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LIFE&ARTS PAGE 8

COMICS PAGE 7

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Tuesday, February 25, 2014

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STUDENT GOVERNMENT

POLICE

Hopefuls debate SafeRide, Riverside

Cooperate, produce ID, advises law professor

By Nicole Cobler @nicolecobler

At the Student Government debate Monday night, executive alliance candidates highlighted their differences on the issues of a new program, Safe Ride, a student activity center in the Riverside area and their respective involvements in the Greek community. Kenton Wilson and his running mate Caroline Carter took issue with Kori Rady’s support for an expansion of the URide program, which gives students rides home late

at night from the PCL. Rady helped author the SG legislation initiating the program last fall. Rady and his running mate Taylor Strickland said they hope to start a similar program, called Safe Ride, to taxi students home from Sixth Street. “I don’t like to see student fees going towards something like that as opposed to something that serves all students,” Wilson said. Rady and Strickland both said the program would give students a safer option to get home instead of waiting half an hour for a bus.

“It’s one thing to take us to our respective neighborhoods, but the next step would be right to our doorstep,” Strickland said. “Sometimes, that walk from the bus stop is also an issue.” The Rady-Strickland campaign also disagreed with Wilson-Carter’s support for the creation of a student activity center in the Riverside area. “The [center] in Riverside is interesting, but I wouldn’t want to pay for a facility I would never use,” Rady said. Wilson said he did not

DEBATE page 2

By Julia Brouillette @juliakbrou

Shelby Tauber / Daily Texan Staff

Kenton Wilson, left, and Kori Rady speak at the Student Government candidate debate Monday evening.

CITY

Food trucks head to Barton Springs Road By Danielle Lopez @ldlopz

Austin’s food trucks have found a new, permanent home and they’re taking West Campus’ Mighty Cone with them. A permanent food court is set to open mid-March on Barton Springs Road and will host a variety of Austin’s most beloved food trucks. Inspired by the removal of the major food trucks from South Congress last year, owners of the Barton Springs property — Alistair Jenkins, Kurt Simons, Christian Brooks and Ronnie Brooks — developed their idea for The Picnic. The owners of The Picnic were originally approached by national credit restaurant operators about opening up chain restaurants on the land but they decided to go a different route that they felt was truer to Austin life.

FOOD TRUCKS page 8

Illustration by StephanieVanicek / Daily Texan Staff

According to law professor David Gonzalez, the jogger who was arrested Thursday for failing to identify herself after being stopped for jaywalking could have avoided arrest by being more cooperative. Austin police officers detained Amanda Jo Stephen, 24, after seeing her disregard a pedestrian traffic signal at the intersection of 24th and San Antonio streets. Once stopped, Stephen refused to identify herself to the officers, who then arrested her. “She had already committed an arrestable offense when she failed to obey traffic laws,” APD spokeswoman Veneza Bremner said. According to Gonzalez, in most cases, withholding one’s name, residential address or date of birth only causes unnecessary tension with police. If one has not been detained or arrested, it is legal to withhold information, but Gonzalez said he discourages it. “It’s never OK,” Gonzalez said. “If you are stopped, even if you did nothing wrong, a police officer has the right to ask you for your name, your residence address and your date of birth. There’s nothing illegal or incriminating about giving that information.” “There is an argument of, ‘Well, I was illegally detained, so I don’t have to give it to the officer because I haven’t been legally detained,’” Gonzalez said. “But, in general, it’s bad practice. Asking for your name isn’t really considered an interrogation.” In Stephen’s case,

ARREST page 2

POLICE

UNIVERSITY

Former kicker to receive jail time for Ponzi scheme

Center struggles to avoid extinction

By Jeremy Thomas

By Madlin Mekelburg @madlinbmek

Former UT football kicker Russell Erxleben was sentenced Monday to 7.5 years in prison for a chain of fraudulent investment operations, through which he amassed more than $2 million. The federal indictment indicates Erxleben organized a Ponzi scheme from 20052009, misleading investors to invest in defrauded German government gold-bearing bonds from the 1920s and 1930s, as well as art by the 19th century French artist Paul Gauguin. Perpetrators of Ponzi schemes trick people into investing money into fraudulent business practices and then give them monetary returns from subsequent investors, rather than actual profits. U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel accepted a December

plea deal in which Erxleben pleaded guilty to one count of wire fraud and one count of money laundering. Erxleben will serve consecutive 90-month prison terms for each offense. David Gonzalez, adjunct law professor and Erxleben’s lawyer, said the defense team was pleased the judge accepted the agreement. “The outcome of the case, in terms of a compromise, was good,” Gonzalez said. “It was a very fair and just result.” Erxleben played football for the Longhorns from 1975-1978 and was a threetime All-American kicker. In 1977, he kicked a 67-yard field goal, which remains tied for the longest field goal in NCAA history. The New Orleans Saints selected Erxleben as the 11th-overall pick in the 1979 NFL Draft, and he played six seasons in the NFL.

NEWS

OPINION

SPORTS

LIFE&ARTS

ONLINE

UT faculty help design largest visual telescope. PAGE 3

Endorsement: Rady/Strickland for SG. PAGE 4

Mark Payton looks to continue hot streak. PAGE 6

Check out the photo slideshows of the Texas vs. Kansas basketball game.

