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Tuesday, February 18, 2014*

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UNIVERSITY

Faculty discusses museum funding By Julia Brouillette @juliakbrou

Faculty Council unanimously passed a resolution requesting the Texas Memorial Museum’s community outreach activities be financed independently from the University at its meeting Monday. The museum, which is

set to lose approximately $600,000 in funding this September, currently subsists on a mixture of state and University funding, as well as giftshop sales and donations. “The museum does provide an education resource for a number of UT classes, including signature classes,” said William Beckner,

mathematics professor and chair-elect of Faculty Council. “Over a thousand UT students benefit from this.” Such financial independence would allow the museum to continue its educational role within UT and the region, according to Beckner. “Our first priority should be the education of

students,” Beckner said. Faculty Council also discussed the response from vice president and chief financial officer Kevin Hegarty to a resolution passed at its last meeting that requested more information about the Shared Services plan. The Shared Services Plan calls for the centralization of

University human resources, finance, procurement and information technology services. According to UT officials, the plan also calls for the elimination of 500 jobs, which will take place primarily through natural attrition and retirement.

BUDGET page 2

CAMPUS

Peta2 sets up tents for animal rights By Adam Hamze @adamhamz

On Monday, peta2, the youth division of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, set up a tent in Gregory Plaza that exhibits the treatment of animals in factory farms in an attempt to persuade students to take action against animal cruelty. The tent, which is open from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday through Wednesday, contains graphic pictures and descriptions of the ways animals are treated, leading up to their slaughter. The tent was organized by peta2 but was partly staffed by members of Students Against Cruelty to Animals, a UT student organization. Volunteers outside the booth asked students walking by to view the exhibit, offering free food and merchandise to those who entered.

PETA page 2

Michelle Toussaint / Daily Texan Staff

PETA’s youth division demonstrates to students how animals are kept in factory farms by displaying graphic pictures and descriptions outside of Gregory Gym on Monday afternoon.

bit.ly/dtvid

POLICE

Thieves nab MacBooks, loss valued at $54,947 By Jordan Rudner @jrud

More than $50,000 worth of new Apple MacBooks were stolen from a secured storage area in the Main Building at some point between Thursday and Friday morning, according to campus police records. UTPD spokeswoman Cindy Posey said she could not elaborate on how many computers were stolen or on the availability of surveillance footage in the Main Building because a police investigation is currently under way. According to a UTPD Campus Watch alert, the $54,947 worth of technology was removed from a storage area on the first floor of the Main Building. Police crime logs record that the burglary happened at some point between 5 a.m. Thursday and 1:10 p.m. Friday, when the theft was reported. A campus watch alert issued Monday by UTPD narrowed the possible time of burglary and said it did not occur later than 7 a.m. Friday. Posey and University spokesman Gary Susswein declined to provide any additional details about the event. Student workers in the Office of the Registrar and the Office of Admissions, which are both located on the ground floor of the Main Building, said they had not heard about the theft.

UNIVERSITY

CAMPUS

Eighth MOOC opens despite low retention

Graduate student leads deaf research

By Madlin Mekelburg @madlinbmek

On Tuesday, the University launched its eighth massive open online course — better known as MOOC — “Effective Thinking Through Mathematics,” which will be taught by mathematics professor Michael Starbird, “The real goal of education is to get people to be better thinkers, so that’s the goal of the course,” Starbird said. “I think one of the most important things a person can learn is how to think deeply over a longer, extended period of time, when you don’t have a bunch of things coming in.” According to Starbird, his MOOC has been in development for a year, and he has filmed more than 50 hours of content for the course. Starbird said one of his biggest challenges was finding an engaging way to present the material. “It’s not exactly thrilling movie productions,” Starbird said. “We were joking about inserting a car chase to keep

Michael Starbird

Mathematics professor

people’s attention.” Starbird said he approached his MOOC as an experiment, focusing on the interactions between himself and his students. “I sat there with [two or three] students on either side of me and I would pose a question — either a mathematical puzzle, problem or concept — and have them work on that mathematical issue, and I would comment as they were working about strategies of thinking,” Starbird said. “I don’t know the extent of which

MOOC page 3

By Nicole Cobler @nicolecobler

Winning Miss Deaf America in 2010 didn’t just mean a new title for graduate student Rachel Mazique — instead, the victory set her onto an entirely new career path. Mazique’s involvement in the deaf community put her on the path to teaching an undergraduate English course in sign language and dedicating her research to the culture of the deaf community. Mazique, who grew up in a mixed deaf and hearing family in Arlington Heights, Ill., said she first came to the University as a student because of its resources, which eventually led her to focus on deaf literature as another form of ethnic literature. “I have a transatlantic focus, as I’m working with both British and American deaf literature, and examining the literature in relation to American [and] British internal law, social justice and bioethics,” Mazique said in an email.

Jarrid Denman / Daily Texan Staff

Deaf instructor and UT doctoral student Rachel Manzique teaches deaf literature at the University. Manzique plans to become an English professor.

Mazique said her interest in pageants began in 2006 when the Illinois Deaf Latino Association asked her to be in its inaugural pageant, which she won. In 2009, she competed to become the Miss Deaf Illinois Ambassador, and was sponsored to the National Association

of the Deaf Conference in 2010. “I was so happy to achieve this goal, so deciding to participate, not ‘just for fun,’ but to serve my community, worked best for me,” Mazique said. Mazique became a graduate student at UT with the

intent to research Chicano literature, but was eventually drawn to her current focus in deaf literature after taking courses in the English and communications department. After she graduates from

DEAF page 3

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014

NEWS

FRAMES featured photo Volume 114, Issue 106

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor Laura Wright (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Shabab Siddiqui (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Retail Advertising (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising (512) 471-5244 classifieds@ dailytexanonline.com

CORRECTION Because of a reporting error, a story and photo in the Feb. 14 issue of The Daily Texan about Black Empowerment Week misspelled the name of UT’s first African-American student. It is spelled Heman Sweatt. The story also incorrectly identified the year Sweatt enrolled at UT Law School. Sweatt enrolled in 1950.

Shelby Tauber / Daily Texan Staff

Taive Brown, a University Towers senior maintenance technician, repaints the “no parking” zones outside of University Towers on Monday afternoon.

