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MULTIMEDIA ONLINE

SPORTS PAGE 6

NEWS PAGE 3

Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

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Thursday, February 20, 2014

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POLICE

Auto thefts, burglaries fall over past year By Julia Brouillette @juliakbrou

Austin police statistics comparing January 2014 and January 2013 show auto thefts down 25 percent and burglaries down by 33 percent. In general, vehicles are less likely to be stolen or broken

into this time of year, according to APD Sgt. Felicia Williams. “January is one of those months where numbers are lower — but, at the same time, the trends vary from year to year,” Williams said. “However, we do recognize trends during the summertime and around the holidays, when more

people are out and about.” Williams said she believes APD’s auto theft unit played a role in reducing burglaries through public education and taking proactive measures to prevent theft. “People are changing their behaviors to prevent auto theft in where they’re parking,”

Williams said. “[By] locking up their vehicles, they’re making diligent efforts to protect their vehicles.” Williams said leaving keys inside the vehicle is one of the most common mistakes people make before their cars are stolen or burglarized. “On average, in about 40 to

41 percent of auto thefts that our unit investigates every month, the key is either left in the ignition or somewhere in the vehicle,” Williams said. Although APD listed Honda sedans and Ford pickup trucks as the most commonly stolen vehicles in 2013, Williams said thefts have more

A WEB OF SUPPORT Sigma Alpha Mu Delta Sigma Pi

Texas Sweethearts

Zeta Beta Tau

Afrikan American Affairs

Phi Gamma Delta

Latino Pan Hellenic Council

Delta Epsilon Psi

Zeta Tau Alpha

Student Government

Texas Hillel

Chi Beta Delta

Alpha Phi Sorority

Dean’s Squad

Texas Spirits

African American Culture Committee

Latin American Institute

Rady / Strickland

Pakistani Students Association

Delta Kappa Delta

Silver Spurs Sweathearts

Tri Delta

Senate of College Councils

Alpha Phi Sigma

Alpha Delta Pi

Pi Beta Phi

Texas Blazers

Latin Economic and Business Association

Black Student Alliance

Latino and Jewish Student Coalition

Kappa Kappa Gamma

Sigma Alpha Epsilon

Afrian Cultural Committee

Texans for Israel

Alpha Chi Omega

With Student Government elections yielding low turnout in recent years — 14.9 percent of the student body voted in 2013 — campaigns often vie for endorsements from voting blocks to

maximize their reach. An in-depth look at the organizational connections of the students registered to each executive alliance campaign this year help shows an identical path candidates are taking towards what they hope will be victory. “Any organized student group — particularly a network of orga-

29.03%

Student Government 15.66%

14.52%

Methodology

Check out an interactive web of campaign connections online at bit.ly/UT_SG2014 nized student groups — could be considered a ‘block,’” said Jordan Metoyer, an economics and urban studies senior who has worked on multiple SG campaigns and served

9.67%

Spirit groups

Pi Kappa Phi

Connections fuel executive alliance campaigns @bobbycblanchard

22.89%

28.91%

This web does not include every student organization that campaign agents and workers are connected to. For the complete list, view our interactive web online.

By Bobby Blanchard

30.64%

Multicultural organizations Pi Kappa Alpha

Multicultural Leadership Institute

27.71%

Wilson / Carter

Greek organizations

Jewish Business Students Assiciation

Alpha Kappa Psi

Latino Leadership Council

Rady / Strickland

White Rose Society

Undergraduate Business Council

Wilson / Carter

Kappa Alpha Theta

Sigma Alpha Lambda

AUTO page 2

Percentage of workers and agents in organizations

Kappa Sigma

Student African American Brotherhood

Chi Omega

Tejas Club

Cowboys

Sigma Phi Epsilon

Alpha Psi Omega

Dean of Students

Interfraternity Council

Hindu Students Association

Black Business Students Association

Alpha Sigma Phi

Silver Spurs

African Students Association

to do with possessions left in sight than the type of vehicle. “Burglaries of vehicles occur because of what people have left in plain view that possible suspects can see,” Williams said. “It doesn’t matter if you have a car, a truck, a jeep or a convertible

as chief of staff in the 2012-2013 administration. “It is impossible to sit down for five minutes with all

CONNECTIONS page 3

The data in this story was compiled from multiple sources. For the first time, candidates were required to publicly submit lists of campaign workers and agents. The Daily Texan contacted every agent and worker on the executive alliance campaigns and requested a list of student organizations. About 50 percent of the Rady-Strickland campaign responded, while 37 percent of the WilsonCarter campaign responded. For those who did not respond, The Daily Texan used online resources including LinkedIn and the Dean of Students’ student organization database. The Daily Texan was able to collect information from about 75 percent of all executive alliance campaign agents and workers. Graphics by Jack Mitts

THROWBACK

CAMPUS

Dating bureau takes love off the battlefield

Law professor urges voting rights action

By Sara Reinsch @sreinsch91

Searching for a date in the digital age is as easy as opening an app and scrolling through a list of nearby singles, but, before modern technology, finding a date was a chancy pursuit. In 1942, a UT council attempted to connect men and

By Leila Ruiz @leilakristi

women in an innovative way — through an organized dating service. UT’s War Effort Council Date Bureau opened registration to University women Oct. 7, 1942, according to a Daily Texan article. The bureau, created by a student group that coordinated World War II-related activities, was created to bring UT women and Austin-area soldiers together for dates. “Sign up for the University Date Bureau today in the Union Building from 8 until 5 o’clock and put your private ‘V’ for Victory into practice!” said

In her Wednesday keynote address for the 18th Annual Barbara Jordan Forum at the LBJ School of Public Affairs, Harvard Law professor Lani Guinier said America must work together to protect current voting rights in the same way civil rights workers convinced President Lyndon Johnson to sign the Voting Rights Act of 1964. LBJ School dean Robert Hutchings said in a press release that the presence of Guinier, a prominent civil rights lawyer, is especially timely because the school is celebrating the 50th

DATE page 2

RIGHTS page 2

Lauren Ussery / Daily Texan Staff

Harvard Law professor Lani Guinier delivered a speech on voting rights at the 18th Annual Barbara Jordan Forum at the LBJ School of Public Affairs on Wednesday afternoon.

NEWS

OPINION

SPORTS

LIFE&ARTS

ONLINE

REASON TO PARTY

Sororities donate $65,316 to fight childhood cancer. PAGE 3

Football players lack academic freedom. PAGE 4

Despite his injury, Whaley hopes to get drafted. PAGE 6

Local artists showcase at the Austin Art Garage. PAGE 8

UT System building bans outdoor tobacco use. PAGE 3

Horns Down: Abbott campaign’s sexism. PAGE 4

Women’s basketball falls in heartbreak to Sooners. PAGE 6

Toilet flushing and the Coriolis Effect. PAGE 8

In this week’s Sidewalk Stories we hear from students about their experiences ignoring the rules, and going for it on their own. dailytexanonline.com

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Thursday, February 20, 2014

FRAMES featured photo Volume 114, Issue 108

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor Laura Wright (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Shabab Siddiqui (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Daulton Venglar / Daily Texan Staff

Multimedia Office (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@ gmail.com

A man and woman walk past the United States Federal Courthouse by West 5th Street on Wednesday morning.