Loudspeakers pervade Nigerian streets. PAGE 3

Endorsements for all U-wide and college races. PAGE 4

Nekia Jones, Longhorns to host TCU on Tuesday. PAGE 6

Access Austin offers students an opportunity to get away from campus and explore the city. PAGE 8

dailytexanonline.com

@JeremyOBThomas

A recent budget cutting decision by the College of Natural Sciences would not only impact the budget of the Texas Memorial Museum but are instead targeted at the entire Texas Natural Science Center, which the museum is a part of. According to its website, the Center works to create awareness and appreciation of biological diversity, especially in Texas. In addition to the museum, the Center oversees both vertebrate and non-vertebrate paleontology labs, as well as the Texas Natural History Collections. Edward Theriot, integrative biology professor and director of the Texas Memorial Museum, said the Center will be organized out of existence starting next fall. Theriot said different parts of the Center’s collection have already started moving to other colleges, including the

Zoe Davis / Daily Texan Staff

The Texas Memorial Museum is the main exhibit hall of Natural Sciences Center. Faculty Council met Feb. 17 to addressed concerns regarding new ways to fund the museum.

paleontological collection, which moved to the Jackson School of Geosciences last fall. “What I have been told about the collections is as of the last discussion I had

with [Linda Hicke, dean of the College of Natural Sciences], there was no plan at this time to cut the operational funding for the collections,” Theriot said.

“Technical, web and administrative support will become the responsibility of existing resources at the

MUSEUM page 2 REASON TO PARTY

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Tuesday, February 25, 2014

DEBATE

FRAMES featured photo

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Volume 114, Issue 111

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor Laura Wright (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Shabab Siddiqui (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@ gmail.com Sports Office (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Zoe Davis / Daily Texan Staff

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Sociology senior Jennifer Berberich works on her painting during a studio art class in the Doty Fine Arts Building on Monday.

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TOMORROW’S WEATHER Low High

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Therapy hour.

other entities.” Theriot said, as of right now, more than $600,000 will be cut from the Center’s budget starting next semester. Theriot said the center had an operational budget of over $1 million before the paleontological collection was moved. At the Faculty Council meeting last week, a resolution was passed that encourages the museum to find independent funding for its community outreach programs. William Beckner, mathematics professor and chair-elect of the Faculty Council, worked with the Faculty Council executive council to write the resolution. He said they wrote the resolution after Mona Medhy, cell and molecular biology associate professor, emailed him and asked Faculty Council to consider the museum’s situation. Beckner said the goal of the resolution was to encourage the museum to look elsewhere for funding. “I recognize the financial constraints on the University’s operating budget,” Beckner said. “The goal was to support

This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25 Permanent Staff

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the museum but not to tell the University how to fund it.” Medhy said she reached out to Beckner in order to promote discussion about potential solutions to the museum’s position. “My point was: Is there any way to help this museum financially, at least in the short term?” Medhy said. “I felt that it was important for our faculty, or anybody who is interested in this topic, to see what the University could provide besides relying simply on the College of Natural Sciences.” Theriot said he appreciates support from the faculty, but the resolution did not change the museum’s financial situation. “Honestly, it puzzles me,” Theriot said. “It doesn’t mean anything to us because that’s what we’ve been working toward since October, when [Hicke] told me that we were

It doesn’t mean anything to us because that’s what we’ve been working toward since October, when [Hicke] told me that we were being cut. My life and the museum’s life was the same the day before the Faculty Council resolution and the same the day after. —Edward Theriot, Integrative biology professor and director of the Texas Memorial Museum

being cut. My life and the museum’s life was the same the day before the Faculty Council resolution and the same the day after. It has had no effect whatsoever.” Theriot said he is currently working on developing a business model to establish a new source of revenue for the museum. He said the museum’s general infrastructure will have to be adjusted to remain fiscally solvent.

NEWS

“I think the museum and what it does and the services it provides are going to have to be rethought from the bottom up in order to get a good grasp on what sort of recurring funding we’ll have, which should come from admissions,” Theriot said. “The first thing we need to do is get it off of life support and get through this admissions phase, [and] then see where we can go from there.”

know how much the initiative would cost and estimated the building would take several years to complete. He said a study location at Riverside would be safer for students who live off campus. Without endorsements from the Interfraternity Council, known as IFC, both alliances said their work with the IFC and the University Panhellenic Council, known as UPC, were important parts of their platform. As a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma, Carter is the only candidate directly involved the Greek community. “I would not be a part of Student Government if it had not been for my involvement in Kappa Kappa Gamma as a freshman,” Carter said. Rady said, although he and his running mate are not in the Greek community, they have worked directly with the IFC and UPC to develop their platform. “Our platform points of Safe Ride and the extended Thanksgiving break has garnered massive support from the Greeks,” Rady said. Wilson also said he would not accept his stipend if elected. The student body president currently receives a $6,840 stipend, which Wilson said he would give to SG agencies instead if elected. “Stipends are put forward by Student Government to create a level playing field,” Wilson said. “Fortunately, I haven’t had to have a job while I’m in school. That’s not the initial purpose of the stipend; therefore, I will not be taking one.” Strickland said she had not given the stipend much thought since election season was still going on. “At the same time, it is very important to understand that it is an option for [the executive alliance] because we are unable to take jobs because it is a very big time consumption,” Strickland said.

