to the Regents West on 24th construction site collapsed and trapped a vehicle Monday evening.

REASON TO PARTY

PAGE 7


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Tuesday, April 8, 2014

FRAMES featured photo

COLLAPSE

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor-in-Chief Laura Wright (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Shabab Siddiqui (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

CORRECTION A story about venue seating for the Civil Rights Summit in the April 7 issue of The Daily Texan included a quotation containing a factually imprecise impression of campus history. The first black students admitted to UT enrolled more than 50 years ago in fall 1956.

CLARIFICATION A story about diversity in the Student Government Executive Board in the April 7 issue of The Daily Texan included a quotation that was not accurate. There are two non-white Universitywide representatives: Taral Patel and Shannon Geison.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2013 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER Low High

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Were you having bug, or were you just trying to fun me?

Jarrid Denman / Daily Texan Staff

Undeclared freshman Rodney Bravo studies outside of the LBJ Library on Monday afternoon.

SECURITY

SUMMIT continues from page 1 that has been passed and having the backing of the president,” Kent said. Kent said the event was a good step forward for students on campus. “I think that it will open students’ eyes to what’s going on around campus,” Kent said. “It’s also one of those things giving college students access to hear and understand why this is important.” In December 2013, Obama issued a press release shining the spotlight on human trafficking and promised to crack down on traffickers. Obama also proclaimed January as National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month. Maureen Clark, global chair for Against Cruel Trafficking and government junior, said she saw the fight against human trafficking among Obama, Clinton and Carter and hopes these issues of civil rights will be addressed at the Summit. “I think, unfortunately, they will be relevant for a very long time, and it’s only when we say they’re not relevant anymore that it gives people room to act in a way that’s not appropriate,” Clark said. “I think we need to keep pushing. The fight is never over.” Among other student organizations pushing for continuous discussions of civil rights is the Black Stu-

dent Alliance. Reva Davis, Black Student Alliance president and African and African diaspora studies senior, said the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act brings the chance to address the racial tensions she has noticed on campus. In the fall, there were 2,337 black students enrolled at UT out of a total of 52,059 students — or about 4.5 percent — according to the Office of Information Management and Analysis. “The retention of black students has been somewhat mediocre,” Davis said. “However, the University has promised to uphold its standard of diversity and ensuring its students have the opportunity to learn in a diverse atmosphere.”

continues from page 1 “We’ve got to cover the entire event for three days, so everyone is participating,” Harkins said. “Other law enforcement agencies around, for example the Capitol Police Department and DPS, will help us with traffic control.” The Secret Service met with University and LBJ Library officials and will be coordinating up until the start of the summit, according to Harkins. “Between the University of Texas personnel and the LBJ Library, there are maybe 35 to 40 people involved in various aspects of the planning and preparation, and that’ll go almost up to the last minute,” Harkins said. APD Sgt. Jeff Crawford

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UTPD and basically have a division of labor, and say ‘OK, here’s what you’re going to handle, and here’s what we’re going to handle,’” Crawford said. “That way we’re not duplicating efforts and everybody’s got their area to deal with. UTPD handles security at any venue on UT grounds, and we usually handle the route or deal with the motorcade getting him from point A to point B.” Crawford said that, ultimately, most of the decisions pertaining to security are made by the Secret Service. “In the end, all of us are supplementing the Secret Service,” Crawford said. “It’s kind of their show. They make the majority of the calls, but we have a good working relationship with them and they work really well with us.”

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Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christina Breitbeil, Adam Hamze, Nicole Stiles, Jeremy Thomas, Alex Wilts Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jarrid Denman, Michelle Toussaint, Amy Zhang Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Leffler, Jeremy Thomas Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Charity Chukwu, Tara Frels, Taiki Miki Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shannon Butler, Calhan Hale, Holly Hansel, Andy McMahon, Isabella Palacios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Annyston Pennington, Riki Tsuji, Bethany Wong Columnist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ali Breland Page Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aleigh Romito Editorial Cartoonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill

said working with the Secret Service requires extra flexibility from law enforcement. “Up until a week or two out, we may not even know what the route will be because, as you can imagine with the White House, things change daily,” Crawford said. “We’ve literally had it where they’re putting the president in the car to go to the next stop, and we get an ‘OK, route’s changing. We’re going to this location,’ and we’re having to scramble and adjust and go to a whole new location that we may not have been planning on. We have to be very adaptable.” Crawford said, while APD will be involved in the overall security coverage for the summit, UTPD will handle most of the security surrounding the LBJ Library. “We coordinate with

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This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25 Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Wright Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala, Riley Brands, Amil Malik, Eric Nikolaides Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shabab Siddiqui Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan Rudner Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Antonia Gales, Anthony Green, Jacob Kerr, Pete Stroud, Amanda Voeller Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Julia Brouillette, Nicole Cobler, Alyssa Mahoney, Madlin Mekelburg Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Reinsch Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brett Michaels Donohoe, Reeana Keenen, Kevin Sharifi Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Mitts Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hirrah Barlas, Bria Benjamin, Alex Dolan, Omar Longoria Multimedia Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charlie Pearce, Alec Wyman Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sam Ortega Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jonathan Garza, Shweta Gulati, Pu Ying Huang, Shelby Tauber, Lauren Ussery Senior Videographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jackie Kuenstler, Dan Resler, Bryce Seifert Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Smothers Associate Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren L’Amie Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Eleanor Dearman, Kritika Kulshrestha, David Sackllah, Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stefan Scrafield Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Hummer Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Evan Berkowitz, Garrett Callahan, Jori Epstein, Matt Warden Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Hadidi Roommate to the Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riki Tsuji Senior Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cody Bubenik, Ploy Buraparate, Connor Murphy, Aaron Rodriguez, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephanie Vanicek Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeremy Hintz Associate Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarah Stancik Senior Technical Staff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Shen, Roy Varney Special Ventures Co-editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard, Chris Hummer Online Outreach Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fred Tally-Foos Journalism Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Michael Brick

