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Thursday, February 27, 2014

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STUDENT GOVERNMENT

CAMPUS

Campaigns accused of misconduct By Nicole Cobler @nicolecobler

Late Thursday night, after the first day of voting, the Election Supervisory Board heard four complaints alleging campaign misconduct, including one that the RadyStrickland executive alliance campaign had violated

students’ privacy by adding students to an email listserv without permission. Danny Zeng, finance and government senior, accused Student Government presidential candidate Kori Rady and running mate Taylor Strickland of unauthorized use of his email address. “I really don’t know the

scope and reach of this operation,” Zeng told the board. “I just know my privacy is being intruded from the negligence on their part.” History senior Joshua Tang and Kennon Kasischke, a biology and psychology senior, represented the RadyStrickland campaign at the hearing. Tang, who is reg-

istered as a worker for the Rady-Strickland campaign, said he was not speaking in any way in his capacity as SG administrative director. Tang said Zeng was added to the campaign’s listserv after Rady and Strickland asked their agents and workers to

‘Wendy’s Guy’ given temporary housing

STUDENT ELECTIONS begin again today at 8 a.m. and end at 5 p.m.

By Nicole Cobler @nicolecobler

Vote at utexasvote.org.

the time,” Harkins said. Laurie Lentz, communications manager for Campus Planning & Facilities Management, said while

Ishmael Mohammed Jr., better known as “The Wendy’s Guy” or Junior, was moved into short-term housing last week after a UT alumnus led a drive that raised $30,000 earlier this month to help get Mohammed off the streets. Mohammed worked at Wendy’s in the Union Building for more than 13 years, where he broke the world record for the most sales at a fast food restaurant in 30 minutes. Mohammed left the company in 2012. UT alumnus Benjamin McPhaul started the fundraiser on Feb. 6 after he saw Mohammed asking for money outside the Cactus Cafe. McPhaul said the money is now being managed by Family Eldercare — an organization that serves seniors and adults with disabilities — to find Mohammed permanent housing and give him permanent residence documentation. McPhaul said Mohammed’s green card was stolen, which made it difficult to move him into permanent housing, but Mohammed is currently in short-term housing. Becca McPherson, director of development at Family Eldercare, said the organization could neither confirm nor deny if it was handling Mohammed’s situation. Family Eldercare manages several low-income housing properties around Austin and a 52-unit complex for lowincome seniors. McPherson said clients who are eligible for the organization’s money

TRESPASS page 2

WENDYS page 3

SG page 2

POLICE

Campus trespassing poses safety concerns By Julia Brouillette @juliakbrou

University officials face a difficult trade-off between the safety and accessibility of campus buildings, according to Bob Harkins, the associate vice president of Campus Safety and Security. UTPD crime statistics show that, in the past six years, criminal trespassing was reported most frequently in Webb Hall, the Union Building, the Student Activity Center, Jester Center and the Perry-Castaneda Library. Harkins said most facilities, while not public, are generally open to the public during daytime hours, meaning anyone can access UT buildings when they are open. “If you live around here, you understand that there are a lot of people that hang out around places,” Harkins said. “Only when they’re in an area they’re not authorized to be in after hours, or they’re creating some type of a nuisance, do we then approach them.” UTPD Lt. Gonzalo Gonzalez said higher criminal trespass rates for Webb Hall and the Union Building could be a result of the buildings’ locations. “They’re right next to

Charlie Pearce/ Daily Texan Staff Over the past six years, the Union Building, along with the Student Activity Center, Jester Center, Webb Hall and the PerryCastaneda Library, has been the site of more criminal trespassing violations than any other building on campus. These buildings are particularly vulnerable because of heavy foot traffic and the likelihood of unattended belongings.

Guadalupe Street,” Gonzalez said. “I can tell you that’s why I would guess those two would be on the list.” Harkins said campus buildings attract homeless individuals because they pro-

vide clean water, food and a break from the weather. Buildings such as the Union, the SAC and the PCL are heavily populated with students, who sometimes leave their belongings

unattended, making them vulnerable to theft. “People will tend to lay down personal property and walk away from it, then we’ve got the threat of thefts that we’re trying to balance out all

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NATIONAL

THROWBACK

Charter schools linked to Teach for America

In college, binge drinking a ‘tribal rite’

By Alyssa Mahoney @TheAlyssaM

Although Teach for America, known as TFA, does not maintain an official position on charter schools, a recent study suggests the organization has significant ties to groups lobbying for charter school expansion. The study, conducted by Carroll University, identified organizations that were founded by TFA alumni, had TFA alumni in senior level positions or had formal partnerships with TFA. The study suggested that TFA is a major part of an alumni network that promotes the growth of charter schools, or schools that are publicly funded but operate independently of school districts, and the

privatization of education. There were 73 UT students who joined TFA last year — the most among large schools — according to TFA’s September 2013 list. Education associate professor Julian Heilig said he agrees with the study’s assessment, and he said while TFA argues that it is part of a broader reform movement, the organization has aligned itself with organizations that seek to provide education privately. “As funny as it sounds, the TFA reformer war is the least interested in reform,” Heilig said. “If they’re not reformers, then they’re ideologues.” Heilig, who blogs about education issues, said he believes TFA’s two-year commitment is insufficient

TFA page 2

By Brett Donohoe @BrettDonohoe1

While excessive alcohol consumption has always been an issue on college campuses, one would seldom compare the practice to tribal behavior; however, an article from the Oct. 19, 1988, edition of The Daily Texan makes just that connection. The article, titled “Student drinkers engage in tribal ritual,” sought to raise awareness of alcoholism in the context of social drinking. “With the group all

Ashley Bogle / Daily Texan file photo

present, the tribal ritual begins,” the article said. “Glasses or plastic cups are filled and passed out. Members of the tribe slam the toxic ma-

terial into their bodies, and continue to repeat the tradition over and over until they are forced to meet with the porcelain god.”