PETA

continues from page 1 The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2013 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

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A pita stunt?!

The walkthrough ends with a video called “Glass Walls” — narrated by Sir Paul McCartney — which highlights the type of violence that is inflicted in the farms. In the video, McCartney said, “If slaughterhouses had glass walls, then everyone would be a vegetarian.” Psychology freshman Autumn Rodriguez said she felt pressured by those running the exhibit to change her diet but couldn’t see herself becoming a vegetarian. “I think they obviously are trying to push us to be vegetarian or vegan, but not everyone wants to do that,” Rodriguez said. “They are very passionate.” According to PETA’s website, the organization has 3 million members and supporters worldwide. It focuses on factory farms, the clothing trade, animal testing laboratories and the entertainment industry.

Retail merchandising sophomore Denise Chavez said she has attempted to stop eating factory-farmed foods, but finds it challenging as a college student who requires cheaper options. “I knew it was going to be about animal cruelty,” Chavez said. “It’s really sad, and I kind of wanted to leave immediately. It was hard to see.” Kenneth Montville, the college campaign coordinator for peta2, said the purpose of the exhibit is to pull back the curtain on the way factory farming treats animals. Montville claimed

students are usually horrified by what they see. “It’s that kind of cruelty that students don’t want to support, and, with all the vegan options popping up on college campuses all around the country, they usually don’t have to.” Montville said. According to a report released by the United Nations Environment Programme, food demand will outgrow sustainable production by 2050. Montville said he believes factory farming is a top contributor to environmental degradation, and, consequently,

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Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Wright Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala, Riley Brands, Amil Malik, Eric Nikolaides Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shabab Siddiqui Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan Rudner Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Antonia Gales, Anthony Green, Jacob Kerr, Pete Stroud, Amanda Voeller Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Julia Brouillette, Nicole Cobler, Alyssa Mahoney, Madlin Mekelburg Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Reinsch Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brett Donohoe, Reeana Keenen, Kevin Sharifi Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Mitts Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hirrah Barlas, Bria Benjamin, Alex Dolan, Omar Longoria Multimedia Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charlie Pearce, Alec Wyman Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sam Ortega Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jonathan Garza, Shweta Gulati, Pu Ying Huang, Shelby Tauber, Lauren Ussery Senior Videographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor Barron, Jackie Kuenstler, Dan Resler, Bryce Seifert Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Smothers Associate Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren L’Amie Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Eleanor Dearman, Kritika Kulshrestha, David Sackllah, Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stefan Scrafield Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Hummer Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Evan Berkowitz, Garrett Callahan, Jori Epstein, Matt Warden Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Hadidi Senior Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cody Bubenik, Ploy Buraparate, Connor Murphy, Aaron Rodriguez, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephanie Vanicek Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeremy Hintz Associate Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarah Stancik Senior Technical Staff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Shen, Roy Varney Special Ventures Co-editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard, Chris Hummer Online Outreach Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fred Tally-Foos Journalism Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Michael Brick

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The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 4711865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

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2/18/14

Monday .............Wednesday, 12 p.m. Thursday.................Monday, 12 p.m. Tuesday.................Thursday, 12 p.m. Friday......................Tuesday, 12 p.m. Word Ads 11 a.m. Wednesday................Friday, 12 p.m. Classified (Last Business Day Prior to Publication)

animal rights and human rights are closely linked. Alex Bean, a member of Students Against Cruelty to Animals and a cell and molecular biology graduate student, said he has been a vegan for years. Bean said he does not believe humans need to eat meat, regardless of how well the animals are treated. “Ethically, I can’t support breeding [and] then killing these animals when we have so many amazing alternatives. We just don’t need to,” Bean said. “[Better treatment] is good, but that should just be a step toward not needing them.”

Men and Surgically Sterile Women 18 to 45

Age Men and Postmenopausal or Surgically Sterile Women 18 to 50 Men and Postmenopausal or Surgically Sterile Women 18 to 50

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Timeline Timeline

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Healthy & Non-Smoking BMI between 18 and 33

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Thu. 27 Feb. through Mon. 3 Mar. Outpatient Visit: 7 Mar.

Timeline Thu. 27 Feb. through Mon. 3 Mar. Outpatient Visit: 6 Mar.

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In January, Hegarty responded to the resolution with a variety of information, including a list of schools that have volunteered to participate in a pilot program. According to Hegarty, both the McCombs School of Business and the College of Liberal Arts have implemented centralized services to some degree. “Shared Services for certain activities does have the potential to save more money if we aggregate that to more particular spots,” Hegarty said at the meeting. Faculty Council chairwoman Hillary Hart discussed Hegarty’s response and said there are 11 departments that are either currently involved in some form of Shared Services or want to participate as volunteers, but none have been selected for the pilot program. Also at the meeting, President William Powers Jr. addressed the recent weather closures, specifically the series of decisions the University made before closing campus Jan. 28. University officials sent three notifications between 4:55 a.m. and 11:26 a.m. that day, first announcing normal operating hours and then later closing the campus for the day. “We get it that it turned out terribly,” Powers said. “It was a very unusual weather phenomenon. We obviously get the point that changing at eight in the morning is not the ideal.” Pat Clubb, vice president of University Operations, said emergency preparedness officials would now make follow-up calls throughout the morning after they make any decision about closing campus.