“People on the street were yelling at us, ‘Come out! Come out! It’s safe to get out,’ so we jumped over a lot of scraps of metal to get out of the car,” Rodriguez said. Chris Cordeiro, an employee of JE Dunn Construction, which is constructing the Regents West building, said it’s not uncommon for strong winds to bring down scaffolding from buildings. “Scaffolds, if you get a strong enough wind that catches something just right, it’s kind of like a domino: One little thing gives and the wind catches it,” Cordeiro said. “Then it can come down.” “You try to make it as safe as you can and make sure everything is secure, but, with the forces of nature, sometimes you

can’t stop it.” A net below the scaffolding is used to prevent pieces of scaffolding or construction tools from falling onto the streets, according to Cordeiro. “The blue safety netting keeps things from falling on people, but it’s possible that the wind blew hard enough to catch on that, especially if it was wet,” Cordeiro said. Austin Energy personnel inspected the power lines near the site before a crew arrived to remove the collapsed scaffolding. Nariah Back, who witnessed the incident from across the street, said the noise of the scaffolding hitting the car scared her. “I didn’t know how tall that building was or how much was going to fall down,” Back said. “I was really concerned about people who might have been walking by.”

continues from page 1

Volume 114, Issue 136

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NEWS BRIEFLY Report: Hall committed impeachable offenses

A draft of the report prepared by the Texas House of Representatives’ transparency committee indicates that UT System Regent Wallace Hall likely committed impeachable offenses after becoming a member of the UT System Board of Regents, as reported by the San Antonio ExpressNews and Houston Chronicle. According to the draft of the report, obtained by the San Antonio Express-News and Houston Chronicle, Hall released student information in violation of federal privacy acts. The draft of the report states he manipulated the House Committee on Transparency in State Agency Operations’ investigation and coerced its witnesses. The draft of the report stated Hall continued to undermine the reputation of President William Powers Jr. after the committee asked him to stop, according to reports from the San Antonio Express-News and Houston Chronicle. Rusty Hardin, special counsel for the committee and author of the report, said the draft was sent to state Reps. Dan Flynn, R-Canton, and Carol Alvarado, D-Houston, the cochairs of the committee, last Tuesday. Hardin said the other members of the committee received the report Friday, and a final report will be released to the public after the committee discusses the draft. According to Hardin, the contract between his law firm, Rusty Hardin & Associates, LLP, and the transparency committee expired March 31. According to the San Antonio Express-News and Houston Chronicle, the report includes copies of emails Hall sent to members of the board stating Powers’ termination would be easy to overcome. The transparency committee has been investigating Hall since July 2013 for potentially overstepping his duties as a regent. He has been accused by some members of the state legislature as conducting a “witch hunt” against Powers. Allan Van Fleet, Hall’s attorney, said he has no comment about the San Antonio Express-News and Houston Chronicle report. —Madlin Mekelburg


W&N 3

NEWS

3

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

CAMPUS

Van de Putte bus tour ends in West Mall By Jeremy Thomas @jeremyobthomas

In a rally on the West Mall on Monday, state Sen. Leticia Van de Putte, D-San Antonio and the Democratic candidate for lieutenant governor, said bipartisan approaches to issues such as higher education are necessary in Texas state government. The rally marked the last stop on Van de Putte’s statewide bus tour, which covered 16 cities in nine days. In the general election in November, Van de Putte will face either state Sen. Dan Patrick, R-Houston, or incumbent Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, depending on the result of a runoff election between the two Republican candidates that is scheduled for May 27. “I heard loud and clear that what people want from their leaders is to focus on the priorities,” Van de Putte said. “Focus on problem solving and not partisan pettiness and politics that absolutely paralyze, like what we sometimes see in Washington D.C.”

Van de Putte said, 10 years ago, the business community, the Texas Legislature and state universities all worked together in efforts to have more tier-one, postsecondary institutions. She said that, because of the way the legislature has handled higher education since then, that goal has not materialized. “You know, I know, and smart business people know the innovations and the programs, the learning that happens at our tier-one institutions, spark the economy,” Van de Putte said. “They give birth to your creative minds that are going to go out and have new products and services, new research and new and better ways to get things done.” David Feigen, government senior and University Democrats president, said Republican candidates for lieutenant governor stand in the way of basic reforms of education, marriage inequality and immigration policy. “This campus is very much ready for change in the lieutenant governor’s

Shweta Gulati / Daily Texan Staff

Democratic lieutenant governor nominee Leticia Van de Putte speaks on the West Mall on Monday evening.

office,” Feigen said. Sheryl Cole, Austin mayor pro tem and a Democrat, said it is historically significant to have two women at the top of the Democratic ticket. “I think they will bring a balance to statewide politics,” Cole said. “I think [Van de Putte] brings a lot

of vibrancy and energy that young people understand and appreciate.” During the rally, Van de Putte said she hopes to unite everyone as Texans. “I see the hopes of your parents and the prayers of your grandparents,” Van de Putte said. “So, as

Democrats, I want us to all embrace these folks who are understanding our true values and what we’re focused on is the opportunity that’s always been Texas, not the issues that divide us, but the issues that make us stronger when we focus on what’s right for Texas.”

