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Wednesday, February 19, 2014

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POLICE

Help UTPD catch a criminal, get a free pizza By Julia Brouillette @juliakbrou

Students don’t report crimes as often as they used to, even though a free pizza hangs in the balance, according to campus police. About eight years ago, while reviewing crime reports, UTPD officer William Pieper noticed bicycle thefts during the daytime had spiked.

In response, the department began offering free pizzas to anyone who reported suspicious activity that led to the apprehension of a bike thief. “It just seemed odd to me that somebody could steal so many bikes or that multiple people could steal so many bikes and nobody would notice it,” Pieper said. “I asked myself, ‘What would it take to get students to report

something like that?’ And, of course, I knew students like free food.” Pieper pitched the idea to then-Police Chief Robert Dahlstrom, who decided to expand the program to include free pizza for reports of any suspicious activity that led to the apprehension of a criminal. After UTPD began offering pizzas, the number of bike thief arrests increased

significantly, Pieper said. “When we first started the program, we saw a spike in reports of suspicious activity and we actually saw an increase in the amount of bike thieves that we arrested,” Pieper said. “It really encouraged people to call in when they saw something.” According to Pieper, instead of UTPD setting aside

PIZZA page 2

Illustration by Hannah Hadidi / Daily Texan Staff

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Meet the SG candidates By Nicole Cobler | @nicolecobler

Kori Rady / Taylor Strickland

Kenton Wilson / Caroline Carter

Year: Senior/Senior Major: Government and communications/communications One Platform Goal: Parking ticket forgiveness: UTPD would void your first parking violation on campus.

Year: Senior/Senior Major: Philosophy and government/marketing and IRG One Platform Goal: Creating a presidential council to meet monthly with organization presidents to hear their concerns.

Campaign promotes new voices Kornel “Kori” Rady, a government and corporate communications senior, said he hopes to represent as many different student groups as possible, which drew him to selecting corporate communications senior Taylor Strickland as his vice

presidential candidate. “I wanted to get together with someone who is different from myself and can make the University a better place,” Rady said. “[Strickland] was the obvious choice.” Strickland said her involvement in Black Student

Alliance, the African American Culture committee, Texas Dance and Student Government would help to ensure every student group has an equal voice. “Sometimes communities

RADY

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Candidates emphasize goals Student Government presidential and vice presidential candidates Kenton Wilson and Caroline Carter have been involved in a total of 19 student organizations in their combined seven years at the University, a feat Wilson believes makes the duo a

CAMPUS

good fit for the student leadership positions. “Since I’ve been a part of so many areas on campus, it’s really shown me how Student Government reaches different areas of UT,” said Wilson, a philosophy and government senior.

Wilson and Carter have 18 platform goals, including maintaining bus routes, creating a campus-wide homecoming and adding more opportunities to hear student opinions. “If leaders in organizations

WILSON page 3

CITY

Crowdsourcing used to restore mural Austin artists protest By Alyssa Mahoney @TheAlyssaM

After public outcry over the defacement of two murals near 23rd Street and Guadalupe, the original artists, the University Co-op and Austin officials have removed the majority of the graffiti and are crowdsourcing funds to finish the restoration process. Brian Jewell, University Co-op marketing vice president, said a co-op security guard first noticed graffiti

on the 40-year-old mural, located on the south wall of the Renaissance Market area, on Jan. 7. Jewell said the guard did not see anyone deface the murals, and no security footage of the area was available, so the co-op could not file a report with Austin police. Jewell said the graffiti removal is nearly complete, and the co-op and original artists are raising funds through online donations to begin restoring the

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pay-to-play practices By David Sackllah @dsackllah

Caleb Kuntz / Daily Texan Staff

A student walks by the 40-year-old Austin mural on 23rd street and Guadalupe that was recently vandalized.

The average hip-hop show has anywhere from two to three opening acts, likely composed of rappers with experience, selected to open because of their skills or popularity. Recently in Austin, though, a surge of shows have had anywhere from 10-15 rappers playing brief 10 minute sets. These artists get booked not because of

talent, but because they paid the promoter hundreds of dollars to perform. This practice, called payto-play, has become more widespread in the hip-hop community. Typically, the artist pays the promoter a flat fee for a guaranteed performance, usually priced in the hundreds. One website, Rocksx.com, offers registered members a guaranteed

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014

NEWS

FRAMES featured photo Volume 114, Issue 107

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor Laura Wright (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Shabab Siddiqui (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@ gmail.com Sports Office (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office (512) 232-2209 dtlifeandarts@gmail.com Retail Advertising (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising (512) 471-5244 classifieds@ dailytexanonline.com

Caleb b. Kuntz / Daily Texan Staff

Radio-television-film production graduate student Mitchell James O’Hearn applies a colored gel to a 1K fresnel during a lighting lab Tuesday evening.

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

CORRECTION Due to an editing error, UT doctoral student Rachel Manzique’ course topics were misidentified in a caption in the Feb. 18 issue. Manzique teaches English courses.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2013 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER High

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MURAL

continues from page 1 murals in mid-March. Jewell said the mural is an important part of Austin history. “[The mural] is 40 years old, and it’s an iconic symbol of Austin,” Jewell said. “It’s almost a rite of passage to view it.” Kerry Awn, one of the murals’ original artists, said he did not realize the mural was important to the public until he witnessed the extensive media coverage done on it. “It took the whole public to let me know that people care about it,” Awn said. “In a weird way, it’s kind of a good thing.” According to Awn, he and the two other original artists — Tommy B and Rick Turner — will complete the restoration over the course of 10 weeks from March 15 until June 1. Awn said the co-op will take additional measures, such as installing cameras and additional lighting in the area, in an attempt to prevent additional acts of vandalism toward the mural from occurring. Julia Narum, Travis County Health and Human Services program supervisor,

said cold, damp weather — which makes removal less effective — delayed the city’s process of removing the graffiti. According to Narum, the city has removed graffiti from more than 1.5 million square feet of public and private property. Narum said the city’s annual budget for graffiti removal is approximately $516,000, including supplies and labor costs. Narum said she thinks the amount of graffiti has increased, forcing the city to dedicate additional funds to graffiti removal. “It’s, in part, a growing pain,” Narum said. “There

are so many events, so many visitors.” Narum said graffiti is more common in places where there is more pedestrian traffic, but she said business owners sometimes paint murals to try to deter graffiti. “When [vandals] did the [graffiti] at the co-op. To me, that means they have gotten really bold,” Narum said. “The [graffiti on the] murals have proven there’s no respect anymore for the murals.” Jewell said he thinks it’s important to preserve the murals for later generations to view.