Sports Office (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office (512) 232-2209 dtlifeandarts@gmail.com Retail Advertising (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising (512) 471-5244 classifieds@ dailytexanonline.com

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2013 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER Low High

71

44

Hintentions.

DATE

continues from page 1 the article, citing the bureau’s slogan. Although today’s process is more efficient and customized than the one in 1942, the two share remarkable similarities. At registration, women were asked to fill out cards detailing their ages, addresses, heights, hair and eye colors, religious preferences, areas of study and interests. They were also required to submit photographs of themselves and were charged 10 cents to register. The women’s dating profiles, along with a record of the unmarried, college-aged soldiers in the Austin area, were filed in the War Effort Council’s office. “The soldier will come to the Date Bureau headquarters, specify the date he prefers, and show his identification,” the article said. “If his card is [on] file, a suitable girl will be chosen. The girl will be called, and if she has no previous engagement and cares to go, the date is made.” UT’s Dean of Women’s Office limited date destinations to a list of approved places, required women to sign out of their residences at the beginning of dates and requested parental permission from every woman who registered for the bureau. Unlike present-day match

‘The soldier will come to the Date Bureau headquarters, specify the date he prefers, and show his identification. If his card is [on] file, a suitable girl will be chosen. The girl will be called, and if she has no previous engagement and cares to go, the date is made.’ programs, the bureau didn’t give users the option to choose their dates. “The soldier requesting a date will not be allowed to go through the files,” an Oct. 8 Daily Texan article said. “The person in charge of the Bureau will choose with his guidance a suitable date.” Four hundred “potential morale lifters” had signed up for the dating service after its first day of registration. That number almost doubled on the second day, reaching 700. “I think the response to the Bureau was wonderful, and that the set-up is splendid,” Assistant Dean of Women Kathleen Bland said in the article. “I like the fact that the Bureau has been so voluntary.”

The overwhelming demand for the service forced the service to close a mere 13 days after its initial launch, as it could not keep up with the administrative demand. “We did not foresee the proportions which the Bureau assumed,” Dean of Women Dorothy Gebauer said in an Oct. 20 Daily Texan article. “The cost of administering such a large office would be more than the University feels able to assume at this time. … We do not have the facilities as yet to handle such a problem.” The resources to facilitate such a program are in high supply in 2014, as computers have created a dating network that the students of 1942 could have only dreamed of.

AUTO

continues from page 1 — if you left things of value or [things] the suspect believes are of value, they’re going to look at breaking into your vehicle to steal those things.” Vehicles are rarely stolen on campus, according to UTPD crime statistics. UTPD spokeswoman Cindy Posey said UTPD did not receive any stolen vehicle reports in January, and only two auto burglaries were reported. Last year, only eight auto thefts were reported. Vehicle theft and break-ins are more frequent just outside of campus, with seven auto thefts and 23 auto burglaries reported in the West Campus area last month, according to APD’s incident database. Biology junior Taylor Reddell said his pickup truck has been broken into twice over the course of a few months. “Both times, my truck was in a parking garage, and, both times, it was locked, so I don’t know how they broke in,” Reddell said. Reddell said he returned to his truck to find it cluttered but not damaged. “I noticed a few items were missing, the first time,” Reddell said. “The second time, I was just missing a couple [phone] chargers.”

RIGHTS

continues from page 1 anniversary of the Voting Rights Act this spring. Guinier said she thinks citizens of the U.S. should consider how similar Western democracies handle voting issues rather than simply comparing different states’ voting policies. “We really need to embarrass the United States in its claim that [it is] the world’s most important, significant and honorable democracy, when we have such a small percentage of our population participating in any election,” Guinier said in regard to new voter ID laws that critics have called unnecessarily restrictive. “We have in many ways abdicated our

This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25 Permanent Staff

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Ranked #2 by U.S. News and World Report’s Best Graduate Schools of Education

NEWS

Austin January 2013: 215 auto thefts 1,180 vehicle burglaries January 2014: 169 auto thefts 828 vehicle burglaries January 2013 vs. January 2014: 25 percent decrease in auto thefts 33 percent decrease in burglaries of vehicles UTPD reports of auto thefts: Jan. 2013: 8 Jan. 2014: 0 West Campus, January 2014: 7 auto thefts, 23 vehicle burglaries Reddell said the experience has made him more wary of leaving his belongings in his vehicle. “I feel like I just don’t keep anything in my truck now that’s valuable because you never know,” Reddell said. commitment to democracy in the name of democracy.” Guinier said maintaining civil rights accomplishments of the past, such as the Voting Rights Act, will require continued cooperation not only to ensure progress but also to avoid worsening issues of the past by assuming they are no longer problems. “What was new to me was [not only] how she brought up the past and where we were but also how far we still have to go,” said Judith Mitchell, a former social worker at the Counseling and Mental Health Center. Mitchell said it’s still hard to have an open and frank discussion about diversity, even within a progressive setting such as the University. Guinier said we should model current efforts to advance civil rights after the leadership style of Nelson Mandela. “Nelson Mandela said that you really need to think about leadership the way a shepherd leads a flock,” Guinier said. “The shepherd does not stand in front of the flock and say, ‘Hey, follow me.’ The shepherd identifies one or two individual sheep who are moving in the right direction and then corrals the rest of the flock to follow the leader.” Bea Ann Smith, a law professor, former judge of the Texas Court of Appeals, Third District, and longtime friend of Barbara Jordan, said she loved Guinier’s speech because the issues of diversity and voter ID laws are problems that require cooperative solutions. “I thought her idea about leading from behind seems very appropriate right now,” Smith said. “Collaboration and consensual leadership instead of authoritative leadership is much more effective.”

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W&N 3

NEWS

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Thursday, February 20, 2014

CONNECTIONS continues from page 1 50,000-plus students during the designated campaign period. To that end, it would be wise for candidates to tap into networks or individuals with large networks on campus.” This is the first year that candidates have had to file a list of workers and agents that are affiliated with their campaigns. The Daily Texan contacted and researched 145 students who are noted as campaign agents or workers for the executive alliance teams: Kori Rady-Taylor Strickland and Kenton WilsonCaroline Carter. There are almost 300 links between the two executive alliances and the various student organizations on campus, many of which overlap across campaigns. About 50 percent of the Rady-Stricklands responded to the Texan compared to about 37 percent of the Wilson-Carter team. The profiles for workers and agents who did not respond are filled out with publicly available information. In all, 37 of the 145 students are not accounted for. Workers and agents tend to be well connected to organizations that the candidates are aggressively pursuing, including multicultural and ethnic groups, spirit groups, SG and Greek organizations. Both campaign teams have more than 60 students listed as workers or agents — an increase from last year, when current SG president Horacio Villarreal said he had about 20 students helping him. Both Rady and Wilson also said they are expecting

to be adding even more names to their campaign teams in the future. Twenty-two percent of the Rady-Strickland campaign team consists of members of a multicultural or ethnic group on campus, compared with 9 percent of the students in the Wilson-Carter campaign team — a pair that is running with ‘diversity training’ as one of its platform points. “Our team is definitely pretty diverse,” Rady said. “We have spent a majority of our time making sure we go after students who have never voted in SG elections before. That’s the key.” Rady-Strickland’s reach into multicultural and ethnic groups is wide, with multiple members in African-American and black student organizations, but, in other multicultural or ethnic groups, the Rady-Strickland campaign has just a single worker or agent. WilsonCarter’s campaign, meanwhile, overwhelms Rady-Strickland’s campaign in connections to Texans For Israel and other Jewish groups on campus. Like Rady, Wilson said he is trying to reach as many groups on campus as possible. “Our agents and workers come from a variety of on campus organizations and different areas on campus, and that really reflects how we want to get more students involved,” Wilson said. “I’ve been able to see how a lot of the same problems effect different aspects of campus, and we’re reaching out trying to

