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NEWS PAGE 5

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UNIVERSITY

Despite hazy policy, UT pushes entrepreneurship By Bobby Blanchard @bobbycblanchard

Austin, which Forbes calls America’s No. 1 boomtown, has become a technology hub as a wave of innovation and entrepreneurship has come to town — and the University of Texas is trying to catch-up and ride that wave. The University and

students groups are working to encourage entrepreneurship on campus, but some students who are starting companies say UT is still far behind in resources other colleges that have played the entrepreneurial game for decades provide. And while entrepreneurial-minded student organizations on campus said they have expanded their

BIG 12 CHAMPIONSHIPS

outreach this semester, UT is in the middle of addressing a confusing intellectual property policy that may discourage students from pursuing entrepreneurship, as it leaves a student company’s profits exposed to the University’s hands. As the UT System

STARTUP page 3

Predictable Data is a data cleaning service that autocompleted missing data and identifies potential incorrect data fields. Dwayne Smurdon, one of the company’s cofounders, said the most useful resource the University offered him was networking opportunities.

Ready Set Golf is a nonprofit based in Boston that pairs business leaders with students for mentorship opportunities. Founder Margaret Efthim said the nonprofit comes with different challenges because she relies on sponsors and fundraisers to keep business going.

Burpy is a grocery delivering service that is targeted toward busy students who don’t have time to shop or the elderly. Founder Aseem Ali said he is currently in Longhorn Startup, a class the University offers to help student businesses.

Racing ahead of the BIG 12 Women’s track and field steals first conference title since 2006 By Daniel Clay @dclay567

No. 5 Texas grabbed six individual titles in Ames, Iowa, this weekend en route to winning the Big 12 women’s indoor track and field championship, its first since 2006. Redshirt junior pole vaulter Kaitlin Petrillose

highlighted the outing as she became the first Big 12 women’s pole vaulter to claim three straight titles. “We were happy with the individual conference champions we had but also about people reaching the top eight and scoring,” head coach Mario Sategna said. Junior Ashley Spencer and

sophomore Courtney Okolo finished in the top two in the 400 meter. Spencer’s time clocked in as second best in the nation, while Okolo’s was the nation’s third fastest this year. Senior middle distance runner Marielle Hall helped secure the title with two wins of her own.

Earning 920 points, more than any woman in the meet, Hall topped the 3,000 meter with a personal-best 9:15.57 and ran the mile in 4:41.78, good for third in school history. “It was great to see Marielle step up,” Sategna said.

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For women’s swimming, 100-yard freestyle is as easy as 1, 2, 3 By Kunal Patel @kunalpatel

The Longhorns did it again this weekend, securing another Big 12 title. Texas glided through competition to sweep seven events Saturday. Grabbing their 12th Big 12 title, the Longhorns set out on a mission and never strayed. Texas ended the meet with 1,109.5 points atop runner-up Kansas’ 617. The Longhorns not only beat their competition but also improved personal times. Freshman Tasija Karosas started off the night with her personal best 1:53.49 in the 200 backstroke.

Mary Beth Hamilton

Inside

Men’s swimming and diving wins 35th straight Big 12 championship. Page 6. Senior butterfly/freestyle swimmer Ellen Lobb continued her dominance in the 50 freestyle to win her third consecutive Big 12 title in the event. She then translated her success from the 50-yard into the 100yard freestyle to edge out teammate senior freestyle swimmer Samantha Tucker by one one-hundredth of a second. As if first and second wasn’t enough,

Marshall Tidrick / Daily Texan Staff

Junior Gretchen Jacques finished second in the 200 IM race Thursday. Junior Kelsey LeNeave beat her out for the title.

senior backstroke/freestyle swimmer Alex Hooper completed the sweep by claiming third place

in the event. Lobb said all she wanted

SWIM page 7

SYSTEM

CAMPUS

System will lease unused building space to retailers

Explore UT inspires young generations

By Madlin Mekelburg @madlinbmek

The UT System will lease out more than 50,000 square feet of its new consolidated building to retailers. Last week, the System announced administrative services and employees in downtown Austin will be integrated into one building on Seventh Street, between Lavaca and Colorado streets. The building will be completed in late 2016 or early 2017. The System currently operates out of five buildings downtown: O. Henry Hall, Claudia Taylor Johnson

By Justin Atkinson @jusatk

Hall, Ashbel Smith Hall and the Lavaca and Colorado buildings. According to System spokeswoman Jenny LaCoste-Caputo, the Lavaca and Colorado buildings will be demolished to make room for the construction of the new building. According to Scott Kelley, executive vice chancellor for business affairs, the estimated cost of the project is $102 million. Kelley said projected savings for the System could be between $2 million and $8 million a year, with a total estimated net savings of

About 50,000 people flooded the UT campus Saturday for Explore UT — nicknamed “The Biggest Open House in Texas” — which encourages schoolchildren to pursue higher education. Explore UT, in its 15th year, is held on the first weekend of March, with preparations beginning in August. President William Powers Jr. appoints an academic dean to coordinate the planning committee, and volunteers plan

BUILDING page 2

EDUCATION page 2

Ethan Oblak / Daily Texan Staff

Pharmacy student Lynn Keerikattu helps Eric Thompson mix chemicals during a “potions class” at Explore UT. These events are meant to help inspire younger generations to attend a university.

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For the biggest, tastefully vulgar laughs around campus. UT’s Student Humor Publication. Tomorrow

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Monday, March 3, 2014*

NEWS

FRAMES featured photo Volume 114, Issue 115

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor Laura Wright (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com

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Managing Editor Shabab Siddiqui (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@ gmail.com Sports Office (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office (512) 232-2209 dtlifeandarts@gmail.com Retail Advertising (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising (512) 471-5244 classifieds@ dailytexanonline.com

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Visitors pass through Jester during Explore UT on Saturday afternoon.

EDUCATION

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The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

hundreds of events during the fall semester. As a senior staff member working inside one of the information booths, finance senior Truc Nguyen said she enjoys encouraging younger students to get excited about college. “It’s an opportunity for children and little kids to come to UT and know that they can come to college,” Nguyen said. “It’s for everyone. We want to tell younger students and families that college is an option.” Of the 50,000 people, about 19,500 were students representing 109 school districts and 230 individually registered schools from across Texas. Advertising senior Angelica King said she thinks attendance at the open house event has grown in recent years. “There’s always a pretty

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2013 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

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good turnout, and it seems like the volume of people who come to visit is steadily increasing,” King said. “There are literally families everywhere, and I think the students know not to come out of their rooms.” Environmental science junior Zoi Thompson, a volunteer at the event, said despite the increase in visitors, UT has been able to accommodate the students and their families. “It can be hard to accommodate all the people visiting, but UT is really prepared and organized after years of doing the event,” Thompson

There are literally families everywhere, and I think the students know not to come out of their rooms. —Angelica King, Advertising senior

said. “It’s really well set up to guide people to their interests.” Thompson said even though there are slight schedule changes every year in events run by organizations, she feels the objective of Explore UT continues to be to motivate younger generations toward higher education.

“It’s up to the school and different organizations to put on the events, so sometimes it changes, sometimes it stays the same,” Thompson said. “We’ve always strived to aim the events at younger kids to get them excited about coming to college. I think the underlying motivation is to show that college is possible.”

