Issuu on Google+

1

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 8

NEWS PAGE 3

SPORTS PAGE 6

Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

@thedailytexan

facebook.com/dailytexan

Thursday, March 27, 2014

dailytexanonline.com

CITY

City considers drunk tank proposal By Julia Brouillette @juliakbrou

Under current state law, police officers have three options once they arrest someone for public intoxication: They can release the person to a sober friend, transport him to the hospital or put him in jail. A group of law enforcement, criminal justice and medical officials are working toward a fourth option — a sobriety center, also known as a “drunk tank,” which would allow intoxicated individuals to become sober and eventually be released without facing criminal charges.

On March 11, Travis County commissioners unanimously passed a resolution encouraging county staffers to work with the City of Austin and Seton Healthcare Family hospitals to develop a plan for a sobriety center. Austin City Council approved a similar resolution on March 20. The county staffers are expected to report back by Sept. 1. Public intoxication is generally a Class C misdemeanor in Texas, which does not carry a jail sentence. Yet many offenders are incarcerated, according to Travis County judge Nancy Hohengarten. “In order to be arrested in the first place, you have to be

a danger to yourself or others,” Hohengarten said. “It really doesn’t make sense to take someone to jail, but if there’s no place to take you, you may end up getting hurt yourself or hurting someone else.” Hohengarten, who handles a number of Class C misdemeanor cases in her court, said UT students in particular would benefit from this type of facility. “[Students] wouldn’t get arrested, they wouldn’t have to deal with a criminal record, they wouldn’t have to pay for an attorney and they wouldn’t even have to tell their parents,”

TANK page 2

Illustration by Connor Murphy / Daily Texan Staff

By Julia Brouillette @juliakbrou

Jonathan Garza / Daily Texan Staff

More than 200 students evacuated the University Teaching Center after a fire alarm was activated Wednesday. Officials said they smelled smoke on the third floor, but no threat was found.

UNIVERSITY

Futuristic predictions prove overly ambitious

@sreinsch91

False alarms cause problems for UTPD

ALARMS page 1

THROWBACK

By Sara Reinsch

POLICE

More than 200 students and faculty lined the sidewalks outside the University Teaching Center on Wednesday morning, as UT police and Austin Fire Department officials searched the building for flames. A Parking and Transportation Services officer directed traffic, while onlookers waited to hear what happened. Ultimately, the officers found nothing unusual — and that itself is not unusual. On campus and across the city, fire and police officers regularly respond to alarm calls that do not ultimately require emergency action. Just after 11 a.m. Wednesday morning, fire marshals smelled smoke on the third floor of the UTC, according to UTPD officers on the scene. “[It] smelled like newspaper was burning or

bit.ly/dtvid

In 1972, The Daily Texan predicted that such technological achievements as clones, video calls and virtual classes would be available to UT students by the early ’90s. Clones have yet to exist, FaceTime was conceived less than four years ago and virtual classes began in the ‘80s, which suggests that attempts at predicting the future are often overly ambitious. The two-part series, published in the Texan in March 1972, paints a hypothetical picture of UT and its student life 20 years into the future. In the year of the series’ publication, the modern Internet had yet to be invented, VCRs had just become available to consumers, Nixon had just declared the “War on Drugs” and the first cell phone — which was the size of a brick — was in the making. Bulky, imposing personal computers were released around that time, but few people owned them. The first article describes a handful of changes that were expected to take place at the University by 1992. “The traditional image of a professor talking at a roomful of students will shatter,” the article said. “An education growing around learning, not teaching, is taking its place.”

FUTURE page 3

UNIVERSITY

UT advocates student Job experience valued over major choice completion of FAFSA By Kate Dannenmaier @kater_tot7

By Adam Hamze @adamhamz

The Obama administration announced the FAFSA Completion Initiative earlier this month, a plan that will aid the Department of Education in identifying students who have not finished their applications for FAFSA and help them do so. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid — also known as FAFSA — is a form used by the Department of Education to determine the amount of need-based federal grants or federal loans a student might receive for college. In the 20112012 submission period, almost 22 million FAFSAs were submitted. Tom Melecki, director of Student Financial Services,

said there are a number of reasons students do not complete FAFSA, and among them is the students’ belief that they will not qualify for benefits. “There are a lot of students who start the FAFSA, [and] then they have to ask their mom and dad to provide some data, and they say, ‘Don’t bother with that. We make too much money,’” Melecki said. “But, then again, it’s really difficult for them to know that.” According to Student Financial Services, 64 percent of undergraduates submitted FAFSA forms last year, and 73 percent of those who applied received need-based financial aid. The total amount of

FAFSA page 2

The number one regret of college graduates is not getting more work experience during school, while choosing the wrong major came in fourth place, according to a Pew research study. When asked how they could have better prepared for their careers, 50 percent of graduates said they wished they would have gained more work experience, and 29 percent said they should have chosen a different major, according to the survey. Spanish and Portuguese professor Jill Robbins said there’s a tendency to think some kinds of majors, such as engineering, have a pathway into immediate employment, and others, such as foreign languages, do not.

Claire Trammel / Daily Texan Staff

Spanish and Portuguese professor Jill Robbins spoke Wednesday about how majoring in certain fields may not necessarily lead to immediate job placements following graduation.

But she said college is not vocational training. “It’s scary because a lot of chatter that you hear is narrowly focused on a

certain kind of work,” Robbins said. “You don’t want to be that kind of worker; you want to be a worker who can move around

NEWS

OPINION

SPORTS

LIFE&ARTS

ONLINE

170,000 gallons of oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. PAGE 3

Regnerus and the new same-sex marriage ruling. PAGE 4

Softball knocks off Texas A&M-Corpus Christi. PAGE 6

Daily Greens juice sells products at Whole Foods. PAGE 8

Ride along with the Austin Police Department’s DWI unit in a video online at

Students install a flower bed near Roberts dorm. PAGE 3

How landlords keep housing prices high. PAGE 4

Carrington Byndom shines in Texas Pro Training Day. PAGE 6

UT grad student writes award-winning essay. PAGE 8

dailytexanonline.com

and do creative and intelligent things. So turn down the chatter.”

MAJORS page 2 REASON TO PARTY

PAGE 7


2 2

Thursday, March 27, 2014

FAFSA

FRAMES featured photo

continues from page 1

Volume 114, Issue 127

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor-in-Chief Laura Wright (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Shabab Siddiqui (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@ gmail.com Sports Office (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Claire Trammel / Daily Texan Staff

Life & Arts Office (512) 232-2209 dtlifeandarts@gmail.com

Biology sophomore Katherine Wee pies biology student Jacqueline Lim at the second annual “Pie A President” fundraiser for Dell Children’s Surgical Global Outreach on Wednesday in the West Mall.

Retail Advertising (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu

TANK

Classified Advertising (512) 471-5244 classifieds@ dailytexanonline.com

continues from page 1

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2013 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER Low High

87

52

Salon de papa

Hohengarten said. Public intoxication cases put a burden on court system officials and police officers, who typically spend several hours booking a suspect into jail, Hohengarten said. In 2013, APD arrested 3,700 people for public intoxication. In that same year, UTPD arrested 169 people for public intoxication, with the offense accounting for roughly 12 percent of the year’s reports. Sobriety centers have opened in San Antonio and Houston, which helped warm up Austin officials to the idea, according to Hohengarten. “When other communities do it and there’s some positive impact, then it makes it easier for other communities to coalesce and look at those experiences,” Hohengarten said. The facility would be available to any law enforcement agency in Travis County, including campus police. UTPD Chief David Carter said he fully supports the opening of a sobriety center, as long as it exclusively serves individuals who could be a danger to themselves or others and not those who commit other

offenses after drinking. “This, in my opinion, does not apply to people involved in other offenses where they’re assaulting people or threatening people. That’s a whole different story,” Carter said. According to Carter, UTPD officers will release a publicly intoxicated person to a sober adult, if possible. “We strive to not put people in jail for public intoxication,” Carter said. “Sometimes we can’t avoid that because there’s no place for the person to go, but we’d rather release a person to somebody who can watch out and make sure that they’re safe.” Offenders are often transported to the emergency room in lieu of jail, according to Christopher Ziebell, emergency department director of University Medical Center Brackenridge.

The nurses at the jail will often reject individuals [whom] they feel are too intoxicated to be safe at jail. So, often, another path is chosen, which is to send the patient to the hospital. —Christopher Ziebell, Emergency department director

“If something happens to that individual while in jail, the county faces liability,” Ziebell said. “Therefore, the nurses at the jail will often reject individuals [whom] they feel are too intoxicated to be safe at jail. So, often another path is chosen, which is to send the patient to the hospital.” This results in decreased space and diminished mental energy in the emergency department, Ziebell said. “These individuals try to get up a lot, they need

Better clinic.