NEWS

OPINION

SPORTS

LIFE&ARTS

ONLINE

UT chosen by Obama to start design institute. PAGE 3

Charitable groups must not forget core purpose. PAGE 4

Basketball holds on to beat Baylor at home. PAGE 6

Issa Nyaphaga of Radio Taboo comes to Austin. PAGE 8

Visiting professor criticizes U.S. foreign policy. PAGE 3

Political strategy: Vote in the Republican primaries. PAGE 4

Ellen Lobb to swim at home for last time. PAGE 6

Science Scene examines the Trolley Problem. PAGE 8

Find out how much the students of West Campus spend on alcohol in our video. dailytexanonline.com

This article was part of an in-depth piece on alcohol awareness, which also

DRINKING page 2 REASON TO PARTY

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Thursday, February 27, 2014

NEWS BRIEFLY

FRAMES featured photo

College distances self from professor, study

developed a list of 668 emails.” Zeng said he felt the campaign should not have assumed he wanted to get the campaign email. “I appreciate what they said, but in this country, with mass marketing, we have an opt-in system rather than an opt-out,” Zeng said. Tang asked the board to have the case dismissed. Ryan Lutz, the board chairman, said the board was required to release a resolution and would have the response within 24 hours. The board also addressed two separate complaints filed against Graduate Student Assembly presidential candidate David Villarreal and running mate Brian Wilkey. Their opponents, presidential candidate Frank Male and running mate Virginia Luehrsen, filed a complaint against executive alliance Villarreal and Wilkey over “misleading campaign activities.” Luehrsen said the duo

claimed other candidates’ platform points as their own. “Misrepresentation of facts and the work involved is damaging to our campaign and to the Graduate Student Assembly,” Luehrsen said. “If students did this in my class, I would report them to Student Judicial Services.” Villarreal said he was

alarmed by the lack of specifics the opposing candidates brought forward. “We fundamentally believe it is our job to campaign for ourselves,” Villarreal said. No ruling on any of the complaints had been made as of press time. Additional reporting by Bobby Blanchard.

The College of Liberal Arts released a statement stating the opinions presented by associate sociology professor Mark Regnerus do not reflect the beliefs of the University. Liberal arts spokesman David Ochsner said the statement was released in light of Regnerus’ testimony on behalf of the state of Michigan in an ongoing trial challenging the state’s ban on same sex marriage. In a study released in 2012, Regnerus claimed children raised by gay parents are worse off than those raised by hetero sexual couples. “Dr. Regnerus’ opinions are his own,” the college’s statement said. “They do not reflect the views of the university. Like all faculty, he has the right to pursue his areas of research and express his point of view.” Ochsner said the College of Liberal Arts has received several inquiries as a result of Regnerus’ testimony. “When the study first came out, there was a lot of discussion,” Ochsner said. “It depends on when the issue comes up about gay marriage or about gay rights. … That’s when we tend to hear more about it than other times.” Ochsner said he has never before seen this level of response from the community about research or a study. “That’s sort of the nature of the business, though, that faculty members have the freedom to pursue topics that are sometimes posing difficult questions,” Ochsner said. “It’s not surprising when you get these kinds of reactions. It’s a very charged topic right now.” —Madlin Mekelburg

training program. “You don’t send your young, new employees to your toughest clients,” Heilig said. “They’re sending the least prepared teachers in their toughest situations.” According to TFA Recruitment Manager Adam Reichow, TFA has no position on charter schools. “This is the approach that some of our alumni from the 1990s and early 2000s had,” Reichow said. “That was their own solution to our problem [of education].”

Education professor Richard Reddick, a TFA alumnus, said there is as much variety in quality education programs among charter schools as there are among typical public schools. “Is Teach for America involved in the charter school movement? Absolutely,” Reddick said. According to Reddick, the issues that critics have with charter schools apply to all schools. He said a major concern is whether all students have access to quality education. “I sit on two charter schools

boards and I ask these questions,” Reddick said. “Are we making our schools accessible for all students?” Reichow said the efficacy of charter schools is a complex and controversial issue, but TFA is learning from the approach alumni who have started charter schools have taken. He said in his experience as a corps member in a Dallas charter school, parents were thankful for the ability to have more choices about what school their child

could attend. Christen Thompson, a Plan II Honors and Spanish senior and a TFA campus campaign coordinator, said she thinks TFA’s alumni network distinguishes it from other teaching programs. “It’s biggest strength is this network of alumni — this ability to reach across different fields and collaborate for change,” Thompson said. “The education system is so complex that with people in multiple different fields, we have a better chance of change.”

TBT

associated with health, vitality, social bonding and trendiness] and conform to them,” Horton said. Packaged with this article, a piece, titled “Fictional Greek party brings up real issues,” detailed a skit reenactment of a typical Greek party, presented by several fraternities and sororities, in order to bring the practice under scrutiny. “Members of various Greek organizations staged ‘Anatomy of a Party,’ … guiding a crowd of several hundred Greeks and pledges through a fictional frat party at the Sigma Epsilon Chi (SEX) house, and discussing the consequences of the partiers’

actions,” the article said. The event stressed the different compromising situations that could, and do, occur at an archetypal party. “One scene involved a crowd peer-pressuring a pledge into downing a beerbong and a frat boy passing out after slamming three cans, leading to a discussion of hazing and medical emergencies at parties,” the article said. Later, the article discussed rape in the context of a party. “The issue of rape came up in a scene where several of the partygoers discovered a girl passed out upstairs,” the article said. “It’s incredible to me that

we even have to talk about this,” an event participant said. “I think this problem starts long before the party, and has to do with attitudes about women and the way we treat them.” The whole in-depth piece ended with an ad offering resources for combating alcoholism. But, the issue persists. “Alcoholism is a problem for our society everywhere,” Ruth, a volunteer for Alcoholics Anonymous and recovering alcoholic, said in the article. “I wouldn’t single out the University. The problem is probably not any greater there, but also not any lesser either.”

Volume 114, Issue 113

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Retail Advertising (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising (512) 471-5244 classifieds@ dailytexanonline.com The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

CORRECTIONS Because of a reporting error, a story about a graduate student researching deaf culture on the Feb. 18 issue of The Daily Texan had several errors. The photo caption misspelled the student’s last name. It is spelled Mazique. The story also misquoted Mazique on one of her research focuses. Mazique’s research looks at international law. Because of an editing error, a front-page box on the Feb. 26 issue of The Daily Texan incorrectly listed the dates of the Student Government elections. The elections run from Wednesday at 8 a.m. to Thursday at 5 p.m. Because of an editing error, a story in the Feb. 26 issue of The Daily Texan about the baseball team misstated the type of surgery John Curtiss had. Curtiss had Tommy John surgery and later thoracic outlet syndrome surgery.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2013 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER Low High

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Staffsketball

Sarah Montgomery / Daily Texan Staff

Juanita, a campus janitor, waits for students to finish their lunches in a dining room of the Union Building.