RESEARCH

Researchers: Trace amounts of toxins found in cribs By Nicole Stiles @nicolestiles42

UT researchers found chemical emissions in plastic and foam in baby cribs after conducting studies about infant sleeping environments. Civil engineering graduate student Brandon Boor led the research, which began about a year ago. Boor said his interest in the matter was sparked by the amount of time babies spend sleeping, potentially being exposed to chemicals. “Babies spend about 1214 hours per day sleeping,”

Boor said. “When you’re looking at exposure to various air pollutants, most of it occurs in that space.” Boor said he collected used and new crib mattresses for sampling. “I bought new mattresses on Amazon and collected old mattresses from around Austin that were donated to me,” Boor said. “I cut them into a smaller size and measured the amount of various chemicals in the foam and on the cover.” According to Ying Xu, architectural engineering assistant professor and a research assistant for the

study, the team simulated infants’ breathing patterns and body temperature to assess the chemical emissions from the cribs. “The chamber was roomsized,” Xu said. “The mattress was stored in there, and we placed a heated mannequin to simulate an infant. Then we collected the information from the infant’s inhalation zone.” Xu said testing the inhalation zone, versus the air in the infant’s room, proved to have an impact on their findings. “We found that the concentration of chemicals in

the inhalation zone is twice as much as the regular air concentration,” Xu said. According to Atila Novoselac, architectural engineering associate professor and a research assistant for the study, the levels of toxicities that were found in the mattresses are not cause for panic. “The levels are higher than expected, but they are not alarming,” Novoselac said. “No reason to go burn all the mattresses.” The study looked into the emission of less potent toxicities, which are only harmful in extremely high concentrations, according to Xu.

“The emission rate is similar to that of vinyl flooring or cleaning products, so it is not that harmful,” Xu said. “But, in our following study, we will be looking into more toxic chemicals, like those from flame retardants and other chemicals that are toxic, especially for children.” According to Boor, there are no direct implications of the study, but it will lay groundwork for further research. “There is already a low volatile organic compound labeling system in the U.S., but it could help raise awareness about chemicals in baby products,” Boor said.

DISABILITY

continues from page 1 federal agency whose 15 members are appointed by the President, urges the LBJ Presidential Library to take this opportunity to include the perspectives and contributions [of] 54 million Americans with disabilities in keeping our collective eyes on the prize for every American still subject to discrimination,” the National Council on Disability said. The Americans with Disabilities Act was passed on July 26, 1990, and aims to guarantee equal opportunities for those with disabilities in employment, public accommodations, transportation, telecommunications and state and local government services. The act is enforced through an unfunded mandate, which means states are not given resources to meet the requirements. An upcoming conference at Texas A&M celebrating the ADA played a part in the decision to leave this aspect of civil rights out of the Summit, Updegrove said, expressing his regret for the original decision. “Right up the road in College Station, there is going to be a conference celebrating the 25th anniversary of the George H. W. Bush administration, and, on their agenda, there was something about ADA,” Updegrove said. “I thought that, if they were addressing that, we would address other issues involving civil rights. It was probably a little shortsighted on my part.” Maya Henry, assistant professor in the department of communication sciences and disorders, said the government is not doing enough to aid many people with neurodegenerative diseases. “I think we could do a lot better, in terms of the population that I work with, in terms of how to help them with long term rehabilitation and reintegration into the community after their brain injuries,” Henry said. “They’re massively overlooked. Insurance runs out, and they’re not covered, and they don’t get any help.”

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4A OPINION

4

LAURA WRIGHT, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / @TexanEditorial Tuesday, April 8, 2014

WE ASKED

We asked: Is civil rights discussion still needed? Editor’s Note: As the Civil Rights Summit gets into full swing Tuesday, we were interested in students’ thoughts on the importance of civil rights today. We hit the West Mall on Monday to find out. Below are some of their responses. Alicia Kiattinat, psychology junior Daily Texan: Do you think it’s still important to talk about civil rights? Alicia Kiattinat: I would say so. I mean, you know that quote, “If you don’t study history, you’re bound to repeat it?” I think that really applies, in that everybody should still be talking about the relevant issues because, if you don’t talk about it, it’s still an issue. DT: What’s the civil rights issue that you think affects students the most right now? AK: I would say, maybe, equal treatment of everyone. Maybe, like, what is the phrase, every race should be given an equal chance? To get into college and everything. Sorry, I really can’t remember the phrase; I got like two hours of sleep. Abraham Bankole, chemistry junior Daily Texan: Do you think civil rights are