Better medicine. At PPD, we count on healthy volunteers Better world. to help evaluate medications being developed –counts maybeon likehaving you. You must Everybody safe, meet certain requirements to qualify, effective medicine for anything from including a free and But the common coldmedical to heartexam disease. screening tests. We have research making sure medications are safe is a studies available in many different complex and careful process. lengths, and you’ll find current studies At PPD,here weweekly. count on healthy volunteers listed to help evaluate medications being PPD has been conducting developed – maybe like you.research You must studies in Austin for more 25 years. meet certain requirementsthan to qualify, Call today to find out more. including a free medical exam and screening tests. We have research studies available in many different lengths, and you’ll find current studies listed here weekly. PPD has been conducting research

studies in Austin for more than 25 years. Current Research Opportunities

Issue Staff

(512) 471-1865 | advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Interim Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frank Serpas, III Executive Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chad Barnes Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barbara Heine Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcasting and Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Event Coordinator and Media Consultant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindsey Hollingsworth Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Carter Goss, Lindsey Hollingsworth Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ted Sniderman Student Assistant Advertising Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rohan Needel Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dani Archuleta, Aaron Blanco, Hannah Davis, Crysta Hernandez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robin Jacobs, Erica Reed, Mayowa Tijani, Lesly Villarreal Student Project Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Aaron Blanco Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mymy Nguyen Student Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dito Prado Senior Graphic Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Hublein Student Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Karina Manguia, Rachel Ngun, Bailey Sullivan Special Editions/Production Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michael Gammon Longhorn Life Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ali Killian Longhorn LIfe Assistant Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrew Huygen

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 4711865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

The Daily Texan Mail Subscription Rates One Semester (Fall or Spring) $60.00 Two Semesters (Fall and Spring) 120.00 Summer Session 40.00 One Year (Fall, Spring and Summer) 150.00 To charge by VISA or MasterCard, call 471-5083. Send orders and address changes to Texas Student Media', P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713-8904, or to TSM Building C3.200, or call 471-5083. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713.

Texan Ad Deadlines

3/27/14

Monday .............Wednesday, 12 p.m. Thursday.................Monday, 12 p.m. Tuesday.................Thursday, 12 p.m. Friday......................Tuesday, 12 p.m. Word Ads 11 a.m. Wednesday................Friday, 12 p.m. Classified (Last Business Day Prior to Publication)

frequent redirection, they occasionally need restraint [and] they urinate on themselves or on the floor,” Ziebell said. “All of these behaviors are distracting to the staff, who have to divert their attention away from trauma, strokes, heart attacks and so on.”

Everybody counts on having safe, effective medicine for anything from the common cold to heart disease. But making sure medications are safe is a complex and careful process.

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Wright Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala, Riley Brands, Amil Malik, Eric Nikolaides Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shabab Siddiqui Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan Rudner Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Antonia Gales, Anthony Green, Jacob Kerr, Pete Stroud, Amanda Voeller Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Julia Brouillette, Nicole Cobler, Alyssa Mahoney, Madlin Mekelburg Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Reinsch Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brett Donohoe, Reeana Keenen, Kevin Sharifi Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Mitts Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hirrah Barlas, Bria Benjamin, Alex Dolan, Omar Longoria Multimedia Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charlie Pearce, Alec Wyman Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sam Ortega Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jonathan Garza, Shweta Gulati, Pu Ying Huang, Shelby Tauber, Lauren Ussery Senior Videographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jackie Kuenstler, Dan Resler, Bryce Seifert Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Smothers Associate Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren L’Amie Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Eleanor Dearman, Kritika Kulshrestha, David Sackllah, Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stefan Scrafield Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Hummer Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Evan Berkowitz, Garrett Callahan, Jori Epstein, Matt Warden Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Hadidi Roommate to the Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riki Tsuji Senior Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cody Bubenik, Ploy Buraparate, Connor Murphy, Aaron Rodriguez, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephanie Vanicek Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeremy Hintz Associate Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarah Stancik Senior Technical Staff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Shen, Roy Varney Special Ventures Co-editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard, Chris Hummer Online Outreach Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fred Tally-Foos Journalism Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Michael Brick

Business and Advertising

Ride along with APD’s DWI unit in a video online at dailytexanonline.com

Better medicine. Better world.

Permanent Staff

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayden Clark, Kate Dannenmaier, Adam Hamze, Zachary Keener Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mengwen Cao, Joe Capraro, Claire Trammel Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Caroline Hall, Brianna Holt, Jacob Martella, Ashton Moore Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sean Armas, Pauline Berens, Anderson Boyd Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Virginia Scherer, Illiana Storch Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Shannon Butler, Calhan Hale, Holly Hansel, Andy McMahon, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Isabella Palacios, Riki Tsuji Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alexandra Dubinsky, Hannah Jane DiCiutiis, Kat Sampson

MULTIMEDIA

Better clinic.

This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25

Call today to find out more.

AgeAge Men and Postmenopausal or Surgically Sterile Women 18 to 55

Age

Compensation Requirements Requirements Compensation

Healthy & Non-Smoking BMI between 18 and 30 Weigh at least 110 lbs.

Timeline Timeline

Thu. 3 Apr. through Sun. 6 Apr. Thu. 10 Apr. through Sun. 13 Apr. Outpatient Visit: 17 Apr.

Current Research Opportunities Up to $3000

Compensation

Men and Women 18 to 55

Up to $4000

Requirements Healthy & Non-Smoking BMI between 19 and 30 Females must weigh at least 110 lbs. Males must weigh at least 130 lbs.

Men and Postmenopausal or Surgically Sterile Women 18 to 55

Up to $1500

Healthy & Non-Smoking BMI between 18 and 30 Weigh at least 110 lbs.

Timeline Thu. 3 Apr. through Sun. 6 Apr. Thu. 10 Apr. through Sun. 13 Apr. Thu. 17 Apr. through Sun. 20 Apr. Thu. 24 Apr. through Sun. 27 Apr.

Thu. 17 Apr. through Sun. 20 Apr. Outpatient Visit: 24 Apr.

www.ppdi.com • 462-0492 • Text “PPD” to 48121 to receive study information

Men and Women 18 to 55

Up to $2000

Healthy & Non-Smoking BMI between 18 and 32

NEWS

Fri. 11 Apr. through Mon. 14 Apr. Fri. 18 Apr. through Mon. 21 Apr. Outpatient Visit: 23 Apr.

www.ppdi.com Text“PPD” “PPD”toto48121 48121to toreceive receivestudy studyinformation information www.ppdi.com• •512-462-0492 462-0492 ••Text

need-based financial aid given in 2012-2013 was approximately $260 million, while the total amount of non-needbased financial aid given that year — including merit-based scholarships — was around $82 million. According to Melecki, FAFSA is operating better now than it has in previous years, but there are two things he said he would change: one would be to allow students to fill out the application two years prior to attending college, and the other would be to make the application a requirement. “I’d be the first to admit that this might be a step too far, but I’d almost like to require every student to have to complete a FAFSA,” Melecki said. “There’s no institution in the country that does that, though.” Journalism sophomore Ashley Lopez said the language found in FAFSA is enough to deter students from applying, but she believes everyone should fill it out, even if they are unsure whether they will qualify for aid. “It’s confusing because it’s based off your parents’ tax info, and, if you haven’t looked at a W2 form or IRS forms, the terms are hard to understand,” Lopez said. “I think all people should [apply for FAFSA].” Melecki said he is unsure whether Obama’s initiative will be successful and thinks there are alternatives to prompting more students to fill out the application. “I think it would be even more effective if Congress would appropriate more money to put in the federal financial aid programs, so that students could equate completing the FAFSA with having a better chance of getting the best forms of federal student aid,” Melecki said.

MAJORS

continues from page 1 According to sociology professor Penny Green, sociology is one of the most versatile majors, but the challenge both advisers and professors face is how to help sociology students understand the marketable skills they have. “The final exam [of my applied sociology class] involved searching for a job that they would like to do and then telling me, in the form of a cover letter, why they are uniquely qualified for that job, as well as constructing a resume to help them sell themselves to a potential employer,” Green said. Robbins said, in addition to certain classes that help prepare students for work, the College of Liberal Arts also has a very strong career services program. Nancy Sutherland, the academic advising coordinator for the Department of History, said most internships and career opportunities for liberal arts students are coordinated through the counselors in Liberal Arts Career Services. “[The counselors] let students from other colleges use the career services in liberal arts because it’s so excellent,” Robbins said. Robbins said a liberal arts education offers students a richer intellectual life and a skill set that can help graduates connect and reach out to possible employers. “The broader your education is, the more you know about different kinds of things; the richer your life is, the richer your possibilities of communicating with other people [are],” Robbins said. “And that opens up all kinds of opportunities for work.”


W&N 3

NEWS

3

Thursday, March 27, 2014

CAMPUS

CITY

SXSW accident victim remains hospitalized By Julia Brouillette @juliakbrou

Photos by Pu Ying Huang / Daily Texan Staff

Members of BRP Residence Hall Council hosted a community garden project over the weekend to plant a variety of flowers in their common courtyard.

Students create shared garden By Zachary Keener @Zak_Keener

While Jester East Dormitory loomed overhead, members of Brackenridge, Roberts, and Prather Residence Hall Council planted flowers in the the courtyard shared by the dormitories this past Sunday. Nick Vasquez, president of the BRP Residence Hall Council, said there were only vines, a small tree and bricks lying under the soil before the council decided to install a variety of plants in the bed.