ATTENTION UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS AWARDS TO BE GIVEN IN THE AMOUNT OF

This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25 Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Wright Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala, Riley Brands, Amil Malik, Eric Nikolaides Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shabab Siddiqui Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan Rudner Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Antonia Gales, Anthony Green, Jacob Kerr, Pete Stroud, Amanda Voeller Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Julia Brouillette, Nicole Cobler, Alyssa Mahoney, Madlin Mekelburg Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Reinsch Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brett Donohoe, Reeana Keenen, Kevin Sharifi Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Mitts Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hirrah Barlas, Bria Benjamin, Alex Dolan, Omar Longoria Multimedia Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charlie Pearce, Alec Wyman Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sam Ortega Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jonathan Garza, Shweta Gulati, Pu Ying Huang, Shelby Tauber, Lauren Ussery Senior Videographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor Barron, Jackie Kuenstler, Dan Resler, Bryce Seifert Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Smothers Associate Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren L’Amie Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Eleanor Dearman, Kritika Kulshrestha, David Sackllah, Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stefan Scrafield Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Hummer Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Evan Berkowitz, Garrett Callahan, Jori Epstein, Matt Warden Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Hadidi Senior Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cody Bubenik, Ploy Buraparate, Connor Murphy, Aaron Rodriguez, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephanie Vanicek Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeremy Hintz Associate Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarah Stancik Senior Technical Staff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Shen, Roy Varney Special Ventures Co-editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard, Chris Hummer Online Outreach Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fred Tally-Foos Journalism Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Michael Brick

$2,000, $3,000 & $10,000 University Co-op George H. Mitchell Student Award for Academic Excellence

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BUILDING

continues from page 1 more than $125 million over 30 years. “If you look at the age, it’ll start saving money right away,” Kelley said. “[Ashbel Smith Hall] needs roof repair right now, the little plaza area needs to be waterproofed. If we chose not to [build a new office] we would be spending millions of dollars over the next couple of years to do those. By deciding to move, we can halt that and defer those costs and not make [those changes] and save money from the beginning.” Kelley said current office space occupied across all five System buildings totals approximately 226,000 square feet, while the new building will have about 258,000 square feet. “Because we’ll be more efficiently using the space, we can take the employees here and move them over to occupy about 200,000 square feet, so we’ve got about 58,000 additional square feet,” Kelley said. Kelley said leasing out some of the space for commercial development has always been a possibility. “We’d always envisioned potentially putting some retail on the first floor,” Kelley said. “We thought that would be good for our employees. We think, and we had discussions with the city, it also may create a catalyst for future development in this area, which we would also applaud as residents here during the day.” LaCoste-Caputo said approximately 200 employees will be displaced once construction begins and will be temporarily moved to other office spaces around Austin. In a press release from the System, Kelley said the remaining System buildings — O.Henry Hall, Claudia Taylor Johnson Hall and Ashbel Smith Hall — will be available for leasing. “O. Henry Hall will remain owned by the UT System and leased to new tenants,” Kelley said in the press release. “The property housing the Claudia Taylor Johnson Building and Ashbel Smith Hall will be available for improvement or redevelopment.” System Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa, who announced last month that he is stepping down as chancellor, updated his higher education improvement plan, “A Framework for Advancing Excellence,” in 2012. In the plan, Cigarroa said he wanted the System to develop stronger “space utilization efficiencies.”


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Monday, March 3, 2014

W&N 3 Lauren Ussery / Daily Texan Staff

Lauren Ussery / Daily Texan Staff

Shweta Gulati / Daily Texan Staff

Dwayne Smurdon, psychology senior and Predictable Data founder, said UT provides networking opportunities for entrepreneurs.

Mechanical engineering senior Aseem Ali, who founded the grocery delivery service Burpy, said starting a company is one of the best experiences UT has provided him.

International relations sophomore Margaret Efthim runs Ready Set Golf, a nonprofit in Boston. Efthim said she has noticed a lack of gender diversity in the UT startup scene.

STARTUP

backing them. “Money is not the problem,” Metcalfe said. “There is a big debate about this — some people believe Austin needs more money, I believe Austin needs better startups. As we grow them, the money will arrive.” Another challenge UT’s student entrepreneurial scene faces is a lack of gender diversity. Computer science junior Taylor Barnett,

current policy. “The UT System Board of Regents’ policy currently is that the University can claim ownership of intellectual property that is developed by students,” Fenves said. “We would prefer to see a university policy where students, who develop intellectual property as part of classes that they are taking and paying tuition for, own the intellectual property that they generate.” Sanchez said UT has never taken the intellectual property from students who are not being paid to do research and development. Sanchez and Fenves both said they hope the task force will ultimately recommend that the board adapt precise language that states students can keep their intellectual property. Dale Klein, System associate vice chancellor for research, who is also a member of the task force, said Austin and UT’s expanding startup spirit is making the System address this issue. “I think we’ve seen a whole dynamic change over the last 20 years — both in the city of Austin and the University,” Klein said. “As a result of that, I think we need to clarify our intellectual property policies so we can encourage that rather than discourage entrepreneurship by vague intellectual property requirements.”

continues from page 1 wrestles with its own policies, some student are trying to encourage entrepreneurship. The student-run Longhorn Entrepreneurship Agency is hosting UTEWeek through Thursday, which is meant to introduce students to entrepreneurship opportunities on campus, according to Grant Heimer, finance senior and director of the agency. “This year, we’re having 18 events in a span of seven days, and we’re involving almost every single group on campus that is involved in entrepreneurship in some way,” Heimer said. “In the last year, a lot more people have heard about us, and that’s been the biggest factor in our growth.” One of the most important resources students say the University provides is the opportunity to network. Psychology senior Dwayne Smurdon returned to school after several years of running his own businesses largely for these connections. Smurdon, who is now running a data cleaning company, Predictable Data, said he held off of seeking funding for his company so he could focus on finishing his degree. “I really came back not only for the academic experience but for the network

of people I would meet,” Smurdon said. “There is a great value of that.” One of those connections is engineering professor Bob Metcalfe, who has dipped a toe into every entrepreneurial pool on campus. Metcalfe teaches Longhorn Startup, a semester-long class that helps kick-start student businesses. The University recently granted Metcalfe new space in Welch Hall for student entrepreneurs on campus. While not as big as its previous office in the engineering building, Metcalfe said the space will function as a co-working space and said he plans to move his office there to further encourage students to use it. “That space is to put a gathering point for entrepreneurs to bump into each other, have collisions, share ideas, be inspired, recruit each other, build teams,” Metcalfe said. Multiple students pointed to Stanford as the model campus for student startups. One of Stanford’s most prominent resources is StartX, a competitive business incubator managed by Stanford students that provides funds to students or faculty launching businesses. Metcalfe said the University is working on developing a similar fund, but the more important issue is the quality of Austin’s student startups, not the amount of money

Money is not the problem. There is a big debate about this — some people believe Austin needs more money, I believe Austin needs better startups. As we grow them, the money will arrive. —Bob Metcalfe, Engineering professor

president of the Technology Entrepreneurship Society, said she has been trying to encourage women to join the scene but has not had a lot of success. “A lot of times I will be the only female in the meeting,” Barnett said. “I’ve been trying to do more outreach to the Women in Computer Science group, and other groups, but

you can’t force someone to be interested.” Capital Factory, an Austin incubator that provides mentorship to new startups, lists 60 mentors on its website, six of whom are women. In interviews, many student business owners echoed concerns about whether the University owns a student’s intellectual property, which would grant the University access to a share of the student’s profits. Students say the System’s policy is not clear on the question of ownership. In December, Paul Foster, chairman of the UT System Board of Regents, created an intellectual property task force to address this and other questions. The task force has not yet released any recommendations. “Nowhere in [the policy] does it say that intellectual property of non-employee students belong to the board,” said Juan Sanchez, UT’s vice president for research. “But what it also doesn’t say is intellectual property developed by non-employee students does not belong to the board. That’s what we need.” Sanchez said the policy, though unclear, does not threaten students’ intellectual property. Greg Fenves, executive vice president and provost and a member of the task force, expressed a different interpretation of the

ENTREPRENEURIAL OPPORTUNITIES Longhorn Startup: A semester-long course that helps jump start teams that have already launched their companies. McCombs Entrepreneurin-Residence: Every year, the McCombs School of Business brings in a new entrepreneur who is available to speak to students about their businesses. 3-Day Startup: A nonprofit that gets students into the entrepreneurial scene by providing a three-day event where participants build the prototype for a company. Technology Entrepreneurship Society: A student organization that focuses on technological startups. The organization regularly hosts hack-a-thons. Texas Venture Labs : A campus-wide attempt to speed up the launch of startups by connecting students to resources on campus. Hackers Lounge: A community of hackers that hosts hacker-related events on campus. For more resources, check out utlea.org

© 2014 Ernst & Young LLP. All Rights Reserved. ED None.

Calculated net present values. Then netted a 10-pounder.

“Last month, I joined a team in San Francisco to start working on a Silicon Valley project. Come to find out, a few of the clients share my passion for fly-fishing. And some of the best in the world is just a short drive into the Northern Sierras. Needless to say, when we head out on weekends, we take the phrase ‘Gone Fishing’ to a whole new level.” See every amazing angle at exceptionalEY.com.