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Friday, February 21, 2014

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

NASA gives chance to propose mission By Jeremy Thomas @JeremyOBThomas

Starting this year, NASA will give University students and faculty the opportunity to propose a mission concept that the space administration may actually use. The Space Mission Design Challenge, presented by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, known as JPL, allows students and faculty to propose space mission concepts for review by a special committee of JPL engineers. The program has been previously offered to Stanford University and the University of Michigan. One of the committee members, UT alumnus and JPL engineer Payam Banazadeh, said the challenge enhances teamwork between different departments at the University. “I think the main benefit here is to connect the science students and science department to the engineering department,” Banazadeh said. “We want to show that, to be able to achieve any scientific goal, [there] is collaboration between the two different disciplines.” According to the challenge’s rules, the concept must either be sciencedriven or have a technology demonstration objective. Banazadeh said, depending on the capability of the retion ion, that tici-continues from page 1 Acthe University, Mazique the said she plans to teach litness erature and writing courses Arts as an English professor and zed continue writing about deaf literature. cer“I would love to teach ave deaf and hard-of-hearing more students on the collegiate that level, so I definitely have ots,” my dream job locations at ng. universities with large pophairulations of such students,” ssed Mazique said. “But I’m open said to teaching anywhere the job that takes me.” ved Lauren Kinast, associSerate director for Services e as for Students with Disabilieen ties, said Mazique’s ability m. to raise the profile of deaf resicommunity members on adcampus has been important cloto the University. Mazique s of said that, in the four years ade she has been teaching, she 28. has worked with roughly sent 300 students, only two of een whom were fluent in Amerthat ican Sign Language. mal “She is a role model to ater our future instructors who day. are deaf and hoping to be out given an opportunity to as a teach at the University,” omKinast said. “I hope to see the more and more deaf int in structors join UT’s pool of .” faculty members in varident ous academic fields.” said Kinast said there are two ofdeaf student organizations foloffered for the 53 deaf stuthe dents registered through any Services for Students with pus. Disabilities: SignHorns and the Deaf/HH Longhorn College Bowl team. Mazique assists Kinast in coaching the University’s College Bowl team, which will go to the National

Jarrid Denman / Daily Texan Staff

UT alumnus Payam Banazadeh spoke to students in STEM-related programs about an opportunity to work with NASA on Monday evening.

designs, the committee will select four to five ideas from students and faculty. In the fall, those selected will have the opportunity to work with aerospace engineering students at the University to develop the concept. The top two teams will travel to Pasadena, Calif., for a two-day design session with JPL engineers and scientists. Aerospace engineering senior Tyler Bollman said he thinks the program will help students prepare for the industry. “I think it’s a great way to get into the business,

DEAF

definitely from a student’s perspective, to straight into learning how the business is handled in a mission scenario,” Bollman said. Aerospace engineering professor Wallace Fowler, who teaches Spacecraft Mission Design with engineers from the JPL providing input on the students’ final projects, said the Space Mission Design Challenge presents a fantastic opportunity for students to excel. “We haven’t done anything like this at UT, ever,” Fowler said. “I told students in the class, ‘If you want to work

for JPL, this is not just an assigned presentation. This is an audition.’” With the challenge open to all UT students, Banazadeh said he believes sometimes the best ideas come from students outside traditional aerospace engineering circles. “If you come from the other end of the spectrum, you don’t think about feasibility,” Banazadeh said. “You come up with a crazy idea and then give the engineers the problem and say, ‘Hey, solve this.’ I think that’s a better way to approaching these innovative-type missions.”

MOOC

continues from page 1 people who are just watching this will actively engage in that same way — which was my hope — or not. That part of the experiment is not known yet.” The University launched four MOOC courses in the fall that had completion rates ranging from 1 to 13 percent. In 2012, the UT System invested $5 million in edX, an online education provider, in order to bring MOOCs to UT. Last semester, UTAustinX, UT’s MOOC program, offered four classes. The courses are open to anyone in the world, and, although UT will not offer any credit for completed courses, students who pass can obtain certificates of mastery. Engineering professor Michael Webber’s MOOC, “Energy 101,” had the highest completion rate of all of last semester’s MOOCs, at 13 percent. Webber said one of his goals in the course was to have a high retention rate. “[A high retention rate] was an explicit goal and something we pursued as part of our MOOC development,” Webber said. “We did that through social media goals and our use of Facebook and Twitter to interact with students.” Webber said he has several ideas on how to improve MOOCs in the future. “I’d like to see it get easier to do a good job with a MOOC and have the MOOC technology work

I don’t know the extent of which people who are just watching this will actively engage in that same way — which was my hope — or not. That part of the experiment is not known yet. —Michael Starbird, Mathematics professor

better with integrating assessments,” Webber said. “If you’re teaching a class and you cannot assess the students, then you’re not really teaching — you’re entertaining.” Germanic studies professor John Hoberman taught a MOOC called “Age of Globalization” last semester. “These courses were, in terms of compensation, one sixth of my salary and one course off in the fall,” Hoberman said. “In terms of the amount of work required, that’s modest compensation, but you don’t go into this to make money. You don’t make a MOOC to make money.” Hoberman said he considers his course a success and would potentially pursue a different MOOC in the future. “In a real sense, a MOOC that has something substantial to offer to all sorts of people is a kind of public service,” Hoberman said.

CAMPUS

She is a role model to our future instructors who are deaf and hoping to be given an opportunity to teach at the University. —Lauren Kinast, Associate director for Services for Students with Disabilities

Association of the Deaf Conference this summer to compete against other teams of deaf and hard-ofhearing students from universities across the country. English professor Hannah Wojciehowski has worked closely with Mazique on her dissertation and studies at the University. Wojciehowski said she had not done work on deaf studies until she met Mazique. “I think it’s a valuable experience for everyone,” Wojciehowski said. “I don’t think it needs to be thought of as some difficulty or impediment imposed on a group but rather an opportunity to think about communication in ways we usually don’t.” Mazique’s dissertation will focus on a term coined by Richard Clark Eckert called “Deafnicity.” Wojciehowski said deaf studies is something that has been written very little about in the English and rhetoric departments. “It’s a way of thinking about deaf identity or the identity of a deaf community,” Wojciehowski said. “I think it’s a valuable experience for everyone.”

Voterama encourages early student turnouts By Christina Breitbeil @christinabreit

University Democrats rallied at the West Mall beginning at 9 p.m. Monday to encourage students to vote early for the Travis County elections on March 4. Early voting opens Tuesday at 7 a.m. The organization has been holding the event, which is called Voterama, for several years to increase student awareness of the opportunity to vote early, according to Michelle Willoughby, government junior and communications director for University Democrats. “We are very lucky to have a polling place on campus, and we want to make sure students

take advantage of it,” Willoughby said. “We also work very hard to increase young people’s voting in general.” Willoughby also said the organization holds other events throughout the year to encourage students to vote. “Another thing we do is Democracy Dogs, where we bring dogs to campus on Election Day,” Willoughby said. “People stop to pet the dogs, and that gives a chance to talk to them about voting.” Candidates running in the Travis County elections that are endorsed by University Democrats also spoke at Voterama, both to defend their platforms and to offer additional promotion of early voting.

