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Thursday, February 13, 2014

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POLICE

UTPD, homeless clash over cold By Julia Brouillette @juliakbrou

On freezing cold days, University officials deal with slick roads, campus closures and delays, but, on freezing cold nights, it isn’t the students whom officials are

concerned about. Instead, UTPD officers get calls of homeless individuals entering campus buildings in search of warmth. Friday night, a non-UT man was arrested after a custodian found him sleeping in the Engineering-Science Building.

According to the UTPD crime log, this was the man’s ninth arrest for criminal trespassing. UTPD Lt. Gonzalo Gonzalez said the man was looking for a warm place to sleep. Since then, UTPD has reported five additional criminal trespass incidents, four of which

involved individuals sleeping in campus buildings. Terry McMahan, assistant chief of police, said UTPD officers issue criminal trespass warnings — and occasionally arrest — individuals who are not authorized to be on the campus. McMahan

said this policy follows the UT System Board of Regents Rules and Regulations. “If they have no business here, we’re going to ask them to leave,” McMahan said. “If they‘re a student, faculty or

bit.ly/dtvid

THROWBACK

HIV/AIDS still poses threat 30 years later

HOMELESS page 2

CITY

Study presents possible lakefront facelift By Alyssa Mahoney

could be built here,” Holt said. Holt said the high value of property in the area has increased economic redevelopment, but the city wants to manage that redevelopment to

LAKE page 2

HIV page 2

Lauren Ussery / Daily Texan Staff

A man jogs along a trail on the South Central Waterfront of Lady Bird Lake. The area could possibly undergo major renovations to clean the water and increase public accessibility to the waterfront and green spaces.

Waterfront area. Associate architecture professor Dean Almy said the University plan tries to avoid the rail and its right-of-way as a social separating force. “This is something that the Dallas DART is strug-

UNIVERSITY

gling with right now.” Almy said. “How do we turn [the area] into a social place?” Holt said, since the 1800s, area development has been stunted by its location in a flood plain, and, when the Longhorn Dam was

finished in 1960, it removed the area from the floodplain and, for the first time, allowed for redevelopment. “For the first time, [the dam] stabilized the area which meant that, after 1960, things like the Statesman [building]

@kevsharifi

Although a Sept. 11, 1984, Daily Texan article, entitled “AIDS cloned; vaccine possible,” assured readers that a vaccine for the human immunodeficiency virus might have been on the horizon, a successful vaccine has yet to be developed. In 1984, geneticists at biotechnology company Chiron Corp. of Emeryville, Calif., claimed “their successful cloning [of HIV] could lead to a sensitive diagnostic test for AIDS within weeks and an experimental vaccine against the deadly disease within months.” Nearly 30 years later, HIV infects more than 1.1 millions Americans, 15.8 percent of whom are unaware of their infections, while Africa suffers the throes of a debilitating AIDS epidemic. HIV acts by invading the body’s T-helper cells, which exist for the purpose of signaling the activation of the body’s immune response whenever they detect pathogens. The virus then integrates its genetic code — translated from RNA to DNA — into the host cell’s DNA, allowing new viral RNA to be expressed as

@TheAlyssaM

A study conducted by the School of Architecture includes a design that, if implemented, would clean water that flows into Lady Bird Lake, connect area neighborhoods and increase public access to a historically underdeveloped waterfront. The South Central Waterfront spans 97 acres between South First Street and Blunn Creek, with Lady Bird Lake to the north and East Riverside Drive and East Bouldin Creek to the south. According to Alan Holt, principal planner of the City’s urban design division, two studies conducted over the past two years created scenarios which incorporate elements the city determined are important to the public — affordable housing, high standards of water quality, public access to the waterfront and green spaces and parks. One of the studies was conducted by the University’s Texas Futures Lab, which consists of architecture and urban design graduate students. Holt said the University study incorporates the Project Connect urban rail plans. Four of the six potential rail lines go through the South Central

By Kevin Sharifi

CITY

UTeach to expand to Icy weather drains city safety supplies five other universities By Alyssa Mahoney @TheAlyssaM

By Adam Hamze @adamhamz

Five more universities will implement the UTeach program starting in fall 2014 bringing the total number of universities to 40. Founded at UT in 1997, UTeach is a program aimed at increasing the number of science, technology, engineering and math — commonly known as STEM — teachers in the country. It offers students a path to teacher certification without requiring them to change majors or add any time to their four-year degree plans. The program has received national attention, including a shoutout from President Barack Obama in 2010. The National Math and Science Initiative, which administers the program, will be implementing it at the following

universities: University of Alabama at Birmingham; University of Maryland, College Park; Oklahoma State University; Florida International University; and Drexel University. The Howard Hughes Medical Institute issued a $22.5 million grant in March to fund the expansion. Another five universities will be added by fall 2015. Michael Marder, associate dean of the College of Natural Sciences and executive director of the UTeach Science Program, said the program is an efficient way for future STEM teachers to grow. “The whole country has a shortage of math and science teachers,” Marder said. “UTeach was very promising here and received interest from other universities.”