4A OPINION

LAURA WRIGHT, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / @TexanEditorial Monday, March 3, 2014

COLUMN

4

COLUMN

Immigrant’s success in Texas Homeless deserve compassion undercuts xenophobic rhetoric By Francisco Dominguez Daily Texan Columnist

LM Otero / Associated Press

Republican Texas lieutenant governor candidate Sen. Dan Patrick speaks during a debate at KERA studios in Dallas on Jan. 27.

By Noah Horwitz

Daily Texan Columnist @NmHorwitz

In the early 1980s, an undocumented immigrant named Mike Andrade began working at a Houston sports bar owned by local businessman Dan Patrick. Andrade said his new boss was kind and understanding regarding his legal status, and even offered to assist him in applying for permanent residency. After Andrade’s mother fell ill, Andrade said Patrick offered to smuggle him home and back for a visit. Roughly three decades later, a lot has changed. The owner of that bar has become a member of the state Senate and is a leading candidate in the Republican primary for lieutenant governor. Arguably one of the most conservative politicians in the state, Patrick has employed viciously anti-immigrant tactics throughout his campaign. In both campaign commercials and the televised debate for the lieutenant governor candidates, he has not been shy about using the incendiary term “invasion” to describe migration from Latin America into this state. However, Patrick is not the only individual whose last three decades should be scrutinized. What happened to Andrade, the undocumented immigrant working in Patrick’s bar? Andrade, who has now lived here for 34 years, became a naturalized citizen in the early 1990s. Shortly thereafter, he got married and had five children, the oldest of whom valiantly serves his country in the U.S. military. The rest of the Andrades live in a house in the suburbs of Houston. Perhaps it is just me, but that sounds a lot like the American dream, and it sounds like Andrade has become a model citizen. On the campaign trail, politicians like Patrick and his opponents — such as Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples — like to bemoan the entrance of these undocumented immigrants, warning they could bring about the end of life as we know it in Texas. “[Undocumented immigrants] threaten your family,” Patrick said at a recent candidates’ forum. “They threaten your life.

They threaten your business. They threaten our state.” Staples, for his part, wasted no time in criticizing Patrick for the perceived discrepancy. “Dan Patrick hired four illegal immigrants to work at his bars,” said a recent campaign commercial for Staples. “[He] even sent a letter supporting one of his illegal workers’ request for amnesty.” The other candidates running against Patrick, incumbent Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst and Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson, have similarly piled on the scorn. “I guess [Patrick] was for amnesty before he was against it,” Patterson said. “The irony is Patrick has accused the rest of us of being soft on immigration, even for amnesty. … Hypocrisy, thy name is Dan Patrick.” But amid the entire clamor over how much of a betrayal this evident flash of humanity has been, perhaps it is more important to note what happened after the immigrant in question was granted amnesty. Specifically, how it has affected the country and state we all live in. Politicians such as Patrick like to say that giving amnesty to undocumented immigrants rewards their unlawful decisions, inevitably leading to more unlawful decisions on their part. However, to my knowledge, Andrade has not lived a nefarious life of crime in the 25 years since he was granted amnesty by the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, signed, of all people, by former President Ronald Reagan, a godlike hero of the modern-day Republican Party. Indeed, he has put down roots in the community, gotten married and provided for his children. Now, one of his children is giving back to his country in the ultimate way, by defending it against enemies. Andrade, legal or not when first migration occurred, is a success story for immigrants all across this country. And knowingly or not, Patrick helped this success story by recognizing a young man’s humanity and potential to this state. It is remarkably easy to paint immigration policy and rhetoric with a broad brush, mercilessly criticizing those who yearn for a better life in this country. But when one examines the life stories of those like Andrade, the narrative becomes more complicated. Patrick, and all those who may vote for him, need to remember that. Horwitz is a government junior from Houston.

GALLERY

Owen Dodgen / Daily Texan Staff

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Right when you thought we had escaped the winter that canceled the most days of class in recent memory, Austin is once again pummeled by bizarre weather changes. Some may be upset that the annual Zilker Kite Festival was postponed, while others are excited by the possibility of another snow day. But on a cold night like Sunday night, whose concerns are more serious: yours in your warm apartment or those of a homeless person stuck out in the cold? You’re walking down the Drag at sundown, and a pack of disheveled people loiter around 22nd Street — the direct route to and from school for many of us. They peer at you with the sullen looks of people weathered by life’s hardest lessons. You watch them from afar as you approach, but the closer you get, the more you avert your gaze. Partially intrigued, partially wary, you look back at them. “They are unfamiliar, unpredictable,” your unconscious echoes. Let’s say one of the suspected homeless is dazed from enduring a summer-long heat stroke, or still shivering from this year’s anomalous record-low freezes. The delirium and indignation of his condition finally gets the best of him. Unprovoked, he releases whatever aggression he has by ranting aimlessly, yelling violent or obscene things. Perhaps to get some kick out of his destitution, he spooks a student or two. Absurd policies of subjugation are currently in place to handle the mess, such as a 30-minute loitering rule requiring such individuals to move locations in the allotted time — be it a few mere inches in physical space. APD Lt. Tyson McGowan admits officers “don’t have time” to enforce such ineffective policies, acknowledging that authorities are constrained by city ordinances to act on this issue, while UTPD has zero jurisdiction in West Campus. Perhaps it’s time we take the solution into our own hands. Walk by and make eye contact. Say hello. Shake their hands and tell them, “Have a good day,” like you would anyone else. After a few

days of cordial gestures, have a conversation. You will be thrown back, not by them, but by the shock of realizing how normal — better yet, human — they are. Before you know it, you’re having lunch together and they introduce you to their friends and they inquire about the things you’re learning in school, absolutely absorbed. Sounds like a customary college encounter, right? This is not a utopian ideal, and if it is, how sad. Relationships like this are possible and, in fact, exist today. Jeff, a friend of mine who spends most of his time in the area, his face stained red from enduring hours of unrelenting sunrays, his scalp visible from patches of missing hair, is one example. A common interest sparked the conversation: We both like bikes. He’s a proud owner of the sweetest ride I’ve ever seen — it’s shaped like a motorcycle! I bring him pecan pie, and every time we see each other he says, “Happy Birthday.” My girlfriend brings him a sandwich and sunblock. The appreciation spills out of his eyes. It’s so simple, yet the entire social dynamic changes — you will make an impression on your fellow students passing by, you will open the indigent individual up to the possibility that these young adults aren’t as naive and cold as previously conceived and you will show yourself that you had the capacity to act out of love in a way that felt right all along. Changing each other’s attitudes is what will have the everlasting positive effect. But, alas, we are scared. There are many different types of homeless people, just as there are many types of people — and just because one has done us wrong does not mean we should not give others a chance. It’s time we changed our mind-set that the homeless are the problem, that our streets should be cleansed of them. Especially on days of near freezing temperatures, it would serve us well to show kindness to the homeless as the winter weather hurts them much more than it affects us. It’s safe to say that our generation hasn’t seen such a blatant generalization of a demographic since the civil rights era. With just the slightest bit of compassion, we can collectively shift the paradigm and make our community a safer, happier and, in terms of this radical social mission here in Austin, a weirder place. Dominguez is a biology junior from San Antonio.