CITY

build coalitions to solve those problems.” Both executive alliance campaign teams are more than 20 percent Greek and have another 15 percent of their team connected back to various spirit groups, though there is some overlap between the two groups. Rady and Wilson are both members of the Tejas Club, a group that calls itself an “independent fraternity.” Rady is also in Silver Spurs, while Wilson is in Texas Cowboys, both of which are spirit groups. One of the major changes this year is a decision by the Interfraternity Council not to endorse a campaign team in 2014. The council is a community that represents 23 fraternity chapters, which accounts for more than 2,300 students. In the past few years, all Interfraternity Council-backed president and vicepresident teams have won. In the absence of the Interfraternity Council’s endorsement, connections and testimonials from other student organizations may mean more this year than before, and new heavyweight voter blocks have become potentially more influential. The council hosted a meeting Wednesday night inviting all candidates to come speak, and the council members intend to send out an email detailing candidates’ platforms. In interviews, both Rady and Wilson said they felt the endorsements they would seek would help their campaigns but not make or break them. “In the past, the IFC email was pretty

Campaign Teams Rady / Strickland Workers: 17 Agents: 66 Response Rate: 51.8 percent

Wilson / Carter Workers: 59 Agents: 3 Response Rate: 37.1 percent

important and carried a lot of weight,” Wilson said. “But I think it’s great what the IFC president and his team are doing — where they’re not going to send out a blanket email and they’re actually inviting all of us to go speak at the IFC meeting. We’ve all been given the chance to advocate for our position.” While both teams will seek endorsements and support, Metoyer warned against assuming too much from just voter block information. “None of this speculation can be conflated with hard science,” Metoyer said. “These assumptions are made year after year. It helps to have the support of influential campus organizations, but it is not a guarantee of success. When campaigns have attempted to ‘calculate’ the vote in the past, they found themselves unsuccessful.”

SYSTEM

System nixes outdoor tobacco use By Madlin Mekelburg @madlinbmek

Daulton Venglar / Daily Texan Staff

RideScout founder Joseph Kopser announces the implementation of RideScout in a press conference at Republic Square Park on Wednesday morning.

Local app combines transit options By Zachary Keener @Zak_Keener

An Austin-based app, RideScout, hopes to utilize the numerous transportation services available to Austinites to improve their downtown commute. RideScout, which launched at last year’s South By Southwest festival, allows husers to view many new and existing transportation service options around Austin on one platform. Users can plan trips throughout the city, tying shared transportation services such as B-Cycle, Car2Go and CapMetro together for use in their trip. Previously, trying to plan a trip using public, shared and commercial transportation services available in Austin has been difficult, City Coun-

cilman Chris Riley said at a press conference Tuesday. “Now we actually have a solution from an Austin-based startup,” Riley said. “RideScout will allow you how to see how to make use of everything that’s out there.” RideScout founder Joseph Kopser said he hopes the app will benefit Austin residents by providing them with an aggregated source for alternative transportation. “If we can get out from behind our wheel all the time, you get time back,” Kopser said. Elliot McFadden, founder of bike share service B-Cycle, said he thinks the service will help to relieve Austin of its traffic problems. “When you interweave all of these services together you get … a whole alternative to driving your

personal car,” McFadden said. “It means fewer cars on the road and a more humane and pedestrian friendly environment in our towns.” Spanish literature graduate student Ignacio Carbajal said he often bikes and uses the bus to get around Austin, and could see the app being useful. “I was in traffic for 45 minutes, inching,” Carbajal said. “If you could consolidate people, that’s always good.” Kopser said he challenges skeptics to try the service. “Like any other tool, it only works if you use it,” Kopser said. “For the readers and the viewers who think, ‘This will never apply to me,’ I actually challenge you. It will make your life easier when you do come to downtown Austin.”

CAMPUS

Greek fraternities raise funds for childhood cancer research By Adam Hamze @adamhamz

UT’s Alpha Epsilon Phi and Sigma Chi chapters presented two checks totaling $65,316 to The Andrew McDonough B+ Foundation on Wednesday. The foundation raises money to provide financial and emotional support for the families of children with cancer and helps fund childhood cancer research. Alpha Epsilon Phi raised approximately $55,000 for the foundation, while Sigma Chi raised $10,000. Both held events and fundraisers in the fall, such as Sigma Chi’s Fight Night. After receiving the two checks, Joe McDonough, father of Andrew McDonough, said he wished he weren’t there but with his son instead. “Seven years ago, my son was a healthy freshman in high school,” Joe McDonough said. “He helped his

team win a Pennsylvania state championship in soccer on a Saturday, and 48 hours later he was diagnosed with leukemia.” Andrew McDonough battled the disease for 167 days until he died July 14, 2007, in his sister’s arms. “The only thing I ever wanted to be was a dad,” Joe McDonough said. “I will always tell you I have two children, but can only hug one.” In the past two years, the foundation has raised $1.5 million in research grants and family assistance for childhood cancer. According to the American Childhood Cancer Organization, cancer is the leading cause of disease-related deaths in children. Every year, 13,400 children younger than 19 are diagnosed with cancer. “You guys are the B+ Foundation,” McDonough said to the two chapters. “You are enabling us to touch so many lives. … All

cancer is bad, but we have got to do more for our kids.” Bob Helen, a cancer survivor and father of a child with cancer, said the foundation helped fund his 14-year-old daughter’s cancer treatment. “Your money that you raised isn’t going to me, or to Joe,” Helen said. “It’s going to that 14-year-old girl out there that, hopefully, because of your money, won’t have to go through this hell on Earth that we had to go through. Anybody that does anything for children’s cancer is her hero. You all are all our heroes.” Matt Johnson, finance senior and president of Sigma Chi, said his fraternity holds charity events every semester and is always open to donating to different causes. “It’s something that we really take to heart,” Johnson said. “We kind of, as a fraternity, hold it as our calling card.”

UT System Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa announced that all System Administration buildings in Austin will be smokeand tobacco-free, starting March 15. Cigarroa made the announcement Tuesday in an email to System employees. He said the decision is part of the System’s health and wellness initiatives. “While I recognize the freedom of choice to use tobacco or smoking products, there is overwhelming support among our employees for our entire work

environment to be smokeand tobacco-free,” Cigarroa said in the email. “I am happy that, along with many of our other institutions, UT System Administration is taking this step to improve the health of Texas, and hope that you will join my excitement in our commitment to complete wellness for all UT System Administration employees.” In the email, Cigarroa said all parking garages and common outdoor areas owned by the System Administration will have to comply with the new policy. He said the Office of Employee Services will assist in the transition by providing resources

on how to shift to a smokefree campus. According to Sarah Pekar, administrative project coordinator in the System Office Employee Benefits, all System health institutions are smoke- and tobacco-free. Pekar said all System academic institutions are either smoke- and tobacco-free or just smoke-free, except for UT-Tyler — where smoking is permitted in designated areas — and UT-El Paso. Last week, Cigarroa announced he will be resigning as chancellor and joining the pediatric transplant team at the UT-Health Science Center at San Antonio after his resignation.