Nathan Kelly, civil engineering freshman and vice president of the council, spearheaded the project. Kelly said he wanted the project to be something different than most other events sponsored by residence halls. “It’s another way to grab the eye of someone who doesn’t want to go do a video game night,” Kelly said. Kelly received shovels and rakes from John Burns, manager in the Department of Facilities Services, and purchased the flowers for $80. Vasquez said he wants a project like this to inspire

more people to become active in the BRP community, in which he has seen a lack of student involvement. “My goal, hopefully, is to show people it doesn’t matter who you are or what kind of background you come from,” Vasquez said. “You can still contribute to the community, and, hopefully, that contribution to the community will help to build a stronger community.” Joshua Nguyen, Brackenridge resident assistant and biochemistry junior, helped advertise the event.

“When we were doing it, people were passing us by,” Nguyen said. “It showed that we, as people who live at BRP, care about BRP. We want the community to strive — to thrive.” Vasquez and Kelly said they hope the garden is something that can grow into a larger, annual event at BRP. “I think it brings a greater sense of community because you’re actually doing something physical,” Vasquez said. “And [it’s] something you can show you helped improve your community through.”

CAMPUS

Book takes modern approach to history By Hayden Clark @HaydenS_Clark

A UT professor discussed his Chinese history book, which uses a non-traditional approach to the subject, on campus Wednesday as part of the History Faculty New Book Series. Published in 2012, history professor Huaiyin Li’s “Reinventing Modern China: Imagination and Authenticity in Chinese Historical Writing,” uses an openended approach to Chinese history rather than a resultsoriented basis. Li said his book was intended for academia in America, but he also translated and published it in China, where it was more popular. “[The book is] primarily for our new historians and students in [the U.S.], but I had the intention to [initiate] dialogue with Chinese historians,” Li said. “In China, afterward, it had a much bigger impact than in this country.” History graduate student James Hudson said

most Chinese history is written with a focus on results rather than what led to those results, but Li’s work is geared toward the meanings of what led to the ramifications. “By advocating newer approaches … that [try] to look at events as they unfolded, and not thinking about the consequences … I think that’s very innovative,” Hudson said. Hudson said Li is unique in his approach to teaching students the differing views of history, both revolutionary and modern. “He’s one of the very few professors that I’ve come across who’s really introduced this idea to students: how you construct a narrative,” Hudson said. “And construction of a narrative involves, ‘What is one’s approach to history?’” Post-doctoral fellow Dominic Yang said the fact that Li is starting to precisely study modern Chinese history written by Chinese historians is a desirable tool for researchers. “For the first time,

History professor Huaiyin Li speaks about his book, “Reinventing Modern China: Imagination and Authenticity in Chinese Historical Writing,” on Wednesday in Garrison Hall. Li takes a unique approach to recounting Chinese history in this book by using narratives.

Claire Trammel Daily Texan Staff

somebody actually [attempted] to do this sort of systemic trace of looking at the currents — the major currents of how modern Chinese history has been [interpreted] by historians in China,” Yang said. “I see a lot of specialists in my field who will welcome this kind of work.” Li said his approaches to Chinese history are not restricted just to China, but are

for all branches of history. “The study of Chinese history is inseparable from history writing in other parts of the world,” Li said. “Lots of questions I raised in my book are the same questions people have discussed in other countries: ‘Is objectivity in history writing possible, or is history writing driven by one’s ideological commitment?’”

Outdated ship channel causes wreck, oil spill HOUSTON — A century ago, the Houston Ship Channel was nothing more than a bayou meandering into the Gulf of Mexico. Today, massive ocean-going vessels carrying thousands of containers zip in and out of the channel, where a barge collided with a ship over the weekend, spilling 170,000 gallons of gooey, tar-like oil into the water. Though the cause of Saturday’s crash is still under investigation, the increase in ship congestion highlights the need for more maintenance, dredging, high-tech navigation systems and other improvements to ensure safe travel through the narrow waterway. “If it’s not done properly there could be a safety issue,” said Thomas Marian, general counsel of Houston-based Buffalo Marine Service, a company that has a fleet of 36 barges and 18 push-boats. The company’s primary purpose is to refuel vessels going

in and out of the area. About 95 percent of the nation’s commerce moves across water. Yet the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, credited with creating the waterborne highway from Brownsville, Texas — on the Mexican border — to Panama City, Fla., is unable to keep up with the growing maintenance responsibilities of the channels, ports and canals that facilitate this trade. The port typically handles about 70 ships daily, plus 300 to 400 tugboats and barges. And Gulf of Mexico traffic — especially of large ships — is expected to increase with the opening next year of the Panama Canal expansion. Already, larger ships are moving through the area. Vessels from East Asia that didn’t arrive in Houston just 10 years ago now make up 25 percent of the port’s business, Guenther said. Many of these ocean-going vessels need at least 45-foot depths.

Karen Warren / Associated Press

A crew makes its way to the shore from the site of the wrecked barge that leaked fuel into the Houston Ship Channel on Saturday just off of the Texas City dike.

The Corps has deepened some areas of the channel to accommodate the larger vessels, and the port is investing more than $700 million of its own money to remain competitive and allow ships to sail safely, Guenther said. The port is ranked first in the country for foreign waterborne tonnage, first in U.S. imports and first in export tonnage. Each year, more than 200 million tons of cargo is transported on some 8,000 vessels and 200,000 barge calls. Underneath is a web of pipelines

— most from the 1950s — that transport crude oil and refined products. Besides the traffic issues, there are also environmental concerns, said Laura Huffman, the Nature Conservancy’s director in Texas. The Gulf of Mexico is the backbone of U.S. energy independence, its fish basket, an increasingly busy shipping channel, an economic power horse, a drainage basin for 40 percent of the country’s waterways and an important cultural resource, she said. —Associated Press

One of the 23 victims injured in the South By Southwest crash is still in critical condition at University Medical Center Brackenridge, according to spokeswoman Kendra Clawson. DeAndre Tatum, 18, was among eight victims transported to UMC Brackenridge after a drunk driver sped through a crowd of people outside The Mohawk during SXSW. Tatum’s condition has not changed since the incident occurred on March 13, Clawson said. Two other victims, Mason Endres, 18, and Evan West, 29, have been moved to inpatient rehabilitation facilities. Joseph McCraney, 26, was released Saturday.

ALARMS

continues from page 1 something,” UTPD officer Nathan Hish said. After roughly twenty minutes, police gave the all-clear and allowed students back into the building. The students in the UTC Wednesday were not the first to experience the disruption of a fire alarm. Last year, UTPD received 9,394 fire or intrusion calls for service, according to annual crime statistics. APD officers also respond to thousands of false alarm calls yearly, according to the APD Alarm Administration. Austin City Council passed a resolution March 20 directing the city manager to review state law concerning penalties for false alarms, draft a relevant amendment to city code, examine the city’s internal practices regarding operation of alarms in city facilities and report back to the council with recommendations on how to reduce false alarms within 90 days. “The City of Austin seeks to enhance safety for all of its citizens through the effective use of public safety resources and collaboration with residents and private businesses,” the resolution said. Mayor Pro Tem Sheryl Cole, Policy Director Michael McGill and City Manager Marc Ott were

FUTURE

continues from page 1 The article described the virtual learning experience of the future, which holds an uncanny resemblance to the online classes of today. “During ‘class’ the computerized program which will be both curriculum and teacher for his course, will tutor and test him, aid his understanding of mistakes and guide him toward completion,” the article said. “The machine will be able to speak to him in a human voice, type instructions to him, and show him movies and demonstrations on a video screen.” The Texan proposed many solutions to the University’s parking and traffic problems, including one that suggested the University “build every campus building with a parking basement.” Twelvestory buildings made of concrete, steel and “perhaps even synthetics and plastics” were expected to accompany the old four-story buildings. Coed living and oncampus drinking in dorms were predicted to become more common. The second article in the series takes readers through “a day in the life” of Jason, a fictional UT student from 1992. As he gets ready for school, Jason watches an announcer on the school’s video channel interview the first clone to attend the University. UT’s actual channel, Texas Student Television, began broadcasting in 1995,