COLUMN

Black culture is American culture By Jordan Maney

Daily Texan Columnist @JordanManey

What did you learn this Black History Month? Be honest. Did you expand your knowledge beyond Martin, Malcolm and Rosa? Did you attend a cultural dinner on campus and learn about the importance of collard greens and fried catfish in black culture? Or did you just forget it because you’re not black and it doesn’t affect you? This isn’t a guilt piece. I won’t berate you with the usual arguments. Instead, let’s play a game. Close your eyes and go back to your elementary school classroom. You’re sitting in one of those blue, plastic chairs, writing something inappropriate on your desk when your teacher informs you it’s time for social studies. Try to remember all of those historical figures, wars and revolts you learned about. For every figure that looked like you, you get paid $1. How much did you make? In my entire elementary education I might have collected a sweet $10. I went to a wonderful school in Northern Virginia, where my thirdgrade teacher pronounced the country of Niger incorrectly and I was one of four black students in a student population of 600. I was taught black history through two-dimensional paper cutouts that hung on walls for 28 days and then were promptly stored away for 12 months until they’d be used again. My entire view of my identity and the contributions of my culture was skewed. If this cursory and often negligent introduction to black Americans was your only interaction with black people, I’m sure your view was skewed, too. If not for my parents, my education on black Americans probably would have stayed there. But for many other cultures my education did stop at laminated cutouts used for history months. I didn’t learn about the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II until I came to college. The Zoot Suit Riots? College. American Indian Movement? College. As much as I’ve cherished that explosion of historical

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to editor@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

knowledge, I hate that I had to wait 18 years to learn about it. I hate that a lot of people never will. The understanding and celebration of American culture have to start before we’re adults. For that to happen we need to teach our children about all Americans and encourage that throughout their lives. I’m embarrassed that in 2014 the celebration of black, Asian, Native American, Latino and female accomplishment in this country is still relegated to specific times of the year and segmented into chapters, paragraphs and separate textbooks. These histories are just as American as our forefathers’ legacies or Eisenhower’s presidency, so why are they constantly treated as supplemental instead of essential? I don’t want a black history month if it’s only purpose is to act as a pat on the back instead of an intentional learning experience. I don’t need UT to recognize it or large corporations to use it for financial gain under the guise of honoring it. I just want a seat at the table. I’m not unhappy with Black History Month because of its existence. It was started in 1926 when black accomplishment was largely unheard of outside of the black community. I just don’t believe that the approach we have now is the most effective way of educating people. The celebration of black and other cultural months is largely internal. I don’t think that’s the purpose. Educating people about your culture is not the problem. The problem happens when we don’t have the same fervor for everyone else’s. In order to change that, we have to look at our definition of American culture and expand it to be inclusive of every American. If we don’t do that we won’t be able to educate, celebrate or understand one another. Our textbooks and our schools need to reflect that. Without a proper understanding of the past, we’re doomed to repeat it. Students, no matter their race or background, are owed the opportunity to learn about American history as it was, not as it’s been constructed to exclude and forget. The one who holds the pen decides what is written. I just wish we all were holding it. Maybe one day we will, but until we’re on the same page, many of us will stay locked in the margins and in between the brackets of a calendar block. Maney is a journalism senior.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@TexanEditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


NEWS

5

Monday, March 3, 2014

CAMPUS

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

SG claims new reforms will create more proportional representation By Nicole Cobler @nicolecobler

Students voted overwhelmingly to pass two Student Government referendums during campus-wide elections Thursday, even though the full details of the changes were not available on the ballot. Philip Wiseman, chief justice for the SG Judicial Court, said the referendums would change the Student Government constitution. Some changes include adding specific protocols for transparency, establishing a method for apportioning college and school representation in the assembly and granting the president veto power over bills. “At the end of the day, these reforms had several objectives, but it was to make SG more transparent, reinforce the checks and balances between branches and make sure we’re becoming in legal compliance with System rules and state and federal law,” Wiseman said. Currently, colleges receive one representative for every 2,500 students enrolled. Some colleges include only undergraduates in this count while others include both graduate and undergraduate students. Wiseman said the change to this rule would apportion representation according to graduate and undergraduate populations within every college. The amended constitution says the number of representatives will be “based upon the proportion of representation among the college and school representatives in the

In reality, if the executive branch is the one carrying that out, there needs to be a check and balance between the legislative branch, and it just wasn’t there before. —Philip Wiseman, Chief justice for the SG Judicial Court

Assembly for the respective college or school as equal as possible to the proportion of the student body enrolled in the respective college or school.” Wiseman said the amendment increases the assembly’s size and more proportionally represents each college. Andrew Houston, chair of rules and regulations, is the school of architecture representative and said he worked closely with Wiseman to improve representation. “The school of architecture has 800 students including graduate students,” Houston said. “Graduate students make up a larger portion of the school, but those people did not count, and graduate students could not be served.” Among the changes, the referendum also grants the SG president the power to veto bills. Before this amendment, the president only had the power to veto legislation. Wiseman said this would ensure that after the president submits the budget to the assembly, there would be a check and balance over any changes made. “In reality, if the executive branch is the one carrying that out, there needs to be a check and balance between the legislative branch, and it just wasn’t there before,”

Wiseman said. Kori Rady, incoming Student Government president, said he does not see himself using the new power in the upcoming year. “I think it’s definitely a last resort kind of deal,” Rady said. “You don’t want to use a veto unless you absolutely have to.” According to Wiseman, SG passed amendments in 2011, which failed to garner any administrative approval, so Wiseman said SG continued operating outside jurisdiction of the UT System Board of Regents. “This is something that hasn’t been accomplished since about 1995,” Wiseman said. “We’re not even sure those suggestions and amendments were formally and finally approved, so this could potentially be a process that hasn’t been done in over 50 years.” In January, the amendments were passed through SG assemblies, and then passed as referendums during campus-wide elections last week. The referendums will move on to be signed off by the dean of students and the vice president of student affairs. Following this, President William Powers Jr. and the UT System Board of Regents must approve them.

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Jenna VonHofe / Daily Texan Staff

Assistant psychology professor David Yeager speaks on the effects of bullying prevention Friday afternoon.

Isolation characterizes teen bullying By Wynne Davis @wynneellyn

Assistant psychology professor David Yeager said bullying prevention programs in schools have no effect on adolescents during their eighth grade and high school years at a lecture Friday. According to Yeager, these programs are often mandated by the Texas Legislature in response to adolescent suicides. While the prevention programs are generally effective for elementary and early middle school students, Yeager said the programs do nothing for the adolescent age group. Yeager shared findings from multiple studies he has done surrounding bullying prevention in schools. He said he is interested in how to prevent bullying but is more interested in how to prevent its effects. During his presentation, Yeager said bullies no longer target others by physical means, but by exclusion. “For ninth graders, these are the kids with the best skills that are the best at bullying — kids who know how to insult you in just the right way, make you feel like you’re nothing in just the right way,”

Yeager said. Nursing assistant professor Karen Johnson said she can see Yeager’s research having major policy implications for addressing bullying. “It’s a reminder that we as a society often forget that adolescence is a very unique and rapid developmental age,” Johnson said. “We can’t lump adolescents with children or with adults and expect that we’ll get similar outcomes from your prevention efforts.” In one of his studies, Yeager simulated a game of catch on the computer where the teenage participants thought they were playing a game with two other students. After a few times of being passed the ball, the other two students didn’t throw the participant the ball anymore. Afterward, the excluded participants shared similar thoughts that they were losers, that their lives would always be like what they experienced in the game or that they were ashamed. Researchers conducting the study also educated participants about how both bullies’ and victims’ personalities and actions change over time. After a few months, the researchers revisited the

It’s a reminder that we as a society often forget that adolescence is a very unique and rapid developmental age. —David Yeager, Assistant psychology professor

students to see if they thought the information they had learned during the study had benefitted them. “I was surprised that the intervention was found to have lasting effects over time, despite the belief of many of the participants that no change had occurred,” nursing graduate student Rebecca Richardson said. Richardson, who is specializing in psychiatric and mental health, said she hopes to apply Yeager’s findings in her future practice because the long-term resilience the participants have after going through the exercise can possibly prevent conditions such as clinical depression.