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

GSA enters talks for Shared Services Plan By Madlin Mekelburg @madlinbmek

Graduate Student Assembly passed a resolution requesting more information about the Shared Services Plan at its meeting Wednesday. The resolution calls for the addition of one graduate student employee, selected by GSA president Columbia Mishra, to be added to the Shared Services Steering Committee. “The main thing we’re really asking for is just [to] give graduate students a seat in this process,” said David Villarreal, communications director for GSA and the bill’s co-author. The Shared Services Plan is a set of recommendations that calls for the

centralization of University human resources, information technology procurement and finance services. According to University officials, the plan calls for elimination of 500 jobs, mainly through natural attrition and retirement. Before pursuing a fullscale implementation of the Shared Services Plan, the Shared Services Steering Committee will design and conduct a pilot version of the plan in specific University units. The assembly’s resolution also asks Kevin Hegarty, executive vice president and chief financial officer, to provide regular updates on implementation, information about centralized services that already exist on campus, specifics on

management-consulting firm Accenture’s involvement and specific information about the process of a pilot version of the plan. The resolution also requests that Hegarty begin sharing information by the next GSA meeting March 5. In January, Faculty Council passed a resolution requesting more information about the plan and for two non-administrative individuals to be added to the Steering Committee. Hegarty responded to the resolution a week after it was passed by posting a list of the requested information online. In his response, Hegarty agreed to add two non-administrative individuals to the steering committee.

PHOTO BRIEFLY

Courtesy of Wyatt Spadden

University professor, alumnus receive law award for book University law professor Derek Jinks and UT alumnus Ryan Goodman received the 2014 Certificate of Merit for a Preeminent Contribution to Creative Scholarship award from the American Society of International Law for their book, “Socializing States: Promoting Human Rights through

International Law.” “International law, particularly in the field of human rights, all too often fails to influence the practices of states. We wanted to know why and to start the process of thinking about alternatives,” Jinks said about his book. —Nicole Stiles


4A OPINION

LAURA WRIGHT, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / @TexanEditorial Thursday, February 20, 2014

HORNS DOWN: ABBOTT APPEARS WITH SEXIST NUGENT

4

COLUMN

Greg Abbott, attorney general and gubernatorial candidate, faced criticism Tuesday for his choice to appear with aging rocker and tea-party darling Ted Nugent at an event in Denton. The criticism was deserved. As has been widely reported, Nugent has previously admitted to having relationships with high school girls and has publicly called female politicians and feminists names including “worthless bitch,” “fat pig” and “dirty whore.” Abbott’s representatives attempted to distance Nugent from the candidate, saying that “while [Nugent] may sometimes say things or use language that Greg Abbott would not endorse or agree with, we appreciate the support of everyone who supports protecting our Constitution.” We don’t know what’s worse: Abbott agreeing to appear with Nugent in the first place or Abbott’s campaign thinking that there’s any room for sexist, self-admitted sexual predators in the noble quest to “protect our Constitution.” Horns Down to everything about this situation: Nugent’s language, Abbott’s choice to appear with him and the Abbott campaign’s insane insistence that fighting for the second amendment somehow makes up for disgusting behavior toward women.

Horns Down to everything about this situation: Nugent’s language, Abbot’s choice to appear with him and the Abbot campaign’s insane insistence that fighting for the second amendment somehow makes up for disgusting behavior toward women. COLUMN

Joe Capraro / Daily Texan Staff

New football coach Charlie Strong, center, is introduced at a press conference on Jan. 6.

Student athletes must pursue valuable majors while at UT By Jasmine Johnson Daily Texan Columnist @AllThatJasss

Illustration by Crystal Garcia/ Daily Texan Staff

“Date a girl who...” articles are sexist, reduce women to “types” By Amanda Almeda Daily Texan Columnist @Amanda_Almeda

As a female college student whose social circle primarily consists of other females in the 17-25 age demographic, my Facebook newsfeed has become saturated with “Date a Girl Who” articles. Earlier this month, The Huffington Post featured an article by Stephanie Ridhalgh titled “Date a Girl Who Travels,” which is written in response to and doesn’t completely understand the satire of another Huffington Post article, “Don’t Date a Girl That Travels” by Adi Zarsadias. “Date a Girl Who Travels” is inspired by Rosemarie Urquico’s “Date a Girl Who Reads,” another poorly written response piece that also misses the satire of the original essay that started this trend in 2011: a piece titled “You Should Date an Illiterate Girl” by Charles Warnke on Thought Catalog. Excluding Warnke’s piece, the problem with these types of articles is that among young women who haven’t formed their full selves yet, they are a silly and popular way to cop out and aspire to be a “type.” They encourage girls to measure their self-worth against male expectations. And because these type of articles are often accompanied with skinny, faceless, Tumblr-esque

It’s easy to latch onto and share the aspirational image of the adventurous traveling girl ... It’s much harder to do the work of defining ourselves.

depictions of females, they glamorize both the manic pixie dream girl trope and the idea that women fit best in a supporting role. The first three pieces mentioned above are replete with cliches and girlish fantasies. “Date a girl who travels. … She doesn’t dote on possessions but rather treasured experiences,” Ridhalgh said. “Don’t date a girl who travels for she has chosen a life of uncertainty. … She goes with the flow and follows her heart,” Zarsadias said. Urquico said to find a girl “reading while waiting in that coffee shop down the street.” In Warnke’s original essay, the narrator generalizes “readers” and “non-readers” into categories because he feels betrayed by a specific woman who was a reader. Ironically, while Warnke satirizes cliches and stereotypes, the first three articles support them. This trend of defining women in relation to men isn’t new. Young girls were insecure before “Date a Girl Who” articles, BuzzFeed personality quizzes and the like. Pre-Internet, girls had personality quizzes in teen magazines and other superficial ways of defining themselves. The difference is that now, we live in an era in which people can define themselves by a visual list of their “likes.” Girls can use Pinterest to organize their favorites and showcase their personalities. People can measure the popularity of a post, image or person with an actual number. We have reduced complex ideas and people to searchable hashtags. Instead of supporting stereotypes on our newsfeeds, let’s celebrate individuality by sharing our own accomplishments and the stories of female role models. It’s easy to latch onto and share the aspirational image of the adventurous traveling girl or the profound literate girl. It’s much harder to do the work of defining ourselves. In a world where millennial attention spans are shorter than this sentence, we’re going to have to find a way to strengthen our stamina. There isn’t a shortcut. Almeda is a marketing senior from Seattle.