Endorsed candidates included Richard Jung, who is running for Travis County commissioner for Precinct 2, Andy Brown, who is running for county judge, and Ramey Ko, who is running for county treasurer. Ko, who is a UT law lecturer and a member of University Democrats, said he comes to the Voterama event for every election cycle and has probably attended a dozen by now. “I have a feeling that, if it wasn’t for [University Democrats] doing this event, students would not have as much a sense of what’s happening on a county, city and state level,” Ko said. “It can be difficult, particularly as a college student, to pay attention

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to what’s happening at city hall … even though our lives are affected much more directly by [those elections].” David Feigen, government and communications studies senior and president of University Democrats, said the organization took care when deciding which candidates to endorse for the March primaries. “From our standpoint, it is important not just to elect the Democrats on the ballot but elect the best Democrats who we think are the most progressive and the most qualified for leadership,” Feigen said. “It’s [also] important that people know that the March primaries mean just as much as any other election.”

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4A OPINION

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LAURA WRIGHT, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / @TexanEditorial Tuesday, February 18, 2014

EDITORIAL

Texas must work to eliminate gender wage gap In Texas, the gender pay gap is still in full force. Women in Texas made 70 cents for every dollar that men made in 2011, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Women working in and around Austin didn’t earn much more than the state average. Based on a Texas Tribune interactive map, in Congressman Lamar Smith’s district, which includes UT as well as rural areas to the west of Austin, women earn 68.9 percent of the median annual income. In Congressman Michael Mc-

Women in Texas made 70 cents for every dollar that men made in 2011, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

Caul’s district, women earn 75 percent of what men earn. And in Congressman Lloyd Doggett’s district, women earn 73.5 percent of what men earn. According to Christine Williams, professor and chair of the department of sociology, this wage gap would be even higher if we included all workers, both full-time and part-time. And although women clearly get paid less for their work as compared to men, this doesn’t seem to be indicative of men having greater expertise in their fields, since women have higher college graduation rates than men. In a 2011 report on college completion, the Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA found that 18 percent more women than men have college degrees in the young adult population between ages 25 and 29. And, just this past Thursday, the Texas Tribune reported that more than 23 percent of females who finished eighth grade in 2001 received a post-secondary degree within six years of graduating from high school, compared to only 16 percent of males. Even at

HORNS UP: AUSTIN NAMED FASTEST-GROWING CITY IN U.S.

UT, the student body is slightly more female than male — 51 percent of the undergraduate population is female and 49 percent is male. So why the pay gap? After all, if women are earning college degrees at a higher rate than men, shouldn’t females be better compensated than males in the workforce? Williams explained that sometimes the gap occurs because “men and women have different majors, so even when women get higher degrees, they tend to be in lower-paying fields” — an answer that seems to be quite popular when the gender wage gap issue arises. But this isn’t necessarily the case. Engineering, computer science and business graduates have the highest average starting salaries by discipline, according to a recent article by Forbes. The McCombs School of Business is only slightly skewed toward male undergraduates — with a 55 percent male and 45 percent female undergraduate body as of last spring. At the Cockrell School of Engineering, though, males substantially outnumber females. Only 24 percent of

undergraduates there are females. But the wage gap persists, even in business professions. A 2012 Bureau of Labor Statistics report comparing the median weekly earnings of full-time and salaried wage workers by occupation and sex showed that female CEOs earn $1,730 per hour while males earn over 30 percent more — $2,275. Female financial managers earn $988 per hour while males earn 42 percent more — $1,405. The trend continues through most professions in the industry. It’s been close to 51 years since U.S. President John F. Kennedy signed the Equal Pay Act into federal law. For a state whose laws enshrine the concept of equal opportunity, our gender wage gap is downright shameful. And it’s bad business, too. Rather than letting the most qualified people lead, we’re giving in to sexism year after year after year. No Texan should take this inequality in stride. As future leaders, administrators and policy makers in Texas, we need to eliminate the wage gap once and for all.

COLUMN

On Monday, Forbes named Austin the fastest-growing city in the nation for the fourth year in a row, citing both the city’s 2.5 percent population growth rate and a 5.88 percent economic expansion rate as the highest in the U.S. But, while this is ultimately good news — growth, after all, means more jobs and more opportunities for UT students — we recognize that Austin’s rise to the top has several potential downsides: more traffic congestion and higher rents being two of them, not to mention the dreaded “Dallas-ification” of Austin that the anti-growth crowd has bemoaned for many years now. Still, a cautious horns up to the city’s continued growth and rising popularity, because a pissy attitude about Austin’s bright future will only create unnecessary tension between longtime Austinites and their new neighbors. Remember, past attempts to keep out outsiders, such as deliberately limiting the development of infrastructure, have only hindered progress in the long run.

COLUMN

Despite low profits, UT’s MOOCs educate audiences far and wide By Coleman Tharpe Guest Columnist

Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs, are seemingly always making headlines across the nation. Conflicting reports of their success and failure follow each other in the same publications. Unclear and unqualified completion rate data color public opinion surrounding these innovative approaches to education. Overall, the paradigm remains the same that MOOCs are intended to be traditional courses designed for traditional students. This belief could not be farther from the truth. Negative press aside, MOOCs retain the capability to transform the traditional model of education. Instead of relegating expert knowledge to the upper echelons of society, online opportunities democratize education. Through this developing model, content experts are distributing their expertise to the masses. MOOCs enable a freedom to learn by connecting underserved communities with the finest professors and institutions from around the world. The University of Texas has been and always will be a university of the first class, but the diffusion of information and communications technologies in the 21st century has redefined the role of the University in research and education. The UT System established the Institute for Transformational Learning to prepare for the future by fostering innovation, producing best-in-class resources and pioneering new cost-cutting programs across the state. This Institute launched UT Austin’s MOOCs and supported this first round of research and development. UT arrived about five years late to MOOC experimentation. The delay both benefits and curses these initiatives. On one hand, investment in experiments that seem to be in twilight informs public opinion and curtails interest. On the other hand, the University is able to leverage data from completed MOOCs all over the country to improve course development. Both the Center for Teaching and Learning at UT Austin and

MOOCs enable a freedom to learn by connecting underserved communities with the finest professors and institutions from around the world.