6 SPTS

PASSES REDUCED! STEFAN SCRAFIELD, SPORTS EDITOR / @texansports Monday, March 3, 2014

6

MEN’S SWIMMING & DIVING

Big 12 title streak lives on

ING TEXERCISE AND CYCL FITNESS

STARTS HERE utrecsports.org

SIDELINE NBA MAVERICKS

By Courtney Norris @CourtneyKNorris

No. 8 Texas won its 35th consecutive conference championship with 1,071 points this weekend at the Lee and Joe Jamail Texas Swimming Center. In addition to finishing first, Texas dominated the competition with six event wins and several NCAAqualifying times. Even though the men’s team has won the Big 12 title every year since the championship was founded in 1996, head coach Eddie Reese said winning doesn’t gets old. “You get a new group, and you send your most experienced group,” Reese said. “If you ever forget to do the simple things then you have to stay on that.” Saturday’s finals kicked off with men’s platform diving. Freshman diver Mark Anderson opened the night well over 100 points ahead of competitors. Anderson said mental imagery helped him prepare. “[Imagining actions outside the water] definitely helped,” Anderson said. “I felt like when I got back in, I didn’t worry as much because I had it played out in my head.” After freshman swimmer Jack Conger claimed the 100 butterfly in an NCAA automatic cut 45.56, Conger

SPURS

BOBCATS

THUNDER

NCAAM STANFORD

(3) ARIZONA

(22) OHIO STATE

INDIANA Andrea Kurth / Daily Texan Staff

Sophomore Matt Ellis led the Longhorns in the 100 freestyle Saturday, finishing at 43.03, good for runner-up. Ellis’ finish helped propel the Longhorns to their 35th consecutive Big 12 Championship, a title no other team has held in Big 12 history.

notched his second victory and automatic berth with a 1:40.56 finish in the 200 backstroke. The success merited Conger recognition as the Men’s Newcomer of the Meet. “It’s not about the time right now — it’s about placing and doing your part of the team,” Conger said. “The NCAAs

are on our mind, you know. I hope I can get up there a few more times. We’ll see.” Longhorn Big 12 title winners of the weekend include freshman Will Licon for his performance in the 200 breaststroke, sophomore Sam Lewis for the 1,650 freestyle and sophomore breaststroke

MEN’S BASKETBALL | TEXAS 65, OKLAHOMA 77

swimmer Imri Ganiel for the 100 breaststroke. Junior breaststroke swimmer Matt Korman finished with the event’s fastest 100 breaststroke time in the consolation final at 53.35. As Texas finished the night swimming the 400 freestyle relay with an NCAA qualifying cut, Reese

applauded his team’s efforts. “We were a little low on our enthusiasm,” Reese said. “But we got it together last night and were a lot better this morning. Tonight we were as good as I could have hoped.” The NCAA Championships will be held March 27–29 in Austin.

@StefanScrafield

NORMAN, Okla. — With freshman standout Isaiah Taylor in early foul trouble, Texas head coach Rick Barnes was forced to find out what his offense was capable of without its starting point guard Saturday. His answer? A calamity of errors. Sixteen turnovers later, the Longhorns found themselves on the losing end of yet another blowout on the road, dropping a 77–65 decision to the Oklahoma Sooners in Norman. “The thing that bothered me most with the guards was the turnovers,”

Barnes said. “Nearly every guard turned it over at least once and they scored 23 points off turnovers, so that was the difference in the game.” Taylor committed two costly fouls in the first half and a third one early on in the second frame, sending him to the bench for much of the game. The Longhorns’ half-court offense was a disaster without his direction, hurling errant passes, tossing up ill-advised shots and struggling to run set plays. “When you play away games, you can’t turn the ball over,” sophomore guard Demarcus Holland said. “You have to give yourself a chance to win.

We shot the ball well so that wasn’t an issue. We just have to take care of the ball.” Sophomore guard Javan Felix was tasked with replacing Taylor at the top of the Texas offense and couldn’t handle the responsibility. Felix often appeared frantic while running the offense, tossing the ball directly to a crimson and cream uniform on multiple occasions. Felix, a Louisiana native, finished with three turnovers compared to just two points on the afternoon. The Texas backcourt’s inability to take care of

BASKETBALL page 7

Shweta Gulati / Daily Texan Staff

Jonathan Holmes scored 11 points on 5-for-10 shooting in Texas’ 77-65 loss to Oklahoma on Saturday. While Texas’ guards struggled, the forwards drove the offense with 43 points.

By Jori Epstein @JoriEpstein

Back in January, Texas fought valiantly against thenNo. 11 Oklahoma State in an attempt to open conference play with a win. Junior forward Nneka Enemkpali contributed 18 points and nine rebounds to the battle, and sophomore guard Brady Sanders hit 10 second-half points in hopes of closing the gap. But the Cowgirls outlasted Texas with a 67-61 win. Some things haven’t changed since then. Oklahoma State (22-6, 11-6 Big 12) still holds a top-15 ranking, while Texas hasn’t been ranked all season. Enemkpali is still playing well for Texas, scoring 19 points to complement nine rebounds against Texas Tech this weekend. And Sanders still explodes in the second half, as she notched 13 of her career-high 17 points Saturday after the half. But with this leadership, one thing has changed: Texas has won conference games. And it’s won a lot of them at home. To name one, the Texas Tech team that competed to a 3-point game at buzzer Saturday lost by 37 at the Frank Erwin Center on Feb. 5. The inconsistency is striking. But the Longhorns’ home success should bode better for them Monday night than the rocky conference start. “It was a competitive game, a little bit ugly,” head coach Karen Aston said of the Jan. 2 matchup. “It looked like the first game of the Big 12, a little bit slower pace than both

teams play, just trying to figure out … the nerves of the first Big 12 game.” Leaving the nerves and slow pace behind in January, the Longhorns (19-10, 10-7 Big 12) have done some catching up. Sitting just one game behind Oklahoma State in the Big 12, Texas’ hope lies in rebounding. Oklahoma State outrebounded Texas 40-38 on Jan. 2, and the teams tied with 28 points a piece in the paint. But Texas now tops the Cowgirls’ 2.6-rebound advantage in conference play. This is where Enemkpali, who averages 8.8 rebounds per game, will have to rise to the occasion. Aston said the team’s rebounding struggled in Stillwater, Okla., and depended heavily on Enemkpali. “It was significant when [Enemkpali] got her fourth foul because she’s such a terrific offensive rebounder,” Aston said. “I really thought we lost all of our offensive rebounding during that stretch when she was out of the game. We just had to try some combinations that were, to say the least, very inexperienced.” Most of these combinations have gained experience in the 16 conference games since Stillwater. But the Cowgirls haven’t sat idly, either, as their top-15 ranking shows. Though the ranking gap looks large nationally, Texas has a chance to catch Oklahoma State in the Big 12 on Monday night. With senior night and their conference standing on the line, the Longhorns have a lot to prove.

BASEBALL

Pitching propels Longhorns through weekend sweep By Matt Warden @TheMattWarden5

The No. 15 Longhorns strong-armed the competition in the Houston College Classic behind their exceptional pitching staff that allowed only two earned runs in three games. Junior pitcher Dillon Peters took the mound against No.

12 Rice on Friday night, striking out six in eight shutout innings of work. Texas jumped on the Owls early, scoring two runs in the fourth inning, which ended up being all it needed to dispatch Rice 2-0. Freshman infielder/pitcher Kacy Clemens reached on a single up the middle before freshman catcher Tres Barrera doubled to right field

to put the first run on the board. Sophomore outfielder Ben Johnson doubled to left center in Texas’ next at-bat, scoring Barrera. Texas held the 2-0 lead into the ninth, when senior pitcher Nathan Thornhill picked up his first save of the year in relief of Peters, striking out two of the four batters he faced. The Longhorns

Mack Brown @UT_MackBrown

Eddie Reece is an amazing coach. Maybe the best swimming coach ever. Maybe the best coach ever? I think so

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Texas drowns in turnovers, Horns hope to use gives Red River Rivalry away expertise vs. OK State By Stefan Scrafield

TOP TWEET

recorded six hits in the game, four of which came from Clemens and Johnson who both went 2-for-3 at the plate. Texas’ domination on the mound continued in its second game of the weekend, as junior pitcher Parker French allowed just one earned run in seven strong innings against Houston. French struck out seven Cougars, ending

Houston’s undefeated season while allowing seven hits in the Longhorns’ 3-2 victory. The teams traded runs in the second inning as Houston scored the first run of the game on an RBI single by senior outfielder Landon Appling. In the bottom half of the inning, Johnson

BASEBALL page 7

TODAY IN HISTORY

1950

After three months, National-American Football League takes back NFL name.