ARREST

continues from page 1 Gonzalez said officers would not have gone through with the arrest if her name had been provided. “The reality is that, if she didn’t go limp, they would’ve given her a ticket, and that’s all there is to it — but, once she went limp and wouldn’t identify herself, they escalated it,” Gonzalez said. Jaywalking alone is an arrestable offense, according to Gonzalez. “It is confusing because it is typically a ticket,” Gonzalez said. “In Texas, other than speeding or having [an] open container of alcohol, every other thing is an arrestable offense, and it’s the police officer’s discretion as to whether to arrest you or to give you a ticket.” Gonzalez said the best course of action for Stephen would have been to fight the arrest in court rather than on the street. “Judges do not want people fighting with police officers on the street about whether it’s a lawful search or a lawful arrest,” Gonzalez said. “If you have a question, ask for a lawyer, follow what the police’s instructions are, say, ‘I want to have a lawyer. I don’t want to consent to anything,’ and then go to court and fight it out like civilized people. What they don’t want are people making those decisions on the street. It just aggravates things.” Undeclared freshman Claire Matlock said she thinks jaywalking should not be an arrestable offense. “It’s not as serious as other crimes that people are arrested for. It’s such a petty thing,” Matlock said. Pre-public relations freshman Marisa Ballard said she thought the most severe punishment for jaywalking would be a citation. “I think jaywalking is something that every college student does,” Ballard said. “I’m not planning on jaywalking on the Drag anytime soon.”


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Tuesday, February 25, 2014*

CAMPUS

Loudspeakers pervade aspects of Nigerian society

itiamattake He By Hayden Clark Riv@HaydenS_Clark stuCity streets in Nigeria are s. entsfilled with a cacophony of nityannouncements and messagFC,es broadcast via loudspeaker, heiraccording to Brian Larkin, andassociate professor and deenicpartment chair of anthropolPC,ogy at Barnard College, who ofspoke Monday about the efem-fect of these loudspeakers on am-Nigerian society. can- Larkin has spent a number theof years living in Nigeria and writing books on social infrat ofstructure and has become a rehadspected researcher in the field. ment “[Larkin is] an expert on as ainfrastructure in multiple senses of the word,” Jennifer heCarlson, anthropology docaretoral candidate, said. “So, not uni-just like bridges or railroads, ect-but also technological linkC toages, cables and computers.” Larkin said it is rare for s ofspeakers not to be used for dedprayer and conveying mesgar-sages in Nigerian society. rom “In Nigeria, a meeting is not considered a real meetoulding unless you have a good d ifPA system,” Larkin said. ody According to Carlson, the ivesfrequent use of loudspeakWil-ers throughout Nigerian city SG d. ard UNIVERSITY t to eld,” tely, job That’s e of By Christina Breitbeil will @christinabreit

streets has decreased Nigerians’ effectiveness in holding individual attention. “[Loudspeakers are] an infrastructural component of everyday life,” Carlson said. Carlson relates this to the proliferation of traffic lights representing an integral part of the everyday American commute. “We may not like or care about stop lights that order the world around us, yet we’re still participating with them,” Carlson said. The constant noise from loudspeakers has become an ordinary element of the Nigerian people’s surrounding environment. “[Sound] is one of these things that’s literally hanging in the air as these people go about their lives, and [it acts] upon their bodies and [forms] how they see the world and how they live in the world … It becomes part of the climate,” Carlson said. Anthropology graduate student Saikat Maitra said different religious sects in Nigeria often use speakers to gain popularity over one another. “What has happened is

Michelle Toussaint / Daily Texan Staff

Brian Larkin, associate professor of anthropology at Barnard College, gave a talk about social infrastructures in Nigeria at the Student Activity Center on Monday. Larkin has spent several years living in Nigeria studying infrastructure, technological linkages and media.

that, in these big cities, there is a way in which every group — like, let’s say the Muslims — [competes],” Maitra said. “What they are trying to do

is to hold attention of their own and convert others … and send their message. It’s a kind of performance to hold attention.”

Larkin said the use of loudspeakers has also played a role in the religious conflicts between Christians and Muslims in Nigeria.