After the crash, 35-yearold Steven Craenmehr and 27-year-old Jamie West were pronounced dead at the scene, while a third victim, Sandy Le, died five days later. All other victims have since been released from the hospital. Police have charged 21-year-old Rashad Charjuan Owens with two counts of capital murder. In a press conference the day after the crash, Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo said the department also planned to charge Owens with counts of aggravated assault with a vehicle. No additional charges have been filed. Owens is currently in Travis County Jail, and his bond has been set at $3 million. His first court appearance is scheduled for April 9. unavailable to comment on the resolution. When campus police respond to alarm activations, officers check for signs of criminal activity and attempt to reset the alarm. If the individual who activated the alarm fails to contact police and report that the alarm was false, that constitutes a criminal offense of false report, according to UTPD policy. The resolution cites the costs associated with false alarms and the high number of false alarm dispatches as reasons to reexamine the city’s alarm ordinance, which governs the amount of money a municipality can fine for false alarms. “The city manager is directed to work with state-wide partners and the False Alarm Reduction Association to address the low cost recovery for municipal services of current fines and the high occurrence of false alarms,” the resolution said. Madelyn Mattern, a management information systems senior, said she wished she had been better-informed about the circumstances regarding the UTC evacuation — even though the building was ultimately fine. “We had just gotten started, so it didn’t really disrupt class that much,” Mattern said. “But I think everybody is a bit anxious because we weren’t told what was going on.” three years after it had been projected to do so in the story. Jason wears a paper necktie to school and rides to campus on a “shuttle wagon,” which invokes images of some kind of cross between a UT bus and a covered wagon. Jason gets off the shuttle wagon near the University Co-op. On his way to French class, he passes a legless Vietnam veteran who sells pens on the Drag. “He sniffed the sweet air around Le Potpourri, recently converted into a marijuana den, then waved to friends among the workstudy construction crew who were putting a reinforcing structure up around the Main Building,” the article said. After his French class, which is a computer course, he heads to an experimental psychology class. The class is research-driven and discussion-based, and the teacher has a laissezfaire approach to grading. His last and favorite class of the day is a nuclear disarmament game. After class, Jason returns home and calls his girlfriend on his videophone to tell her he got a job — as his dad’s boss. A demand for young, versatile college graduates prompted the hire. The Texan’s predictions for the future were mostly bizarre, although a few were remarkably spot-on. A variety of prediction outcomes indicate that the future is wholly uncertain.


4A OPINION

LAURA WRIGHT, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / @TexanEditorial Thursday, March 27, 2014

HORNS UP: PROFESSOR GIVEN ACCESS TO BORDER WALL INFO

4

COLUMN

As The Daily Texan reported Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Beryl Howell has granted a UT law professor access to the names and addresses of people affected by the 670-mile border wall because of possible discrimination. In 2008, two years after the wall was authorized by Congress, Denise Gilman, co-director of the law school’s immigration clinic, requested access to the information but received nothing more than a heavily redacted “handful of documents.” Gilman sued in response in 2009 but never received the withheld records. Now that a federal judge has forced the government to turn them over, Gilman can begin to explore possible discriminatory effects on those who live near, and now, in some cases, behind, the wall. Horns up to Judge Howell for valuing citizens’ right to access government documents and for shining a light on the possible effects of the wall’s construction.

In 2008, two years after the wall was authorized by Congress, Denise Gilman, co-director of the law school’s immigration clinic, requested access to the information but received nothing more than a heavily redacted “handful of documents.” COLUMN

Paul Sancya / Associated Press

Jayne Rowse, left, looks at her partner April DeBoer on Friday after a decision to strike down Michigan’s gay-marriage ban.

Regnerus findings of fact demand clear UT action By Travis Knoll Guest Columnist @tknoll209K

Ricky Llamas / Daily Texan Staff

Kiefer Shenk, finance/business honors and sport management senior, sits in West Campus in August.

In student housing game, advantage goes to landlords By David Davis

Daily Texan Columnist @daveedalon

Recently, I was asked by my landlord to renew my lease. The notice gave me only a week to make a decision as to where I want to live four months from now, and I realized that I didn’t have very many options. Any hope of finding a cheaper apartment this late in the semester that was closer to campus was a long shot. I really enjoy the peacefulness of my neighborhood, and I am not all that crazy about the whole process of moving. So, I gave in. But after reading my lease renewal papers, I was shocked to find that my monthly rent was going to be raised $50. This doesn’t sound like a fortune, but in the course of a year, it would mean spending $600 more for rent to live in the same place I do now. Even though I was sure that I was not being personally victimized, I spoke with other students who live off campus and discovered that many others were subject to increases in rent. In fact, Austin has the highest average monthly rent in Texas, and students have certainly not been immune to high rent prices. When looking for off-campus housing, students take a few factors into account, including location, amenities and most importantly, price. Many students may want to pay cheaper rent, but depending on where they want to live, students may have to trade affordability for convenience. Student housing complexes are aware of students’ desire to live within close proximity to the University, and they take advantage of students through raising already high rent prices. One of the most popular student neighborhoods, West Campus, has unmatched

Many students may want to pay cheaper rent, but depending on where they want to live, students may have to trade affordability for convenience.

convenience, as many of its student housing buildings are within walking distance of the University. Home to many new luxury apartment complexes, landlords are also able to sell students on the aesthetic qualities of the housing in the area. But those who wish to live in the highly desirable neighborhood must plan almost a year in advance of when they want to move in as apartment complexes start to pre-lease units for the next year in the middle of the fall semester. If living arrangements are not made long in advance, students are often left with few housing options at less than competitive prices. The demand for apartments in West Campus is very high and price-inelastic, meaning landlords have the opportunity to increase rent to as much as they think students or their parents are willing to pay because there are always other students who want to live there and would happily take over a vacant apartment. The opportunity to capitalize on students’ desire to be close to the University and to the social events that take place in West Campus has led to some of the highest rents in Austin. A one-bedroom apartment in the city is, on average, $834 per month, but a one-bedroom apartment in West Campus can rent for well over $1,000 a month. The National Low Income Housing Coalition reported that in order to afford the average one-bedroom apartment in Austin, the income, at minimum wage, of more than two full-time jobs is required. Landlords do not consider students from all socioeconomic backgrounds when setting rent prices. It would be impossible for students to work two fulltime jobs just to make enough money to afford rent, when the purpose of living there is to attend class at UT. Geography sophomore Mijal Grosman believes that annual increases in rent prices do not take into account students who work in order to afford rent. “It’s unfair to some students because, in general, working student wages don’t go up at the same rate as rent does,” Grosman said. While it is certainly understandable that profit is the ultimate end game for owners of student housing properties, it is important for them to remember that their market is almost exclusively made up of college students, who sometimes spend more money on housing in a year than they do on in-state tuition for a semester, and to make price adjustments with this reality in mind. Davis is an international relations and French junior from Houston.

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

On March 21, federal judge Bernard Friedman struck down Michigan’s 2004 law banning same-sex marriage. The decision, despite pertaining to another state, still paid a great deal of attention to Texas, or at least to research conducted by UT sociology professor Mark Regnerus. In his opinion, the judge drew on emails obtained through open records requests and Regnerus’ testimony in court to conclude that Regnerus’ gay parenting study was “concocted at the behest” of Regnerus’ funders, the conservative Witherspoon Institute and Bradley Foundation, to be used at the Supreme Court. Friedman wrote that Regnerus “obliged” his politically minded funders — funders who “clearly wanted” predetermined results that would protect “the funder’s concept of ‘the institution of marriage’” from the assault by the prevailing social science consensus. A Pre-trial deposition by Regnerus’ colleague and fellow witness BYU economics professor Joseph Price also exposed a previously unknown connection between Regnerus’ study and the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank. According to The New York Times, Heritage hosted various meetings to help coordinate Regnerus and others’ research that they hoped would halt gay marriage victories in court. According to the deposition, Regnerus attended at least one such meeting, as did the state’s other social science expert witnesses. The judge, a Reagan appointee, concluded that whatever his interpretations, “[Regnerus] certainly cannot purport to have undertaken a scholarly research effort” on gay parenting outcomes. Such a pointed rebuke by a legal authority embarrasses Regnerus, but it also gives the University a simple way to revisit its own August 2012 decision to defend Regnerus against allegations of “scientific misconduct.” UT should scrutinize the Michigan trial testimonies and determine whether the new evidence presented warrants some sort of formal action or whether the University should once again reaffirm that Regnerus has done nothing wrong. Mainly, UT should consider whether Regnerus was dishonest regarding the “proposing, conducting, or reporting” of his findings. Although the University recently distanced itself from Regnerus’ opinions, in the 2012 inquiry, the University found no evidence that Regnerus violated ethics norms. Based on the scant evidence at the time, the University had a point. Having not yet filed briefs or testified, Regnerus argued that he had merely put out controversial research to let other scholars and organizations interpret the findings as they wished, a stance even I accepted at the time. Regnerus’ own study

Such a pointed rebuke by a legal authority ... gives the University a simple way to revisit its own August 2012 decision to defend Regnerus against allegations of ‘scientific misconduct.’