SG

continues from page 1 contact the leaders of the student organizations in which they held membership. Tang and Zeng both said they had a direct connection to each other through their involvement in Up To Texas, a case competition to raise awareness about the national debt deficit. “The emails that I submitted were sent to people I know are engaged on political matters on campus,” Tang said. According to Kasischke, a Rady-Strickland agent, he felt the campaign team was selective in who the emails were sent to, and kept well within the boundaries of the guidelines about email messaging in the board’s code. “If your team is using the directory to email someone you know, you need to have someone on your team to have a direct connection to him,” Kasischke said. “We

TFA

continues from page 1 because more teaching experience is necessary to increase teaching effectiveness. He also criticized its teacher

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2/27/14

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NEWS

continues from page 1 discussed “Women and Alcoholism” and Greek parties. “Many students embrace the Animal House mentality and demonstrate that drinking to excess is their tribal rite,” Jerry Horton, the then-co-coordinator of the campus alcohol and drug education program, said in the article. Horton also brought up the problem of drinking to excess. “To a significant degree students buy into these mythic stereotypic images [of drinking being

TRESPASS

continues from page 1 criminal trespassing does not frequently interfere with the management of buildings, trespassers occasionally cause disruption for custodial services personnel. “It’s sort of episodic — things will happen occasionally and it’ll be kind of a mess, but there’s no really consistent pattern with it other than that typically what’s affected are the restrooms,” Lentz said. “Generally, it would be homeless people using UT restrooms to clean up and they may leave paper towel waste on the floor or splash a lot of

Sarah Montgomery / Daily Texan Staff

Student Government president and vice president candidates Kori Rady and Taylor Strickland listen to their defense given by senior Kent Kasischke to the Election Supervisory Board regarding a complaint filed by finance senior Danny Zeng.

water around, and then the custodial team will need to come clean it up.” Campus Safety and Security is working to install electronic access locks in all campus buildings. Currently, 64 of the 238 main campus buildings are equipped with these locks, which require a UT ID card for entry. “What those do is they give us the capability to provide a safer environment for students that are studying late in small groups or even by themselves,” Harkins said. “We’re moving through campus as quickly as we can to get more funding to be able to do more of the buildings.”

Trespass trouble Most frequently trespassed buildings: 1. Walter Webb Hall 2. Union Building 3. Student Activity Center 4. Jester Center 5. PCL Recent criminal trespass reports, according to UTPD campus watch: Feb. 11: Jester Center Feb. 11: Perry-Castaneda Library Feb. 11: Union Building Feb. 13: Student Activity Center Feb. 17: Graduate School of Business Feb. 23: Littlefield House


W&N 3

NEWS

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Thursday, February 27, 2014

CAMPUS

STATE

Texas gay marriage ban ruled unconstitutional By Alyssa Mahoney @TheAlyssaM

Sarah Montgomery / Daily Texan Staff

Professor Bruce Thornton of California State University discusses the modern day approach to foreign policy and how it relates to the approach of ancient civilizations, arguing that modern policy makers should take after ancient examples.

Classics expert rejects idealism By Adam Hamze @adamhamz

Visiting professor Bruce Thornton used ancient Greek political philosophy to criticize modern foreign policy at a talk Wednesday, titled “New World, Old Wisdom: Foreign Policy and the Classics.” According to Thornton, classics and humanities professor at California State University, the modern world has adopted democracy from ancient Greek politics, but it takes a different approach to foreign policy. Thornton studies ancient Greece extensively in order to find implications for modern political science. Until the 1800s, the majority of the world, including the ancient Greeks, operated with a realist approach to foreign policy, according to Thornton. He said the world now predominately takes an idealist approach to foreign policy.

The driving force of realism is the quest for power, not matters of principle, while idealism is the belief that through the use of international laws and agreements, all nations can work in harmony. Thornton said he believes one of the most important parts of foreign policy is to understand what motivates people, and the motives of two countries are often different. “The biggest mistake a diplomat can make is to sit across the table from someone and think that he thinks the same way,” Thornton said. A CNN poll from September 2013 shows that 40 percent of Americans approve of President Barack Obama’s foreign policy approach. Thornton said he believes the U.S. should shift to a more realist mentality. “Clearly, over the last five years American foreign policy has been a disaster,” Thornton

The United Nations is an abysmal failure. It’s an excuse … to hang out in Manhattan and not pay parking tickets. —Bruce Thornton, Classics and humanities professor at California State University

said. “We have no credibility anywhere in the world.” Thornton said international groups, such as the United Nations, are more problematic than beneficial. “The United Nations is an abysmal failure,” Thornton said. “It’s an excuse … to hang out in Manhattan and not pay parking tickets.” The talk was sponsored by the Clements Center for History, Strategy & Statecraft, the history department and the Thomas Jefferson Center for the Study of Core Texts and Ideas. Steele Brand, a postdoctoral fellow at the Clements

CAMPUS

Obama selects UT for digital manufacturing collaboration

Plan nior aign nks tinhing

By Kate Dannenmaier @kater_tot7

this this As part of a push toward ffer-innovation in manufacturforing processes, the Obama TheAdministration announced om-Monday the establishment mul-of the Digital Manufacturing ve aand Design Innovation Insti-

tute, known as DMDI, a program in which the Cockrell School of Engineering will play an integral role. The research collaboration between UT and six other American universities will be funded by a $70 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense, as well as $250 million of outside contributions from industry, academia, government and community partners. Digital manufacturing is the use of virtual simulation tools to design and manufacture technology more efficiently. Engineering professors Steven Nichols and Joseph Beaman have led the Cockrell School’s effort to be selected for this program, according to

WENDYS

continues from page 1 management services must be low-income, elderly or adults with disabilities that prevent them from managing their own money. “If there was a situation where somebody raised money to help enhance someone else’s life and they fell under the guidelines, we could serve that client,” McPherson said. According to McPherson, the organization also works with clients who have lost proper documentation, especially homeless individuals. “If they lost [their