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Justin Atkinson, Christina Breitbeil, Hayden Clark, Wynne Davis, Leila Ruiz, Natalie Sullivan Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Helen Fernandez, Caleb Kuntz Sports Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jeremy Thomas Columnist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lucy Griswold Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tara Frels, Hannah Wimberly, Claire Yun Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nathan Burgess, Andrew Cooke, Crystal Marie Garcia, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cole Ourso, Lindsay Rojas, Samuel Vanicek

Business and Advertising

(512) 471-1865 | advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Interim Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frank Serpas, III Executive Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chad Barnes Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barbara Heine Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcasting and Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Event Coordinator and Media Consultant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindsey Hollingsworth Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Carter Goss, Lindsey Hollingsworth Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ted Sniderman Student Assistant Advertising Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rohan Needel Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dani Archuleta, Aaron Blanco, Hannah Davis, Crysta Hernandez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robin Jacobs, Erica Reed, Mayowa Tijani, Lesly Villarreal Student Project Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Aaron Blanco Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mymy Nguyen Student Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dito Prado Senior Graphic Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Hublein Student Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Karina Manguia, Rachel Ngun, Bailey Sullivan Special Editions/Production Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michael Gammon Longhorn Life Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ali Killian Longhorn LIfe Assistant Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrew Huygen

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 4711865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

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funds, individuals within the department chip in for pizzas. The pizza is purchased from the tipper’s preferred restaurant, Pieper said. “If they want Papa John’s, we get Papa John’s — if they want Mangia’s, we get Manjia’s,” Pieper said. “If it’s a pizzeria here in Austin, we can go get it.” Pieper said the offer is extended anyone who submits a crime tip and is not exclusive to UT students, faculty and staff — but

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This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25 Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Wright Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala, Riley Brands, Amil Malik, Eric Nikolaides Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shabab Siddiqui Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan Rudner Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Antonia Gales, Anthony Green, Jacob Kerr, Pete Stroud, Amanda Voeller Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Julia Brouillette, Nicole Cobler, Alyssa Mahoney, Madlin Mekelburg Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Reinsch Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brett Donohoe, Reeana Keenen, Kevin Sharifi Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Mitts Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hirrah Barlas, Bria Benjamin, Alex Dolan, Omar Longoria Multimedia Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charlie Pearce, Alec Wyman Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sam Ortega Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jonathan Garza, Shweta Gulati, Pu Ying Huang, Shelby Tauber, Lauren Ussery Senior Videographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor Barron, Jackie Kuenstler, Dan Resler, Bryce Seifert Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Smothers Associate Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren L’Amie Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Eleanor Dearman, Kritika Kulshrestha, David Sackllah, Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stefan Scrafield Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Hummer Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Evan Berkowitz, Garrett Callahan, Jori Epstein, Matt Warden Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Hadidi Senior Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cody Bubenik, Ploy Buraparate, Connor Murphy, Aaron Rodriguez, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephanie Vanicek Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeremy Hintz Associate Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarah Stancik Senior Technical Staff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Shen, Roy Varney Special Ventures Co-editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard, Chris Hummer Online Outreach Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fred Tally-Foos Journalism Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Michael Brick

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the tip must result in apprehension for the tipster’s pizza dreams to become a reality. Typically, people only submit one tip, according to Pieper. “I think we had one person years ago who made two reports over the course of several months, but, so far, we do not have any frequent flyers – or pizza eaters, as it were,” Pieper said. “I think we’ve only had one case where somebody said they didn’t need [a pizza].” Pieper said tips aren’t submitted as frequently now as they were when the program was implemented. “I’m hoping that with more advertising and more media stories, that will reinvigorate people to call in on suspicious activity,” Pieper said. “We encourage people to put the UT police department number in their cell phones. That way if they see something they’ll have our number handy.” The Austin Police Department does not offer any similar incentives, according to Lisa Cortinas, senior public information specialist. “Sometimes family members of victims or businesses that are victims will offer rewards, but that’s really it,” Cortinas said. Kendall Hogenmiller, a textiles and apparel sophomore, said she thought the program could prompt students who may not otherwise report a suspicious person to call UTPD. “I feel like I would call anyway,” Hogenmiller said. “But it’s nice knowing that you would get something out of it.”

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We encourage any community member who has any kind of temporary or permanent disability to contact Texas Student Media beforehand so that appropriate accommodations can be made. Anyone is welcome to attend.

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014

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Civil rights history informs present By Christina Breitbeil

The LBJ School of Public Affairs will debut a multi-year initiative called 50 for 50 to highlight current civil rights issues.

@christinabreit

Helen Fernandez / Daily Texan Staff

President Powers speaks at a Campus Conversation regarding undergraduate education at UT.