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Since joining UT in early January, head football coach Charlie Strong has made the headlines many times over, and rightfully so. He is the University’s first black men’s head coach. He is guaranteed a minimum of $5 million annually for a five-season term, with $100,000 increases per year starting in 2015. He has brought many new faces to the coaching staff. But aside from all of that, he has brought a refreshing sense of discipline and expectation. What remains to be asked is whether these expectations will foster a fervent effort to ensure success for athletes both on and off the field. Shawn Izadi, a pre-med senior linebacker from Coppell, defined the term “studentathlete” as “athlete being in bold, all caps, 50 size font while student is written in small, lowercase italicized font.” “It should be the reverse,” Izadi said. “But the problem is a degree doesn’t generate $150 million. Football does. But what a degree will do is place an individual in society to make a meaningful impact.” The degrees that football players earn at Texas are limited by more than financial concerns: More than one-third of UT’s football team studies physical culture and sports, applied learning and development or youth and community studies. While these areas of study may truly suit their interests, it’s important to consider the other factors that may contribute to the players’ choice of major, as a critical part of academic

It’s important that athletes acquire the best education possible, since their degrees are all that they’ll have to show for countless hours of dedication to the sport.

success is pursuing a major in a field of interest. Grant Sirgo, a senior mechanical engineering major and kicker for the UT football team, said this pattern may exist because of the support system already in place for those majors. “With many of the upperclassmen [football players] majoring in these degree plans it can seem like a comfortable choice with a solid support system already in place,” Sirgo said. “Some enter school already having a passion to teach and coach. For these individuals, the decision is no different than mine to enter engineering.” But Izadi also offered a different reason for the skew towards physical culture and sports in the player’s academic lives. “They come here to play football and their priority is not to get an education or they may not have been introduced to what they like yet,” Izadi said. Perhaps there’s social pressure to pursue these particular majors, given that the H.J Lutcher Stark Center for Physical Culture and Sports, where most classes in the physical culture and sports major are taught, is conveniently located in the north end of the football stadium. Whatever the case may be, it’s important that athletes acquire the best education possible especially since their degrees are all that they’ll have to show for countless hours of dedication to the sport. And by best education, I mean a major that really suits their interests and not what’s socially convenient and easily accessible. Strong may not directly address the importance of choosing a major that will provide future opportunities, but his insistence that his team members excel as students first, and then as athletes suggests that the players have free reign when choosing a major. After all, there’s a reason “student” comes before “athlete” in the term “student-athlete.” If these athletes are genuinely drawn to their particular majors, their athletic services are being compensated through a free education. But if they are choosing these majors because of social pressures or lack of time to pursue their real interests, the trade-off between their services and their education is heavily lopsided. Though football may be what attracts and binds these football players to UT, it should not be the only thing of value they have once they leave. Johnson is a journalism junior from DeSoto.

HORNS UP: UTPD OFFERS PIZZA TO STUDENTS FOR CRIME TIPS In Wednesday’s paper, we reported on a delectable incentive to report crimes to UTPD: a free pizza. While the program is limited to bike thefts, UTPD officer William Pieper noticed almost immediately after its inception that the number of reports of suspicious activity around bikes spiked. The program discourages false reports by offering the reward only to tipsters whose information leads to an arrest. And just when you thought it couldn’t get any better, the program doesn’t cost the University a thing — according to Pieper, the money for the pies comes out of officers’ pockets. Horns Up to the men and women of UTPD for their continued, creative commitment, often at personal expense, to keeping students, faculty, staff and visitors safe.

HORNS DOWN: HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES LEAVES OUT HB2 The state Senate Committee on Health and Human Services is meeting Thursday to discuss women’s health services, and noticeably absent from the agenda is any discussion of the elephant in the room: the impact of the abortion regulations passed over the summer that, among those already in effect, require doctors to obtain admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of the abortion facility. The committee’s exclusion of the issue is a shortsighted, politically calculated move with dangerous consequences. Although the law has not yet gone into full effect, its impact is already being felt acutely across the state: only five of the 22 remaining abortion facilities in the state will remain open once the other restrictions take full effect in October. This legislation needs to be discussed, and we’re disappointed but not surprised that the committee would deny this reality.

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to editor@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@TexanEditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


CLASS 5

LIFE&ARTS

5

Thursday, February 20, 2014

CORIOLIS continues from page 8

Sarah Montgomery / Daily Texan Staff

The Austin Art Garage, going on its seventh year, is a gallery that offers a wide variety of art for any budget with pieces ranging from $20 to $2,500.

GARAGE

continues from page 8 unsuccessful search, the idea for the art garage took root. “I could not find a gallery that reflected Austin at all,” Bryer said. “Instead they were more high-end galleries that felt intimidating. I thought, ‘Where does a normal person go to buy art?’” With a marketing degree and no previous art experience, Bryer sought out Ganucheau, an artist and childhood friend, for help. “I was pretty excited when Jake first called me about the idea of opening the Art Garage,” Ganucheau said. “When we were in high school we both always talked about opening a business together. I guess that was in the back of Jake’s mind.”

FLEMING

continues from page 8 art students and students in general is to hear about somebody who believes so strongly in goals.” Studio art freshman Connor Frew enjoyed the Fleming exhibit, saying he appreciated the way Fleming’s art correlates with goals he has in his own art and related Fleming’s art to a project he did last semester. “We were doing this project with foundations, where we were working with what [Fleming] was basically doing,” Frew said. “I’m a big fan of structural stuff, and that’s something I enjoy a lot.” Henderson said Fleming’s

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After searching on Craigslist, the two found their current location. “We were looking for a place like this,” Bryer said. “Something that looked lowbrow and funky and cheap.” After renovating the building, Bryer and Ganucheau began searching for artists by posting ads on Craigslist, and they were soon flooded with offers. They have since quit their previous jobs and the art garage has doubled in size, showcasing dozens of local emerging and established artists. “We’re 100 percent local,” Ganucheau said. “There is so much talent in this town and there’s so many artists in this town that don’t know what to do and where to go, and we try to create a launch pad for them.” Tim Lasater, a local artist

message to students is a positive one. According to Henderson, Fleming is interested in students and is always eager to speak. “He’s had really wonderful interactions with students,” Henderson said. “There’s so much for students to learn, but also there’s this larger message of believing in art and following your dream — that kind of vision, that belief in possibility is really important.” Fleming has also inspired Henderson as an educator. “For me as a scholar, he’s really inspiring,” Henderson said. “His mood and his attitude say that art can change the world.”

and childhood friend of Bryer and Ganucheau, has been showcasing in the gallery for the past two years. “I was working in another field and I hurt my knee,” Lasater said. “They handed me some paints and canvases and brushes. They gave me the opportunity to sell some art and some of them sold and I was like, ‘I’m an artist now.’ I’ve seen so many emerging artists come through here. It’s like an incubation place.” Both Bryer and Ganucheau’s work is featured in the garage alongside the work of other artists. Still, the two try to keep a distinction between being artists and business owners. “I try not to push my own art and let the other artists have a fair chance of selling their work,” Ganucheau

Multimedia

Hear from the founders and see the broad range of art in our video at dailytexanonline.com

said. “This gallery isn’t about Jake and I. That sort of came along the way.” After watching it change for the past seven years, the owners are happy that the art garage is located in the middle of what they consider Austin’s growing art scene. “I feel like we’re at a tipping point,” Bryer said. “We’ve been supporting this all along. We don’t ever look at it as a competitive thing. It’s always growing and I think there’s room for collaboration.”