UT System’s Institute for Transformational Learning engage students, researchers, content experts and media professionals at the forefront of innovation in higher education. Preliminary data, even from UT Austin’s record-breaking MOOCs, should quell any remaining fears regarding disruption in higher education. Students are not replacing traditional institutions of higher learning with MOOCs. Graduate students at this University are not choosing between registering for Dr. Michael Webber’s Energy Technology & Policy course or completing all the assignment to earn an edX certificate for Energy 101, a MOOC created from the same material. However, motivated learners, and more importantly teachers, around the world can supplement traditional education with this expert-level content. Energy industry professionals, international policy researchers and general interest audiences tap into the content to expand their personal knowledge beyond their respective worlds. High school teachers effectively employ MOOC content and structure in their STEM classrooms to cultivate knowledge and interest beyond state-mandated curricula. These are the virtues of free and open education. Learners can connect with content aligned with their interests to meet unique learning goals instead of chasing cookiecutter learning objectives. Individual accomplishment, while difficult to quantify, should be identified as the new standard for MOOC success. Accordingly, online learning initiatives like MOOCs will never disrupt brick-andmortar educational institutions. Instead, they open the virtual doors of such institutions to the whole world. Since launching the first four MOOCs, UT Austin has expanded its footprint onto every continent. Geographically isolated individuals are joining virtual communities in online spaces based on their common interests and expertise. Quite simply, students from around the world without easy access to high quality education are connecting directly with UT’s professors. Take, for example, Amanda, a 13-yearold Brazilian Energy 101 student who expressed her appreciation this way, “Energy is so important for me … I’ll take these lessons for the rest of my life.” Profit margins and completion rates aside, it appears this UT Austin initiative is living up to the university’s tagline, and is in fact changing the world. Tharpe is an anthropology and radio-television-film senior.

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Trent Lesik / Daily Texan file photo

Ishmael Mohammed Jr. at the Union Wendy’s in September 2011.

Generosity to ‘Wendy’s Guy’ masks larger suffering of Austin’s homeless By Ali Breland

Daily Texan Columnist @alibreland

Last week, UT alumnus Benjamin McPhaul raised roughly $30,000 to get Ishmael Mohammed Jr. — known to many on campus as “The Wendy’s Guy” for the 13 years he spent working at the Union Wendy’s — off the streets and into permanent housing and employment. Junior left UT in 2012, but, before he did, he gained renown on campus for his cheery demeanor and ability to take orders at record-breaking speeds. When the news broke that Mohammed had been found homeless and that McPhaul was attempting to help him, the local media — including this newspaper — jumped at what seemed like a cut-anddried, heartwarming story. But while McPhaul deserves admiration for the help he provided — raising $30,000 to substantially change the course of one person’s life is significant and praise-worthy — his actions also represent a narrow scope of thinking about the problem of homelessness. Both this mindset and the way McPhaul’s actions perpetuate it don’t help with larger issues of inequity. Homelessness in Austin and anywhere else isn’t a problem that can be ameliorated in a piecemeal fashion. More importantly, it’s not a problem that can be fixed without clearly looking into its causes. Oscar Wilde addressed this in 1891, when he related slavery to charity by saying, “The worst slave owners were those that were kind to their slaves, and so prevented the core of the system being realised by those who suffered

While McPhaul deserves admiration for the help he provided ... his actions also represent a narrow scope of thinking about the problem of homelessness.

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from it.” Having one shining example of an individual like Mohammed blinds us from the rest of the homeless population that is still in dire need. While McPhaul’s charity is indeed a beautiful act of humanity, very little will have changed in Austin by the time Mohammed has received the benefit of the $30,000. We need to address the structural issues of homelessness and poverty instead of focusing on its most visible members. Not every homeless person is “The Wendy’s Guy.” There are many well-adjusted homeless people in Austin who need help but whose backstories and personal connections will not inspire anyone to raise money for them. And, according to McPhaul, the $30,000 that was raised for Mohammed has actually caused some of the homeless community to resent him; the resentment is a reminder of the fact that the $30,000 Junior will receive will do little good for other homeless individuals. We must address the structural problems of homelessness at both the organizational level and at the policy level. Austin has several organizations that offer assistance to the homeless, such as the Austin Resource Center for the Homeless, the Ending Community Homelessness Coalition and Foundation for the Homeless, and these are groups that could all use more resources to combat homelessness in the city. In a piece for the New Yorker, Malcolm Gladwell posited that the cost of housing a homeless person and providing them with a caseworker would be cheaper than the annual cost that homeless individuals incur on the system (supported by taxpayers) through the various medical costs that stem from life on the streets. Money spent to provide homeless persons with caseworkers also goes further toward helping mitigate homelessness itself, rather than aiding just the victims of the problem. Yes, McPhaul’s fundraising efforts are aimed in the right direction. McPhaul has said he wants to help Junior in a similar fashion to the way Gladwell would like to address homelessness, and McPhaul has expressed multiple times that the money raised will go to helping Junior over the long term. The next step is to apply that mentality over the long term to assist Austin’s other homeless individuals. Breland is a Plan II senior from Houston.

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STEFAN SCRAFIELD, SPORTS EDITOR / @texansports Tuesday, February 18, 2014

FOOTBALL

‘Magic Mike’ vying for NFL spot Wide receiver Mike Davis lines up against Oklahoma State in a game in November. After four seasons with the Longhorns, Davis is projected to be a middle-round draft choice by most scouting reports.