Powers: Faculty must shape online classes By Leila Ruiz @leilakristi

President William Powers Jr. said faculty input was a critical element of transforming undergraduate education at the University during a Campus Conversation with faculty in the Etter-Harbin Alumni Center on Tuesday. The faculty-only meeting, also hosted by executive vice president and provost Gregory Fenves, focused on encouraging a continued dialogue regarding the progress and transformation of the University’s undergraduate curriculum. The meeting highlighted opportunities to use technology to improve learning opportunities for students and allow teachers to reach a larger audience, such as online courses and massive open online courses, commonly known as MOOCs, for the public. Powers acknowledged the magnitude of these endeavors and said the process is a years-long conversation before a decades-long transformation. Powers also said faculty and department involvement will be

crucial for decisions regarding the format of classes and the style of teaching, personalizing the courses instead of implementing blanket policies. “The faculty owns that curriculum,” Powers said. “That’s a privilege, but it’s also a responsibility.” Fenves said these model changes are necessary in order to stay competitive, citing the flexibility of a first-year medical school program — which doesn’t use semester hours, has a loose interpretation of courses, lacks lectures and emphasizes flipped classrooms — as inspiration for the University’s undergraduate work. Mechanical engineering associate professor Michael Webber instructed “Energy 101” as a MOOC this fall, and said the experience made him a better professor, despite the eight months it took to put the class together. “It forced me to think more carefully about what I was thinking,” Webber said. “It forced me to be global and not just think about the Texas perspective. Now, I’ve got really good material for me to use with my class from now on.”

A multi-year initiative to highlight current civil rights issues by remembering the civil rights legislation of the past debuts Wednesday on behalf of the LBJ School of Public Affairs. The initiative, known as “50 for 50,” will be presented in a series of 50 events to commemorate the 50 years that have passed since President Lyndon B. Johnson signed several key pieces of civil rights legislation, such as the Civil Rights Act in 1964. LBJ School dean Robert Hutchings said he hopes the events — including a Civil Rights Summit from April 8-10 that will feature keynote speeches on campus by presidents Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton — will ignite action among the students that can influence future legislation. “It’s a catalyst for getting those people of [the college-aged] generation to start thinking about public service,” Hutchings said. “Our commemoration of these events doesn’t

RADY

continues from page 1 just get left out,” said Strickland, who also serves as a Univeristy-wide representative for SG. “There’s no excuse for it. We plan on meeting with these members and seeing what they want on campus and what they want out of their college experience.” The executive alliance candidates’ platform focuses on student life, safety and transportation, academics and civic engagement. Rady said he referenced his own personal experiences at UT when creating his platform points. His initiative to expand the URide program to reach more neighborhoods

Helen Fernandez Daily Texan Staff

mean we have a political agenda. It’s a time for deliberating these [civil rights issues].” The series of events is a celebration of civil rights triumphs of the past but, more importantly, will focus on the issues that are pressing today, according to Mark Updegrove, director of the LBJ Presidential Library. Updegrove said he thinks there is still room for improvement in civil rights issues. “We always have to pay attention to issues like education and immigration and ensure began when a drunk driver hit a friend from his hometown. Rady said although he draws inspiration from his own personal experiences, he encourages students to reach out to him and voice their concerns. “It’s not about [Strickland] and [Rady],” Rady said. “It’s about UT.” Strickland said one of the platform goals she is excited to work toward is expanding the student section at games. “There have been many times where me and my friends are separated in our seating,” Strickland said. “All of our platforms are from experiences we’ve had or our friends have had.”

that racism or discrimination of any kind does not hold us back,” Updegrove said. “While we’ve made progress in these areas, I think we always must remain vigilant and ensure that we live up to the American promise.” Mohnish Gandhi, finance and Plan II senior, said he thinks the initiative should focus on the most contentious civil rights issues. “I hope the series tackles the topics that are more controversial as opposed to more conservative in nature,” Gandhi said. “I think that will

WILSON

continues from page 1 can really voice their concerns, I think that’s huge,” said Carter, a marketing and international relations and global studies senior. “We have so many amazing organizations that, unfortunately, Student Government does not communicate with.” Carter said being an outof-state student who has only been in SG for a year gave her a different perspective on ways to transform the organization. Wilson said he admired these aspects when selecting a running mate. “I was really excited to see the fire she could bring to Student Government,” Wilson said. “I saw her come

create more of an impact on campus because students are more attracted to controversial issues that have more time in the spotlight.” Hutchings said he hopes the events will be dramatic enough to call attention to the approaching anniversaries of other civil rights legislative acts. “If you look at LBJ, whether you agree or disagree with his policy, he was a president who knew how to get things done,” Hutchings said. “We want to pass on this spirit to the next generation.” into the assembly and get elected to the Chair of Student Affairs Committee and immediately started tackling all of her different platform initiatives.” Wilson said his platform’s focus on more specific goals is what differentiates him and Carter from the current executive alliance. “I think we’re coming in with many strong points that we’ve had many conversations with administrators on campus and we’re going to get it done,” Wilson said. “I’m just looking for quick, tangible changes that can be made to the student experience that will show people on campus that SG is there to work for them.”

Applications Now Being Accepted The J. J. “Jake” Pickle Citizenship Award

The Pal – Make a Difference Award

University Unions

University Unions

Each year The J. J. “Jake” Pickle Citizenship Award is presented to a

The Pal—Make A Difference Award annually recognizes a student whose

student whose cumulative, notable contributions to campus life over a period

single initiative “made a difference” to the University or broader community.

of time exemplify the commitment to public service and the high standard of

The award was created in 2006 by Texas Union Advisory Council member

leadership that were the hallmarks of the life and career of U. S. Congressman

Jaspreet Singh Pal (BBA ’95) to inspire students to engage in a lifelong

J. J. “Jake” Pickle.

commitment to public service.

The 2014 recipient of The J. J. “Jake” Pickle Citizenship Award will receive a certificate, a copy of Congressman Pickle’s autobiography, Jake, and a

The 2014 Pal—Make A Difference Award recipient will receive a certificate

$5000 check at a luncheon on Friday, April 11, 2014.

and a $1000 check at a luncheon on Friday, April 11, 2014.