[Civil rights are still important] because everyone is still trying to get to that equal ... everyone wants to feel accepted, and nobody wants to feel neglected or discriminated against. So it’s important to make sure that everybody feels equal. —Abraham Bankole, Chemistry junior

still an important thing to be talked about? AB: Yes, because everyone is still trying to get to that equal. … Everyone wants to feel accepted, and nobody wants to feel neglected or discriminated against. So it’s important to make sure that everybody feels equal, whether it’s women, or, you know, outside minorities or things like that. DT: What’s a civil rights issue that you think really affects issues today? AB: One of the biggest civil rights things that still needs addressing is, I feel like, the whole sexual orientation. … It’s not a truly equal stand yet. I feel like us, as African-Americans, have come a long way, but we still do get discriminated subtly. Jacey Rudy, Latin junior Daily Texan: Do you think that civil rights is still a conversation worth having even in 2014? JR: Well its still an issue, even though the people in sight have changed mostly. DT: What do you think the biggest civil rights issue is for students at UT today? JR: For students, just probably affirmative action, both the positives and negatives of it because, as a program, it’s not succeeding both getting people who aren’t able to get into college. Ian Carbone, geography senior Daily Texan: Do you think civil rights are still an important thing to be talked about? IC: Yes. These are people we’re talking about. If they’re being held back by society in any way, you know they’re people, and it’s an important issue that we need to take care of. DT: What’s the biggest civil rights issue that affects students right now? IC: I don’t know. DT: You can name a few if that helps. IC: I have no idea; I don’t know. [Laughs.] Grace McDonald, accounting junior Daily Texan: In light of the Civil Rights

Summit this week, why is civil rights a conversation worth having, even though it’s 2014? GM: Racial issues are definitely still happening on campus. There are things that go on in everyday life that we are not even aware of. I mean, we still have Confederate statues here. Like, what are we really supporting, where are we really going, how are we really treating people is something that really needs to be talked about and come in more conversations because people are really lacking knowledge and lacking awareness of racial prejudice and how it has affected us because of our societal norms. DT: What do you think is the most important civil rights issue for students on this campus? GM: I’d say, from the people that I’ve talked to, little comments and things people say here and there that sort of show a deeper thought process, that people think differently of them … and especially in West Campus, just like the assaults and things that happen to black students, it’s just not. It’s really not okay. Grant Wiles, government sophomore Daily Texan: In light of the Civil Rights Summit that’s happening this week, do think civil right is still a conversation worth having in 2014? GW: By no means is the fight for civil rights over. I think we saw, in the summer of 2013, with section four of the voting rights act being struck down. Immediately afterward, we had voting ID laws passed through Texas and many other states across the United States. Just because there is no segregation allowed etc. does not mean that people have equal rights in this country, and we still need to fight. I think one of the biggest future struggles for our generation is going to be marriage equality. I think that’s the next civil rights issue. I’m hopeful that, in Texas and nationally, we’ll have standards that don’t protect prejudice against people based on their beliefs.

The best example of a civil right, this year, in this age is equal pay for women, and then also marriage equality for everybody. —Madaleine Toups, Government junior

Madeleine Toups, government junior Daily Texan: In light of the Civil Rights Summit that is going on Tuesday, why do you think civil rights is still a conversation worth having in 2014? MT: The best example of a civil right, this year, in this age, is equal pay for women, and then also marriage equality for everybody. I think those are both really good jumping off points for civil rights. DT: So what do you think the most important issue to student on this campus in particular is? MT: I think people are more concerned with marriage equality right now. It’s been making a lot of waves in the news for the past two years and a huge push this past year. Like six or seven states had major legislation in the past couple of month, so I assume student are more interested and involved in that, especially in our generation. I’m personally very interested in equal pay for women because I think its $0.77 right now to the dollar, which I think is ridiculous.

Multimedia Check out some of the students’ responses at dailytexanonline.com.

HORNS UP: COMMITTEE SAYS HALL MAY HAVE BROKEN THE LAW

COLUMN

Students must not rely on UT for housing help By Ali Breland

Daily Texan Columnist @alibreland

On March 31, the new City Council Stealth Dorm ordinances went into effect. As a consequence, for the next two years, the occupancy limit of unrelated individuals in newly built single-family homes in North and Central Austin will be reduced from six to four. City Council ordered a study looking into the effects of the ordinances. However, it was ultimately determined there was not enough time to complete it. Regardless, it’s likely that students will have fewer options for finding reasonable rent around UT. Austin’s rent is already the most expensive in Texas, and with the new Stealth Dorm ordinances limiting the expansion of affordable housing, the situation isn’t going to get any better. Another unfortunate aspect of the Stealth Dorm ordinance’s passage: It’s yet another example of how students at UT are asked to fight for affordable housing when they should be focusing on their studies instead. Yes, the University could be leading the fight and building more oncampus units. This isn’t the case, however, and the next best option is for students to take matters into their own hands and get involved in lobbying for more affordable housing options in a city where their viewpoints and needs are often maligned. Consider the language used by supporters of the ordinance, who argued that college students living in stealth dorms cause

Another unfortunate aspect of the Stealth Dorm ordinance’s passage: It’s yet another example of how students at UT are asked to fight for affordable housing when they should be focusing on their studies.

Rising rent prices can, in and of themselves, have a far-reaching impact on the community in many ways, such as inducing unintended racial segregation and harming students’ academic performance by forcing them to live further away from the University. issues such as “parking problems,” “noise disturbances” and “trash problems,” all problems related to stealth dorms listed on stopstealthdorms.com. While these are legitimate concerns, they pale in comparison to the concern of finding affordable student housing. The inconvenience of a concentrated minority is not worth driving up housing costs for an entire community of students. Rising rent prices can, in and of themselves, have a far-reaching impact on the community in many ways, such as inducing unintended racial segregation and harming students’ academic performance by forcing them to live further away from the University to be able to afford rent. These problems have a much deeper influence on Austin and Texas than trash cans in the driveways of Hyde Park residents do. Ultimately, while the stealth dorms decision was disappointing, there is a much larger and more complex component to affordable housing in Austin and UT of which the council is cognizant and interested in fixing. Councilman Chris Riley expressed interest in expanding affordable housing across the city by intelligently and strategically revising the housing code to foster things like microhomes and what he described as the “missing middle” between single-family homes and high rises, among other potential options. However, none of these options are currently realities, and, until the University provides more support, students need to be at the table helping to fix the housing situation in the neighborhoods and communities around our campus. Breland is a Plan II senior from Houston.