SPORTS BRIEFLY Former PA announcer Wally Pryor dies at 86

The former “Voice of the Longhorns,” Wally Pryor, died Saturday at the age of 86. Pryor served as the public address announcer for Texas’ basketball and football programs for nearly 40 years. The former announcer was known for his sense of humor and constant hijinks over the loud speaker. Among his hijinks, he interspersed scores from a small Pennsylvania college into his Texas annnouncing and told crowds how his good friend, a former mayor of Luckenbach, Texas, needed to once again pick up his drunken grandmother from beer gardens and dance halls. “Those things were legendary,” Bob Cole, who succeeded Pryor with Big Little in 2000, told the Austin American-Statesman. “Wally had that special gift of not being noticed for anything bad but being able to do some things we could never do.” Pryor, a Texas alumnus, was named to the Longhorn Men’s Hall of Honor in 1977 for his announcing work, his time on the University’s water polo team, his participation in two Southwest Conference swimming championships and his work as an emcee at numerous university charity events. His most memorable line may be telling Texas fans storming the field in 1990 to “get those idiots off the goal post.” —Stefan Scrafield


SPTS/JUMP 7

SPORTS

7

Monday, March 3, 2014

SOFTBALL

Texas wins five straight in state By Scarlett Smith @ScarlettRSmith1

The Longhorns bounced back from a less than spectacular performance in the Mary Nutter Classic to go an impressive 5-0 in this weekend’s Texas Invitational, outscoring their opponents by a combined score of 42-6. Texas led a balanced attack with superior play on both sides of the ball. Pitchers combined to allow only 14 hits and six runs while striking out 34 through five games. Longhorn batters were just as tenacious at the plate, scoring 42 runs on 64 hits. Freshman utility Lindsey Stephens was stellar for the Longhorns, leading the team with 12 hits and 10 RBIs as she extended her streak to 24 straight games on base. Senior shortstop Taylor Thom reached a milestone 200th career hit against Southern Mississippi on Friday. Thom also moved up on the Texas all-time RBI list, tying alumna Taylor Hoagland for second. The dual threat didn’t stop there. After starting the entire tournament in left field, freshman second baseman Stephanie Wong exploded with seven hits and four RBIs, including the first two-run homer of her collegiate career. Head coach Connie Clark’s team finally advanced runners into scor-

BASEBALL

continues from page 6 grounded out to second base which scored freshman infielder Andy McGuire to tie the score at one a piece. Senior outfielder Mark Payton got back into the hit column against Houston after his 18-game hit streak came

BASKETBALL

continues from page 6 the ball nullified a strong performance from the Longhorns’ interior presence. Led by sophomore center Cameron Ridley, who had 19 points and 14 boards for his eighth double-double of the season, Texas’ forwards combined for 42 points on 61 percent shooting from the field. Barnes’ big men clearly

SWIM

continues from page 1 this year was to translate her 50 into the 100, and that the performance was a “big boost of confidence.” “I knew after this morning the three of us were so close that it was just going to come down to whoever put their head down at the finish,” Lobb said. The Longhorns also took home individual awards

TRACK

continues from page 1 “We saw that all fall during the cross country season when she led the charge on the women’s side. I couldn’t be more proud because I know there are even better things to come during the outdoor season.” Senior jumper Shanay Briscoe rounded off the women’s 18th league title with a second-place 4,043-point pentathlon finish. Briscoe repeated as indoor high jump champion, an honor only three woman — all Longhorns — have received. The Longhorns will compete in the NCAA Indoor Championships on March 14 and 15 in Albuquerque, N.M.

SPORTS BRIEFLY

Men’s track and field finishes Big 12 No. 2 Daulton Venglar / Daily Texan Staff

Freshman utility Lindsey Stephens led the Longhorns to 5-0 in the Texas Invitational last weekend. With 12 hits and 10 RBI, Stephens extended her on-base streak to 24 games and has an offensive threat at the plate.

ing position with ease after struggling earlier in the season. “We really focused on hitting with runners on base,” Clark said of the previous week’s practices. “When somebody came up to the plate, we would load the bases or there were runners at second and third just to simulate getting runs across, and we did a great job with that tonight.” Junior pitcher Gabby

Smith and freshman pitcher Tiarra Davis provided a dynamic pitching duo for the Longhorns (13-9). “Gabby and Tiarra were really pounding the mitt, throwing a lot of strikes and getting great movement,” Clark said. “They’re able to offset each other with the righty and the lefty, mixing speeds effectively and just doing the things we need them to do to keep us in games. They’ve emerged, and I

love what we’re getting from them right now.” Freshman second baseman Kelli Hanzel has found a recent spark at the plate. Hanzel got her first career hit and RBI in a walk-off single to right field against Texas Southern, en route to a run rule. Hanzel then singled against Texas Southern, before scoring on sophomore pitcher Holly Kern’s triple to center field. Reaching the century

mark, senior catcher Mandy Ogle notched her 100th career hit with an RBI single to right field that scored Kern. The Longhorns then loaded the bases before senior Brejae Washington’s walk-off sac fly secured the win. Texas is now 11-0 this season in games with six or more runs. Its four straight run-rule wins this weekend happened for just the second time in school history.

to an end against Rice, doubling in a run in the bottom of the third. Clemens came across the plate after a fielding error by the Cougars, bringing the Texas lead to 3-1. Despite a Houston run in the top of the ninth, Thornhill came in to record the last out of the game, picking up his second save on the

season and second in two games. Sophomore infielder C.J Hinojosa tallied two of the Longhorns’ four hits in the contest. In its last game on Sunday, Texas showcased its resiliency with a come-frombehind 3-2 win against Sam Houston State. Sam Houston State took advantage of

shaky pitching in the first inning, scoring two runs on two hits and an error by the Texas defense. The Longhorns responded with two runs in the seventh inning in lieu of a sacrifice bunt by Hinojosa and a single by Clemens that scored Payton. Texas notched the

winning run in the top of the eighth on a sacrifice fly by junior outfielder Collin Shaw. Clemens and Shaw tallied two hits apiece to make up four of Texas’ 10 in the game. The Longhorns will attempt to continue their win streak at home against Valparaiso on Tuesday night.

overwhelmed the Sooners, but the sloppy guard play proved to be too much to overcome. “[The forwards] all played well today,” Barnes said. “I thought [Ridley] was terrific. He did a good job of getting his space and doing what he needed to do.” The loss marks Texas’ fourth consecutive road defeat. The four setbacks have come by an average

margin of more than 17 points per contest. With the Big 12 Championship and NCAA Tournament fast approaching, the Longhorns’ road woes are an obvious cause for concern late in the season. “Some of our guys don’t play with a toughness that they need to on the road,” Barnes said. “Turnovers and poor offensive play have been common over the course of these road losses.”

for coach, diver and newcomer of the meet. The awards went to diving coach Matt Scoggin, senior diver Maren Taylor and freshman swimmer Madisyn Cox, respectively. Head coach Carol Capitani acknowledged the Longhorns’ overall dominance but said her team cannot dwell upon the Big 12 victory for too long.

“The competition day in and day out has helped get our team get to where it is right now,” Capitani said. “You’re disappointed when every single thing isn’t perfect but I think that’s where lessons are learned. That’s where we’re going to move forward and be better.” The NCAA Championships will be held March 20-22 in Minneapolis, Minn.