Nichols, who said they teamed with other universities to prepare a proposal for DMDI, and, after technical panels reviewed it, the proposal was submitted to and chosen by President Barack Obama for inclusion in the program. According to Nichols, specific research topics will be decided between DMDI and funding agencies from a list of exemplar topics submitted as part of UT’s proposal. Nichols said it is their intention to drive innovation in manufacturing processes and systems by creating tools that can better predict and prevent manufacturing defects. “The tools developed in this program will increase the speed and reduce the cost of the supply chain,” Nichols said in an email. “When combined with design process improvements, this will allow the U.S. supply chain to be more lean and responsive to demand.” Beaman said he believes the University was selected because of its previous accomplishments in the

areas of manufacturing and computational research. According to Beaman, the 3-D printing method they developed is a key advanced manufacturing technology today. “UT Austin was selected because it is a top engineering school and it has a long history of excellence in advanced manufacturing and computational analysis,” Beaman said in an email. “UT-Austin was the first academic institution to develop and commercialize additive manufacturing, sometimes called 3-D printing or direct digital manufacturing, starting in my lab in the 1980s.” Balaji Chandrasekaran, corporate relations director of the Graduate Engineering Council, said, as a mechanical engineer turned industrial engineer, he understands the importance of improving efficiency in manufacturing. “The fact that UT has been selected to contribute to solving such an important issue adds to my pride of being part of this great institution,” Chandrasekaran said.

documentation], we can assist clients in helping them regain what they need,” McPherson said. When Mohammed spoke to The Daily Texan, he mentioned alcohol several times. McPhaul said he was not sure whether Family Eldercare was providing professional help for Mohammed’s mental health or whether Mohammed was an alcoholic. “I think maybe he does drink and likes to drink, but I’ve had numerous interactions with him on a daily basis where he’s not drunk at all,” McPhaul said. “I don’t know if that’s something that is being blown out of

proportion or if he is actually an alcoholic.” According to McPhaul, he will still stay in touch with Mohammed but will not be involved as regularly as he has been with the situation. McPhaul said Mohammed, who is 58 years old, will be eligible for early retirement at 62, and Family Eldercare will make the donated money last as long as possible until Mohammed can set aside enough to retire. “I’m just hoping he gets back on his feet and gets a place to live and a job,” McPhaul said. “That’s pretty much all I really care about.”

center, which started in 2013, said the center aims to bring more attention to the classical world’s politics. “Our mission is to bring the insights of history to modern foreign policy,” Brand said. The audience contained a mix of students and professors. Matthew Deal, a global policy studies graduate student who attended the speech, said it is important for political leaders to be informed by history. “I think we can draw a lot of lessons [from the Greeks] and draw parallels with the origins of democracy,” Deal said.

On Wednesday, San Antonio-based U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia ruled a ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional, though the ruling will not take effect until it can be reviewed on appeal. Garcia, who sits on the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas, said his decision is consistent with the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in June that held the federal government must allow married same-sex couples to receive federal benefits. “After careful consideration, and applying the law as it must, this Court holds that Texas’ prohibition on same-sex marriage conflicts with the United States Constitution’s guarantee of equal protection and due process,” Garcia said. “Texas’ current marriage laws deny homosexual couples the right to marry, and, in doing so, demean their dignity for no legitimate reason.” The case was put forth by Cleopatra De Leon and Nicole Dimetman, two lesbian women from Austin who sought recognition for an out-of-state marriage license, and Mark Phariss and Victor Holmes, two gay men from Plano who want to get married in Texas. De Leon got her master’s degree from UTSan Antonio, while Dimetman is an alumna of the UT School of Law. Garcia now joins five other federal judges who have ruled same-sex marriage bans unconstitutional in Virginia, Oklahoma, Utah, California and Kentucky. Earlier this month, U.S. District Judge John Heyburn ruled that Kentucky’s state ban on gay marriage violated gay and lesbian citizens’ guarantee for equal protection under the law.

Orlando Garcia

U.S. district judge

“Kentucky’s laws treat gay and lesbian persons differently in a way that demeans them,” Heyburn wrote in his opinion. In Virginia, Justice Arenda Wright Allen also overturned the state’s ban on same-sex marriage. Like Garcia, Allen stayed the execution of her ruling pending review in an appeals court. In June, in a 5-4, the Supreme Court overturned a part of the Defense of Marriage Act and ruled the federal government could not deny recognition to same-sex couples whose marriages are legally recognized by the state. According Greg Abbott, Texas attorney general and favorite to be the Republican nominee for governor, the process to appeal Garcia’s decision will begin in the Fifth Circuit. “Because the judge has stayed his own decision, his ruling has no immediate practical effect,” Abbott said in a statement. “Instead, the ultimate decision about Texas law will be made by the Court of Appeals or the U.S. Supreme Court.” Abbott said the U.S. Supreme Court’s precedent gives states the authority to regulate marriage. “The Texas Constitution defines marriage as between one man and one woman,” Abbott said. “If the Fifth Circuit honors those precedents, then today’s decision should be overturned and the Texas Constitution will be upheld.”


4A OPINION

LAURA WRIGHT, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / @TexanEditorial Thursday, February 27, 2014

HORNS UP: BAN ON GAY MARRIAGE FOUND UNCONSTITUTIONAL

4

GALLERY

Change may come to Texas more quickly than expected: On Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Orlando L. Garcia for the Western District of Texas, in San Antonio, struck down Texas’ ban on gay marriage, saying that the ban violated the U.S. Constitution. The decision comes just weeks after a similar federal court ruling in Oklahoma. LGBTQ couples in Texas will not immediately be able to wed, though. The judge issued a stay on the decision pending its inevitable appeal by state officials. If appealed, the law will head to the 5th Circuit, a notoriously conservative court. But that doesn’t change the fact that Garcia has lent yet another strong voice supporting equal LGBTQ rights, and we’re happy that he’s taken the stance in one of the states that needs his clear reasoning most. Horns up to Garcia, who is also a UT law graduate, for a ruling that in many ways restates what’s already been decided: It’s a mistake to deny anyone the right to marriage, and we can’t let it happen for much longer.

These Texas laws deny ... access to the institution of marriage and its numerous rights, privileges and responsibilites for the sole reason that Plantiffs wish to be married to a person of the same sex. The Court finds this denial violates Plantiffs’ equal protection and due process rights under the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

—Orlando L. Garcia, U.S. District Judge

COLUMN

Illustration by Lucy Griswold / Daily Texan Staff

For undocumented Longhorns, the Republican primaries matter

HORNS UP: UNIVERSITY FINDS WAYS TO CONSERVE WATER SUPPLY The Daily Texan reported Wednesday that the University’s irrigation program reduced water usage 66 percent last year, which is particularly good news considering the National Weather Service’s prediction that the Texas drought will persist through at least May of this year. And now, as drought conditions continue to worsen, the University is expanding its current conservation efforts by targeting water usage in student dorms. Some initiatives include installing light timers, low-flow toilets and shower heads and faucets that can be installed even in older campus residences. Considering the size of our campus, it’s safe to say that every little bit of conservation helps. So horns up to the University for continuing to focus on conserving our dwindling water supply.