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

According to a 176-page draft report obtained by the San Antonio Express-News and the Houston Chronicle, UT System Regent Wallace Hall likely committed impeachable offenses — including abusing his power, leaking confidential information in an attempt to silence critics in the state legislature and attempting to coerce UT administrators to alter their testimony in committee hearings — and may even have violated state and federal law. The report was drafted by a House committee tasked with investigating Hall and his potential misconduct. While we can’t say that the report’s accusations come as much of a surprise, Horns Up to the possibility that the Wallace Hall saga may soon come to an end, and the University administrators can refocus on actual student related issues. That way, we’ll finally be able to focus on something more worthwhile.

HORNS DOWN: EEOC COMPLAINTS ON THE RISE IN TEXAS According to an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission report, Texas’ number of workplace discrimination and harassment complaints has increased in recent months. The Frisco Enterprise reported that the commission received 9,068 harassment and discrimination charges last year alone, which is an increase of 2 percent from the year before. While Texas’ incident reports increased, nationally, the number of harassments decreased by 6 percent last year. According to the commission, any unwelcome action based on factors including race, religion, sex, national origin, age or disability can be classified as harassment in the workplace. Horns Down to this unfortunate increase; it’s definitely not a positive outcome of the Texas workforce.

GALLERY

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to editor@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

Illustration by John Massingill / Daily Texan Staff

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@TexanEditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


CLASS 5

NEWS

5

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

NEWS BRIEFLY City Councilman Mike Martinez to run for mayor

City Councilman Mike Martinez launched his campaign for Austin mayor Saturday. The news comes after Councilwoman Laura Morrison announced she would not run for mayor on March 18. Martinez, who previously served as an Austin firefighter for 13 years, joined the council in 2006. He currently serves as Capital Metro board chairman, Minority-Owned and Women-Owned Business Enterprise chairman and on the Small Business Council Subcommittee. He is also a member of the City Council’s Judicial Committee and Public Health and Human Services Subcommittee. If elected, Martinez will serve as the first mayor of a

$5

10-1 system, which voters approved in 2012. The new system will consist of 10 districts, each represented by a city council member, for a total of 11 members including the mayor. The council will consist mostly of new members because only council members Katy Tovo and Chris Riley are eligible to run for re-election. Riley, who announced his plans to run for re-election as District 9 representative on Monday, was chair of Austin’s Planning Commission for two years and co-founded CarShare and Alliance for Public Transportation. District 9 consists of parts of the University, West Campus and North Campus, and District 1 accounts for the rest of the University and East Campus. —Alyssa Mahoney

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STEFAN SCRAFIELD, SPORTS EDITOR / @texansports Tuesday, April 8, 2014

BASEBALL

Horns strive in mental game By Matt Warden

SIDELINE NCAAM National Championship

@TheMattWarden5

The No. 8 Longhorns had been on a tear at the plate heading into last weekend’s series with Baylor, and, when the weekend was over, Texas had shown it has the will to match its skills. Texas (26-7, 6-3 Big 12) will battle Rice for the second time in a week after sweeping Baylor at home this weekend. While the offense stayed hot, scoring 15 runs combined in the three games, the team proved it can always find a way to win, no matter what the situation. “I think, over the weekend, what we demonstrated was three different ways to win a ball game,” head coach Augie Garrido said. “That’s what it’s going to take. It takes versatility. You can’t just have one dimension to your offense that will win a game. I think we have more balance in our lineup now, for sure. Any part of that lineup can score runs in any one of the innings, and we proved that over the weekend and over the week.” Texas won a come-frombehind thriller Friday night when senior center fielder Mark Payton, who was hitless until his at-bat in the bottom of the ninth, smacked a three-run double to clear the bases and gave the Longhorns a walk-off win in game one. Although Payton will

(8) KENTUCKY

(7) UCONN

MLB RANGERS

RED SOX

ANGELS

ASTROS Jarrid Denman / Daily Texan file photo

Senior pitcher Nathan Thornhill winds up during a game against Kansas on March 16. Thornhill leads Texas’ pitching rotation, which has been solid all season, with a 0.73 ERA and a 5-0 record.

get the credit for that win, the Texas lineup as a whole showed that, when the chips are down, they can still score runs. “One through nine [in the order] is not an easy out,” Payton said. “That is always good to have. Even the guys on the bench are tough outs. Like I said, we believe we can do it with nobody out, or we can do it with nobody on and two outs, so we are just

BASEBALL | COLUMN

going to keep having quality at bats.” While the Longhorns’ offense continued to progress this weekend, senior pitcher Nathan Thornhill staked his claim as perhaps the most dominant pitcher on a solid pitching rotation after his eight-inning, two-hit stint in Sunday’s 4-0 victory. Thornhill is now 5-0 on the season with a 0.73 ERA that buoys the Longhorns combined

1.98 ERA on the year. “Nathan was excellent today,” Garrido said after Sunday’s win. “But that’s within the framework of what he’s capable of doing when he focuses on hitting the mitt and not feeling responsible for winning the game.” Texas knocked off Rice (22-12) on the road 5-2 last Tuesday behind 10 hits and two big RBIs by freshman Tres Barrera, who is now

Rice @ Texas

YANKEES Day: Tuesday Time: 7 p.m. On air: LHN

second on the team with a .295 batting average. Now, Texas will face the Owls at home, where it holds a 17-4 record this year.