Faculty helps construct Giant Magellan Telescope

had The Giant Magellan Teleuchscope, designed in part by sea-UT faculty, has passed reviews and is now ready for veryconstruction, according to thatan announcement by the ecu-McDonald Observatory last areweek. Once constructed, it se itwill be the world’s largest vimp-sual telescope. The telescope underwent five separate weeklong reviews over the past 12 months with five panels. The panels reviewed technical aspects, design and cost plans, according to Patrick McCarthy, director of the Giant Magellan Telescope Organization, commonly known as the GMTO. “All of the review teams returned very positive results, and the project passed all of

our reviews,” McCarthy said. “We have a rigorous program for testing components of the telescope.” McCarthy said, in addition to serving on the advisory committees and in the board of directors for GMTO, University faculty are contributing to the building of the telescope by designing and eventually constructing one of the instruments to be used on the telescope. David Lambert, director of the McDonald Observatory and member of GMTO’s board of directors, said the telescope will be a great benefit to the University’s astronomy department. “Access to the world’s largest telescope will enable us to attract and attain the very best faculty, the very best graduate students and even the very best undergraduate students,”

Lambert said. “In the United States, we are part of a very small group of universities with access to this telescope.” According to McCarthy, the telescope will primarily be used to study planets that aren’t easily visible with existing technology, and, particularly, planets that could potentially support life. Lambert also said the telescope will be able to capture images of galaxies that have never before been closely observed. “Because it’s a large telescope, you can look at very faint things,” Lambert said. “So, we’re looking at the very first stars and galaxies that were formed after the Big Bang … . You can image — very crisply and sharply — nearby stars and identify planets.” Karl Gebhardt, astronomy

Photo courtesy of Todd Mason

A proposed telescope has passed the necessary reviews to begin construction. It will be the largest of its kind in the world.

professor and associate chair of the University’s astronomy department, said he believes the telescope will be the greatest advancement for astronomy in his lifetime. “Having UT involved in such an important endeavor is an example of the

excellence this university provides,” Gebhardt said. “I look forward to many years of using the GMT, trying to understand the formation of the universe, the long-term fate of the universe, and finding the largest black holes throughout the universe.”

“Religious sound has been at the heart of this conflict, while at the same time being a quotidian, ephemeral part of everyday life,” Larkin said.

NEWS BRIEFLY Bicyclist hospitalized after crash by Co-op

A bicyclist crashed into a potted plant outside the University Coop on Monday around 1:15 p.m., according to UTPD spokeswoman Cindy Posey. Emergency Medical Services, the Austin Fire Department and campus police responded to the scene. An EMS spokesman said the individual was transported to a University Brackenridge Hospital with non-life threatening injuries. APD arrested a jogger Thursday for failing to identify herself after illegally crossing the intersection of 24th and San Antonio streets. The mirror of a UT shuttle bus hit an unidentified woman Friday as she was crossing Wichita Street. —Julia Brouillette

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4A OPINION

4

LAURA WRIGHT, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / @TexanEditorial Tuesday, February 25, 2014

EXECUTIVE ALLIANCE ENDORSEMENT

Students should cast vote for Rady-Strickland team Student Government elections at UT have never drawn a large turnout, and this year’s competition for Student Body president and vice president will likely be no exception. Presidential candidates Kori Rady and Kenton Wilson, flanked by vice-presidential candidates Taylor Strickland and Caroline Carter, respectively, are members of the same fraternal organization and are both members of traditional spirit groups. Much of what we saw from both campaigns was almost identical, including their campaign videos, which were nearly the same frame-by-frame. With such similar resumes and styles, many students may think it’s pointless to cast a ballot. However, following interviews with the candidates, a debate co-moderated by Daily Texan Editor-in-Chief Laura Wright and long conversations about the teams’ respective qualifications, this editorial board has teased out enough key differences between the candidates to endorse Rady-Strickland. Our reasoning? First off, Rady demonstrated a better understanding of how SG actually works, recognizing limitations to legislation and the importance of relationships with administrators, indicated by his commitment to the uRide pro-

Rady demonstrated a better understanding of how SG actually works, recognizing limitations to legislation and the importance of relationships with administrators, indicated by his commitment to the uRide program.

gram and the student scholarship initiative. On the other hand, there is no doubt that Wilson and Carter have run the better campaign. They have been on more organizational listservs, the subject of more Facebook statuses and at the front of more meetings. They also campaigned on more innovative policy points — particularly the presidential council (a committee gathering student leaders from organizations around campus) and their plans to pursue a student activity center on East Riverside Drive. Miles away from the traditional core of UT’s campus, East Riverside has become a hub of affordable student housing, and a student activity center would be hugely beneficial to the growing number of Longhorns who live in the area. But the idea of tackling such a massive project — one that would likely need the support of a major donor, the UT System Board of Regents and the UT president — is, quite simply, unrealistic. While we appreciate the effort to be forward-thinking and innovative, we can’t help but prefer Rady’s realistic, achievable platform points that will concretely improve life on the 40 Acres in the short-term, and we were disappointed in the Wilson-Carter campaign’s inability to admit the difficulty of achieving one of their main platform points. It was also frustrating, however, that the tensest exchange of the debate came when Rady and Wilson sparred over the effects that a fall break would have on fraternity and sorority recruitment. The two candidates went back and forth for several minutes, longer than they did on any other issue. Considering the fact that the Greek community’s concerns pale in comparison to other campus groups’ concerns over the initiative — particularly the possible impact that an extra day off would have on natural science lab schedules — this focus on Greek candidates was disconcerting.

Pu Ying Huang / Daily Texan Staff

Candidates for Student Government Executive Alliance Kori Rady and Taylor Strickland.