UTEACH page 2

Buried in the heart of the city, surrounded by warehouses, dead-end streets and U.S. Route 183, lies a collection of materials that, together, make up Austin’s emergency preparedness plan. The city has drawn extensively on its stockpiled safety materials in the last few weeks, as icy roads and freezing weather resulted in closures for UT, AISD and other public services. City workers use the carbon-based mineral dolomite on streets and roads during “major ice events” affecting the entire city, according to Gerald Nation, Districts Maintenance division manager in the Public Works Department’s Street and Bridge Operation. Nation said Austin decided to use dolomite exclusively instead of another material, such as salt, out of environmental concerns. “The salt can have an

environmental impact on the vegetation, so we just use the dolomite,” Nation said. Austin city spokeswoman Alicia Dean said the city has 4,000 to 5,000 cubic yards of dolomite at any given time during the winter, resulting in a total cost of anywhere from $64,000 to $80,000. Nation said that because the city stores enough dolomite to handle two days of icy weather, it has had to replenish its stock since the last ice event on Jan. 28, but this cost hasn’t exceeded the amount allowed by the city’s normal operating budget. Dean said city workers used about 1,200 cubic yards of dolomite Jan. 28. “We’re actually still within our budgeted range right now,” Dean said. “We haven’t really gone over our budget, in terms of cost of dolomite.” Marissa Morrison, economics and German senior, said she thinks the salt and sand mixture used in her

Lauren Ussery / Daily Texan Staff

Stockpiles of the mineral dolomite, which is used on roads during ice storms to prevent accidents, were recently replenished because of the inclement weather.

hometown of Sartell, Minn., is safer than the material used in Austin. Morrison said she thinks Austin’s cold weather emergency preparedness does not adequately ensure the safety of motorists and pedestrians. “I think [in Minnesota] they do a better job of dispersing [the road mixture] consistently,” Morrison said. “After the ice is gone, the sand is still there. I’ve seen a

NEWS

OPINION

SPORTS

LIFE&ARTS

ONLINE

Wendy Davis said she supports medical marijuana. PAGE 3

McCombs dean: Shared Services benefits UT. PAGE 4

In Texas’ home opener, UTSA shocks the Horns. PAGE 6

How to avoid Valentine’s Day in Austin. PAGE 8

African international students flock to Texas. PAGE 3

Valentine’s Day vendors overlook LGBTQ buyers. PAGE 4

Women’s basketball beats young Kansas State team. PAGE 6

Praying mantises make human dating look tame. PAGE 8

Check out The Daily Texan’s suggestions for pairing Girl Scout Cookies with craft beer. dailytexanonline.com

lot of people fall, especially on bikes.” Government and Plan II senior Kristin Meeks said she drove on icy roads to and from the Bee Cave area for her job during one of January’s ice incidents. Meeks said although main roads and thoroughfares were treated for icy conditions, neighborhood roads

WEATHER page 3 REASON TO PARTY

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Thursday, February 13, 2014

FRAMES featured photo Volume 114, Issue 103

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor Laura Wright (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Shabab Siddiqui (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@ gmail.com

Jonathan Garza / Daily Texan Staff

Education junior Carlos Richardson plays frisbee golf on the West Mall on Wednesday afternoon.

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TOMORROW’S WEATHER Low High

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Secrets.

HIV

continues from page 1 proteins — which are essential to the virus’ survival — and move to the host cell’s surface, forming a new, immature HIV. Repetition of this process begins to hurt the body’s CD4 count. Once this number drops below 200 cells per cubic millimeter of blood, the viral infection will have resulted in AIDS. Despite the three-decade delay from the 1984 breakthrough, officials are still optimistic about an imminent HIV vaccination. In a speech on World AIDS Day in December, President Barack Obama emphasized the importance of HIV/AIDS education and prevention programs and expressed hopes that an “AIDS-free generation is within our reach.” Members of the National Institutes of Health predict the development of a vaccine by 2015. At a local level, a study in the January/February 2014 issue of the Travis County Medical Society Journal showed the number of people living with HIV in Travis County has increased by more than 40 percent since 2006. In fall 2013, University Health Services surveyed 934 students, 0.1 percent of whom reported having been tested for HIV within the last year, despite the increase in its rate of infection. According to a recent University study, fewer than 27 percent