T h e T e xa s e x e s congratulate the recipients of the

2014

James W. Vick Awards for Academic Advising Promoting quality advising at the University of Texas. Julia D. Chinnock School of Undergraduate Studies Jonathan Pereira Cockrell School of Engineering Deborah Salzberg Jackson School of Geosciences Susan Somers College of Liberal Arts Mark-Anthony Zuniga College of Fine Arts

The Longhorns came up just short in their bid to defend the Big 12 conference title, finishing in second place at the meet in Ames, Iowa, over the weekend. The team scored 108.5 points, barely edged out by Oklahoma State’s winning score of 112.5. Some bright spots shone beneath the loss, as Texas brought home four individual conference championships. Freshman sprinter Senoj-Jay Givans won the men’s 60-meter, and sophomore sprinter Zack Bilderback and junior thrower Ryan Crouser won the 400-meter and shot put, respectively. The 4x400-meter relay team also claimed the conference title. The team will now prepare for the NCAA Indoor Championships, which will be held on March 14 and 15 in Albuquerque, N.M. —Grant Gordon


8 L&A/JUMP 8

Monday, March 3, 2014

MURILLO

continues from page 10 ager, offered Murillo a job running tickets from the coaches to the ticket booths. Murillo soon became close friends with many Texas coaches, especially Royal. When Royal stopped coaching in 1976 but remained Texas’ athletic director, Murillo became his personal driver and friend. He goes so far as to call himself Royal’s “illegitimate son.” “Ah, coach — we were so close,” Murillo said. “I think that, next to his wife, I was his closest friend. We’d always go everywhere. We’d go golfing together. We’d go eat Mexican food together. We’d go everywhere. Two birds of a feather got to stick together.” Now, Murillo guards the dugouts at UT baseball games and guards the tunnel at the football games. He’s always standing close to the action, talking with the players

SHAKESPEARE

continues from page 10 “There’s a moment in ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’ when Lysander is lying asleep and my character, Helena, has to discover him and say, ‘But who lies here?’ In the original play she is in the dark, but here I am on stage with all the lights on, and I have to pretend like I don’t see the body lying there. I realized I could just cross him and ask an audience member, ‘But who lies here?’ When I did that, and they shook their head and pretended like they didn’t know, I could just look at them and ask them, ‘Are you kidding? You haven’t been watching the play?’” This style of performance creates a more natural conversation with the audience, according to Rue. The center’s actors often have to write entire dialogues for the plays themselves and rehearse their parts well before the first day of rehearsal without interacting with any of the other actors. “Lady Mortimer cannot speak English. She only speaks in Welsh,” Rue said. “I got to write the dialogues for her. I had to learn some Welsh, because in the script it just says, ‘Lady speaks in Welsh.’ I had to practice speaking in Welsh and get all of this done before the first day.” The center’s productions are most often performed on

E! FRE d wor

ad s

only

a thrust stage, where the actors are surrounded on three sides by the audience to allow for more interaction. “We also have what’s called a ‘Renaissance Run,’” Rue said. “On the first day of rehearsal, we all show up with our lines completely memorized. We meet each other for the first time and we rehearse the play without the director. We end up having to become a team from day one, and the principle behind that is that Shakespeare’s actors would have rehearsed plays in a pretty similar way. It’s only us trying to negotiate and communicate with each other.” This approach to rehearsing the plays allows rehearsal periods to be shorter and allows actors to put up more shows per year, according to Glenn Schudel, the center’s tour manager and assistant director. Schudel said the center’s actors do not try to do the exact same thing that Shakespeare’s actors would have done. “We want to make audiences understand how modern Shakespeare can be,” Schudel said. “Because the things that he wrote about — power, ambition, jealousy, love, greed — are relevant even today. We want to tap into the beautiful language of Shakespeare and recreate the staging conditions that he wrote for. Audiences should look forward to being involved in the play themselves in a way that they’ve never been before.”

Sam Ortega / Daily Texan Staff

Louis Murillo explains the grooves on a baseball and details various ways in which pitchers hold and spin the ball. Murillo started a men’s fast pitch team in 1961, which was honored and recognized by the Texas Senate.

MASQUERADE

continues from page 10 Feb. 16. The event focused on bringing multiple African American culture groups together to educate students on black history at UT. The last event of the month was the career expo, Black to Business. While each of these events was advertised, Ealy said he wishes there could have been greater campus involvement. “The one difficulty that we have had in gaining interest is the assumption that Black to Business is only for African American students,” Ealy said. “This assumption is not true. This event [was] a career expo premised on the fact that every company and organization in attendance will have a focus on the betterment of minority populations or significantly interested in diversifying their staff.” In an effort to increase participation, the committee will hold Masquerade in the Park on the East Mall because of its high foot traffic and space for tents. The festival is free to attend and will offer students an opportunity to taste Creole cuisine, listen to Creole and Zydeco music and participate in Mardi Gras activities. Public relations junior Jacy Jones is in charge of advertising

Illustration by Connor Murphy / Daily Texan Staff

the event on multiple social media platforms but mainly by word of mouth. Jones is especially excited to promote this event because of her ties to Creole culture. “My favorite event we host is Masquerade in the Park, simply because I am Creole,” Jones said. “Growing up with Zydeco music is something that I’m used to.

I’m always hearing it. The food, the culture — that’s my niche.” The committee, along with each event that it hosts, works to promote inclusivity within the African American community and the UT community. “I want students to see the difference that our organization and many other organizations are making

CLASSIFIEDS THE DAILY TEXAN

on campus and how it directly affects all of them,” External Communications Chair Gennavonah Wade said. “We are a committee to put on events that cater to every aspect of a student. From political, to inspirational, to gaining leadership and communication skills, to entertaining and just adding to the holistic character of a student.”

ADVERTISING TERMS There are no refunds or credits. In the event of errors made in advertisement, notice must be given by 10 am the fi rst day of publication, as the publishers are responsible for only ONE incorrect insertion. In consideration of The Daily Texan’s acceptance of advertising copy for publication, the agency and the advertiser will indemnify and save harmless, Texas Student Media and its officers, employees and agents against all loss, liability, damage and expense of whatsoever nature arising out of the copying, printing or publishing of its advertisement including without limitation reasonable attorney’s fees resulting from claims of suits for libel, violation of right of privacy, plagiarism and copyright and trademark infringement. All ad copy must be approved by the newspaper which reserves the right to request changes, reject or properly classify an ad. The advertiser, and not the newspaper, is responsible for the truthful content of the ad. Advertising is also subject to credit approval.

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and coaches, putting in his 2 cents and remaining the same friendly face that showed up at Texas games 61 years ago. Murillo suffered a stroke the day before Christmas that left the left side of his body paralyzed, but that didn’t stop him from being at the season opener against Texas A&M-Corpus Christi. He attributed his speedy recovery to an active youth, when he boxed against future Olympians such as Lefty Barrera. “I’m 83 years old,” Murillo said. “If you take good care of yourself, you’ll be fine. I don’t drink, I don’t smoke, I don’t chase bad women, I chase good women. I’m just fine.” These days, Murillo can be found at any Texas home game by the dugout, talking with the players and cheering on the team that has meant so much to him over the years. And, just like with his precious home in East Austin, he doesn’t think he’s going anywhere any time soon.

LIFE&ARTS

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TEXAS TRAVESTY TOMORROW 3/4/2014


COMICS 9

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Monday, March 3, 2014

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Edited by Will Shortz

Crossword

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7

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1 9 8 3 3 6 2 4 4 5 1 8

Earn a graduate degree at St. Mary’s University

5 1 2 7 4 8 3 6 9

Today’s solution will appear here next issue

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9 4 6 5 2 3 7 8 1

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8 9 1 6 3 5 2 7 4

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4 5 7 1 6 9 8 2 3

2 6 9 3 8 7 4 1 5

ACROSS 1 Attack with a knife 5 “Oops-a-daisy” 9 Hypermasculine 14 See 2-Down 15 Duet minus one 16 Patriot Ethan of the Revolutionary War 17 *Flying 19 “Silly” birds 20 Renter’s document 21 “No idea” 23 Mormons, in brief 24 *One placed between warring parties 29 Ivy League school in Philly 30 Encountered 31 Doc grp. 32 *Contestant’s help on “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire” 36 Like some cereals

38 Colored part of the eye 39 Softly, in music 42 Born and ___ 43 Serving on a skewer 45 *King, queen or jack 47 Brian who composed “Music for Airports” 48 The “L” of L.A. 51 Squabbles 52 *Piece of furniture that might be under a chandelier 55 “There ___ is, Miss America” 58 Epic work by Virgil 59 Quick 61 Hybrid kind of battery 63 Vacation lodging purchase … or an arrangement between the two halves of the answer to each starred clue? 66 Desert flora

S U D O K UPrep to highest Fthe degree. O

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE Z A G A T R A T E D

O N E T O O M A N Y

M O T O R C Y C L E

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N A U T

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B I E M A L Y I N T O S O D A N E C O L T A N I T U S S M O S B O T E S T O C K N O U T E L L A R I L E

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S U P E R S T A R S

67 Battery 68 Port of Yemen 69 “America’s Finest News Source,” with “The” 70 Car parts that have caps 71 Hotel and hospital features