Both Rady’s and Wilson’s previous experiences are key to their understanding of the role of the president. Wilson’s position as speaker of the assembly allows him to stand at the helm of the assembly and required him to know all the rules and keep order. However, the position also makes being involved in actual legislation much more difficult. The speaker cannot be involved in legislation itself and would have to move out of the position temporarily and have another SG member replace him in order to jump in and have a say in the proceedings. This may be the reason Wilson has focused on making initiatives happen without legislation. Rady, as external financial director on the executive board, worked closely with the current alliance headed by Vil-

larreal and Williams. Rady has repeatedly cited his experience and shadowing the alliance, which has given him the edge on understanding how to push forward SG initiatives at the executive level. Both teams have proven themselves to be incredibly well spoken, knowledgeable and interested in student issues. But, at the end of the day, we are more confident with Kori Rady and Taylor Strickland’s realistic platform, experience with SG procedure, relationships with administrators and engagement with underrepresented groups on campus. Students can vote for the SG executive alliance along with the other campus representative positions at www.utexasvote.org Wednesday and Thursday. We encourage you to vote Rady-Strickland.

ENDORSEMENTS

ENDORSEMENTS

University-wide representative

College-specific representative

Editor’s Note: There are eight University-wide representative positions. Eighty-two percent of University-wide representative candidates responded to the Daily Texan Candidate Questionnaire, and we judged the candidates based on both their performance in Monday night’s Hook the Vote/Daily Texan/ ESB debate and the quality of their written responses in our survey.

Editor’s Note: The college-specific representatives were judged based on their responses to the Daily Texan Candidate Questionnaire. The response rate for each college is included below. We have not endorsed contests in which the candidates were uncontested.

MAURICIO GARCIA / GOVERNMENT SENIOR As a transfer student from UT-Brownsville, Garcia represents two campus groups that don’t often find their way into student government: transfer students and students from the Valley. His concern over campus safety was well-reasoned, and he has extensive political experience from previous positions on local campaigns and in the Texas legislature.

TARAL PATEL / BIOLOGY SOPHOMORE Patel rightly criticized Student Government for focusing so heavily on toilet paper in recent legislation instead of more pressing student issues. By mentioning sexual assault at the debate, he strayed from the typical script and showed a willingness to tackle issues that campaigns tend to avoid.

BRAYDON JONES / GOVERNMENT JUNIOR Jones performed like a political pro in the debate, and his strong grasp on important campus issues like Shared Services is impressive as well. Jones is likely the most well-qualified candidate running for Universitywide representative. Strongly recommended.

MAIRA JORGE / ANTHROPOLOGY JUNIOR Jorge’s involvement on campus and the desire she expressed to eventually work in University student affairs demonstrate her strong commitment to UT students. She gave smart and concrete answers in support of undocumented Longhorns, for whom she would be a strong advocate.

Architecture — Uncontested Business — 3 spots, 100 percent responded Business sophomore Sapan Patel demonstrated an impressive and in-depth understanding of the issues affecting campus, including the University’s Shared Services plan. His interest in serving on the Legislative Affairs committee demonstrates that he knows his own strengths and is interested in doing the best by the assembly. Strongly recommended. Business honors freshman John Falke has experience both in UBC and internal Senate, indicating that he can serve as an effective bridge between the two organizations. His legislative ideas are not terribly exciting, but his resume is impressive and indicative of his ability to do the job. Business sophomore Jackson Clifford is attuned to the needs of the business school and has innovative ideas for involving minority students in Student Government, including the creation of an external position in black student groups. His answers demonstrated a clear grasp of SG’s jurisdiction and mentioned concerns about late-night dining options and parking availability, both of which have appeal beyond the business school. Communication — 2 spots, 66 percent responded Public relations freshman Ruben Cardenas demonstrated an understanding of Student Government’s jurisdiction and mentioned several pressing student issues, including pedestrian safety, stealth dorms and the need for a longer Thanksgiving break. Education — Uncontested

LEE LUEDER / FINANCE / PLAN II / BUSINESS HONORS JUNIOR Lueder spoke during the debate on requiring student government members to attend other student organization meetings, which is a smart solution to the difficult problem of making SG involved in campus beyond its own affairs.

Engineering — 3 spots, 50 percent responded Architectural engineering senior Jamie Nalley has been involved in more than four engineering student organizations, making her a strong representative of her college. Her answers were well-reasoned, eloquent and specific. Issues she is interested in pursuing include Campus Climate and the Urban Rail. Strongly recommended. Fine arts — Uncontested

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to editor@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