of students reported having ever been tested for HIV. FACE AIDS Austin is a student-run organization dedicated to HIV/AIDS education and awareness, as well as fundraising for Partners In Health, a separate nonprofit in Rwanda that serves as a model for comprehensive healthcare within impoverished communities. Kat Wilcox, international nutrition senior and president of the organization’s UT chapter, said one major issue with the effort to develop a vaccine is insufficient funding. Wilcox said she believes the issue of HIV/AIDS is one that students can affect by drawing attention to the lack of accessible and affordable health care around the world. “I think there is hope for a vaccine,” Wilcox said. “[But only] by addressing the disconnect and apathy that is present within today’s developed communities because HIV/AIDS primarily affects those who are marginalized and less empowered to make an impact.”

HOMELESS

continues from page 1 staff, then it’s OK and we move on to something else.” McMahan said people seeking shelter from the freezing temperatures could turn to local resource centers, such as the Austin Resource Center for the Homeless. Center spokeswoman Kay Klotz said the center is always open for transient individuals. “Everybody is able to sleep in a warm place at night if they come here, but they have to come here,” Klotz said. Klotz said the Austin area has had more than 30 freezing nights so far this year. Once at the shelter, people are provided a place to sleep for as long as necessary, according to Klotz. McMahan said UTPD

LAKE

continues from page 1 incorporate system planning and discontinue development that does not consider public access to the waterfront or area

UTEACH

According to Marder, expanding the program is a five-year process, and the money will go toward hiring staff and helping the universities integrate UTeach into their systems. “Creating a new program is like creating a new department,” Marder said. “The universities need to set aside space, add faculty and add supportive staff. This grant will help them do that.” William Kiker, a UTeach alumnus and UT graduate with a bachelor’s and master’s in mathematics, said the UTeach program creates effective and passionate teachers. “The UTeach program supports each of its students through their content-area growth,” Kiker said. “It also equips

them with the theory behind successful teaching strategies and practice implementing them in the classroom.” Larry Abraham, UTeach co-director and an education professor, said the medical institute has had a long-term interest in the UTeach program, and its talks with the National Math and Science Initiative led both organizations to believe the grant would have a positive effect on STEM teaching quality nationwide. “The [medical institute] specifically noted the proven success of the UTeach program in helping universities recruit more STEM majors into pursuing teacher certification, entering the classroom and staying there longer as reasons to invest in this program expansion,” Abraham said.

officers do not escort people to shelters. “We have an obligation to patrol the University of Texas campus, we don’t have an obligation to take people to the [center],” McMahan said. “We don’t have the resources to taxicab people all over the city, especially when we’ve got buses and everything else.” While the public views the University as a public space, the regents’ rules do not allow unauthorized use of campus facilities, McMahan said. “The University of Texas is really not public property, but we kind of treat it that way,” McMahan said. “Once somebody comes on to the campus, and they violate a regent’s rule, then that is what evokes their right to be here.” Linguistics senior Hadley Main said the University

should be more lenient when dealing with homeless people. “For a public research institution, it is sad to me they would arrest [someone],” Main said. “We are welcoming in so many different areas.” McMahan said UTPD officers do not tailor their response to trespassing based on whether a person is homeless and make decisions solely on individuals’ accordance with the rules and regulations of the UT System. “It has absolutely nothing to do with whether they’re homeless or not, it has to do with whether they’re an authorized user of the facilities,” McMahan said. “The University of Texas is a very welcoming campus; we want people to come see what we’re about. But, if you’re here for foul play, we don’t want you here anymore.”

continues from page 1

connectivity. “The question is: Are we likely to be happy with the [redevelopment]?” Holt said. “We know where that gets us, and it doesn’t get us anywhere pretty.”