The University’s irrigation program reduced water usage 66 percent last year — particularly good news considering ... that the Texas drought will persist.

COLUMN

Sam Craft / Associated Press

A “Vote” sign at the Lamar County Services Building, Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014 in Paris, Texas.

By David Davis Jr. Daily Texan Columnist @daveedalon

Friday is the last day for early voting in the primaries, and for some students, the stakes of the lieutenant governor’s race are high — maybe high enough to keep them from going to college, because the Republican candidates have vowed to do their best to repeal the in-state tuition law that allows undocumented students to pay in-state tuition prices. Throughout the race, Republican candidates David Dewhurst, the current lieutenant governor; state Sen. Dan Patrick, R-Houston; Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson; and Commissioner of Agriculture Todd Staples have leaned completely to the right in a fight to prove who has the most conservative political ideals, which are highly favored in the red state of Texas. Antiimmigration rhetoric has been ubiquitous during the campaign for the office, which is often considered the most powerful in the state. Patrick, a Tea Party candidate, seems to be the most likely to make good on this threat. Despite college students’ tendency to vote for Democrats, UT students should vote in the Republican primaries if only to keep Patrick out of office. Among the Republican candidates, there is a consensus that illegal immigrants, even those brought here as children, should not be granted citizenship or reap any of its benefits. Patrick has even referred to immigrants as “invaders,” and his campaign

What Patrick fails to realize the value that college-educated, bilingual people could add to the state economy. Repeal of in-state tuition for undocumented immigrants would be a loss for the state.

website states that illegal immigrants are a threat to the safety of Texans as well as to the Texas economy. However, Patrick fails to realize the value that college-educated, bilingual people could add to the state economy. Repeal of in-state tuition for undocumented immigrants would be a loss for the state. As Barbara Hines, codirector of the Immigration Center at the UT School of Law, told the Texan, “It would be bad economic sense for the state. Once educated, these students contribute to society in a professional capacity, and they pay sales and property taxes as well.” Beyond being bad economics, repealing the in-state tuition law is also morally repugnant. Undocumented students who are children of illegal immigrants do not have a say in where they are born or raised. It would be a mistake to blame and punish these students who, according to Hines, have excelled in Texas high schools and have no intention of returning to their home countries. American studies associate professor Nicole Guidotti-Hernandez agrees. “It is unfortunate that politics of exclusion have gotten in the way of humanistic ways of imagining a more tolerant, educated and inclusive civil society,” Guidotti-Hernandez said. Though all of the Republican candidates for the lieutenant governor’s office have stated their firm opposition to the in-state tuition law during the campaign season, only Patrick has the track record to prove that they would truly repeal it. Dewhurst has been in office for 12 years, and the law has yet to be repealed. Patterson has stated that he would support a method of providing lawful status to illegal immigrants, and Staples actually voted in favor of the instate tuition law in 2001. Their support for the repeal could easily be an empty platform point. Patrick is the only Republican candidate that has not contradicted himself on the issue. Given the high stakes of this election for some of our fellow Longhorns, students should take the time to vote in the Republican primaries before early voting closes Friday, if only to ensure that Senator Patrick does not move on to the general election in November. Davis is an international relations and French junior from Houston.

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Student-held events for charity shouldn’t forget underlying cause By Amanda Almeda Daily Texan Columnist @Amanda_Almeda

Last Friday, China Care, a student-run organization that fundraises for lifesaving surgeries for orphans in China, hosted its fifth annual Benefit Night. The event was held to raise money to fund brain surgery for Huan, an orphan with epilepsy. The benefit night featured competitive performances by student organizations such as Hum A Cappella and Punjabbawockeez, food sponsored by local Austin businesses, including Amy’s Ice Creams, T-shirts and a raffle. While the event attracted an audience of about 300 people and helped raise a lot of money, some attendees worried that the entertainment aspect overshadowed the promotion of the actual cause. Accounting senior Justin Chao performed at the event with Hum A Cappella. He and a few of his friends felt there was a lot of emphasis on the performances and competition, and he wished there had been more talk about Huan’s story throughout the evening. He said the discussion with his friends “really prompted [him] to think about the kind of attitude” he has when he gives and when he performs.

On the stage, it’s easy to forget why you are there in the first place. Am I here to perform and show off my own talents? Am I here for me? Or am I here for a cause greater than me?

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to editor@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

—Justin Chao, Accounting Senior

“On the stage, it’s easy to forget why you are there in the first place,” Chao said. “Am I here to perform and show off my own talents? Am I here for me? Or am I here for a cause greater than me?” While entertainment may help attract an audience large enough to reach an organization’s fundraising goals in the short term, without a stronger emphasis on that organization’s overall mission, charity events may not necessarily inspire audiences to commit to causes in the long term. This is crucial, as there is such a high concentration of philanthropic organizations on campus. We should take advantage of this opportunity to spread the word, learn and care about the diverse range of causes we are exposed to on a regular basis. When we host events to achieve these goals, we should make sure we don’t lose sight of the cause to the means supporting it. Perhaps the recent successes of charitable enterprises are affecting how we model our own on-campus charity events. Buy a pair of Toms, and you’ll give a pair of shoes to someone in need. Buy a carton of Boxed Water Is Better, and 10 percent of the profit will go to world water relief foundations. Purchase a book from Chegg, and the company will plant a tree. While companies like these may be achieving some level of social good, it’s hard not to question the intentions and effectiveness of such initiatives. Feel-good marketing may be creating a culture in which we expect something in return for giving. As we promote our own philanthropic projects on campus, we should be conscious of this trend and do our best to avoid a quid-proquo mindset when it comes to charity. Entertainment and merchandise can be helpful in increasing the size of an audience, but it may not guarantee an increase in the number of committed supporters. While they have the attention of a crowd, philanthropic organizations on campus should take advantage of the opportunity to talk to their captive audiences about the stories behind their causes, whether that’s through showing a video with a firsthand account, starting a discussion or talking about other ways to get involved. Almeda is a marketing senior from Seattle.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@TexanEditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


CLASS/JUMP 5

LIFE&ARTS COMEDY

continues from page 8 try to go for really smart, witty comedy but I’ve hung out with him for so long that now I tend to do dumb stuff like he does.” After more than 10 years of touring, constant traveling may seem exhausting, but Sherwood insists

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Thursday, February 27, 2014

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that his job could not be any better. “We get to do our favorite thing in the world — doing live improv,” Sherwood said. “We like to make people laugh. We like the immediacy of being in front of a live audience, instead of the TV version. It’s really a dream gig.”