Candidates must be in good academic standing, be currently enrolled

Candidates must be currently enrolled full-time at The University of Texas at Austin and complete an application comprising:

full-time, and must complete an application comprising:

One-page personal statement, highlighting UT campus involvement and leadership activities and describing organization and club memberships Résumé

Biographical Information Form Personal statement describing a single program or initiative that benefited the campus or broader community Letter of recommendation from a UT faculty, staff, or student

750-word essay on a specified topic Two letters of recommendation supporting campus leadership and involvement (Note: The J. J. “Jake” Pickle Citizenship Award application period runs

(Note: The Pal—Make A Difference Award application period runs

concurrent with The Pal—Make A Difference Award. Eligible students may

concurrent with the The J. J. “Jake” Pickle Citizenship Award. Eligible

apply for both awards.)

students may apply for both awards.)

February 28 Applications due

February 3 thru February 28 Application packets available in UNB 4.124 (Must be picked up in person) February 28 Applications due

April 11

April 11

Presentation of The J.J. “Jake” Pickle Citizenship Award

Presentation of The Pal - Make a Difference Award

February 3 thru February 28 Application packets available in UNB 4.124 (Must be picked up in person)

For more information megan.mcmillin@mail.utexas.edu or 475-6600


4A OPINION

LAURA WRIGHT, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / @TexanEditorial Wednesday, February 19, 2014

4

EDITORIAL

Student Government limits legislation to tissue Student Government’s latest move to improve student life at UT is a campaign for two-ply bath tissue on campus. And no, they are not joking. Liam Woolley-Macmath, a supply chain management junior and McCombs student representative and business sophomore Garret Neville have authored legislation urging the University to swap out the one-ply bath tissue used in many building on campus for Georgia Pacific two-ply, which would, admittedly, increase costs. The legislations was supposed to be presented Tuesday to the General Assembly, though the regularly scheduled meeting was canceled via Twitter because of low attendance. Some context: In December, Facility Services Manager Andrew Yanez told The Daily Texan that the University was making efforts to decrease bath tissue usage to reduce waste. while provide necessary supplies to campus areas based on need. Facility Services

“The bath tissue has been the same for years. It’s a single-ply, it’s really cheap and almost feels like a paper towel. This seems a really silly issue to talk about, but it has been the No. 1 complaint from students for a while at McCombs.” — Liam Woolley-Macmath, McCombs student representative

manages the bath tissue in more than 100 academic and administrative buildings on campus, though it does not manage or supply bath tissue to auxiliaries of the University, including the Division of Housing and Food Service buildings and the University Unions, neither of which is addressed by WoolleyMacmath’s legislation. Granted, even if the legislation passes, it would not force Facility Service to shell out more money for two-ply rolls, as SG resolutions are non-binding. In 2012, Facility Services spent $125,044 on bath tissue alone, amounting to 133,380 one-ply rolls used by students across campus. But Woolley-Macmath believes that UT’s academic buildings can do better than oneply. He said the thicker bath tissue used in the unions, such as the Student Activity Center, is exactly what he would like to see throughout campus bathrooms. “The bath tissue has been the same for years. It’s a single-ply, it’s really cheap and almost feels like a paper towel,” Woolley-Macmath said. “This seems a really silly issue to talk about, but it has been the No. 1 complaint from students for a while at McCombs.” Woolley-Macmath made it clear to this board that this was serious legislation prompted by student complaints over what they perceived as a real tissue issue, and we believe him. But that raises a decidedly more disturbing question about UT students and their “No. 1 complaints.” Of all the issues on campus — Shared Services, tuition raises, online education, affordable housing and safety initiatives, to name only a few — students are most concerned about the adversities they’re confronting inside UT’s bathroom stalls? Really? Granted, legislation is only one way in which SG works for students on campus, and the organization’s many lobbying efforts

Illustration by Albert Lee / Daily Texan Staff

outside the agency may be as important — if not more so — than the pieces of legislation they endorse. In 1969, for example, SG literally stood up against the Board of Regents to spare hundred-year-old trees from being cut down to make room for an expanded stadium. In 2006, it began work on creating the Student Activity Center, where it now holds

its weekly meetings. Just last spring, it organized a march to the Texas Capitol to lobby legislators for increased funding to the University. Obviously, SG can use its position as the “official voice of students” to tackle difficult issues and come out on top. And yes, UT is better than one-ply toilet paper. But isn’t it also better than bullshit causes?

COLUMN

TAKE YOUR SHOT

A reply to dean on Shared Services

Firing Line: Keep FAC open 24 hours

By Lucy Griswold

Daily Texan Columnist @GriswoldLucy

Despite the despairing cries of professors and students of the movement to corporatize institutions of higher learning, there is no debate that the business-ification of the ivory tower has proved incredibly, undeniably useful to students: They can now fill out student loan applications without assistance, have perfected the art of shading in bubbles on test forms and made the period freshman year during which they consider majoring in philosophy considerably shorter. At our own University, the latest iteration of corporatization is Shared Services, a cost-saving plan to centralize certain administrative functions that other participating universities have hailed as an opportunity to listen to even more hold-music while waiting to contact IT. The latest to argue in favor of the plan is McCombs School of Business Dean Thomas Gilligan, who did so in an Op-Ed piece published in this newspaper Thursday. Some were flabbergasted that a business dean would advocate in favor of changes that replicate business practices, while others were simply surprised to see that a Sooner alumnus could write a coherent article. Most would agree, however, that Gilligan is out-of-touch with the technical turn the conversation has taken, offering up simple platitudes despite the fact that both sides are now using mathematics to support their respective arguments. As someone who appreciates Gilligan’s time in the Reagan administration, however, I feel that it is my duty to explain some of Gilligan’s points, some of which may have been misinterpreted by those opposed to Shared Services. Gilligan has been criticized for asserting that a Shared Services system would “[increase] opportunities for administrative staff.” Opponents were curious how the plan, set to eliminate 500 positions and likely result in a more demanding workload for the staff who remain, would live up to this claim. They can stop wondering: the “administrative staff ” Gilligan was referring to were not those facing attrition and relocation, but the set of managerial and executive administrators that the new Shared Services center will inevitably necessitate. This supervisory staff will gain the opportunity to lead a team of subordinates and pad their