By Drew Lieberman @DrewLieberman

He is one of three Longhorns to catch 200 passes and 2,700 yards in their careers. But, while the other two — Jordan Shipley and Roy William — had the luxury of playing with some of the top passers in school history, senior wide receiver Mike Magic Davis’ 49-game career consisted of three different quarterbacks starting 10 games or more. Davis finished 4th on Texas’ all-time receiving yards and receptions list, as well as 5th in receiving touchdowns. In 2010, Davis was one of the few bright spots of the abysmal 5-7 season. He hauled in a UT freshman single-season record 47 passes for 478 yards — third most for a UT freshman — and tied for the team-lead with two touchdown receptions. Following a strong freshman campaign, expectations were high for Davis, but inconsistency at the quarterback position produced some trouble for the receiver’s season. Davis

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caught three passes for 115 yards in the opener against Rice, which would be his only 100-yard receiving game for the year. He failed to record a catch in the game against BYU, and at times appeared to lack focus and effort as the quarterback carousel went from Garrett Gilbert to a rotation of David Ash and Case McCoy. Davis appeared to enter 2012 with his mind set on living up to his middle name — Magic. With Texas’ quarterback position settled, Davis

proceeded to have a breakout year as the Longhorns’ primary deep threat. Davis set career-highs in receptions, receiving yards and touchdowns, including four 100-yard receiving games, one more than he had recorded in his first two seasons combined. Despite reports of entering the 2013 NFL Draft, Davis decided to stay at Texas for his senior season. As Texas’ top receiver, Davis caught 13 passes for 177 yards and three touchdowns in Texas’ first two games

before Texas lost Ash to a concussion. From then on, Davis was only as consistent as his quarterback, playing at an elite level against West Virginia and Texas Tech, but largerly a nonfactor at other times, including logging a measley 26 total yards in his last two games. Davis is projected to be a middle-round draft choice by most scouting reports, which is the same range Marquise Goodwin was reported to be in when entering the 2013 NFL Draft. Goodwin ran an

unofficial 4.25 40-yard dash at the NFL combine, which resulted in him being selected by the Buffalo Bills in the third round of the draft. While Davis doesn’t have the same Olympic speed as Goodwin, he is much less raw at the receiver position. At around 6-feet-2-inches, Davis is undersized to play the traditional deep-threat role in the NFL, so he will have to have a good showing at the combine and Texas’ pro day to be picked on the draft’s second day.

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Texas looks to control Big 12’s leading scorer on trip to Ames

Balanced offense propels Horns back to success By David Leffler

By Stefan Scrafield @stefanscrafield

Daily Texan Columnist @leffler_david

On Saturday night, the Longhorns found a way to slow down the Big 12’s second leading scorer, Juwan Staten, en route to a victory over West Virginia. Three days later, they’ll have to stop the only man ahead of Staten if they want the same result. Senior forward Melvin Ejim — who averages a conference-best 18.9 points per game — and his No. 17 Iowa State Cyclones welcome No. 19 Texas to Ames for a top-25 matchup at Hilton Coliseum tonight. “[Ejim’s] a scary guy,” head coach Rick Barnes said. “He’s put up some unbelievable numbers. He’s been one of those guys that has had an incredible impact on their program.” Unlike Staten, a true point guard who was defended by Javan Felix and Isaiah Taylor, Ejim plays on the wing and will likely be guarded by Texas’ defensive specialist, Demarcus Holland. Holland’s athleticism and deceptive length should help slow down Ejim, who can score from anywhere on the floor. Ejim was effective in

Oftentimes, basketball lends its focus to individuals more than to whole teams. A few select players steal the attention deserved by many others, largely because of the small team size, which allows star players to emerge and cast shadows over their teammates. But things are different with the current Texas men’s basketball team, which has won nine of its last 10 conference games, thanks to its cohesive, selfless playing style. For years, head coach Rick Barnes tried the same route to success as many other coaches in college hoops: recruit several big-time talents who will only stick around for a year before going to the NBA and hope to win with them immediately. Barnes has since shifted from this tactic and sought players who plan to stay in Austin for multiple years, resulting in valuable team chemistry and all-in effort from every player. Saturday’s 88-71 victory over West Virginia sums this up perfectly. All of Texas’ starters reached doubledigit point totals while the team made more than half of its shots. This was the fifth time this season the

Sam Ortega / Daily Texan Staff

Sophomore guard Javan Felix is defended by Melvin Ejim during Texas’ matchup against the Cyclones last month.

Iowa State’s 86-76 loss at the Frank Erwin Center last month. The Canadian player had a double-double with 17 points on 8-for-11 shooting and 10 rebounds. But the Longhorns’ team defense has improved significantly since the last time these two teams met, and, if Texas’ most recent performance is any indication, Ejim could be in for a long night. “Our defense has been the most improved aspect of our game,” Barnes said. “We’ve stopped fouling as much. We still have some things to work on, but it’s getting better.” Offensively, the Longhorns will once again rely

on their size and strength inside to overwhelm Iowa State’s undersized front court. Junior forward Jonathan Holmes and sophomore center Cameron Ridley combined for 39 points and seven offensive boards in the first meeting. Those two, combined with Holland’s defensive work ethic, have been the key to the Longhorns’ rebounding success. “The length has a lot to do with [the rebounding],” Barnes said. “You’ve also got two guys — in Jonathan Holmes and Demarcus Holland — who put in tremendous effort. That kind of effort is what gets us the extra possessions that we need.”

Longhorns have had five players reach double figures in points, although it was the first time every starter got in on the action. A balanced scoring attack has been a constant strength for this team. Of the team’s 25 games this season, Texas has had four or more players reach double-digit point totals 16 times and three or more players on 20 occasions. With scoring threats across the board, opposing coaches can’t focus their defensive schemes on one or two players. At this point, the Longhorns have four players averaging between 11 and 13 points per game. It’s rare to see such a small gap between a team’s top scorer and its fourth-leading scorer. Texas’ offense gives Barnes flexibility in designing schemes that have resulted in six wins by double-digit point margins in the last nine games. A balanced attack has a paramount effect on a team’s psyche, something the Longhorns will draw upon for their two critical games this week against No. 17 Iowa State and No. 8 Kansas. It is no longer a death sentence when one player has a disappointing game. Now it’s merely an opportunity for someone else to step up.

DUKE

GEORGIA TECH

NOTRE DAME

TOP TWEET Sarah Palmer @spalmer16

“ Vegas definitely got the best of me ... exhausted is an understatement.”