1

2

3

4

5

14

6

7

24

33

25

26

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44

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36 40

41

45 49

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27

28

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12

22

30

38

11

19 21

23

10

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59

62

63

64

60

65

66

67

68

69

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PUZZLE BY JAMES TUTTLE

33 Resident of Tehran

41 Green science: Abbr.

34 Eponym of a number series that begins 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, …

44 Not be conspicuous

35 Munchkin

49 Mined metal

37 Kindergarten basics 40 Bit of pasta, for short

46 Pitchers 50 Hilarious person, in slang 53 “Far out!” 54 Fond farewell

55 Digging tool 56 Put on the payroll 57 Perfect places 60 Ill-fated captain 61 Sgt., e.g. 62 Suffix with Dickens 64 Cubs and White Sox org. 65 Windy City trains

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MCAT® | LSAT® | GMAT® | GRE® Available:

9

18

20

32

8

15

17

29

DOWN 1 Shower unit 2 ___ and 14-Across (reliable) 3 Surrounding glows 4 Risks 5 It’s between Can. and Mex. 6 ___ lane 7 Kind of acid in soapmaking 8 World Series of Poker game 9 X-Men villain 10 Coeur d’___, Idaho 11 1963 Elizabeth Taylor role 12 Guys 13 First number dialed when calling long distance 18 Push back, as an attack 22 Hawaiian strings, for short 25 “Idylls of the King” lady 26 ___ Domini 27 Mideast bigwig: Var. 28 Early stage of industrial work, for short 29 Mexican money 32 Had a crush on

No. 0127

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LiveOnline

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10 L&A

HANNAH SMOTHERS, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR / @DailyTexanArts Monday, March 3, 2014

10

CAMPUS

Sam Ortega / Daily Texan Staff

Since the age of 12, Louis Murillo has been a fan of and worked for UT Athletics. Now an 83-year-old man, Murillo vividly recalls his personal relationship to players and coaches such as Darrell Royal and Mack Brown. You can find Murillo at any home baseball game in his favorite spot by the dugout.

Royal’s closest friend bleeds orange for UT

By Sam Hays

@samingtonhays

Eig ht y-t hre e-ye ar-old Louis Murillo said he would never sell his home — not even for a million dollars. That’s because almost

everything inside Murillo’s small, East Austin home is a remnant of a long, fruitful relationship with UT Athletics. Every piece of clothing in view has a hint of the signature burnt orange on it. Portraits of star running back Earl Campbell and legendary football coach Darrell Royal populate the walls. In one photo, Murillo is smiling with Royal. In another, he has one arm around singer George Strait and the other around Willie Nelson. The final photo he shows depicts a smiling Gov. Rick Perry alongside Murillo. “I’ve never voted for him,

but he’s a nice man,” Murillo said. Murillo has been attending UT games since 1953. In that time, he’s gone from an enthusiastic fan to Royal’s personal driver. Among his relics from the days is a letter written by former football coach Mack Brown. “You’re a good man and we all appreciate you,” the letter said. “We’ll see you at practice soon.” Murillo is currently employed as, and was initially offered a job as, a ticket “gopher” on the stadium grounds because he was a friendly face that was

always around. “The coaches would say, ‘Hey Louis — go for this,’ or, ‘Hey Louis, go for that,’ so they just called me a gopher,” Murillo said. But, long before it was his job, Murillo lived and breathed Texas sports. Murillo was born in Austin in 1931. After fourth grade, he dropped out of school to begin working when he was 12. The Thompson family, who owned a 7-Eleven in the East side of Austin, offered Murillo a job selling groceries. “They were great people,” Murillo said. “I owe

them a lot.” When the Thompsons sent Murillo to the UT stadium grounds to sell sodas, he heard stories of the great UT quarterback Bobby Layne, whose accomplishments of the late ’40s and early ’50s drew the attention of millions, including Murillo. In 1950, Murillo took a break from the Longhorns when he was drafted into the U.S. Army and deployed in Korea as a mechanic. Sitting at his kitchen table, Murillo emptied a leather pouch into his hands, and several Army medals fell out onto his hands. He vividly

remembers the moment he was told he was going home after 16 1/2 grueling months on the front lines. “As a grown man, I cried,” Murillo said. “I did not want to go back [to Korea].” When Murillo returned from Korea, he returned to his job at 7-Eleven. He began going to the football games as a spectator, not just to sell sodas. Over the years he became a familiar face at the stadium, and he built a rapport with the coaching staff. Al Lundstedt, the athletics department business man-

MURILLO page 8

CAMPUS

THEATER

Student Mardi Gras event celebrates Creole culture

Interactive Shakespeare comes to campus

By Kat Sampson

MASQUERADE IN THE PARK

In a window-lined room on the second floor of the Student Activities Center there are two circles of chairs, one within the other. Six members of the African American Culture committee, a subcommittee of Campus Events + Entertainment, are laughing and eyeing each other, as they run around the smaller circle of chairs to an upbeat song from the Creole genre, Zydeco. It is the beginning of the group’s last meeting before its Mardi Grasthemed event this Tuesday on the East Mall, Masquerade in the Park. As the meeting begins, there is a lot of talk about grades and the inconsistency of Texas weather before the discussion naturally transitions to upcoming events, specifically the cultural mixers that freshmen get to plan. “Something we want to keep in your heads and consider for your cultural mixture would be what food we want to serve, advertising ideas like the handbill and what booths you’ll have,” said Matthew Ealy, applied learning and development junior and committee chair. Largely focused on giving UT students the opportunity

When: Tuesday from 6 p.m.8 p.m. Where: East Mall

@katclarksamp

to develop, plan and present African and African American culture programs to the University, the committee plans a variety of events, such as Masquerade in the Park. “The greatest thing about Campus Events + Entertainment is probably the wide array of events that we sponsor,” Ealy said. “Because we consist of nine committees, each committee has a different interest. This allows for the most diverse programming of events by any organization on campus.” The committee, which meets every Wednesday in the SAC, is open to all UT students. While the meetings are loosely structured, they rely heavily on an open forum discussion. The committee’s Black History Month events are the topic of much discussion this week. The first was a viewing of the movie “42” on Feb. 4. Following the screening, the committee hosted a night of entertainment, What Started Here Changed Our World, on

MASQUERADE page 8

By Kritika Kulshrestha

The American Shakespeare Center is coming to UT for the fifth time Monday and Tuesday. The center incorporates audience memebers in its performances.

@kritika88

While traditional stage productions usually keep the performers and the audience separated, the American Shakespeare Center’s productions take pride in including audience members in every performance. The American Shakespeare Center, returning to UT for the fifth time, is collaborating with UT’s Shakespeare at Winedale program to present two Shakespeare plays, “The Merry Wives of Windsor” and “Henry IV, Part I,” this Monday and Tuesday. The center, located in Staunton, Va., has constructed an indoor theater, the Blackfriars Playhouse, which resembles Shakespeare’s original indoor theater. These productions differ from traditional theater productions in the way that the actors interact with their audiences. “Most of the time you go into a theater and the lights are turned off,” said Stephanie Holladay Earl, an actress at the center. “There’s this imaginary, forced wall between the actors and audience. However, we don’t turn off the lights. We stage our plays in universal lighting because in Shakespeare’s time, the plays were staged in either candlelight or sunlight.” These plays often involve a lot of variables

Courtesy of the American Shakespeare Center

and unexpected moments because the actors cannot predict how audience members will react to the dialogues thrown at them during the show. “Because we interact with the audience and involve them in our stories, a lot of things change in the performance based on how the audience might react in a particular scene,” Earl said. “If I point to a member of the audience and give them

a line to speak, that person may laugh or may look embarrassed and turn red.” Speaking directly to the audience during the show makes for a more engaging experience, center actress Bridget Rue said. Rue said many of the dialogues in Shakespeare’s plays are in the form of direct speeches, which makes it easier for the actors to enact when they address the audience members directly.

THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR AND HENRY IV, PART I Where: Texas Union Theater When: Monday and Tuesday at 7 p.m. Admission: $10-15

“It causes a lot of comedy oftentimes,” Rue said.

SHAKESPEARE page 8

The Daily Texan 2014-03-03  

The Monday, March 3, 2014 edition of The Daily Texan.

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