By Jeremy Thomas @jeremyobthomas

Sam Ortega / Daily Texan Staff

Senior center fielder Mark Payton, who holds the longest on-base streak in the country, has stamped himself as a Texas great.

Payton on path to join league of Texas greats By David Leffler

For an average player, two hits over the course of a three-game series would equal a major slump. Fortunately for the Longhorns, senior center fielder Mark Payton is not just any average player. Payton went a combined 2-for-13 with two walks during Texas’ three-game sweep of Baylor this weekend, struggling to find consistency at the plate. Although it was his worst three-game stretch of the season, the senior from Chicago drove in four runs, including a bases-clearing walk-off double Friday, his only hit in the 5-4 victory. That hit, which came on a full count with two outs, extended his streak of reaching base safely to an NCAAleading 70 games. Following an RBI single Saturday and two walks Sunday, the streak now sits at 72 and has people wondering whether he can make it to 100. Payton has proven he is one of the best pure hitters to pass through this decorated program — up there with the likes of Jeff Ontiveros, Omar Quintanilla, Kevin Keyes and Drew Stubbs. Those players own a combined three national championships and a handful of other trips to the College World Series. Each played a pivotal role in reviving a Texas program that, prior to the

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@MikeDavis_1

“UConn hooping ........Just saying.”

FOOTBALL

Players begin to shine, grow as spring practice continues

Daily Texan Columnist @leffler_david

ORIOLES

Longhorns’ championship in 2002, had not been to the College World Series Championship since 1989. Payton stacks up with all of them. The first thing that stands out is his efficiency at the plate, where he has hit over .300 in all but his freshman season. Last season, he finished with a .393 average and .483 on-base percentage. Those are numbers that Ontiveros, Quintanilla, Keyes and Stubbs never attained while at Texas. Payton’s biggest strength is his patience, which explains why he has only struck out nine times in 119 at-bats this season. Only Quintanilla, who currently plays shortstop for the New York Mets, had a lower strikeout percentage. This plate efficiency was formed out of necessity. Unlike these other players, whose teams were stacked with talented hitters, Payton has been the only proven hitter in his teams’ lineups. As a result, opposing teams have been far more selective in how they’ve pitched to him. Despite a rough weekend, Payton is sitting at a .370 average and has reached base in nearly half his at-bats. With 25 RBI’s already in 2014, he is on pace to shatter his previous season-high of 29. If he can maintain this production and get some help from his teammates, he will have to chance to end his collegiate career the same way it started: with a trip to the College World Series.

After two weeks of spring practices, multiple Longhorns have begun to shine and grow accustomed to the new coaching regime. At a press conference last Tuesday, head coach Charlie Strong named multiple players, including defensive tackle Malcom Brown, linebacker Steve Edmond cornerbacks Quandre Diggs and Duke Thomas, safety Josh Turner and running back Malcolm Brown, as rising leaders that continue to compete at a high level throughout the offseason. “Running back Malcolm Brown is a really solid player,” Strong said. “I told our defense, at times, they didn’t want to tackle him because of the way he runs. He does a great job of just running behind his pads. He’s a punishing runner. When he hits, he’s always falling forward.” Brown said he is continuing to work on all aspects of his game during the offseason and focus on the smallest details such as his footwork during zone read plays. “I’ve always tried to be a complete back,” Brown said. “It’s just the fact that it is a

I’ve always thought I had a voice on this team. So I can say some things that some of the young guys can’t say, but I feel like guys respect me on this team. —Quandre Diggs, Senior cornerback

different year, and you got to focus a little bit more on something that you might not have accomplished last year.” The Longhorns are getting used to Strong at the helm of the team and describe their new practices as grinding and extremely physical. “He wants that to be our mentality,” Brown said. “I mean, it’s working. You can tell the guys are getting used to just hitting and going at it, lasting longer at the end of practice and grinding it out.” Late last month, the team had one of its first scrimmages. Strong said he was pleased with the way quarterback coach Shawn Watson and offensive line coach Joe Wickline called the plays on offense and the aggressiveness of the defensive. But, he said, the longer the scrimmage went, some of the guys just quit competing. “I always talk about [how] we have to finish,” Strong

said “I didn’t see that there at the end. We still have a lot of work to do, and we have a chance to go. Just finish it out the right way. When I say quit competing as the scrimmage went, it’s not so much a competition. It’s all about, when you have a chance to go make plays, go make plays.” Diggs said he is starting to emerge as a leader on the team and believes it’s his time to step up. “It’s coming along slowly,” Diggs said. “I’ve always thought I had a voice on this team. So I can say some things that some of the young guys can’t say, but I feel like guys respect me on this team.” The annual game between the Longhorns and the rival Sooners is also going through a rebranding. The annual Red River Rivalry will now be known as the AT&T Red River Showdown. The 109th game of the rivalry series is scheduled for Oct. 11 in the Cotton Bowl.

Charlie Pearce / Daily Texan file photo

Senior running back Malcolm Brown looks on from the sideline during a game last season. Brown, along with other Longhorns, is beginning to impress head coach Charlie Strong.