SPORTS BRIEFLY Payton named Big 12 Player of the Week

Senior centerfielder Mark Payton was named the Big 12 Player of the Week Monday after strong play at Cal over the weekend. Payton, who was the 2013 Big 12 batting champ, went 9-17 in a four-game series with the Bears. He recorded a double, triple and home run on the weekend, along with four RBI and three runs. In addition, Payton went 4-5 with runners on base. The senior has now extended his reached-base streak to 43 games dating back to last season while also extending his hitting streak to 13 games. Payton finished the weekend with a .882 slugging percentage to mark the first time in his career he has earned Big 12 Player of the Week honors. —Garrett Callahan

BY THE NUMBERS TEXAS BASKETBALL

Texas is ranked No. 5 in the nation in rebounds per game

BASEBALL |

Longhorns begin home stint hoping to improve its hitting By Evan Berkowitz @Evan_Berkowitz

Texas returns to UFCU Disch-Falk Field on Tuesday night for the home opener as it looks to find its groove at the plate against Texas A&MCorpus Christi (2-2). Run scoring was a premium last season for the Longhorns, who finished last in the Big 12 with fewer than four runs per game. “Things didn’t fall our way last year,” said senior outfielder Mark Payton, who led the team in hitting last year. “This is a new season, though.” So far this year, it’s the same

problem. The Longhorns couldn’t muster a run against Cal’s opening day freshman starter over the weekend. Then, in the following game, Texas only pushed one run across, spoiling a gem by junior starter Dillon Peters. Only Payton, sophomore shortstop C.J. Hinojosa and freshman first baseman Kacy Clemens recorded a batting average above .218 over the weekend. The five-throughnine slot in the batting order is hitting a measly .167 with more strikeouts than hits. But head coach Augie Garrido doesn’t care about the batting average.

“We are taking emphasis off batting average and putting it on run scoring, the true way to win,” Garrido said. “We want guys to keep the rally alive.” Unfortunately for Garrido, 19 strikeouts and three double-plays aren’t a good way to keep the rally alive — although it’s just an early sample size — but, if the trend continues, run scoring will be a major problem again. So far, the starting rotation is, once again, the strength of the team. If finishing No. 7 in ERA last season and returning the weekend rotation didn’t catch college baseball’s attention, Texas’

weekend performance did. “Those guys all know how to pitch at the college level,” Payton said. “They are good workers and know what it takes to get the job done.” The weekend trio of senior Nathan Thornhill and juniors Peters and Parker French went 20 innings, surrendering no earned runs. “I’m really excited to see what we can do as a pitching staff,” Peters said. “There’s not a lack of confidence in our pitching staff.” But despite a .33 starters ERA, Texas left Cal after splitting the four games, partly because of six errors,

accounting for seven unearned runs. Garrido saw this becoming a problem earlier in the year. “We are far behind in terms of bunt defense,” Garrido said before the season, bringing light to the two errors on bunts. When the Longhorns take the field tonight against Texas A&M-Corpus Christi at 6 p.m., they will look to hit their stride at the plate and sure up their defense. But the starting pitching gives them a good base. “[Our starters] give us confidence and something to build upon,” Garrido said.

Texas has now reached 20 wins on the season, the 14th time in 16 seasons under Rick Barnes

TODAY IN HISTORY

1899

Montreal Shamrocks sweep Queens U (Kingston, Ont) in two games in the 8th Stanley Cup.


COMICS 7

COMICS

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Edited by Will Shortz

Crossword ACROSS 1 Nonsense 5 Nonsense 9 Nonsense 14 “California ___ Alles” (classic punk rock song) 15 James who wrote “A Death in the Family” 16 Car with a stylized caliper in its logo 17 Target of NASA’s Rover mission 18 B&Bs 19 Clear of vermin à la the Pied Piper 20 Nonsense 22 Nonsense 24 Near-prime seating 26 Overseer of N.Y.C. subways 27 Nonsense 31 “Didn’t you leave out something …?” 33 Emulates Jay Z and Master P

37 Score before a service break, maybe 38 Windshield material 40 ___ King Cole 41 Nonsense 42 Nonsense 43 Nonsense 45 “Well, ___ be!” 46 River crossed by the Pont d’Avignon 48 Kingly 49 “Sax on the Beach” musician John 51 ’50s presidential nickname 52 Nonsense 53 “Thumbs up” response 55 Sailor’s tale 57 Nonsense 61 Nonsense 66 Some jabs and turns 67 “Right back ___!” 69 Second hearing? 70 Skylit rooms

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71 Tiny bit of time: Abbr. 72 Thin Russian pancake 73 Nonsense 74 Nonsense 75 Nonsense

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PUZZLE BY TIM CROCE

38 Understand, informally

52 Bring up, as a subject

39 Drawn (out)

54 “Can you see” preceder

44 Lo-___ (not so clear)

56 “Sure, I remember!” 47 Shout after a series of numbers 57 Shrug-worthy 50 McDaniel of “Gone With the Wind”

58 Actor Jared of “My So-Called Life”

59 Do that may have a pick 60 Tirade 62 Jimmy who wrote “Galveston” and “MacArthur Park” 63 Rights org. 64 Leg part 65 Beep 68 General on a menu

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MCAT® | LSAT® | GMAT® | GRE® Available:

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DOWN 1 Hurdle 2 Certain metal beam 3 Wang of fashion 4 Long ago, once 5 Turnkey 6 Nixon’s number two 7 Kind of state that’s peaceful 8 Piquancy 9 Attacked 10 Brand of mops and brooms 11 Member of a Turkish minority 12 Russia’s ___ Mountains 13 Australian pal 21 More hackneyed 23 Iraq war concerns, for short 25 Nonsense 27 Chewing one’s nails, e.g. 28 The black swan in “Swan Lake” 29 E-ZPass charges 30 Follower of Jul. 32 Silver of fivethirtyeight .com 34 Near, poetically 35 Fruit also known as a prairie banana 36 Inscribed stone slab

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8 L&A

HANNAH SMOTHERS, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR / @DailyTexanArts Tuesday, February 18, 2014

8

ART

Artist brings 3-D installations to light

By Samantha Grasso

Adela Andea stands beside a piece from her newest installation, “Lux, Lumens, and Candelas,” on Saturday evening. The installation will run through March 20 at Women & Their Work Gallery.