southern water — flowing towards the north — would veer right, creating a counterclockwise motion. The problem is that the Coriolis force is subtle and not powerful enough to affect our toilets: The bowls are too small and the flushes too quick. But what about a larger tank that drains slowly? That sounds like a job for an expert in fluid mechanics. In the early 1960s, MIT professor Ascher H. Shapiro induced the effect in a bathtub made with scientific precision. He built a tub 6 feet in diameter and attached a 20-foot-long hose to a drain in the base. After plugging the hose, he filled the tank six inches using a clockwise flow to ensure the act of adding water didn’t create a counterclockwise motion. He also covered the tub with a plastic sheet to prevent air currents from influencing the experiment and kept the room at a constant temperature so as not to allow temperature variations that may have affected the direction of the swirl. Even with all of those precautions and letting the water settle for an hour or so, it would still rotate in the clockwise direction when drained because of the filling process. Things got a little better after allowing four or five hours of settling — the water would initially travel clockwise but, by the end of the drain, would begin moving in a counterclockwise direction. Twenty-four hours of settling was required to see the effect, but even this

continues from page 8

Photo courtesy of UT Visual Arts Center.

Artist Dean Fleming will be giving an artist talk via Skype on his new VAC exhibit, “Grids and Geography: Dean Fleming’s Travels in North Africa and Greece,” on Thursday

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the same soulful qualities of his father’s. Clay leans on his Texas country approach, and he understands what makes rhythm work in songs. He likes to make music that makes people smile.” Songwriter Bruce Channel remembers McClinton when he was 10 years old performing tricks on his skateboard at his family’s home. “His determination to just want to do it, his love of music is truly wonderful,” Channel said. “He loves to write songs with his band and I’m just glad to be able to help him write a song here and there.”

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was subtle — there wasn’t any visible rotation until about 12 to 15 minutes into the 20-minute draining period when it began to flow in a counterclockwise direction. A few years later, researchers in Australia replicated the experiment in the Southern Hemisphere, hoping to produce clockwise rotation. It did, but not without difficulties. The scientists noted that winds from outside the laboratory were enough to disturb the experiment, at least on a blustery day. It is the nature of science that one cannot prove an idea to be correct. Experiments are designed to falsify premises and, though these tests ended up with results consistent with predictions based on Coriolis forces, there’s no way to ensure that there wasn’t some other force the scientists neglected. It’s only through continuously attempting to prove ourselves wrong that we can ever hope to be right. And, if the experiments happen to turn out differently than we’d like them to, we need to be ready to flush our pet theories down the toilet — but not necessarily in a counterclockwise motion.

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6 L&A

STEFAN SCRAFIELD, SPORTS EDITOR / @texansports Thursday, February 20, 2014

6

FOOTBALL

Draft hope still alive for hurt Whaley

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It was third and four for the Sooners with the game tied at three. Chris Whaley dropped into coverage and into the perfect spot as the blitzing safety, Adrian Phillips, forced a pass right into Whaley’s hands. Whaley rumbled down the field, bulldozing the “Belldozer” to score his first collegiate touchdown and help the Longhorns grab a 10-3 lead they wouldn’t relinquish in the 2013 Red River Rivalry. The fact that Whaley’s biggest play in burnt orange was a touchdown wouldn’t have come as a surprise to anyone in 2009; after all, Whaley was ranked by ESPN as the 72nd best recruit in the nation as a running back coming out of high school. But now, coming out of college, he is the 27th best defensive tackle, according to NFLDraftScout.com. Whaley’s journey from running back to potential NFL defensive lineman spanned over five years at Texas. In 2009, then-head coach Mack Brown opted to take Whaley as the lone running back for the class, but he was redshirted in his first season on the 40 Acres. In 2010, Whaley saw

CANADA

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Charlie Pearce / Daily Texan file photo

Chris Whaley’s pick-six against the Sooners highlighted a season that saw him go from irrelevant to a possible late-round pick.

limited playing time and began bulking up, ultimately getting too big to play running back. That spring, Whaley finally made the move to the defensive line. The 2011 campaign was filled with collegiate firsts for Whaley as he recorded his first tackle in the season-opener against Rice, his first sack against Kansas, his first start against Baylor and his first fumble recovery against California in the Holiday Bowl. With elevated expectations in 2012, Whaley struggled to

SOFTBALL

make a significant impact on a historically bad Texas team against the run. But 2013 was a different story for Whaley, starting with the Red River Rivalry. The Longhorns entered the game as huge underdogs, but, thanks to Whaley’s pick six, they were able to dominate the Sooners. Two weeks later, Whaley scored his second touchdown of his career on a momentum grabbing “scoop and score” against Kansas, becoming the first defensive tackle in school history to score two defensive

touchdowns in a season. His elevated play had him climbing the draft boards. Draft experts began talking about Whaley as a potential Day 3 name. Then a season-ending knee injury against West Virginia abruptly ended his Texas career and his climb up the draft boards. Whaley was invited to the NFL Scouting Combine, but it is unknown if he will be able to participate as he recovers from his knee injury. Currently he is expected to go very late in the draft or to have to sign on as a

free agent. If Whaley can sell himself like former Texas running back turned Pro Bowl defensive tackle Henry Melton, he should be able to make an NFL roster. Physically, both Melton and Whaley are officially listed at 6 feet 3 inches and 295 pounds, but Whaley actually has an extra season of collegiate experience on the defensive line. Whaley also needs to prove that his knee has recovered. If he can do this, his knack for making the big play late in his college career should help him make an NFL roster.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL | TEXAS 63, OKLAHOMA 64

Texas falls short in Norman By Rachel Wenzlaff @Rachel Wenzlaff

Jenna VanHofe / Daily Texan Staff

After catching for All-American Blaire Luna her entire career, senior catcher Mandy Ogle now works with new personnel.

Slow start has softball hoping for turnaround By Scarlett Smith @ScarlettRSmith1

Texas softball finds itself in uncharted territory as of late, with a 6-6 record heading into the Mary Nutter Classic in Palm Springs, Calif. on Thursday. After four straight wins to start the season, Texas lost six of eight games to fall to a modest .500. The last time Texas failed to post a winning record through its first 12 games was in 2000, when the Longhorns were an even 6-6 after consecutive losses to then No. 15 Long Beach State and No. 1 UCLA. That year, Texas finished third in the Big 12 and advanced to the regional round of the NCAA playoffs before losing to Florida. Coming off a 2013 campaign in which the Longhorns reached the semifinals of the Women’s College World Series and were a perfect 12-0 at that point in the season, head coach Connie Clark’s team has found success hard to come by early on. With a notably younger team than last year’s squad — there are seven freshmen and six sophomores on the roster — Clark has stressed to the players the importance of pacing themselves as they continue to navigate the growing pains of an unproven pitching staff and uncertain ace. “The pitchers’ performances have improved every time

SLOVENIA

they come out here,” senior catcher Mandy Ogle said. “It’s cool to see how they started out in the first weekend and what they have done this past weekend. I am excited for what this week brings.” Texas has suffered some close losses, including its most recent 6-5 defeat at the hands of No. 9 Kentucky in the championship game of the Texas Classic. The Wildcats came through in the seventh to score the winning run after a costly error. “I feel like we are a comeback team this year,” Ogle said. “We’re in it all seven innings and that’s good to say for any team.” Despite the team’s rough start, freshman outfielder Stephanie Wong finished the tournament leading the team in batting average (.636) after seven hits through five games. “She is just locked in,” Clark said of Wong’s recent play. “She has a tremendous mind-set for the game [and is] very focused.” The Longhorns fell from No. 16 to No. 25 in the nation after the sluggish start, but hope to end their woes against UNLV (2-7) and Cal Poly (4-6) on Thursday at 12:30 and 3 p.m. respectively. Texas will face No. 2 Washington, Fresno State and California, who both just fell out of the top 25 this week, throughout the rest of the weekend.