Geoscience — 1 spot, 50 percent responded Geological sciences senior Jessica Sherman was well spoken and seemed to understand the issues affecting her college. Liberal Arts — 4 spots, 66 percent responded Government junior Tanner Long has the experience with on-campus organizations, including Hook the Vote and University Democrats, to serve as a student leader. His idea for a “civics week” on campus, which would highlight civic engagement, was particularly engaging. Natural Science — 5 spots, 50 percent responded Biology junior Anish Patel is involved in several Natural Science student groups, including Alpha Epsilon Delta Pre-Health Honor Society and SURGE (Science Undergraduate Research Group). His answers were well-phrased and demonstrated an understanding of and an interest in Student Government. Social Work — Uncontested School of Undergraduate Studies — 1 spot, 50 percent responded Undeclared sophomore Sachin Chandiramani, the only candidate for this position to respond to the Texan, understands that the primary goal of UGS students is to transfer into another college and will work to ease that transition. Co-op Board of Directors — 2 spots, 50 percent responded Accounting senior Alex Bryan shows an impressive understanding of the problems facing the Co-op today and hopes to increase funding for student organizations from its current allocation of just $20,000. He brings key experience to the position, having served as the scholarship chair of the Inter-Fraternity Council. Business sophomore Garrett Neville wants to make the most of the UT relationship with the Co-op by looking for ways to increase the student rebate program a well as pushing for more affordable course materials. University Unions — 2 spots, 33 percent responded Communication studies junior Vicky Nguyen, although the only University Union candidate to respond to the Texan, is interested in better utilizing the union spaces as well making it an appealing place for student to spend their study time.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@TexanEditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


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6 SPTS

6

STEFAN SCRAFIELD, SPORTS EDITOR / @texansports Tuesday, February 25, 2014

BASEBALL

Payton becoming a star for Texas

SIDELINE NBA MAVERICKS

By Evan Berkowitz @Evan_Berkowitz

When junior infielder Brooks Marlow singled to right field with two outs and the game tied, the crowd rose to its feet. Senior outfielder Mark Payton began his slow walk to the plate. He was 6-for-7 against Stanford in the series at this point. “He’s confident,” head coach Augie Garrido said. “He thinks he’s got them right where he wants them. That’s confidence.” And, to no one’s surprise, Payton delivered, scorching a single up the middle to load the bases. A Stanford wild pitch just a few pitches later would bring in the winning run for Texas. “Yup. [Payton’s] got my national player of the year vote,” a Stanford man half-seriously joked in the press box. Payton is hitting .613 while slugging .935. Both numbers lead the Big 12, far ahead of his contenders. “He is really playing the game at a high and mature level right now,” Garrido said. “He is just hitting the ball where it is pitched.” It’s a small sample size. He is just eight games and 31 at bat into his senior year, but, at the same time, his hits are rockets — line drives capable of decapitating the pitcher. “So, that’s baseball too,” Garrido said about hard outs.

KNICKS

SPORTS BRIEFLY Texas ends Junior Day with two commitments

Jenna VonHofe / Daily Texan Staff

Senior outfielder Mark Payton rounds first base after a hit during Texas’ weekend series against Stanford. Payton is leading his team with a slugging percentage of .935 as the Longhorns take on UTPA on Tuesday night.

“It’s really hard to control the direction of the ball, except for Payton.” And, when the pitches aren’t there, he doesn’t swing. After going 3-for-3 Saturday against Stanford, the Cardinal didn’t want any part of him, so Payton walked down the first baseline three times. “I’m just keeping it simple,” Payton said. “Our job as hitters is to get the bat to the

next batter.” Payton sits at just 5 feet 8 inches, the smallest player on Texas’ roster. He’s not physically superior — but technically sound. His hard work is paying off — he’s in the midst of the hottest streak of his career. “I don’t pay attention to it,” Payton said. “I’ve never really thought about it.” Instead, he deflects the

attention to the team, using “we” in almost every response. He has bought in to Garrido’s philosophy that teamwork, not individuals, wins games. “I think the other thing unknowingly he is doing is passing it on to his teammates,” Garrido said. “We worked on teamwork, and it’s showing. They are not playing for batting

average; they’re playing to keep the rally going and to take a quality at bat. They are fighting to get their teammate to the plate.” Payton will look to continue his streak when UTPA comes to UFCU Disch-Falk Field on Tuesday at 4:30 p.m. “I’m just going up with confidence,” Payton said. “I’m keeping it simple and keeping the game slow.”

MEN’S BASKETBALL | COLUMN

Horns lack experience when compared to past teams By David Leffler

Daily Texan Columnist @leffler_david

Last Monday, the Longhorns were 9-3 and one game behind Kansas in the Big 12 title race. But, after consecutive road losses to Iowa State and Kansas — two teams Texas defeated in Austin earlier this season — Texas now trails the Jayhawks by three games with only four games remaining. With reality setting in, it’s important to recognize that, while they have exceeded expectations, these Longhorns are not yet at the level of Rick Barnes’ prolific teams of years past. From 2002-2008, Texas made it to the NCAA tournament’s Elite Eight three times. Although each of those teams had different playing styles, they all possessed two characteristics: veteran leadership

and big-time talent, traits the current Longhorns lack. Texas’ main troubles lie on the offensive end, where freshman guard Isaiah Taylor is the only player averaging more than three assists per game. The Longhorns sit at 217th and 239th nationally in assists and field goal percentage, respectively — a clear indicator that they don’t have an elite offensive playmaker. This fact was painstakingly clear in Saturday’s 85-54 shellacking in Kansas, which dropped Texas to 20-7. Texas’ lack of offensive power starkly contrasts that of the 2002 team, which, fueled by T.J. Ford’s 15 points and 7.7 assists per game and James Thomas’ nightly double-doubles, was 22-5. With Ford at its helm, the team reached the Final Four before falling to Carmelo Anthony and Syracuse,