@samjgrasso

Houston-based artist Adela Andea stood in the center of the gallery with an eager audience amassed in front of her. From the ceiling behind her hung an expanse of plastic magnifying lenses and blue and green lights that were strategically and creatively constructed to create her latest art installation, “Lux, Lumens and Candelas.” “[This installation] is a new work,” Andea said at the opening. “I haven’t shown this anywhere else. I decided to take some new risks and move on to a new direction with this magnifying plastic.” Andea, an installation artist, premiered her installation, “Lux, Lumens and Candelas,” Saturday at Women & Their Work, an Austin art organization devoted to educating the public on and promoting the work of contemporary female artists. The installation is scheduled to run until March 20. “Andea is an intense and inspired artist,” said Rachel Koper, program director at Women & Their Work. “It is important to host the elusive solo show for ambitious and hardworking artists. As far as I know, we’ve never had underwater LEDs in a sculpture before. Andea’s use of consumer electronics and products all have her hand in them.” As an installation artist, Andea develops art pieces out of different consumer materials, plastics and technology, using these objects to present and manipulate the central medium of light. The creation of the installation is a physical process, Andea said. For over a week,

Jenna VonHofe Daily Texan Staff

Andea spent time immersing herself in the space, installing and adjusting the different light sources and reflective materials to modify the perception of space in the gallery, and examining the installation from all angles. “[While installing,] I have to be in the space to sense how it’s going to look,” Andea said. “That space becomes my studio. I have to be there by myself and spend time walking, and start to build.” Andea earned her bachelor of fine arts in painting from the University of Houston and went on to earn her master’s in new media from the University of North Texas in 2012. She said, while art

interested her from a young age, it wasn’t until her undergraduate career that she realized she wasn’t satisfied with 2-D art, and she began the transition to working in 3-D. “I was slowly dissatisfied with how the paint looked on the object,” Andea said. “It wasn’t bright enough, it wasn’t controllable enough, and then I just did a sudden switch to light.” It was at Andea’s senior show for her undergraduate career that she debuted her first light installation. Two days before her show at Bluffer Gallery, she said she decided to go in a different direction with a light installation after her original piece

was too heavy to install. “Without any approval and prior curatorial decision, I just put the lights there,” Andea said. “The curator from Bluffer noticed and he also insisted that I should apply for Lawndale [Art Center] and start my career.” The materials and technology Andea uses in her installations include pool noodles, LED and compact fluorescent lights, small computer fans, fish tanks and computerized motors. While some parts of the show for “Lux, Lumens and Candelas” were previously created and brought to Women & Their Work, the suspended installation is site-specific,

featuring Andea’s latest material experimentation. “[Lenses] come in different shapes and forms, and getting orders mixed up sometimes gives me ideas,” Andea said. “I do look at what’s on the consumer market and how we have so much of everything. That’s where I found the inspiration — in the large quantities of consumerism.” Melita Elmore, audience member at the unveiling, felt that Andea’s incorporation of technology into her work brought contemporary art to the 21st century. “A lot of people who are not artists, including myself, would think of artists just being painters, but really all

kind of materials can be made into art,” Elmore said. “[Andea] really proves that’s so.” Andea said that, while being noticed for her work early on gave her a positive confirmation on her use of light, it also made her aware of her responsibility as a light installation artist. “When you get attention, there are already people following you as a trend or an inspiration,” Andea said. “It is a huge responsibility when you think of opening a new door. I hope I make a difference. I want everyone to consider [his or her] own work as more important, not just doing something because someone did it and got recognition.”

CAMPUS

New fraternity offers a place for filmmakers By William Menjivar @Casu_Will

Despite the resources for UT film students — ranging from student productions to access

to equipment — a group of students felt there should be more organizations with an organized structure and a social interest in the UT film community.

GREAT

FOOD MADE FAST!

Last semester, a few students set out to establish a chapter for the Delta Kappa Alpha fraternity at UT. This professional coed cinema and film fraternity’s mission is to help like-minded filmmakers by providing them with resources and networking opportunities, regardless of whether they are radiotelevision-film majors. “We wanted to create a fun environment where people can go and not feel like they are being criticized constantly,” said Stephanie Garza, radio-television-film sophomore and chapter president. “We want to create a supportive environment.” Delta Kappa Alpha has developed a legacy of respected filmmakers since its establishment in 1936. Prominent members include

Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, Lucille Ball and other established names in the film industrys. Representatives from the University of Southern California, where the fraternity was established, approached students in the fall semester to start a chapter at UT. Garza, along with 14 other students, joined the fraternity and agreed to recruit new members after the new year started. The founding members knew that most students were unaware of the fraternity’s existence but hoped that with the right kind of outreach, the organization would have all the necessary selling points. The founders spoke to classes, posted on Facebook and passed out fliers to reach and inform the student body and ultimately

received 80 applicants. “[Recruitment] was a lot of work,” said Michael Park, radio-television-film sophomore and chapter vice president. “But the response we got was incredible. … None of us knew what to expect. I don’t think that anyone expected the numbers that we got.” According to Garza, new pledge recruitment at UT attracted the attention from chapters at other universities, which contacted the UT founders for recruitment advice. “Carter Baker, [radiotelevision-film and advertising sophomore], created the website and designed everything for it and the national council and other chapters started approaching [him] asking just how he did it,” Garza said. “The same thing happened with our fliers.

[Carter] designed those and our expansion coordinator said it was perfect. He sent it out to other chapters and said this is what it should be.” Delta Kappa Alpha’s rush process resulted in the biggest pledge class of all other chapters in the country this year, surpassing those of other film schools. Founding members hope their fraternity leaves its mark on UT and the Moody College of Communications. “I want [DKA] to be synonymous with the school of communication, or at least with the radio-television-film department,” said Remi Vitales, radiotelevision-film sophomore and scholarship chair. “Whenever people bring up the RTF department, they always bring up [UT’s Semester in Los Angeles program]. I want people to bring DKA up as well.”

FREAKY FAST

DELIVERY! ©2013 JIMMY JOHN’S FRANCHISE, LLC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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Jonathan Garza / Daily Texan Staff

Radio-television-film sophomore Stephanie Garza is the president of the newly created chapter of the Delta Kappa Alpha fraternity at UT. The fraternity is open to all students who are interested in filmmaking.


The Daily Texan 2014-02-18