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to editor@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

warned against politicizing his findings and claimed that it could not answer questions surrounding the “legal legitimacy” of gay marriages. Regnerus also claimed in his article that “the funding sources played no role at all in the design or conduct of the study, the analyses, the interpretations of the data, or in the preparation of this manuscript.” These arguments, weighed by Friedman in a court of law, were unnecessary, misleading and unethical. After all, Regnerus, like any activist researcher, could have simply acknowledged the funders’ involvement in his study and explained that he wished to stop the prevailing consensus. Instead, he hid their involvement. According to the emails released in February 2013, Regnerus asked Witherspoon for feedback regarding the study’s boundaries, timelines and the funders’ hopes for what the project might produce. Regnerus admitted on cross-examination that he filed away Heritage Foundation media talking points regarding his research after giving a talk on his study there days before the study’s publication. When questioned further, he said he “largely ignored” the document. Regnerus is not the first professor to have disclosure issues. After initially promoting former geology professor Charles Groat’s fracking study in July 2012 — around the same time Regnerus’ study came out — the University reprimanded Groat and updated its disclosure policies a few months later. In December 2012 an independent investigation noted deficiencies in UT’s procedures and confirmed that his employment by the company he was studying constituted a conflict of interest. Regnerus seemed to cross the line from “good-faith disagreements,” a plausible defense against misconduct allegations, and possible incompetence, to dishonesty in reporting his research, testifying and filing briefs across the nation even though his study warned it could not address the politics of gay marriage. Furthermore, non-disclosure on his part in a coordinated effort by Heritage, another conservative organization, to get multiple politically charged studies into the courtroom while his study was being routed through the Population Research Center recklessly put the University’s reputation on the line based only on partial disclosure. While Regnerus was not employed by Witherspoon, Regnerus seemed to produce his study’s conclusions for both ideological and financial reasons. Regnerus told the Texan he accepted Witherspoon and the Bradley Foundation’s $785,000 grant because receiving a National Institute of Health grant, typically $477,215 for 2011 according to the institute, for a polarized topic was timeconsuming and unlikely. According to Regnerus, the survey cost around $415,000 total. Some may ask why UT should bother pursuing a once-reputable scientist whose testimony has already been discredited and whose department has already distanced itself from his opinions and interpretations in court, citing the “highest ethical standards” of the department. Nevertheless, the evidence that has surfaced since the initial allegations suggests not only that Regnerus misled the academic community from the beginning, but also that he unnecessarily bent the academic process to present himself as unbiased in his research. If Friedman is correct that the funders influenced the research, Regnerus deserves direct institutional rebuke. If Friedman is incorrect, the University should defend Regnerus against the judge’s opinion. Either way, in the light of new evidence, the University must settle the question of Regnerus’ ethical behavior. Knoll is a first-year master’s student in Latin American studies from Dallas.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@TexanEditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


CLASS 5

SPORTS

5

Thursday, March 27, 2014

DRAFT

WALK-ON

that I can move in space, change direction and show that I can play defensive end and outside linebacker. When it comes down to it, they want to see my film and they want to see me move out here.” Senior wide receiver Mike Davis said he thought he could have done better. “I’m just shooting for whoever calls me,” Davis said. “I feel scouts know who I am. I take pride in my route-running ability. As a receiver, I’ll be able to separate, and I feel like I can do that really well and I can play inside and outside.” Senior safety Adrian Phillips said, from what he was told, Longhorn Network clocked his 40-time at a 4.37, but the scouts measured his time at a 4.44. “My fieldwork was exceptional,” Phillips said. “I think I did really well on that. I dropped the ball. I was mad about

“I feel I was a better player in the beginning of my career,” Jou said. “As I got older, I began to focus more on academics.” While in high school, Jou competed in USTA tournaments, Texas junior tournaments, national tournaments and even the Nike and Stanford junior tours. He played on the varsity team all four years at Memorial High School in Houston and won the state doubles title his senior season. “I have been playing tennis just as long as my teammates, [but] just not at the same level or intensity,” Jou said. Jou practices with the team for about three to four hours each day, and said he is treated equally, despite not being on scholarship like the rest of his teammates. He said being on the team has also taught him about

continues from page 6

continues from page 6

Pu Ying Huang / Daily Texan file photo

Safety Adrian Phillips and cornerback Carrington Byndom play against TCU in 2013. They both performed at the Pro Training Day on Wendensday morning.

that. I wanted to go perfect on that. Other than that, I feel like everything I came out and showed what I was and did my best and hopefully the scouts like it.” Senior defensive tackle Chris Whaley returned to the Pro Timing Day after he suffered a seasonending knee injury in the

SWIMMING

RECAP

here,” Chandler said. “The guys are starting on their own blocks.” Michigan took the 2013 NCAA Championship title, followed by California and Arizona, and Texas finished in fifth place. This year, 20 determined Longhorns are hoping to keep the title at home. “You will see a bunch of kids that have got a great shot to make the Olympics in 2016,” Reese said. The competition kicks off at 11 a.m. Thursday, with the preliminary rounds and finals to follow at 7 p.m.

Behind junior Bertine Strauss’ 13th-place finish, Texas (302-301-295=894, +34) finished a seasonbest eighth place at SDSU Farms Invitational in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. The eighth place finish marks the team’s first top10 finish of the year. Strauss and freshmen Julia Beck, Anne Hakula and Lara Weinstein all recorded season-best individual finishes. Powered by Beck, who shot a season-best 71 in the final round, Texas recorded the fourth lowest final-

continues from page 6

UNS AD IRNE FOR ONL

E! FRE ad s

d wor

only

West Virginia game last year. Whaley only participated in the bench press, and he said he maxed out at 22 reps at 225 pounds. Whaley measured in at the Pro Timing Day at 6-feet-3-inches, 273 pounds, nearly 30 pounds lighter than he was while he played last year. He said he was happy he lost

weight during the process of his recovery. “I kind of started running a little bit, and it’s progressing really good,” Whaley said. “I got all my range and motion back. Not all the flexibility back yet, but it‘s close and it’s getting there and I am about a month ahead of schedule.”

WOMEN’S GOLF / CAROLINE HALL round score in the 17-team field. Beck (+10), Strauss (+3), Hakula (+13) and Weinstein (+18) earned the Longhorns a +7 performance Wednesday to push their three-day total to 34over par — 37 strokes behind the leader. Overall, USC claimed team honors in the invitational, finishing 3-under par, while Stanford and UCLA finished tied for second at even-par. USC’s Karen Chung took home the individual title with a field-low 66 on Wednesday.

Bertine Strauss Junior

The Longhorns will conclude the regular season at the PING/ASU Invitational from April 4-6 in Tempe, Ariz.

William Jou Freshman

time management. “My teammates help me improve and encourage me to work harder every day,” Jou said. “We all get along.” Although he is not allowed to travel with the team yet, he attends every match he can. Jou has an older brother who is a UT School of Law student, but that’s not why Jou chose to come to Texas. “I felt like it was a good fit academically and a great place to pursue what I am interested in,” Jou said.

SOFTBALL continues from page 6 Longhorns would break the game wide open. Like the first inning, senior shortstop Taylor Thom led off with a single and a stolen base and would score on a single by Davis. Senior catcher Mandy Ogle blasted a two-run home run to left field to put Texas up 6-0. Sophomore second baseman Stephanie Ceo and Washington then had RBI hits to push the lead to 8-0. Ogle, who has hit a home run in back-to-back games, said she thinks the game is finally paying her back after a rough start to the season. “In the first half of the season, I was hitting it, but I wasn’t getting the gap shots, so I’m glad it’s finally coming through when it matters,” Ogle said. The three Longhorn pitchers combined to allow only

CLASSIFIEDS THE DAILY TEXAN

two hits and no base runners past second base. Davis picked up the win, striking out four and allowing only one hit in three innings pitched. Junior Gabby Smith and freshman Lauren Slatten each pitched a scoreless inning. Clark, who planned on getting all of the pitchers at least an inning in the circle, said it was good to see her pitchers be able to pitch well against opposing batters. “When they’re facing our hitters in practice, it’s different because they know each other so well,” Clark said. “This gives us an opportunity to see how they’re going to attack other hitters.” Texas will get the weekend off and then host Texas State next Wednesday before restarting conference play next weekend against Texas Tech.

ADVERTISING TERMS There are no refunds or credits. In the event of errors made in advertisement, notice must be given by 10 am the fi rst day of publication, as the publishers are responsible for only ONE incorrect insertion. In consideration of The Daily Texan’s acceptance of advertising copy for publication, the agency and the advertiser will indemnify and save harmless, Texas Student Media and its officers, employees and agents against all loss, liability, damage and expense of whatsoever nature arising out of the copying, printing or publishing of its advertisement including without limitation reasonable attorney’s fees resulting from claims of suits for libel, violation of right of privacy, plagiarism and copyright and trademark infringement. All ad copy must be approved by the newspaper which reserves the right to request changes, reject or properly classify an ad. The advertiser, and not the newspaper, is responsible for the truthful content of the ad. Advertising is also subject to credit approval.