resumes for future, more lucrative positions in the private sector. As for those who lose their positions, they will get the opportunity to enter the job market and receive a free, real-world lesson in supply and demand. His hotly contested claim that Shared Services would result in “improvements in quality standards” also came under attack. Opponents of the plan pointed to testimonials from other universities, in which affected faculty and staff reported an increase in waiting periods for service and complicating a functional system. Again, critics are misinterpreting Gilligan’s words. Gilligan wrote that there would be improvements in service quality standards. Administrators love standards: writing them, talking about them, encouraging others to adopt them. All of this takes lots of work for executive-level administrators who have to spend precious time locating best practices, copypasting those practices and going to lush conferences to discuss those practices. Finally, many may have taken issue with Gilligan’s insistence that “Shared Services was not and is not an Accenture initiative.” Critics were surprised not only that Gilligan could effectively differentiate between the past and present tense, but that he would breeze over what opponents view as a close relationship, marked by cronyism and a lack of transparency. Sure, Accenture executive Stephen Rohleder wrote an Op-Ed in the Austin American-Statesman recommending the program for the University before it even began, was proposed by a strategic planning committee led by Rohleder and incubated in a steering committee stacked with individuals with close ties to Accenture, but it is not an Accenture initiative. Dissenters will continue to argue that Gilligan, the second highest-paid administrator at UT, is supporting this plan because of the money he stands to make, in the form of donations to the business school and future lucrative deanships at colleges in need of a prudent leader. However, Gilligan isn’t stupid. If he wanted to work in the public sector and be rich, he would have been a football coach. That Gilligan is so insistent on cutting administrative services in these “difficult” times and hasn’t considered taking a pay cut from his $541,500 salary isn’t hypocrisy; it’s capitalism in higher education. Opponents of Shared Services, please, put your protest signs down and go work your second part-time jobs. Shared Services is the future. Griswold is a government senior from Indianapolis.

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

The Firing Line is a column first started in the Texan in 1909 in which readers share their opinions “concerning any matter of general interest they choose.” Just like in 1909, the Texan “will never express its approval or disapproval of opinions given under the [Firing Line] header.” In other words, take your shot. Submissions can be sent to editor@dailytexanonline.com. Seven years ago I dropped out of the University of Texas. In the interim, I started a small mobile food business in Fayetteville, Ark., attended classes at the University of Arkansas, and lived in Cairo. I was readmitted for this spring semester and am back on campus ready to finish the degree I started so many years ago. Unfortunately, there have been a number of changes since I left that make me question the level of commitment this institution has to its stakeholders, the students. In my previous tenure, the Flawn Academic Center was known as the Undergraduate Library, or the UGL. The UGL had a lobby area, open 24 hours a day, that was furnished with tables, desks and comfortable chairs. The massive room which now has a fireplace, IT desk and student computers closed at midnight was partitioned from the lobby by a set of glass doors. Some of my fondest memories of are of the times I stayed up all night studying in the lobby of the UGL, frantically typing papers, reading or cramming for tests. Students would come in and out throughout the night, small study groups would form then dissolve, and students fueled by coffee, Red Bull, and cigarettes could be seen scattered throughout the lobby working on coursework every hour of the night. In the morning, the sun would rise, and campus would slowly come to life. The place was magical and filled me with a sense of awe — it felt like the beating heart of this great university and provided round the clock academic services to the

Toward the end of my previous tenure here, about half a dozen students staged a ‘sit in’ where the fireplace is now. They demanded that the entire ground floor, in addition to the lobby area, remain open all through the night.

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to editor@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

thousands of minds wandering campus. Sadly, as I write this in the lobby of the FAC, half an hour from now, at midnight, I will be evicted from this building I once knew as the UGL. The Flawn Academic Center’s doors will lock, the students will disperse, and this once 24-hour heart of campus will sit empty and idle. What has happened to this institution? Why does the University no longer provide its students with a 24-hour building for academic services and access to computers? Tuition has increased by thousands of dollars since I was last here, yet our student services have declined. If the University can pay its football coach over $5 million a year, surely we can afford security, staff and whatever else it takes to keep the Flawn Academic Center open 24 hours. I have attended, and know of, quite a few other institutions that provide their students with a 24-hour academic building, complete with fireplaces, computers and comfortable chairs, for the occasional nap. I suspect that the middle-aged men and women who run our University find themselves asleep in bed by 10 p.m. most nights and have long ago forgotten what it’s like to have the energy and urgency to pull repeated all-nighters and, therefore, don’t see the value in providing students with an on-campus building in which to study from midnight to 6 a.m. Toward the end of my previous tenure here, about half a dozen students staged a “sit in” where the fireplace is now. They demanded that the entire ground floor, in addition to the lobby area, remain open all through the night. They were arrested — I saw them being dragged away in handcuffs by campus police. However, about a week after that student action the entire ground floor opened 24 hours. Those students understood the power of peaceful protest — were willing to be arrested and shamed the University into meeting their demands. What happened after that? That generation cycled through, as students do, and the administrative regime closed it all down again. Has our student population become unaware and apathetic? How long have the students gone without a 24-hour academic services building? Where are our student leaders, and why has Student Government failed to champion this cause? We deserve better than this, especially from an institution with an endowment worth billions. They say, “What starts here changes the world.” I guess just not between midnight and 6 a.m. —Alexander Dickey, Government senior.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@TexanEditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