the eventual champions. This trend continues with the ‘05-‘06 Longhorns, which stood at 23-4 overall and 11-2 in conference play after 27 games. P.J. Tucker and LaMarcus Aldridge were unstoppable that year, each averaging more than 15 points and nine rebounds per game while anchoring a stifling defense that allowed only 60 points per game — a far cry from the defensive stats of the current Longhorns, who yield 71 per outing. Powered by this dynamic duo, they fell to Glen “Big Baby” Davis and LSU in the Elite Eight. Texas’ most recent deep run in the NCAA tournament was in 2008, when D.J. Augustin and A.J. Abrams each averaged more than 16 points per game. Fueled by superb outside shooting, they sat at 23-4 with a 10-2 mark in the Big 12 before eventually losing to

Stephen Durda / Daily Texan file photo

Former Longhorn and current Chicago Bull D.J. Augustin drives against Oklahoma State in a game in 2007.

Derrick Rose and the Memphis Tigers in the Elite Eight. To put it simply, this year’s Longhorns lack the explosiveness, experience and star power that propelled past Texas teams to postseason success. That being said, it is crucial to note that this is the

same group everyone wrote off before the season even began. They have already made huge strides and will continue to grow. If they can build on this foundation, these players will have a chance to join the likes of Ford, Aldridge and Augustin in the Texas record books.

The first junior day for Charlie Strong and his new staff ended with an offensive and defensive commitment for the 2015 recruiting class. Rowlett High School, in Rowlett, Texas, defensive end Charles Omenihu decided to verbally commit to Texas on Monday after he received an offer two days prior. The 6-foot-5 220-pound end is the Longhorns eighth commit of the 2015 class. Omenihu also received offers from Northwestern, Louisiana Tech, SMU and Tulsa. In his junior season, Omenihu collected 50 tackles, four sacks and 11 tackles for a loss. After Omenihu tweeted about his verbal commitment to Texas on Monday, Strong tweeted “Another big day in Austin. Continuing to put The T Back In Texas! #letsride.” Omenihu joins Bryce English, from DeSoto High School in DeSoto, Texas, another defensive line commit, for the 2015 class. Texas only signed one defensive end, 6-foot3 240 pound Jake McMillon, from Abilene High School in Abilene, on National Signing Day three weeks ago for the 2014 class and zero in 2013. Omenihu was not the only prospect affected by Longhorn Junior Day. Huntsville High School, in Huntsville, Texas, offensive tackle Ronnie Major decomitted from Baylor, and, after he received an offer from Texas during the event on Saturday, Major committed to the Longhorns. Major is listed at 6 feet 6 inches and 280 pounds. He committed to Baylor back in August. His verbal commitment makes him the third offensive lineman in the new recruiting class led by fourstar commit and 6-foot-3 286-pound Patrick Vahe, from Trinity High School in Euless, Texas. —Jeremy Thomas

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Jones able to combine many talents By Jori Epstein @JoriEpstein

Most collegiate basketball players keep their focus on a basketball, but freshman forward Nekia Jones isn’t like most players. The Texas sharp shooter boasts a gold medal in shot put from the 2013 Texas Relays and top-three finishes in both shot put and discus at the 2012 UIL Track & Field State Meet. Jones thinks her track-and-field experience enhances her basketball game. “It’s a lot of footwork,” Jones said of shot put and discus. “You have to have strength, but footwork is a big key and technique — paying attention to the little details will help you a lot in both track and basketball.” Jones pays attention to the little details because she envisions herself going far in both sporting events. With dreams of becoming the first female Olympic athlete to compete in both basketball

and track and field, Jones aims high and doesn’t let anyone lower her goals. “I feel like I have the opportunity to be great,” Jones said. “As long as I keep working hard, and the coaches believe in me, and I just have the confidence to keep going and pursue my dreams, everything will fall in place.” Jones’ long-term goals, though, don’t keep her from focusing on the task at hand. While averaging just 9.7 minutes of play per game, Jones, the Beaumont native, also averages six points in the short periods. Providing much-needed boosts of energy off the bench, Jones takes her shooting seriously. Freshman center Lilley Vander Zee says Jones’ success doesn’t come with selfish intentions — she always puts the team above herself. “It’s her special talent that she’s been gifted from God, and it’s her mindset, too,” Vander Zee said. “She simply plays for everyone else and to help you. It’s such a special

Nekia Jones

Freshman forward

thing and to see her excel in track. I can’t believe I have the opportunity to play with her.” As Jones and her teammates face the Horned Frogs (15-12, 6-9 Big 12) on Tuesday, the team will look to one another once again to better itself and rebound from the team’s longest losing stretch of the season: three games. Texas also hopes to avenge a disappointing 54-48 loss to TCU last month. When Jones jumps off the bench to face TCU opponents, she’ll be ready — it’s just one more step in the right direction.