Self-serve, 24/7 on the Web at www.DailyTexanOnline.com

360 Furn. Apts.

791 Nanny Wanted

THE PERFECT LOCATION! Five minutes to campus, pool, shuttle and Metro, shopping, parking, gated patio, summer rates available. Century Plaza Apts. 4210 Red River (512)452.4366 Park Plaza and Park Court Apts. 915 & 923 E. 41st St. (512)452.6518 apartmentsinaustin.net 452-6518 512-452-6518

512-

370 Unf. Apts.

$100 CASH* 1-4 Bedroom Elloras West Campus Apartments. 512-808-7292/ TitanMX12@gmail.com *For Sign-up this week only! 512-8087292

425 Rooms

AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY One large room in lovely home/ Central Austin. Perfect for Graduate Students. 10 minutes UT shuttle. $500 plus utilities. Share bath. 850-420-2122 AFFORDABLE STUDENT HOUSING meets Christian community. $495 and up. www. ConneXionHouse.org

766 Recruitment

$5,500-$10,000 PAID EGG DONORS SAT>1100/ACT>24/GPA>3.0 N/ Smokers, Ages 18-27. Reply to: info@eggdonorcenter.com

NANNY WANTED Westlake family seeking positive and cheerful nanny for only child (girl, age 9) after school and summers. Job would include help with homework, music lessons, transport to dance/ other classes, and light meal prep. Non-smoker, child care experience, good driving record and car insurance required. Preference given to students entering education, psychology, music or related fields. Resumes accepted at hillary@calavitta. com.

800 General Help Wanted

SWIM INSTRUCTOR JOBS Instructors needed for children’s Swim lessons. Will train. email resume: austininfo@ aqua-tots.com

BIKINI GIRLS for Lake Austin Bachelor Party ($$$). For more info, please respond to lakeaustinbachelorparty@ gmail.com SWIMMING POOL TECH Looking to hire Swimming Pool Equipment Repair Technician. Must have good driving record and experience cleaning pools. Wages starting from $12-18.00 for Qualified repair techs depending on skills. Applicants must be professional, responsible and dependable. Contact me at: mhurosky@longhornpoolservice.com

790 Part Time

PART-TIME OFFICE HELP Small property management/ real estate company looking for part-time assistant. Duties include processing end-ofmonth activities, monitoring rental properties, contacting necessary repair people, insuring leases are current, checking properties, general office errands. Must have own transportation and be willing to work July 15-August 15th. Close to campus. Very flexible hours. Spreadsheet and Word processing experience helpful. Pay commiserate with skill. Please email resume and salary requirements to: sjp@itinst.com.

super tuesday COUPONS

clip and save!

every week

SEE WHAT OUR

ONLINE SYSTEM has to offer, and place

YOUR AD

790 Part Time

920 Work Wanted

PPD Study Opportunities

PPD conducts medically supervised research studies to help evaluate new investigational medications. PPD has been conducting research studies in Austin for more than 25 years. The qualifications for each study are listed below. You must be available to remain in our facility for all dates listed for a study to be eligible. Call today for more information.

Men and Postmenopausal or Surgically Sterile Women 18 to 55 Up to $3000 Healthy & Non-Smoking BMI between 18 and 30 Weigh at least 110 lbs. Thu. 3 Apr. through Sun. 6 Apr. Thu. 10 Apr. through Sun. 13 Apr. Outpatient Visit: 17 Apr.

Men and Women 18 to 55

Up to $4000 Healthy & Non-Smoking BMI between 19 and 30 Females must weigh at least 110 lbs. Males must weigh at least 130 lbs. Thu. 3 Apr. through Sun. 6 Apr. Thu. 10 Apr. through Sun. 13 Apr. Thu. 17 Apr. through Sun. 20 Apr. Thu. 24 Apr. through Sun. 27 Apr.

Men and Postmenopausal or Surgically Sterile Women 18 to 55 Up to $1500 Healthy & Non-Smoking BMI between 18 and 30 Weigh at least 110 lbs. Thu. 17 Apr. through Sun. 20 Apr. Outpatient Visit: 24 Apr.

Men and Women 18 to 55

Up to $2000 Healthy & Non-Smoking BMI between 18 and 32 Fri. 11 Apr. through Mon. 14 Apr. Fri. 18 Apr. through Mon. 21 Apr. Outpatient Visit: 23 Apr.

NOW!

dailytexanclassifieds.com

512-462-0492 • ppdi.com

text “ppd” to 48121 to receive study information

visit dailytexanonline.com

TUTORS WANTED Seeks College-Educated Men 18–39 to Participate in a Six-Month Donor Program

Donors average $150 per specimen. Apply on-line

www.123Donate.com

910-Positions Wanted NETWORK SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR Upgrade, set-up, and monitor the company’s wide area networks and local area network. Perform maintenance, evaluation, installation, and training tasks to ensure LAN and WAN performance and user requirements and assess network performance. Deploy new accounting/managing software for newly acquired sites. OneSite Knowledge. Develop receipt software for non-accounting staff members using Clarion. Analyze products and recommend use of new products and services to managers and corporate. Establish and implement policies and procedures for LAN/WAN usage throughout the organization. Administer network workstations, utilizing one or more TCP/IP or non-TCP/ IP networking protocols. Requires bachelor degree in computer science. Send resumes to The Preiss Company. austinjobs360@gmail.com. Job is in Austin, TX.

for all subjects currently taught at UT. Starting at $10/hour. Apply online at www.99tutors. com or call 512-354-7656.

Sell Longhorn Stuff

PHD ACADEMIC REGALIA w/UT Hood, Mortar Board, $150 Cash. Email 4SBO2014@ GMAIL. COM

Sell Textbooks SCIENCE FICTION: After catastrophic biological warfare, we may not agree on what nature is or what civilization is. WILDERNESS is a novel by Alan Kovski. Available via Amazon.com SCIENCE FICTION: Life will change fast amid genetic engineering, climate engineering and economic upheavals. Will we cope? WONDERS AND TRAGEDIES is a novel by Alan Kovski. Available via Amazon. com SCIENCE FICTION: What will we become, years from now? Better or worse? Fools, victims, fortunate souls, survivors in dangerous times? REMEMBERING THE FUTURE: stories by Alan Kovski. Available via Amazon.com

RECYCLE


6 SPTS

6

STEFAN SCRAFIELD, SPORTS EDITOR / @texansports Thursday, March 27, 2014

TEXAS

TAMUCC

VS.

ENTER NOW WATER VOLLEYBALL FUN

STARTS HERE www.utrecsports.org

SIDELINE NBA HEAT

PACERS

NUGGETS

SPURS

CAVALIERS

PISTONS

TOP TWEET Charlie Strong @Strong_TexasFB

Joe Capraro / Daily Texan Staff

Sophomore right fielder Lindsey Stephens smashes an RBI double in Texas’ 8-0 run-rule of Texas A&M-Corpus Christi. Stephens, after riding the bench for much of the last year, is sparking the Longhorn offense, which is coming on as of late. She is hitting .407 with 10 home runs.

Longhorns leave Islanders stranded By Jacob Martella @ViewFromTheBox

The bats came alive Wednesday night against Texas A&M-Corpus Christi. Texas tallied 11 hits and benefitted from a five-run third inning to take an 8-0 runrule win. With a break from

conference play this weekend, head coach Connie Clark said she was pleased with the way the team came out against the Islanders. “We need to make sure that, on these two nonconference games, as well as our practices, that we’re very intense and we have a sense of urgency, so we can finish out

conference [play] strong,” Clark said. The Longhorn offense, which at times has started slow, got off to a quick start with senior centerfielder Brejae Washington getting on base with a bunt and then stealing second on the next pitch. Sophomore right fielder Lindsey Stephens put

the Longhorns ahead with an RBI double. Freshman pitcher Tiarra Davis and sophomore first baseman Holly Kern each added an RBI hit to extend the Texas lead to 3-0 after one inning. Clark said although Texas can’t score every time in the first inning, the team

has talked about winning every inning. “I like their approach,” Clark said. “That’s taking them to a heightened sense of awareness that they need to push every inning like it’s the seventh inning.” In the third inning, the

SOFTBALL page 5

MEN’S SWIMMING & DIVING

MEN’S TENNIS

Texas to host NCAA Championship

Tennis from Jou’s eyes: the life of the walk-on

By Courtney K. Norris @courtneyknorris

Texas will host the NCAA Division I Men’s Swimming and Diving Championship for the first time since 2003 from Thursday to Saturday at the Lee and Joe Jamail Texas Swimming Center. Head coach Eddie Reese has led the Longhorns to 10 NCAA titles in his 36 years as head coach, and if Texas finishes in first place this weekend, Reese will be tied with former Ohio State coach Mike Peppe for the NCAA record of 11 titles. The men’s No. 6 team has qualified four divers and shares the lead with California with 16 swimmers attending the championship. Reese has trained his athletes rigorously since September to prepare for the most important meet of the season. This is the weekend their hard work will potentially pay off. “To make this meet is a great statement,” Reese said. “A great commitment.” Freshman diver Mark Anderson qualified at the

By Brianna Holt @AllHailBrianna

Marshall Tidrick / Daily Texan Staff

Senior diver Will McCraney dives at the Big 12 championships on February 27. The Longhorns will bring four divers and 16 swimmers to the NCAA championships in Austin.

NCAA Zone ‘D’ Diving Meet in Minneapolis earlier this month, finishing first with 840.6 points, despite having been out of platform diving for weeks because of an ear condition. After undergoing a corrective operation, Anderson is now required to wear a polo cap when he competes, but that isn’t holding him back.