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6 L&A

6

STEFAN SCRAFIELD, SPORTS EDITOR / @texansports Wednesday, February 19, 2014

BASEBALL | TEXAS 10, TEXAS A&M-CORPUS CHRISTI 0

Horns’ home opener a perfect 10 By Matt Warden

SIDELINE NBA HEAT

@TheMattWarden5

Despite an early lack of control on the mound, Texas went on to control every moment of its 11th straight home opening victory. The Longhorns (3-2) blanked Texas A&M Corpus Christi (2-3) 10-0 Tuesday night behind sophomore infielder C.J. Hinojosa’s threeRBI performance. Texas recorded 11 hits to the Islanders’ seven, while capitalizing on its opponent’s four errors. The game was a showcase of young pitching for the Longhorns, as freshman pitchers Blake Goins, Josh Sawyer and Jon Malmin combined for six-and-athird innings pitched, surrendering only six total hits and striking out five. Goins threw 2.1 scoreless innings in his collegiate debut, while Sawyer had a team-high four strikeouts. Although the Islanders failed to capitalize on many opportunities, leaving 10 runners on base in the game, Texas head coach Augie Garrido was troubled with the lack of stability by his pitching unit that yielded four walks and two wild pitches. Texas got the scoring started with an RBI single by

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Shelby Tauber / Daily Texan Staff

Freshman pitcher Jon Malmin delivers a pitch against Texas A&M-Corpus Christi. The Longhorns won the game 10-0. Malmin threw 1.1 innings of scoreless relief in Texas’ home-opener, helping Texas move to 3-2 on the season.

Hinojosa that scored senior outfielder Mark Payton after his triple gave the Longhorns their first hit. The Longhorns recorded two more runs in the third after a dropped fly ball by the shortstop, giving them a 3-0 lead. The Longhorns erupted in

the fifth inning to add five more runs to their lead. Hinojosa picked up his second RBI on a double while Texas scored two more runs on another error by the Islanders’ shortstop. A&M Corpus Christi’s only threat to Texas came in

MEN’S BASKETBALL | IOWA STATE 85, TEXAS 76

By Jeremy Thomas @jeremyobthomas

Texas blown away by Cyclones After two impressive wins against conference opponents, Texas fell victim to the strength of the Big 12 on Tuesday night. At the Hilton Coliseum in Ames, Iowa, No. 19 Texas (20-6, 9-4 Big 12) had trouble pulling past No. 17 Iowa State (20-5, 8-5 Big 12), falling to the Cyclones 85-76. Texas failed to control the Big 12’s leading scorer, Melvin Ejim, who coming into Tuesday’s contest averaged 18.9 points per game. Ejim tallied 25 points and eight rebounds, leading Iowa State

his five at-bats to help carry the Longhorn offense. Texas has scored 21 runs in its last three games, giving the offense much needed momentum as it carries a three-game win streak into next weekend’s series with Stanford.

Injury-riddled career could not stop Jeffcoat

Justin Hayworth Associated Press

@CallahanGarrett

the top of the sixth when it loaded the bases following a wild pitch and an error. After being named Big 12 Player of the Week, Payton continued his fast pace, going 2-for-4 with a triple and a single and two runs scored. Hinojosa added two hits in

to a split in the season series with Texas. But Ejim wasn’t the only player who gave the Longhorns trouble; a total of three Cyclones passed the 20-point mark on the night. Iowa State controlled the first frame of the top-25 matchup as Texas shot just 27 percent from the floor in the first 20 minutes. Down by nine to start the second half, the Longhorns traded baskets with the Cyclones to remain close for the rest of the game, but could never pull past Iowa State, despite tieing the game with 14 minutes left. The last 10 minutes created the large final-score gap for

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Iowa State forward Dustin Hogue and guard DeAndre Kane celebrate a blocked Texas shot by Hogue. Iowa State won 85-76.

By Garrett Callahan

GA TECH

the Cyclones. Iowa State went on a 12-4 run in that span of the game to secure their 20th win of the season. Freshman guard Isaiah Taylor led Texas with a game-high 26 points and seven rebounds. Sophomore Cameron Ridley, who averaged 14.5 points per game in the last two contests, recorded just four points and five rebounds against Iowa State as Texas shot a mere 32.9 percent from the floor. The Longhorns now face losing two straight games for the first time since the start of Big 12 play as they travel to Lawrence, Kan., to face the Jayhawks on Saturday.

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Jackson Jeffcoat ended his career on top, despite much adversity throughout his four years in Austin. Jeffcoat is one of just five consensus All-American defensive ends in school history. He served as a captain in 2013 and was a semifinalist for the Chuck Bednarik Award given to the nation’s top defensive player each year. He also earned the 2013 Big 12 Conference Defensive Player of the Year award and was a first-team All-Big 12 choice. Jeffcoat’s stature at 6 feet 5 inches and 250 pounds makes him appealing to NFL scouts as he attempts to follow his father’s NFL footsteps — he is projected as second-day draft pick. Teams will examine his injury history closely in the evaluation process, but Jeffcoat is accustomed to overcoming adversity. In 33 of his last 36 games, Jeffcoat had at least one tackle for a loss, and he had 12 sacks over his last 19 games. He was also the only FBS lineman in the 2013 season who led his team in tackles. Those accolades create a great resume, but they did not come easy. Jeffcoat appeared in eight games as a true freshman

and was forced to sit out four of the team’s contests due to a nagging ankle injury. Despite the ankle issues, he posted 15 tackles, 2.5 sacks and six tackles for a loss. His sophomore year was much more typical for the former top-overall national recruit. He collected 71 tackles, 21 for a loss. His eight sacks ranked him fifth in the Big 12, and he tied for third in the conference in tackles for loss. In the final game of the Lone Star Showdown, Jackson picked up five tackles, one tackle for a loss and ruptured his left pectoral muscle in a dramatic 27-25 victory over Texas A&M. After the Longhorn season concluded, Jeffcoat underwent surgery to correct the issue. Health would still prove fleeting for Jeffcoat as he entered his junior season. Jeffcoat started the first six games of the year, amassing four sacks and 11 tackles for loss. His early season success ended at the Red River Rivalry when Jeffcoat suffered a season-ending right pectoral injury. Before the injury, draft experts predicted him as a first or second round draft pick. Despite the end to his junior campaign, he still finished the season as second on the team in tackles for loss and sacks. Despite numerous injuries to other teammates, Jeffcoat managed to remain healthy his senior season and started all 13 games. He ended the year with 86 tackles, 22 of which were for loss and 13 sacks.