It looked as though Texas could have escaped Norman with a last-second win. Down one with four seconds remaining, Oklahoma guard Morgan Hook missed a free throw, and the Longhorns took it coast-to-coast as junior forward Nneka Enemkpali found herself behind Oklahoma’s defense. Enemkpali completed the layup, but took too much time as the shot fell about a second late. Instead of Texas celebrating, it was Oklahoma, clad in pink uniforms, that celebrated in front of a crowd of pink uniforms with a 64-63 win. “It was a tough loss,” head coach Karen Aston said. “Defensively, we just weren’t good enough down the stretch. We can’t put ourselves in a position to have to make that play on the road.” Hook, who recorded 15 points, nine rebounds and eight assists, was just a free-throw short of being perfect in the final

minutes of Wednesday night’s game. Hook pushed the tempo, going down the court for a game tying layup with 43 seconds to go to tie the game. Then, after Texas didn’t get a call on a hard collision at the rim, Hook drove right at sophomore center Imani McGee-Stafford, drawing a foul with just four ticks remaining. Hook sunk just one of two, but that was all the Sooners needed to skirt past the Longhorns without their best player. “We just attached ourselves to Morgan’s will. We really did,” Oklahoma head coach Sherri Coale said. “She … made tough play after tough play. … She was not going to be denied this win.” Oklahoma guard Aaryn Ellenberg, who leads the Sooners (16-11, 7-7 Big 12) with 18 points a game, was knocked out in their last contest against Oklahoma State with a concussion and was not able to suit up against the Longhorns. This was supposed to be a break for the Longhorns (17-9, 8-6 Big 12) who saw

Ellenberg drop 37 points against them in their first matchup but still pull off an overtime win. But this time, without the Sooner star, Texas fell to the balanced Sooner offense led by Hook that saw three players score double-figures. Both teams struggled from the field as Texas shot 40 percent and the Sooners shot 38.6 percent. “Despite miserable numbers, I told them in the locker room that this stat sheet is ugly, but the important number on there is 64,” Coale said. “We had one more point than they did and we finally figured out how to win a close game.” Enemkpali and senior guard Chassidy Fussell led the Longhorns, combining for a total of 33 points, while McGee-Stafford and sophomore guard Celina Rodrigo grabbed eight rebounds each. The Longhorns also recorded eight blocks, seven from McGee-Stafford. Texas will try to recover from the loss when they play Iowa State on Saturday at 7 p.m. in Ames, Iowa.

Jenna VonHofe / Daily Texan Staf

Junior forward Nneka Enemkpali goes for a loose ball against Texas Tech. Enemkpali led the Longhorns with 17 points Wednesday against Oklahoma in a losing effort.

OLYMPICS

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TOP TWEET Mandy Ogle @mandyogle5

“Cali babbyyyyy!! Off for the weekend. #PalmSprings”

TODAY IN HISTORY

1887

First minor league baseball association organizes in Pittsburgh.

SPORTS BRIEFLY TCU receiver off team after drug arrest

FORT WORTH — TCU receiver LaDarius Brown has been kicked off the team after being arrested on a marijuana possession charge. A statement Wednesday from the Horned Frogs athletics department says Brown violated team rules and was removed from the football program. Officials didn’t elaborate. Fort Worth police late Sunday stopped Brown’s vehicle after he allegedly went through a stop sign. The officer smelled an odor believed to be marijuana and searched the vehicle. Police confiscated a bag containing a green, leafy substance. Brown was charged with possession of less than 2 ounces of marijuana. He was freed Monday on $500 bond. Jail records Wednesday didn’t list an attorney for Brown, who as a sophomore last season had 393 yards and two touchdowns. —Associated Press


COMICS 7

COMICS

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Thursday, February 20, 2014

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Thursday, February 20, 2014

Edited by Will Shortz

Crossword ACROSS 1 Harley, e.g. 4 First of all 8 Cartoonist who said “I don’t read or watch TV to get ideas. My work is basically sitting down at the drawing table and getting silly” 14 Speaker’s aid 16 “The Glass Menagerie” woman 17 Paddle pusher 18 Indulge 19 Grasped 20 Ball holder 21 Kitchen gizmos 22 Bartlett’s, e.g. 24 Pet saying? 26 Coll. units 27 What a public scene may elicit 30 Gets ready to play, say, with “up”

ANSWER

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1 12 29 9 5 58 8 44 77 33 66 8 85 56 6 7 71 1 33 99 22 44 4 47 73 3 6 69 9 22 88 55 11 2 23 38 8 4 46 6 77 55 11 99 6 69 94 4 8 85 5 11 33 77 22 7 7815 19 57 53 36 34 21 22 99 44 66 88 3 373812 846 295 281 124 167 439 458 55 66 99 77 5 545668 673 186 192 917 921 754 739 88 22 44 33 9 921493 415 734 747 258 289 362 376 66 11 88 55 Arrr matey. This scurrvy beast is today’s answerrrrrr. Crop it out, or it’ll be the the fishes for ya!

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S U D O K U F O R Y O U

SS U U D D O O KK U U

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C O O M O G P L B E L T A M C E K E R Y E E N D D P S

33 Hunt’s production 59 Not shoot for the stars, to put it 34 What some mildly waiters never 60 “I’m not the only see? one!” 35 Prepare to plant, 62 River to the perhaps Missouri 36 Lowercase letter 63 Vitamin, e.g. illustrated six times in this 64 Some plasma puzzle? TVs and digital cameras 38 Actor Stephen 41 Shoes and socks, 65 Roman rebuke typically 66 Poor grade 42 Start to take DOWN off one’s pants, 1 Break (into) say 2 ___ incline (tilted) 44 Girl’s name 3 Produce meaning “beautiful” 4 Suffix with orange 45 Constituency 5 “Go ahead!” 46 Lead 6 Flummoxed 47 Slumber party 7 Thing that might togs have a needle 8 “Charlie’s Angels” 50 Rap’s Dr. ___ actress 51 Senility 9 French mine? 54 ___ card 10 Wheel with 56 Newswoman sloped teeth Paula 11 Contemptuous responses TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE 12 They may be B C O D A B A B A picked up in a A A S A P A F E W locker room R A P H Y B S T A R 13 Indian breads B L E A T P I E T Y 15 Crouches in fear A T H O S I E R 23 Like England in R O W N U P N S C the Middle Ages A I R E M E M O I R 25 Arctic ice O N L Y U A O N E I T L I P S Y N C S 27 Tech, e.g.: Abbr. B A D G E H A T E S 28 Subject of meditation A S E L O O N R C A D R E C U E 29 Turn C A R I B B E A N C 31 Make sense O N I N O W E T O 32 Made up S T A G X E N O N 34 Some sports cars

Prep to the highest degree.