RADIO

continues from page 8 Nyaphaga lives in the U.S. now, but returns to Nditam every summer for three months. As long as he does not engage in any activity that directly attacks the government, he can return. Radio Taboo now runs on a citizen journalist

system where trained local journalists in Cameroon will teach civilians in the area to report on things in their community. Issue TV, an indie documentary group, has teamed up with Radio Taboo to create a documentary that will, when completed, show the radio’s establishment from start

to finish. The first half of the documentary will premiere Thursday at Nyaphaga’s talk, and the money earned will be used to complete and fund the film “Radio Taboo,” as well as to start and maintain the actual radio station. “What we hope to do with the film other than have it broadcasted on

CLASSIFIEDS THE DAILY TEXAN

U.S. televisions and in the Western world, is we hope to bring a certain version of the film around to different communities [in Cameroon],” Rousmaniere said. “The idea being that the film could then in different areas that are not reachable by radio, inspire others and educate them in another way.”

ADVERTISING TERMS There are no refunds or credits. In the event of errors made in advertisement, notice must be given by 10 am the fi rst day of publication, as the publishers are responsible for only ONE incorrect insertion. In consideration of The Daily Texan’s acceptance of advertising copy for publication, the agency and the advertiser will indemnify and save harmless, Texas Student Media and its officers, employees and agents against all loss, liability, damage and expense of whatsoever nature arising out of the copying, printing or publishing of its advertisement including without limitation reasonable attorney’s fees resulting from claims of suits for libel, violation of right of privacy, plagiarism and copyright and trademark infringement. All ad copy must be approved by the newspaper which reserves the right to request changes, reject or properly classify an ad. The advertiser, and not the newspaper, is responsible for the truthful content of the ad. Advertising is also subject to credit approval.

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STEFAN SCRAFIELD, SPORTS EDITOR / @texansports Thursday, February 27, 2014

TEXAS (24)

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A left-handed layup high off the glass by freshman point guard Isaiah Taylor put Texas ahead by 3 points with 43 seconds left in Wednesday’s game. But it was a one-handed block by sophomore center Cameron Ridley on the other side of the court that sealed the victory for Texas. After back-to-back losses, the Longhorns (21-7, 10-5 Big 12) moved back into the win column Wednesday night against Baylor. Among a rowdy crowd at the Frank Erwin Center, the Longhorns beat out the Bears 7469 to gain their first Big 12 win in more than 10 days. “This was a big game because of the way we played,” head coach Rick Barnes said. “We hadn’t given ourselves a chance in the last two games. But there are teams that at this time of the year think championships and teams that are just in survivor mode. So we told them they are going to want to play a lot of basketball.” Texas looked dominant in the first frame, and at one point led by 18 points. The Longhorns overpowered a lethargic Bears team with an energized offense. Fueled by sophomore guard Javan Felix’s five 3-pointers, Texas shot 51.6 percent from the floor in the first frame to give it a 15 point lead

PELICANS

MAVERICKS

NCAAM W. VIRGINIA

IOWA STATE

MICHIGAN

PURDUE

Shweta Gulati / Daily Texan Staff

Sophomore guard Demarcus Holland penetrated the Baylor zone in a 74-69 win Wednesday night at the Frank Erwin Center. Despite being up by 18 in the first half, the Longhorns had to hold off a second-half Baylor rally to secure the win.

heading into the break. It was no different on the other side of the court, where a hard-nosed defense held Baylor to just 25 percent shooting. It was a different story in the second half, as Baylor came out of the locker room with a combination zone and man defense that caused trouble for the Longhorns. As the Longhorns adjusted back to the energized

play it had in the first half, they were able to hold off the Bears. It wasn’t until Taylor’s layup that Texas took the momentum and the victory. “There’s going to be a time in every game when you need someone to go get one and someone to go stop one,” Barnes said. “[Taylor] is really good in his floater game and we know that. So sometimes it better to just let him open up and go. He’s

MEN’S SWIMMING & DIVING

going to get it there.” Felix led his squad with 21 points, including seven 3-pointers. Ridley finished with 20 points and 10 rebounds. “I felt really good,” Felix said. “We had a lot of time to get extra reps on our own. It just felt good coming out of my hand today.” The Longhorns hardly outrebounded their opponent, 41-40, but had the

34-18 advantage in the paint. Texas has three games left in the regular season, sitting in third place, as it travels to face Oklahoma on Saturday. “We need to carry this momentum,” Holmes said. “Last week we didn’t execute on the road, but it’s easy to play at home. Taking it on the road is a whole another challenge. We need to play our best game like we played here.”

WOMEN’S SWIMMING & DIVING

No time to celebrate achievements as Reese leads Texas in to Big 12 tourney By Courtney Norris @courtney_k_norris

It’s no surprise that Texas, the reigning champion, is favored to win the 18th annual Big 12 Championship in Austin this weekend. Texas has won 17 consecutive Big 12 titles since the tournament began in 1996. Head coach Eddie Reese, in his 35th year at the helm, is known for setting the bar high, as no school has won more NCAA team titles than Texas since his arrival. Reese took Texas from being a 21st-ranked team in his first season to winning 10 NCAA titles — more than any other team in that time span. “We started the tradition of being very good,” Reese said. “We’ve kept it going and they know that, it’s why a lot of them come here.” As a three-time Olympic coach — 1992 Barcelona, 2004 Athens and 2008 Beijing — Reese is a vital recruiting tool and attracts the best swimmers in the country. In his tenure, he has had no trouble translating that talent into success. But Reese doesn’t have time to celebrate his achievements and success

as head coach. With 13 talented freshmen on his team, Reese is prepared for a long, but rewarding, season. He knows a strong team bond is needed to compete at a national level. “It’s not just about what I’m swimming,” said senior freestyle swimmer Charles Moore, a two-time Big 12 champion. “It’s about what everyone is swimming. For us it’s individual efforts that are going to add up. Freshmen are always going to have unbelievable swims.” Texas swam well during the year, bringing it to No. 6 in the NCAA, but the team wants more, and that road starts this weekend with the Big 12 Championships. “At this meet, we have to worry about the times because that’s what’s going to qualify us for the NCAAs,” Reese said. In the early goings, the home waters seem to be treating the Longhorns well. Texas built itself a lead in the first night of the championships, winning all three events — the 200 medley relay, 800 freestyle relay and one-meter diving — Thursday night. Texas started the night taking first in the 200 med-