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Charlie Pearce / Daily Texan file photo

Texas senior DE Jackson Jeffcoat was a consensus All-American in 2013. He is projected as a second-day draft pick.

SPORTS BRIEFLY Longhorns to face OU, ready for blood

It never feels great, but sometimes a team needs a taste of blood to find motivation. “They just came out hungrier,” junior forward Nneka Enemkpali said after Sunday’s 72-56 loss to Baylor. “Coach ended up calling a timeout and told us that they taste blood and are going for it.” Although Texas (178, 8-5 Big 12) allowed Baylor’s frantic offense to scatter its discipline Sunday, the team hasn’t shown such complacency throughout conference play. Texas boasts five wins in its last seven games, only dropping two games to No. 7 Baylor (21-3, 11-1 Big 12). The matchups against Baylor were far from close, but Texas has shown promise with wins against Iowa State and West Virginia. The Longhorns showed the same dedication and drive against Oklahoma (15-11, 6-7 Big 12) in a Jan. 8 79-74 overtime win. Senior forward Gigi Mazionyte hit a 3-pointer to send the Red River rivals into overtime. “It was a matter of will and our team digging deep, believing in each other and making plays down the stretch,” head coach Karen Aston said. “It was a team win, no question about it. And I want it to be a building block for us.” The Longhorns used their crimson and cream building block to secure six wins after the Oklahoma matchup. Statistically, Texas holds the advantage Wednesday. Oklahoma is on a two-game losing streak and is two games behind Texas in the Big 12 after falling to Oklahoma State by double digits. But Texas has also let blocks crumble its road game. The road has been tough for Texas this season with five away-game losses but, if Texas gets hungry and tastes the blood it didn’t get on Sunday, the Sooners will have a difficult matchup. —Jori Epstein


COMICS 7

COMICS

7

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Edited by Will Shortz

Crossword ACROSS 1 Furrier John ___ Astor 6 Musical closing 10 Rum-soaked cake 14 Bouquet 15 Request under deadline 16 Not many 17 It’s all about location, location, location 19 Kansas City daily 20 Sustenance for aphids 21 Farm cry 22 Reverent quality 23 Narrow wood strip 24 Willow tree 26 Glowing coal 29 Admit 31 White House advisory grp.

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ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

Today’s solution will appear here next issue

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64 Hwy. safety org. 65 “Come ___!” 66 Have because of 67 Home of the Brenner Pass 68 Kind of party 69 Arc lamp gas DOWN 1 Sprees 2 Vicinity 3 Chicken’s place 4 “Horrors!,” in texts 5 Newswoman Walters 6 Southern tip of South America 7 Factoryinspecting org. 8 City near Wright-Patterson Air Force Base 9 Manhunt letters 10 Count of music 11 Occasion for sandwiches and scones 12 Shellac 13 Off-balance 18 Cover girl Carol 22 Hookah, e.g. 23 “Step aside, I can handle this” 25 Recap 26 Circumvent 27 Poser 28 Soul food ingredient 30 “Hmm, imagine that!” 32 Inasmuch as 33 Salad green 35 Bits

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PUZZLE BY BERNICE GORDON

37 Like some ancient pyramids 40 Soft to the touch 43 Building unit with flanges 45 Line of greeting cards billed as “a tiny little division of Hallmark”

48 Pour, as wine 51 Rips apart 53 Sphere 54 Org. that prepares flood maps 55 Elliptical 57 Andrea Bocelli offering

58 Battle of Normandy locale 59 Golden rule preposition 60 One of the social sciences, for short 62 N.Y.S.E. listings 63 21-Across crier

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

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7

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In Person

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8 SPTS

HANNAH SMOTHERS, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR / @DailyTexanArts Wednesday, February 19, 2014

8

THEATER

Local director debuts play series By Kritika Kulshrestha @kritika88

Michael Floyd believes the true reward of his work is getting to listen to the audience and not the critics. He wants people to feel something after a performance. An Austin-based actor, director and writer, Floyd directs three of the 10 short plays in Austin-based Oh Dragon Theatre Company’s upcoming production of “Didn’t See That Coming” this Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Floyd’s three pieces are “LA 8 AM,” “A Little Fresh Air” and “Up on the Roof.” “Every play is interesting,” Floyd said. “Some of them are extremely funny, and some of them are melancholic. Even some of the most outlandish scenarios in the play have some real-life emotions — things that real people think about or feel.” An Austin resident since late 2008, Floyd initially moved here to mend a troubled relationship. After witnessing Austin’s arts and theater community, he decided to stay and make the switch to directing. “As an actor, I was a puppet on stage,” Floyd said. “I

wanted control. Directing started with ego, but, after that, it was about wanting to entertain people and to make people think and touch their hearts and minds with great work.” Floyd prefers directing for stage rather than directing films. While he hopes to make more films in the future, directing plays remains his focus for now. “There’s an audience out there, and they’re watching you,” Floyd said. “You can actually feel them connecting with you and that connection between the audience and the performer, that is inspiring to me, and that is what makes me want to do more and more theater.” In late 2012, Floyd and a friend formed a theater company, Untitled Theatre Works. The company was created to help new artists, directors, technicians and people with little or no experience in theater learn the ins and outs of the industry. Kris Dillon, company member at the theater company, met Floyd when she interviewed with him in 2010. “He really has a clear vision of how he wants to stage the production before going into rehearsals,” Dillon said.