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PUZZLE BY ELIZABETH A. LONG

37 Part of a drain 38 Passed on, in a way 39 Bracket shape 40 Had 41 It’s an imposition 43 Russian wolfhound

44 For whom Alfred Pennyworth is a butler

53 Female Cotswolds

46 “Behold!”

55 Kennel club reject, no doubt

48 Old-time actress Meadows

57 Sharpen

49 Corpulent

58 ___ to self

51 Fist-bumps 52 Attend

61 “___ Hill,” 1996 platinum album

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

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8 SPTS

HANNAH SMOTHERS, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR / @DailyTexanArts Thursday, February 20, 2014

8

CITY

Local art garage supports emerging artists By Sarah Montgomery @withalittlejazz

Down a small dirt path off South Lamar sits a metal building not much larger than two dorm rooms. The rusted metal sidings, exposed concrete foundation and dusty exterior leave little hint as to what lies inside the building’s walls: local art, and lots of it, with pieces ranging in price from $20 to $2,500. The Austin Art Garage, founded in 2007 by Jake Bryer and Joel Ganucheau, is a place for artists and buyers to sell and purchase art in a place that aims to capture the aesthetic of the Austin lifestyle. “The gallery is for the everyday person,” Bryer said. “Someone that’s young that doesn’t have enough money can buy something, but also there are big original pieces for people to buy. Not everything is affordable for everyone, but there’s something for everyone.” After working 7.5 years for the Austin Business Journal, Bryer began looking for art to furnish his home in Austin. Following an

GARAGE page 5

Sarah Montgomery / Daily Texan Staff

The Austin Art Garage on South Lamar, founded by Jake Bryer and Joel Ganucheau in 2007, is home to hundreds of art pieces made by local established and emerging artists.

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

MUSIC

Singer releases ‘Texas gumbo’ collaboration By Kritika Kulshrestha @kritika88

Illustration by Cody Bubenik / Daily Texan Staff

Toilets safe from Coriolis effect

By Robert Starr @RobertKStarr

Everything in Australia is backward: Its winter is our summer, cars drive

on the left side of the road, mammals lay eggs and toilets flush in the opposite direction. Well, not quite on that last one, but, if you believed it, you’d be in good company. The idea stems from the fact that we live on a rotating planet. Depending on your latitude, this results in traveling at different speeds. A visitor near the North Pole barely moves at all, whereas, here in Austin, we’re

traveling at around 900 miles per hour. Fire a bullet at the equator and it’s still traveling at 1,000 miles per hour. But, since the ground below it is moving at the same speed, it doesn’t appear to travel nearly that fast. But, if you’re on a cruise ship due south of Austin at the equator and fire a gun toward our city, your bullet is going to hit to the right of where you aim, since it will have received an extra 100-mile-per-hour

boost from the rotation of the earth. This “Coriolis effect” that causes the bullet to apparently turn in midair has major implications for ballistic motion, and, in theory, should have some effect on the water in our toilets. The idea is that, as the water moves toward the drain, the northern water in the bowl — flowing toward the south — would veer left, while the

CORIOLIS page 5

ART

Artist to field queries about new exhibit By Brigit Benestante @BBenestante

From the mountains of Libre, Colo., in his self-built dome home, artist Dean Fleming will be answering questions via Skype at the UT Visual Arts Center on Thursday. The exhibit, “Travels in North Africa and Greece,” showcases the artist’s work and allows students to journey through the paintings of his travel sketchbook. The exhibit consists of many different

paintings of colorful geometric shapes and designs. Art history professor Linda Henderson is the curator of the exhibit and will host the talk with Fleming. Henderson believes Fleming’s art searches for another realm of space through shape. “What we see in this exhibition is his discovery of the way, if he alters the grid or starts stretching things, the space will start moving,” Henderson said. “He would really like these works to

shake your confidence in the 3-D world as you know it.” Xochi Solis, director of events and public programming at the center, helped coordinate the upcoming talk with Fleming. “[Fleming] just had hip surgery, so it will be a Skype interview, but he’s looking forward to it,” Solis said. “Dr. Henderson flew in [from Berlin] for this event.” Henderson and Fleming have worked together

before in reaching out to students. Fleming lectured when his work was featured at the 2004 Blanton exhibit “Twister: Moving Through Color, 1965-1977” and also gave a lecture to one of Henderson’s classes a year ago. “When he talks to students it is so inspiring because he believes so much in the power of art and its ability to affect people in a positive way,” Henderson said. “What’s so great for

FLEMING page 5

Clay McClinton has never tried to get away from the music lineage of his father and Grammy award-winning singer-songwriter Delbert McClinton, but he is trying to carve out his own path in Americana music, or what he fondly calls Texas gumbo. McClinton’s blend of Texas country, blues and rock ‘n’ roll is evident in each of the 12 tracks on his latest album, Bitin’ at the Bit, which was released Tuesday. To celebrate the album’s release, McClinton will perform at the Cactus Cafe for the first time Thursday night. “I like rock ‘n’ roll, country, a little blues, a dash of jazz,” McClinton said. “You just have to know how to collaborate different kinds of style to make your own and hopefully it turns out good.” Bitin’ at the Bit is McClinton’s first collaboration with Grammy-winning record producer and songwriter Gary Nicholson, who has known McClinton since he was 2 years old. Nicholson and McClinton co-wrote most of the songs on the album with contributions by Delbert McClinton, Nashville studio drummer Tom Hambridge and Austinbased artist George Ensle. “My dad and I were trying to figure out a name for the album and I was so anxious for the CD to come out,” Clay McClinton said. “I told my dad, ‘I’m just bitin’ at the bit, I’m just chompin’ at the bit,’ and a light went off in my head and I said, ‘That’s

CLAY MCCLINTON ALBUM RELEASE SHOW When: Thursday at 8 p.m. Where: Cactus Cafe Admission: $10

the CD name.’” McClinton produced the album with the help of a Kickstarter campaign through which he and his wife were able to raise $43,000. A portion of the funds raised were used for publicity while the rest went toward creating the album. “I couldn’t go back into debt,” McClinton said. “One of the hardest things about being an independent artist is finding a budget to keep making CDs without any backing or label.” Born and raised in Fort Worth, McClinton never graduated from college. Instead, he decided to accompany his father on his road trips, playing music. “When I was 15 or 16, during the summertime my dad would hire me to go with him on his road trips and help with the equipment,” McClinton said. “We would be on the road for a week or so … sleeping on the bus and playing music one night after another. I’ve always [liked] being nomadic. It was the coolest time when I was on the road with him.” McClinton’s career has grown a lot since his first performance at age 14. “His music is different,” Nicholson said. “But it has

ALBUM page 5

Shelby Tauber / Daily Texan Staff

Clay McClinton, son of Grammy award-winning artist Delbert McClinton, will be performing for the first time at the Cactus Cafe on Thursday evening. Clay McClinton blends Texas country, blues and rock ‘n’ roll in his latest album, Bitin’ at the Bit.


The Daily Texan 2014-02-20  

The Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 edition of The Daily Texan

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