SPORTS BRIEFLY Marielle Hall named Athlete of the Week

Senior track and field athlete Marielle Hall was named the U.S. Track and Field and Cross Country Coaches Association National Female Athlete of the Week on Monday. Hall earns the honor for her performance at the Stanford Invitational this past weekend. She broke the school record while posting one of the best 5,000-meter marks in collegiate history Friday night with a time of 15:19.26, 19.26-second time. Hall’s time beat the former UT record by almost 30 seconds and ranks No. 10 on the alltime collegiate outdoor performance list. Hall, the Haddonfield, N.J., native, is the second UT athlete to claim the honor this year. Ryan Crouser was named the USTFCCCA National Male Athlete of the Week on Feb. 2 after his performance at the New Mexico Collegiate. —Garrett Callahan

Pistorious takes the stand for first time

PRETORIA, South Africa — Oscar Pistorius took the witness stand Monday for the first time, testifying that he was trying to protect the girlfriend he killed, and that he became so tormented by memories of the fatal shooting and panic attacks that he once hid helplessly in a closet. Pistorius also offered an apology to the family of Reeva Steenkamp, who died from multiple wounds after the double-amputee runner shot her through a closed toilet door last year in his home. He has yet to be cross-examined about the shooting in the early hours of Feb. 14, 2013, and that testimony is likely to be the centerpiece of a trial being broadcast on television and followed around the world. —Associated Press


COMICS 7

COMICS

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Tuesday, April 8, 2014

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Edited by Will Shortz

Crossword ACROSS 1 Archenemy of the Fantastic Four 7 Tech product introduced in ’81 12 Rapper with the 2002 #1 hit “Always on Time” 13 Make into cornrows 14 Like 50/50 vis-à-vis 60/40 15 Merits 16 With 23-Down, what 27-Across/ 32-Down is often credited with 18 Song girl who’s “sweet as apple cider” 21 Chicago-toTampa dir. 22 Sup 23 Coup d’___ 24 Yellowfin tuna, on menus 25 On vacation 26 Trumpet

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9 7 6 1 4 5 9 2 9 4 3 2 9 8 1 6 2 3 4 8 1 7 2 1 5 4 8 2 2 6 5 9

Today’s solution will appear here next issue

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27 With 32-Down, person associated with the scene depicted in this puzzle’s grid 30 Silences 31 Added slyly, as a comment 32 Mink, e.g. 33 Young chap 34 What Command-P means on a Mac 35 With 44-Down, advice to 27-Across/ 32-Down? 38 Herringlike fish 39 Towel holders 43 Continental coin 44 “Absolutely right!” 45 “Yeah, right!” 46 Suffix with señor 47 Real stinker 48 Milan’s La ___ 49 Martial arts instructor 51 Veteran

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PUZZLE BY BRUCE HAIGH AND PETER A. COLLINS

30 British pound, informally 32 See 27-Across 34 Sports wonders, say 35 Dancer in a kimono

37 Site of 27-Across/ 32-Down’s ambassadorship 38 The Mustangs of the American Athletic Conf.

40 2000s White House family 36 Best in an annual Nathan’s contest, 41 Remove, as spam say

42 One not blinking, perhaps 44 See 35-Across 47 Dos x tres 48 A, B and F, e.g., in D.C. 50 Jamaican music genre 52 Fast way to connect, briefly

Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

MCAT® | LSAT® | GMAT® | GRE® Available:

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DOWN 1 Provided the music for a party, informally 2 Enraptured 3 Order often “on the side” 4 Post office scale unit 5 Yellow spread 6 Game show maven Griffin 7 Spanish or Portuguese 8 Opposite of dense 9 River of W.W. I 10 Worrisome engine sound 11 Some 60-mo. investments TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE 17 Buzz Aldrin’s real first name H P J S S C A N T I H A H U H H U H 18 Writer Calvino N D I V A B R A K E 19 “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” T O A R C I B E X girl A N Y O U T S 20 “This is only ___” T T E R N P A T T E R G O A P I A N O 23 See 16-Across T O W N F R E E T O W 24 $5 bill, informally H G O O E S E 25 Surrounded by 26 Seriously E R N E A S T E R overcook E P O L I R A M B A E U G E N E 28 Dessert brand once pitched by E L E A R N L E A R Bill Cosby N E R R K E N T S 29 The Beatles’ “___ G R O T S T Y L E in the Life”

S U DPrep to O the highest Kdegree. U I F W E

53 Cope 54 Say wrongly 55 Military command 56 Precursor to talk shows for Jimmy Fallon and Seth Meyers, in short 57 River of W.W. I

No. 0304

In Person

LiveOnline

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8 L&A

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HANNAH SMOTHERS, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR / @DailyTexanArts Tuesday, April 8, 2014

THEATER

After casting dispute, student play to open By Kritika Kulshrestha

Theatre and dance freshmen Max Torrez, Trey Curtis and Melinette Pallares star in “In The Heights.” The UT staging of the Tony Award-winning musical will start Wednesday and run through April 19.