After qualifying for his first NCAA Championship, Anderson’s teammates shared a photo via Instagram of Reese and all the swimmers wearing identical caps. Diving coach Matt Scoggin has been impressed with Anderson’s perseverance this season. “He had a great ability to stay cool and calm and

focus on what makes the dive work at a very crucial moment,” Scoggin said. In its seven times hosting the NCAA Championship, Texas has won three of the titles. Junior diver Will Chandler considers home-pool advantage to help the team. “We are very comfortable

SWIMMING page 5

NFL DRAFT

Byndom stands out at Pro Timing Day By Jeremy Thomas @jeremyobthomas

Longhorns eligible for the upcoming draft displayed their talents in front of NFL scouts Wednesday at the team’s Pro Timing Day. Senior cornerback Carrington Byndom was among the players who impressed scouts. Byndom ran a 4.37 40-time. He was not invited to participate

in the NFL Scouting Combine in February. “I had to come out today with a lot to prove and today was my day to kind of show everybody what I can do and what I’m capable of,” Byndom said. “I think a lot of scouts had me running a lot slower than that, so to come out and run that is really good. I could have done a little bit better on my position work, but there’s still

time for that. But overall, pretty good day.” Byndom said he has heard rumors about where or if he will be drafted in May. “I can’t really listen to all that,” Byndom said. “If my name gets called, then my name gets called. If it doesn’t, then let’s see if we can make a team.” Senior defensive lineman Jackson Jeffcoat posted high numbers at

the combine with his 4.63 40-time and his 36-inch vertical jump. He only participated in the bench press Wednesday because he said he did not think he performed well with it in Indianapolis. “I went out there and showed I was in shape, showed that I’ve been working,” Jeffcoat said. “The goal was to show

DRAFT page 5

William Jou did not think he would get the chance to represent the men’s tennis team after he first applied as a freshman at Texas. After choosing to pursue a degree at Texas, Jou emailed head coach Michael Center and hit for him in May during his summer orientation. “I hit that summer with [junior Jacoby Lewis] and a former player, Chris Camillone,” Jou said. “I didn’t make the team then, but I was asked to come back after the summer.” After spending his whole summer training, Jou tried again in the fall and knew he had made the team when he was asked about his shoe size. Once aware that he had made the team, then ranked No. 8 in the country, Jou didn’t know what to expect. “Obviously Texas has a really good team, so I didn’t feel needed,” Jou said. “But this has been a great opportunity, and I have no pressure as far as expectations. It’s whatever I can make out of it.” The mechanical engineering freshman picked up his first racket at the age of 5 and began playing with his father.

WALK-ON page 5

Good luck to everyone participating at Pro Day in front of all 32 NFL franchises! #TexasFight

TODAY IN HISTORY

1939

First NCAA Men’s Basketball Championship: Oregon beats Ohio State 46-33

SPORTS BRIEFLY Northwestern players allowed to unionize

CHICAGO — In a stunning ruling that could revolutionize a college sports industry worth billions of dollars and have dramatic repercussions at schools coast to coast, a federal agency said Wednesday that football players at Northwestern University can create the nation’s first union of college athletes. The decision by a regional director of the National Labor Relations Board answered the question at the heart of the debate over the unionization bid: Are football players who receive full scholarships to the Big Ten school considered employees under federal law, thereby allowing them to unionize? Peter Sung Ohr, the NLRB regional director, said in a 24-page decision that the players “fall squarely” within the broad definition of employee. Pro-union activists cheered as they learned of the ruling. “It’s like preparing so long for a big game and then when you win — it is pure joy,” said former UCLA linebacker Ramogi Huma, the designated president of Northwestern’s would-be football players’ union. —Associated Press

Softball game against Baylor rescheduled

The Longhorns’ game at Baylor has been rescheduled for May 6 at 6 p.m. The game, which was originally supposed to be played on March 23 at Getterman Stadium in Waco was rained out. —Evan Berkowitz


COMICS 7

COMICS

7

Thursday, March 27, 2014

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Thursday, March 27, 2014

Crossword

SUDOKUFORYOU t

2 7 9 9 4 1 7

2 7 3 1

7 3 1 4

3 1 7 8

7 3 2 6

4 8 9 9 9 5 2

Earn a graduate degree at St. Mary’s University

Today’s solution will appear here next issue

4 7 5 2 3 8 9 6 1

8 3 6 9 4 1 7 2 5

9 1 2 7 6 5 4 8 3

2 4 3 1 8 9 6 5 7

Get started today at www.stmarytx.edu/grad Arrr matey. •ThisPh.D. scurrvy • beast is today’s answerrrrrr. Master’s Joint Crop it out, or it’ll be the the fishes for ya! Degrees • Combined Bachelor’s San Antonio, Texas and Master’s • Online and 6 4 2 8 5 3 1 9 7 Distance Learning

5 7 9 6 4 1 8 3 2

1 6 7 4 5 2 8 3 9

5 8 9 3 7 6 1 4 2

7 5 4 6 1 3 2 9 8

6 9 8 5 2 7 3 1 4

3 2 1 8 9 4 5 7 6

Edited by Will Shortz

No. 0220

ACROSS 33 What un desierto 59 Rice, for one 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 lacks 60 “The Grapes of 1 One may follow a Wrath” figure 14 15 16 34 First-aid kit staple long drive 61 Wyoming’s ___ 35 Article in Vogue 5 CNBC topic 17 18 19 Range Paris 10 Tidy sum 62 Nude alternative 20 21 22 36 Mug, e.g. 14 Subject of the 63 Reel in 1994 best seller 37 First name of a 23 24 25 former president 64 Origami, e.g. “The Late Shift” … or, read 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 15 Scoop 65 Drop, as pounds another way, 16 Flurries 33 34 35 what each of the 17 Big mailer to the DOWN shaded lines is 37 38 39 over-50 crowd 1 Make some noise 36 39 Veer off course 18 More than loud 2 When repeated, 40 41 42 40 “… ___ go!” 19 Building often “Amen!” 41 Reducing, after near a cafeteria 44 45 46 3 Latin phrase on a 43 “on” memo 20 Rapacious 47 48 49 42 ___ die 4 Pink, e.g. 22 The Golf Channel 43 “Phew!” co-founder, to 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 5 Laborer on an 44 Empty talk fans old roof, maybe 57 58 59 45 Patrol boat 23 Ones getting a 6 Island roots 47 Dictionary label good licking? 60 61 62 7 Body ___ 49 Gossipy Barrett 24 Math subgroup 8 French Open 63 64 65 50 Cheerios 26 George feature Washington, for 52 Things often left 9 Flooey lead-in PUZZLE BY ZHOUQIN BURNIKEL AND DON GAGLIARDO one at copy shops 10 One wearing a 29 Do the trick 57 Kind of place collar 29 Got one’s feet 51 Paul in the 42 Golf 30 Trash collector 58 Dodge wet? Songwriters Hall fundamentals 11 “You failed to of Fame convince me” 31 Harebrained 45 Convincing, as ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE 12 Petty of “A 53 Pro ___ 32 More current an argument League of Their W A D S T H A N D A S H 34 Reviewing 54 Sole support? 46 Prefix with brow Own” O M I T H O H O S I B I S 37 Jazz trumpet 55 Tales of old O M O O E L E N A P E R T 13 Salinger girl 48 Zapped, in a way sounds 21 Hotshot F O R W A R D M A R C H 56 Source of some 38 God with two 49 Through with carbs E S M E O A T S 22 Out of kilter ravens on his S R O C O M P A N Y H A L T 25 Ricelike pasta shoulders 50 Drill, for one 58 …: Abbr. H I P P O S L U G O T O E 26 Ricochet Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday A V E R T Y E S K N I S H 27 Old shopping crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. R E N E K E N I A G R E E locale AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit P R E S E N T A R M S E R E 28 Polish-born nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. R O S E E P E E musician who Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past R E A D Y A I M F I R E was awarded puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). I S N T D I O D E I M A C a Presidential Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. M I C E S A G E T L A S H Medal of Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. P R O D G A R Y E X P O Freedom

S U D O K UPrep to highest Fthe degree. O

MCAT® | LSAT® | GMAT® | GRE® Available:

In Person

LiveOnline

Use promo code DailyTexan$150 to save $150 on classroom prep. PrincetonReview.com | 800-2Review


8 L&A

HANNAH SMOTHERS, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR / @DailyTexanArts Thursday, March 27, 2014

8

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Sous vide method reinvents art of cooking