COMICS 7

COMICS

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Tuesday, February 25, 2014

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Edited by Will Shortz

Crossword ACROSS

1 With

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For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

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8 L&A

HANNAH SMOTHERS, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR / @DailyTexanArts Tuesday, February 25, 2014

8

CAMPUS

New organization shows students sites of Austin By Vanessa Sliva @VanessaSliva

While many students find themselves indoors, drifting between schoolwork and sleep, members of Access Austin, a new club at UT, are exploring Austin in search of the spark that makes this city memorable. Access Austin is a club driven toward discovering Austin through group outings. The group had its first meeting this past Wednesday but has future plans to organize trips online instead of in person. The inspiration behind forming this group came from the three founders realizing that Austin had so many diverse sites, yet they’d seen few to none in the time they had spent studying. “It was a nice day out and we were sitting around, playing video games,” said undeclared sophomore Andrew Kleiman, vice president of Access Austin. “We always hear how great of a city Austin is, so we’ve decided we wanted to go out and see what the city has to offer, get other people involved and do stuff, whether it’s hiking, biking

FOOD TRUCKS continues from page 1

“This property was planned for a permanent brick-andmortar restaurant,” Jenkins said. “But, when the South Congress food trailers lost their home because of the new hotel development, we decided to explore whether or not we could build a permanent home.” The Picnic will lease out to eight different vendors that the owners have decided are the best of the best: Hey

or eating — just to enjoy what the city has.” Access Austin offers a unique exploration opportunity which allows students to branch out and bond by meeting new people and traveling with them to different destinations. “We feel like we’re either on campus or on West Campus,” said Sam Devine, finance junior and head tour guide for Access Austin. “We don’t really leave the same group of people or the same area, so, if we can meet other people while learning new things about Austin, then it’s great.” Officers work alongside members by asking for suggestions and giving them the chance to propose different locations to visit, and the group makes the arrangements. “The cool thing about Austin is there’s really no limit on what you can do,” said Sam Yonack, pre-public relations sophomore and president of Access Austin. “There’s water activities, great concert venues where artists play, sporting venues — it has everything. It’s a really cultured city.” The vast range of activities

allows the club to be universal in tastes. When brainstorming plans for the club, the three founders came up with ideas such as kayaking on the river, visiting Mount Bonnell and other potential outings, all mapping different options for the club. “Ideally, what we should do on an adventure or on a trip

is go somewhere [and] get something to eat — at food trucks or something like that — and then all carpool to a location at a lake or [go] hiking,” Devine said. “We can combine the food aspect of Austin with music or nature. That’s the best way to do it.” The idea of this club had been around for months, but

only recently it was approved. Access Austin was first proposed in September but under the name “Discover Austin.” Legal complications arose with Discovery Card, but, months of paperwork later, the club was approved under the name “Access Austin.” The activities for this group will take place once or twice

per month, depending on the availability of members. “We’re really excited to be able to provide an opportunity for those who want to bridge the gap between campus life and life in the greater Austin area,” Yonack said. “There’s a lot of things to do in the city and we look forward to doing them.”

Cupcake!, Turf N’ Surf Po Boy, Skinny Limits, Ms. P’s Electric Cock, Tapas Bravas, The Seedling Truck, Hey!… You Gonna Eat or What? and The Mighty Cone. “We reached out based on popularity while keeping different cuisines in mind,” Jenkins said. “We’re making such a large financial investment. We have to make the place a place where people want to eat.” The food court is constructed on a 1.2-acre lot next to Chuy’s. Designed

by Studio 8, The Picnic will include two fixed pavilions with seating fit to accommodate 150 people underneath. Additional commodities will be a paved parking lot for 80 cars and air-conditioned restroom facilities. After losing its residency on South Congress last year, The Mighty Cone took its current position in the Rancho Rio Eatery in West Campus but has been searching for something more ever since. The Mighty Cone’s business has suffered because

its main consumer base now consists of college students, and because the West Campus location lacks parking and exposure. “Business on South Congress was really, really good, and it had turned into a worldfamous tourist location,” said Sara Courington, general manager of The Mighty Cone. “But West Campus just has not been profitable for us.” Hey! You Gonna Eat or What?, this year’s winner of Austin’s food truck tasteoff, Truck by Truckwest,

will be taking its $10,000 prize and leaving its location on South Congress to move into The Picnic. The food truck’s owner, Eric Regan, strongly believes in the future success of The Picnic as an Austin trademark. “They’re doing something that hasn’t been done before,” Regan said. “This is not just a nomadic lot where you have food trucks squatting on prime property earmarked for development.” Plans were set on The Picnic opening in time for

South By Southwest, but the recent freezing weather set back construction slightly. The grand opening is to take place before the end of March as vendors are moving in and beginning operations the weekend of March 14. The Picnic hopes to conserve these trademarks of Austin as the city continues to rapidly progress. “It’s a food-truck lot for the purpose of being a foodtruck lot,” Regan said. “It’s going to live on in perpetuity and keep going and going.”

Access Austin founders Sam Yonack, Andrew Kleiman and Sam Devine aim to provide an opportunity for students to explore the greater Austin area. They plan to hold group outings once or twice a month to help students branch out and have new experiences.

Ethan Oblak Daily Texan Staff

The Daily Texan 2014-02-25  

The February 25, 2014 edition of The Daily Texan.

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