@kritika88

For theatre and dance freshman Max Torrez, the more he is able to find the personal connection within a script, the better he is able to convey the emotions to the audience. Torrez stars as Sonny in UT’s staging of the Tony Award-winning musical “In the Heights,” being performed Wednesday through April 19 at the B. Iden Payne Theatre. “I just like being able to tell a story,” Torrez said. “I feel that’s what acting is for. Art is a universal language and being able to communicate these fantastic stories about ordinary people in extraordinary circumstances is just mind-blowing for me.” Torrez was among the few students who got cast in one of the lead roles in the first round of the musical’s auditions. According to director Jerry Ruiz, most students were initially cast in ensemble roles with local professional actors being considered for most of the lead roles. “The creative team wanted more experienced performers in those lead roles, and there was an unfavorable reaction to that from the student body,” Ruiz said. “The students really wanted to have a shot at playing some of these roles, and that’s when the department rebooted.” Ruiz was hired as director in late December after the theatre and dance department decided to change the entire creative team and allow

LGBTQ

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from across the country. While composed almost exclusively of UT students, the group was prevented by the University’s policy from meeting on campus or becoming an official student organization. “The nation was just in incredible turmoil, but it was also a very exciting time when people were energized and felt that we could really build a better world,” Jones said. Today, LGBTQ students and their GLF predecessors have different tactics and issues they are fighting for, but their underlying goal of equality has not changed. “I think our goals are fundamentally the same as when we started seeing more LGBTQ visiblity on campus,” said Marisa Kent, co-coordinator for UT’s Queer Student Association. “But the one big shift is that we are more accepted on campus.”

Amy Zhang Daily Texan Staff

more students to be cast. “I quickly saw there was a lot of talent in the student body,” Ruiz said. “I knew we would be able to cast people who were really appropriate for the role, who were the right age, and who could believably play these characters with their talent and musical and acting ability.” Torrez is one of 34 UT students who have been cast in lead and ensemble roles for “In The Heights.” The musical is set in New York City’s Washington Heights neighborhood,

which is primarily inhabited by people of Latin-American descent, and tells the story of a small community of people in their late teens or early twenties who have to grow up and learn to face their problems. Torrez’ character Sonny is a 15-year-old who likes hanging out with his friends and his older brother . “He’s quite a character,” Torrez said. “He has a lot of growth because he’s forced to grow up in a short amount of time. He’s funny, he’s insightful and he’s smart. Back

Often faculty and staff members and students were supportive of gay students, but discrimination was common on campus in many forms. According to Randy Conner, UT alum and former GLF member, professors would sometimes alter grades if they discovered a student was homosexual. “When I wrote an openly gay story, [my professor] totally flipped out and basically told me, after telling me I had great talent, that I had no talent,” Conner said. Conner contributed to the group by teaching one of the University’s first LGBTQ literature classes. The course was informal, not for credit and free for all students. “They made me call it ‘The Homophile in Literature,’ and no one used that term anymore,” Conner said. “That was a term from the ’50s. It was the only way they allowed me to teach the class.” When UT did not recognize the group as an official student organization in the spring of 1972, GLF decided

GAY MARRIAGE: A CIVIL RIGHT?

to sue the University. They raised money to sue through a school dance, which the then-dean Edward Price canceled at the last minute. Wendell and his peers refused to leave the area in protest and were arrested. In jail, the police put Jones in a cell with an AfricanAmerican man and told the stranger he could be violent toward Jones, stereotyping both men in the process. The man told Jones he had a gay brother [and that he] would not harm him.” This further opened Jones’ eyes to the connection between all minority groups. “I began realizing that there were certain common things that homosexuals shared with black people at that time, and my politics started getting much sharper,” Jones said. “I started wanting to work with other groups — not just the

MLK

EX

Melinette Pallares auditioned the first time with only one goal — to be part of the musical. Even though she wasn’t cast the first time, she said she received a callback when she participated in the second round of auditions. “I was just going to be happy with anything that I got,” Pallares said. “I was just happy to be there and gain the experience of auditioning because a lot of other schools don’t let their freshmen and sophomores audition.” Pallares plays Nina Rosario, one of the lead characters.

Born and raised in Harlingen, Pallares moved to Austin last year to study at UT. Of Puerto Rican descent herself, Pallares found her dream role in Nina. “I automatically fell in love with Nina,” Pallares said. “My mother is Puerto Rican, and so I feel like I can really understand all of the cultural aspects of who she is and what her family is like. She’s also a 19-year-old freshman. She’s just trying to figure her life out — what she wants to achieve — and I feel like I’m in the same boat.”

When: Tuesday at 12:35 p.m. Where: LBJ Auditorium

1901

ED V I WA EE! F 4 P P A P. 4/9/1

when I was younger, I was that kid.” Torrez’ foray into acting began halfway through junior year of high school when his school director asked him to audition for a role. “I was in football, and, when I ended up getting the role, the audience’s reaction after the first song I sang sealed the deal for me,” Torrez said. “I dropped football, and I took up acting, and I’ve not stopped since.” Unlike Torrez, who instantly knew Sonny was the role for him, dance freshman

Photo courtesy of Cactus Yearbook

Policemen arrested Gay Liberation Front members for refusing to vacate the premises in 1972.

anti-war movement and the gay liberation movement — that were trying to create a better world.” In the spring of 1974, the GLF was finally recognized as an official student organization. But, as the Vietnam War came to an end, the gay rights movement became

Rio Grande POINTE

more conservative — the once-connected movements became isolated, and the group lost momentum. In 1976, Jones left UT to study law in California, and Conner graduated with his masters degree in English. Current LGBTQ student groups owe their establish-

ment to the efforts of the GLF. “They had a hard fight to have the ability to form a group,” Kent said. “I think in that in itself, and what they were working towards, started opening the door for other groups to come in and form organizations based on their LGBTQ status.”

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The Daily Texan 2014-04-08