By Hannah Jane DeCiutiis @hannahjaned

Whether you are a burgeoning Iron Chef or you get nervous just watching Ina Garten, the concept behind cooking is fairly universal: to kill harmful pathogens and to make the food tastier to eat. Over the past two decades, DIY kitchen enthusiasts and restaurant chefs alike have been perfecting a method called sous vide to achieve both pasteurization and a surprisingly tasty result. Sous vide, meaning “under vacuum” in French, is one of the most logical cooking methods out there. Vacuum-seal the raw food, place it in a water bath that is consistently held at the desired temperature, wait until the food reaches that temperature and don’t worry about overcooking — the food can’t possibly go above the temperature of the water. The result? Evenlycooked food that retains many of its natural flavors, which are often amplified. DIY sous vide setups

traditionally involve athome components like pressure cookers and temperature controllers. As sous vide has become trendier, much more elegant machines have become easy to find with a simple Google search and a hefty amount of cash. Aside from being hailed as more delicious, sous vide-cooked foods are often touted as being significantly safer and more nutritional than traditionally cooked foods. After all, since everything is sealed up, the nutrients stay in and the bacteria stay out, right? Well, sort of. Sous vide foods are considered to be healthier for several reasons. First, they’re cooked in an environment with little oxygen, so the lack of oxidation preserves more of the essential fatty acids obtained from meats and fish that your body needs. Sous vide foods have also been found to retain many more of their vitamins and minerals than traditionally cooked foods. Plant cell walls won’t deteriorate the way they do during traditional steaming or boiling, so vegetables keep their nutrients rather than leaching them out into the water they are cooked in. Despite the apparent health benefits, sous vide is not entirely without risk. An introductory biology class will teach you that all raw food items contain millions of bacteria microbes

Illustration by Hannah Hadidi / Daily Texan Staff

— some good, some bad. Cooking food sous vide at more than 140 degrees and then serving it while it is still hot will successfully pasteurize it, meaning you will kill the active bacteria and any pathogens of interest. But some bacteria produce spores. Spores are harmless on their own, but can turn into active bacteria if they spend enough time in the “danger zone,” between 40 and 140 degrees, which is why you need to serve the food soon after taking it away from the heat. These spores aren’t killed by

FILM

By Kat Sampson

Shauna Martin, founder and CEO of Daily Greens, started juicing as a way to get healthy after she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005.

@katclarksamp

Essay examining movie industry wins awards for graduate student With a passion for film and a talent for writing, radio-television-film graduate student Paul Monticone wrote an award-winning, 40page essay after researching for two months. Monticone’s essay, “Useful Cinema, of Limited Use?: Assessing the Role of Motion Pictures in the Largest Public Relations Campaign of the 1920s,” received first place in the 2014 Society for Cinema and Media Studies Student Writing Award competition. SCMS, a scholarly organization committed to promoting film, television and related media studies, presented Monticone with his award March 21 at its conference in Seattle, Wash. Eleven other graduate students from the radio-television-film department were also invited to participate in the conference. The essay examines the film industry and its broader function within advocacy campaigns, advertising and promotion. Monticone uses the National Electric Light Association’s public relations campaign in the 1920s as a specific case study to represent private ownership in the electric power industry. Within the case study, Monticone explores how film was used to argue against

in many cases. Pasteurization is a function of temperature and time, so having precise control over both exact temperature and cook time is a flexibility that the sous vide method provides. As a result, the rave reviews about the texture and flavor profiles of sous vide foods are only increasing. With emerging sous vide technologies becoming more sophisticated, and hopefully cheaper, it won’t be surprising if sous vide machines soon become staples in the home cook’s arsenal of kitchen gadgets.

Company touts natural juice

Mengwen Cao Daily Texan Staff

@DailyTexanArts

prepared meal. If a restaurant takes too long when chilling or freezing the packaged food, the spores can easily become active bacteria. Storing vacuum-sealed foods improperly can also lead to an outgrowth of Clostridium botulinum, which creates a toxin that produces botulism, which can be fatal in doses the size of a particle of baking powder. Even with these risks in mind, cooking sous vide at home is no more dangerous than traditional cooking. In fact, it can actually be safer

FOOD

Radio-television-film graduate student Paul Monticone won first place in the 2014 Society for Cinema and Media Studies Student Writing Award competition.

By Alexandra Dubinski

pasteurization — you have to completely sterilize the food to get rid of them, which is difficult to do with sous vide. This can be problematic with restaurants and industrial food processors, which often employ the cook-chill method of sous vide. Food is cooked under vacuum and is then quickly chilled or frozen. When done properly, the shelf life of cook-chilled food is much longer, and few people will be able to tell the difference between the precooked food and a freshly

U.S. government regulation. “Nobody knew how film would work in this way,” Monticone said. “Some of the companies I looked at thought about making a regular movie and doing it in a way that the messages snuck in and nobody would really notice.” A common example of this, according to Monticone, would be to incorporate scenes in which a local gas or electric company goes out of business, causing the town to erupt in chaos. By doing this, the scene then emphasizes the importance of utilities. Radio-television-film assistant professor Caroline Frick, who worked closely with Monticone in providing feedback, said he is a gifted writer and one of the most impressive students within the department. “His work is a valuable contribution to the society,” Frick said. “Very few films that relate to this kind of research exist, so the fact that Paul was able to construct his paper out of such little data is truly impressive.” Monticone had originally drafted the essay for an assignment in Electrification, an undergraduate seminar that mirrors a graduate class. He said his advisors encouraged him to narrow his arguments to fit more precisely within the realm of film and

media studies. “The most important thing for producing good scholarship is to give it time,” Monticone said. “And not just so that it is sitting there, but to fill that time up with reading it, revising it and figuring out more ways in which the thing you’re thinking about contributes to things that other people are thinking about.” One of Monticone’s advisers, Tom Schatz, professor and director of media studies, said this is a major accomplishment for Paul and the department. “This research is an exciting and submerging field that’s changing the way we look at film and media studies,” Schatz said. “And it’s one that Paul is very invested in.” Monticone started his film career as a cinema studies undergraduate student at the University of Toronto, and he then got a master’s degree in film and moving image at Concordia University in Montreal. Monticone hopes to ultimately become a professor. “The most fun I have is putting together a course and teaching it.” Monticone said. “If you’re a filmmaker or reviewer, you’re trapped in the present moment. If you’re a scholar, you’re more free to go where your intellectual interests take you.”

Each Saturday, the farmer’s market at Republic Square Park is filled with white tents housing various vendors and the occasional string quartet. Daily Greens is one of the busiest of those white tents. The Austin-based company sells bottles of cold-pressed drinks that are each packed with six pounds of locally sourced produce, consisting of nine servings of fruits and vegetables. The juices are also sold at Whole Foods, Central Market and other natural grocers around the Austin area. Daily Greens founder and CEO Shauna Martin created the company after being diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005. At 33 years old, with a nine-month-old son and no family history of breast cancer, the diagnosis was a shock. A vegetarian for most of her life, Martin always considered herself healthy, but she still sought out a way to combat the draining chemotherapy treatments with a change in diet. “Being diagnosed with breast cancer was a real wake-up call for me,” Martin said. “I developed the cleanse to help me detox from all the poisons and trauma.” Soon, juicing became an integral part of her diet as a meal supplement. Her friends and family teased her for consuming what they called “pond water,” but the hobby eventually turned into a day job. “I convinced a friend to start making the juice with me for no pay, and we would spend every weekend making juice until midnight,” Martin said. “I would take what we made to the farmer’s market the next morning and each weekend we would sell out. So I kept making the juices, all the while keeping my day

Photo courtesy of Daily Greens

job as a corporate attorney.” Apart from creating a product that Martin said is akin to drinking from the fountain of youth, she also became the board president of the Breast Cancer Resource Center of Texas. Through the center, Martin co-founded the Pink Ribbon Cowgirls, a social network for young breast cancer survivors in the Austin area. Runi Limary, a patient navigator at the BCRC, worked with Martin during her time as the center’s board president. “Shauna Martin personifies a strong, young breast cancer survivor,” Limary said. “First and foremost, she’s a mom, [a] wife and [a] careerminded woman. She has accomplished a tremendous amount since she was first diagnosed with breast cancer.” Sean Hickman, a Daily Greens employee, can be found working the tent any given Saturday and speaks to customers about Martin’s positivity. “[She] has not just overcome a fatal disease, but she has become a source of awareness,” Hickman said. “Shauna is a perfect example of how you can fight for your health.” Martin makes an effort to push her product to an audience that doesn’t just

include health gurus. Vitality, one of the seven Daily Greens juices, is based off of the sweet and savory taste of barbecue sauce. It was created in an effort to bring meat-lovers into the juicing game. “Our cleanses are designed to help folks ease into a healthier lifestyle,” Martin said. Freshman Tayla Daniel moved to the U.S. from Australia in high school, said the juices remind her of the clean eating attitude in Australia. “During the summers, my mom would grind all the fruits and vegetables and just drink that,” Daniel said. “You wouldn’t add anything to it. With Daily Greens, it’s the same. You can taste that it’s healthy and that it’s doing good for your body.” Daily Greens, which is in the process of expanding to Whole Foods sites across the country, is gaining popularity. Martin said she couldn’t be happier. “When pure exhaustion sets in, the only thing that keeps you going is an unwavering belief in what you are doing,” Martin said. “I believe in Daily Greens and the health benefits of drinking a daily green juice with all of my heart, and that is what drives me every day.”


The Daily Texan 2014-03-27