Shelby Tauber / Daily Texan Staff

Michael Floyd, an Austin-based actor, director and writer, directs three short plays in Oh Dragon Theatre Company’s upcoming production of “Didn’t See That Coming.” The ten short plays will be performed this Thursday, Friday, and Saturday.

“You can tell that [Floyd] has a solid education, as well as experience behind him.” During the making of the company’s production “Dahlia” in 2012, Floyd met Jordan Plessala, an actor who

CAMPUS

‘Wicked’ recasts spell on Bass hall By Eleanor Dearman @ellydearman

A day before “Wicked”’s return to Bass Concert Hall, 13 semi trucks drove up to the theater. In the trucks were all the contents necessary to bring the show to cities nationwide: 10 tons of equipment, several hundred lights and one truck dedicated solely to transporting costumes. The plot of “Wicked” acts as a prequel to the classic story “The Wizard of Oz.” It follows the Wicked Witch of the West, Elphaba, and the Good Witch of the North, Glinda, as they go to school and learn to be friends despite their differences. Kathy Fitzgerald, who plays Madame Morrible, said UT students should see the show because it’s something everyone can connect to. “The girls are exactly college-aged,” Fitzgerald said. “It’s a gorgeous story about college-aged friendships.” At each new location, the cast is allowed about an hour to run through important elements of the show. These rehearsals tend to focus mainly on sound since the acoustics of each theater vary. “They’ll walk the stage while doing it and mark the

Photo courtesy of Bass Concert Hall

“Wicked” returns to Bass Concert Hall on Wednesday.

choreography to get familiar with the space and the sound,” production stage manager Ryan Lympus said. The musical travels with 70 crew members and pulls 100 additional crew members from Austin residents who work in the field. “At every city, you have a whole crew of locals who — maybe some of them have done the show when it was here in the past — but maybe they’ve never seen it before or they’ve never done it,” assistant stage manager Colleen Danaher said. Some students even have the opportunity to work behind the scenes on “Wicked.” Lympus and other members of the crew will have UT

students shadowing them during the musical’s three-week run at Bass Concert Hall. “If students took the time to reach out to us through the right contacts, we’re happy to help,” Lympus said. The students who work with “Wicked” could end up in professional Broadway tours, similar to Danaher, who graduated from UT in 2002 with a Bachelor of Arts in theatre and dance. “I graduated from the theater department, and I stage-managed in our building, and I stage-manager an opera in our smaller theater, the McCullough,” Danaher said. “And so to come back and be a stage-manager here is crazy.”

was auditioning for the role of the main character’s wife. “[Floyd] is an actor’s director,” Plessala said. “He makes an excellent director, but a poor friend because he’s horrible for your ego. [Floyd]

has made me feel like a superhero or like someone who could win an Oscar.” Floyd is currently working to develop his directorial skills. “What has been more

challenging to me has been directing,” Floyd said. “Directing doesn’t come naturally to me, but you can always learn more and you can always become better at whatever you choose to do.”

RAP continues from page 1 unofficial South By Southwest showcase opening slot for a flat $1,500 rate. In other pay-to-play scenarios, an artist is responsible for selling a certain amount of tickets for the show or reimbursing the promoters from their own pockets. Members of Austin’s music community have been fighting back against this practice, which they view as exploitative. Leading the group is Jennifer Houlihan, executive director of Austin Music People, an advocacy organization that supports local musicians and other members of the local music scene. In early February, Houlihan and other supporters went to city hall to discuss the issue with the Austin Music Commission, a group of industry professionals who advise city council on music development issues. Their goal was to get the commission to issue a public statement that the practice was not endorsed or encouraged by the Austin music community. “We never went in planning to ask for an ordinance or regulation changes,” Houlihan said. Houlihan has been confronting this issue for about a year now but admitted that it was difficult at first

due to the lack of artists involved who were willing to speak out against it. “Nobody wanted to blow the whistle,” Houlihan said. “People were saying ‘I don’t want to be blacklisted. I don’t want to be seen as a troublemaker, or I don’t want to bite the hand that feeds.’” The reason Houlihan believes that hip-hop artists are involved in pay-to-play shows is because rock bands often require training to learn an instrument. “A lot of these kids taking advantage of pay-toplay are coming straight from their bedroom,” Houlihan said. “All you need is your voice and your mind, so, if hip-hop is calling you, it’s easier to start doing that.” Houlihan said there are about four venues that come up often in stories regarding pay-to-play, including Red-Eyed Fly & Infest, the latter of which shut down at the end of January. At times, venues may not even know whether a show is pay-to-play. Austin rapper Adam Protextor, who goes by the stage name of P-tek, opposes payto-play because he said the artists don’t gain anything from participating in it. “The only person who

benefits is the promoter, who pockets the money,” Protextor said. “It all boils down to money.” Artists who have participated in pay-to-play shows in the past are speaking out. Donovan Keith, a member of Austin funk band Soul Track Mind, explained that his band booked a pay-to-play show early in its career in order to get an opportunity to play an unnamed “big venue” in town. Keith said the practice can actually harm a band’s career. “Someone in the crowd might be a huge local music promoter, and, if he sees you associated with this, or if you play a 15-minute set of garbage, that impression will stick with them for a long time and prevent you from getting future work,” Keith said. Because there can be no legal or regulatory ramifications taken against this practice, most bands involved agree that the best way to combat pay-to-play is education. “We just want to make sure that people are informed and make good choices,” Houlihan said. “We can’t get rid of it completely in Austin, but we can work to keep it to a dull roar.”

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