For us it’s individual efforts that are going to add up. Freshmen are always going to have unbelievable swims. —Charles Moore, Senior freestyle swimmer

ley in 1:24.86, before absolutely dominating in diving, where it took the top six spots led by freshman Michael Hixon’s 429 points. The Longhorns also beat TCU and West Virginia, the only other two Big 12 men’s swimming programs, in the 800 freestyle relay with a time of 6:17.24 to close the night. Texas leaves the pool with 175 points total, far eclipsing TCU’s 97 points and West Virginia’s 80 points. The championships will continue Thursday with the 50 and 500 freestyle finals and the 200 and 400 individual medley relays beginning at 6 p.m at the Lee and Joe Jamail Texas Swimming Center.

Marshall Tidrick / Daily Texan Staff

Freshman Mark Anderson helped lead the Longhorns diving team. Behind first place finsiher freshman Michael Hixon, the Longhorns finished one through six in the standings.

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1987

Marshall Tidrick / Daily Texan Staff

Senior Ellen Lobb helped Texas capture the 200 medley relay on Day 1 of the Big 12 Championships. She looks to continue the pace over the weekend in her last Big 12 meet.

Lobb hopes for one last hurrah at Texas By Kunal Patel @kunalpatel104

Senior butterfly and freestyle swimmer Ellen Lobb will swim in her home pool for the final time at the Big 12 Championships this weekend. As a veteran, she has learned to deal with the pressure and is trying to instill the same confidence in the team’s younger athletes. “Leave the meet with no regrets,” Lobb said, reiterating her message to the freshman swimmers. “Leave it all in the pool. Swimming is a tough sport, so just have fun with it. Have a smile and live in the moment.” Lobb is looking to cap off her four-year career with another worthy performance this weekend. A three-time Big 12 Commissioner’s Honor Roll recipient and four-time All-American, Lobb is as impressive in the pool and she is out of it. With this week’s Big 12 competition falling a week after last week’s SEC Swimming and Diving Championships, Lobb is looking to do more than just win the conference meet. The SEC is home to three of the top 10 teams in the nation — Georgia, Texas A&M and Florida. Knowing the times of some of the top swimmers in the country has given the Longhorns some added motivation. “Seeing those results will

give our girls a high standard to work towards,” Lobb said. “We can use those times for extra motivation to work harder during this week leading up to our races.” While the team continues to train hard, Lobb is relaxed heading into the tournament. She’s enjoying every last minute with her teammates, knowing full well that this will be her final opportunity to swim in front of the Austin crowd. “All those little things I was telling myself that I should do freshman, sophomore and junior year, now I’m like, ‘Ellen this is your senior year, you have to do it now,’” Lobb said. And so far in the Big 12 Championships’ first night, she is doing just that, helping Texas ‘A’ win the 200 medley relay in 1:37.16, good for the third fastest time in program history. In addition to claiming a first of her own, she watched as her teammates took first in the 800 freestyle relay in 7:01.97. Texas leads the Big 12 Championships after one day with 80 points, as Kansas sits in second with 66. The Big 12 Championships will continue Thursday with the one-meter diving finals. The finals for 50 and 500 events, and the 200 and 400 individual medley relays begin at 5 p.m. at the Lee and Joe Jamail Texas Swimming Center.

NCAA cancels SMU’s entire 1987 football schedule for gross violations of NCAA rules regarding athletic corruption

SPORTS BRIEFLY Bertine Strauss leads Texas in New Orleans

The final round of the All-State Sugar Bowl Intercollegiate ended well for junior golfer Bertine Strauss. Leading the Longhorns throughout the first two rounds, Strauss continued to carry the team through Tuesday’s final round, charging up 20 places in the individual leaderboard and leading the team to its best finish of the season at 15th overall. Strauss shot a 3-underpar 69 in the final round to finish 17th individually, hitting a total of five birdies and making it Texas’ lowest individual round of the season. Freshman Julia Beck ended with an even-par 72 and tied for 58th at 8 over par. Freshmen Lara Weinstein and Anne Hakula tied for 74th and 77th places, respectively, while sophomore Natalie Karcher rounded out the team, finishing 82nd. The Longhorns will not return to action until March 23-25, at the Farms Collegiate Invite in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. —Caroline Hall


COMICS 7

COMICS

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Thursday, February 27, 2014

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Thursday, February 27, 2014

Edited by Will Shortz

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8 L&A

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HANNAH SMOTHERS, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR / @DailyTexanArts Thursday, February 27, 2014

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Studies challenge limits of human morality

By Robert Starr @robertkstarr

A runaway trolley heads down the tracks, aimed at five innocent bystanders. In front of you lies a switch. Pulling it diverts the trolley to another track, where it will only hit one person. You have five seconds — do you pull the switch? If you are like the majority of people — around 90 percent, depending on the study you reference — you’ll say you will, defending your decision with the utilitarian stance that saving five lives is worth sacrificing one. What if there is no switch? Instead, you are above the track, standing on a bridge. There is a large man beside you, and if you push him off, he will fall in front of the train and block it from hitting the five people. It’s not such an obvious choice now, is it? Even though the end result of the action is the same

— one dead, five saved — the second scenario tests the limits of our moral sensibilities. These are both variations on the “Trolley Problem,” devised by Philippa Foot, former University of California, Los Angeles philosophy professor, and popularized by Judith Thomson, a philosophy professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The explanation of why the first situation is acceptable and the second is not usually runs along the lines of circumstance. The death of one is an unfortunate consequence in the first case and a method of rescue in the other. A recent study removed some of the artificiality of the trolley problem by providing subjects with a virtual reality headset, a real switch and auditory consequences. A paper from the study describes “screams of distress from either one or five agents became audible depending on the direction of the boxcar and the placement of the agents. Screaming was cut short at the moment of impact, and the visual environment faded to black.” The high-tech reworking didn’t change much. The results were largely the same as the survey answers. But the researchers did hit upon something that the thought experiment ignored:

Illustration by Ploy Buraparate / Daily Texan Staff

human error. In an alternate group, participants saw the train headed toward the one bystander and had the choice to flip the switch and kill five innocents. Of the 146 subjects in this group, 17 chose that option. Eight of the participants said they didn’t notice the people on the other track, and some of them apologized to the corpses they

THEATER

inadvertently created. Even in virtual form, these scenarios get to the heart of our innate morality, which is difficult to define, but feels absolute. Though these thought experiments are completely artificial, their directness has the capacity to reveal our deeply held beliefs and inform more realistic issues. In Thomson’s “Violinist,” for instance, you wake up and

discover a society of music lovers has plugged you into a famous violinist, and you will act as his life support. After nine months, he can safely detach and live on his own, but if you unplug before then, he dies. Here, Thomson has created a parallel to the abortion debate, but one in which the issue of personhood is removed. That being the case,

is it acceptable for you to detach your body from another human who is dependent on it? The scenarios are silly, but it’s not difficult to see their implications: Regardless of if we will ever need to detach ourselves from a famous violinist, it’s important to know whether the society we’re in would deem it murder if we did.

WORLD

Comedian brings tour to Austin Exiled journalist organizes By Jackie Wang @DailyTexanArts

Stacey Amorous lost track of her high school friend Brad Sherwood after graduation, only to see him on Comedy Central several years later. Amorous, associate director of the Liberal Arts Honors Program, became friends with Sherwood through theater in high school. Years after graduation, in 1992, Sherwood became a recurring performer on the British version of the improvisation comedy show “Whose Line is it Anyway?.” When the show moved to American television in 1998, Sherwood joined the new cast. In 2006, he and fellow performer Colin Mochrie decided to tour on the side, and began their own show. Sherwood and Mochrie will bring their show to the Long Center on Thursday evening. “We’ve never really thought we’d be doing this

for so long, and we’re ready to do it for another 10 years,” Sherwood said. “It’s kind of this fun little part-time job that became our full-time real job.” The audience spans all ages, according to Sherwood. He and Mochrie get to see people who have watched “Whose Line is it Anyway?” from a young age. “College-age kids are coming to the show now and saying, ‘I grew up watching you guys since I was 6 or 7,’” Sherwood said. “It’s really cool — now they’re adults, and they’ve got their own jobs and their own money. It’s fun, because they might not have gotten to see us live when they were kids but now they can. It’s really cool to see. We’re sort of like a fond part of their childhood memories.” For Sherwood, touring is a constant reunion with friends from his past. “I’ve probably seen more people I knew in high school

and college and other periods of my life than other people get to see again because I travel so much,” Sherwood said. “So I get to reconnect with people that all my other college friends will never get to see again.” Amorous remembers Sherwood as “a clown, but in a good way.” “He always kind of had that energy and that quickness that I admire,” Amorous said. “I’m probably one of his biggest fans, because being able to do improv is pretty impressive — he was always outwardly funny, super creative and quick. He was destined to do something like that.” Sherwood attributes his style of humor to Mochrie. “I’ve gotten a little goofier over the years, hanging around Colin for so long,” Sherwood said. “Just look at Colin. He’s pretty goofy. He tends to rub off on you. I

COMEDY page 5

taboo-breaking radio station By Eleanor Dearman @EllyDearman

Standing 100 feet high in rural Cameroon is a radio tower built by exiled journalist Issa Nyaphaga and his team of supporters. The tower is an unexpected sight in Nyaphaga’s village Nditam, as well as in the surrounding towns in Cameroon, because community members have almost no access to technology. This makes it more difficult to spread education and common knowledge about a range of topics such as sex education and women’s rights. “It’s another world where time doesn’t exist, and people struggle for basic life,” Nyaphaga said. While living in America, Nyaphaga decided he wanted to help combat the ignorance in the Central African country. His solution was Radio Taboo, a community radio station that reports information that is traditionally taboo in the culture. Nyaphaga is giving a presentation Thursday at the ART on 5th Gallery to discuss his life and work — particularly his efforts involving the radio station and an accompanying documentary being made about the station. “It’s going to be fun for the people, but it’s going to be highly educational,” said Sophie Rousmaniere, director of “Radio Taboo” the film. “It will give them a voice for their community, but it will also expose them to some information that could really improve people’s lives.” Because of Cameroon’s isolated rainforest setting, radio is the most practical form of mass communication in Nditam and the surrounding communities. Jim Ellinger of Austin Airwaves, an organization that has worked closely with Radio Taboo, said radio is ultimately the most effective way of getting information to people. “Everyone has a

Photo courtesy of Issa Nyaphaga Issa Nyaphaga started Radio Taboo in his home country of Cameroon, Africa, to discuss issues traditionally considered taboo in the culture. Nyaphaga will givew a presentation in Austin on Thursday.

radio,” Ellinger said. “If they don’t, oftentimes we give them one. It’s free, it’s immediate, everyone in an area can listen all at once and most importantly it allows people to speak for themselves and to themselves.” In response to the government’s censorship of knowledge, Nyaphaga became a political journalist who drew cartoons about all aspects of Cameroon’s news, but especially criticized those in power. His illustrations were seen by government officials and resulted in his expulsion from the country. “It was a normal newspaper with general information,” Nyaphaga said. “What got us in trouble is that the government had censorship laws, so they have to control what we publish.” In order to make these stabs at government officials and work around the strict censorship laws, Nyaphaga and his coworkers drew the cartoons

anonymously by signing them with a nickname. But when the government noticed his defiance, Nyaphaga was one of the first to be identified and arrested. “I was kept in the bureau of information, which was really a government police office where they forced people to give information — so they tortured people,” Nyaphaga said. “I was hanged there and shocked for about two weeks to say the name of my friends because they had the nicknames of all the journalists and they asked me to identify who is really who. I didn’t do that.” While Nyaphaga survived the investigations, he said many of his peers did not. “I am very lucky today because I am one of the ones who is alive and left the country,” Nyaphaga said. “That’s why I decided to move to a bigger country where I could have a bigger audience to tell this story.”

RADIO page 5


The Daily Texan 2014-02-27