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Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Wright Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala, Riley Brands, Amil Malik, Eric Nikolaides Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shabab Siddiqui Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan Rudner Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Antonia Gales, Anthony Green, Jacob Kerr, Pete Stroud, Amanda Voeller Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Julia Brouillette, Nicole Cobler, Alyssa Mahoney, Madlin Mekelburg Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Reinsch Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brett Donohoe, Reeana Keenen, Kevin Sharifi Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Mitts Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hirrah Barlas, Bria Benjamin, Alex Dolan, Omar Longoria Multimedia Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charlie Pearce, Alec Wyman Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sam Ortega Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jonathan Garza, Shweta Gulati, Pu Ying Huang, Shelby Tauber, Lauren Ussery Senior Videographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor Barron, Jackie Kuenstler, Dan Resler, Bryce Seifert Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Smothers Associate Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren L’Amie Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Eleanor Dearman, Kritika Kulshrestha, David Sackllah, Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stefan Scrafield Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Hummer Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Evan Berkowitz, Garrett Callahan, Jori Epstein, Matt Warden Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Hadidi Senior Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cody Bubenik, Ploy Buraparate, Connor Murphy, Aaron Rodriguez, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephanie Vanicek Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeremy Hintz Associate Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarah Stancik Senior Technical Staff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Shen, Roy Varney Special Ventures Co-editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard, Chris Hummer Online Outreach Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fred Tally-Foos Journalism Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Michael Brick

NEWS

$2,000, $3,000 & $10,000 University Co-op George H. Mitchell Student Award for Academic Excellence

T st

she Regardless of whether cen- “ tral planning is incorporated,of t Holt said, $1.2 billion worth of[wa redevelopment will be imple-said mented in the next 20 years. [wa “Out of all of the districtsbe s all up and down the lake, N there’s not as much redevelopment in the area as in this area,” Holt said. “[The other areas] are stable residential areas or parks or downtown, which is pretty much built out or on track to build out.” Daniel Woodroffe, a landscape architect, said Waller Creek serves as a good example of a natural feature that has historically been seen as detrimental to development and can inform the waterfront design. “Waller Creek has become a living laboratory,” Woodroffe said. “Waller Creek is a good example of how to change.” Almy said the Texas Futures Lab found that area water is being polluted before it empties into the lake. He said the University’s design would not only connect neighborhoods and increase public access to the waterfront, but would also have an ecological function. “We can use soft infrastructure and hard infrastructure systems to clean water,” Almy said. “We can clean 100 percent of the water before it goes into the lake.”

Issue Staff

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hayden Clark, Kate Dannenmaier, Zachary Keener, Adam Hamze, Jeremy Thomas Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrea Kurth, Amy Zhang Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jacob Martella, Scarlett Smith, Jeremy Thomas, Rachel Wenzlaff Columnist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Davis Jr. Editorial Cartoonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lucy Griswold Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sean Armas, Pauline Berens, Anderson Boyd Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shannon Butler, Tallis Davidson, Calhan Hale, Holly Hansel, Andrew McMahon, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Isabella Palacios, Riki Tsuji Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Virginia Scherer, Iliana Storch

Business and Advertising

(512) 471-1865 | advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Interim Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frank Serpas, III Executive Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chad Barnes Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barbara Heine Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcasting and Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Event Coordinator and Media Consultant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindsey Hollingsworth Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Carter Goss, Lindsey Hollingsworth Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ted Sniderman Student Assistant Advertising Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rohan Needel Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dani Archuleta, Aaron Blanco, Hannah Davis, Crysta Hernandez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robin Jacobs, Erica Reed, Mayowa Tijani, Lesly Villarreal Student Project Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Aaron Blanco Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mymy Nguyen Student Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dito Prado Senior Graphic Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Hublein Student Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Karina Manguia, Rachel Ngun, Bailey Sullivan Special Editions/Production Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michael Gammon Longhorn Life Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ali Killian Longhorn LIfe Assistant Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrew Huygen

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 4711865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

The Daily Texan Mail Subscription Rates One Semester (Fall or Spring) $60.00 Two Semesters (Fall and Spring) 120.00 Summer Session 40.00 One Year (Fall, Spring and Summer) 150.00 To charge by VISA or MasterCard, call 471-5083. Send orders and address changes to Texas Student Media', P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713-8904, or to TSM Building C3.200, or call 471-5083. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713.

Texan Ad Deadlines

2/13/14

Monday .............Wednesday, 12 p.m. Thursday.................Monday, 12 p.m. Tuesday.................Thursday, 12 p.m. Friday......................Tuesday, 12 p.m. Word Ads 11 a.m. Wednesday................Friday, 12 p.m. Classified (Last Business Day Prior to Publication)

Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees Meeting

Students must be nominated by a faculty member for this award. Nominees must be juniors or seniors currently enrolled at UT Austin or have received their undergraduate degree in December 2013.

NOMINATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED FROM MARCH 11-25, 2014(at noon) For Nomination Form and Award Information Please Visit http://www.utexas.edu/provost/initiatives/ undergraduate_awards/mitchell/ or contact Kati Pelletier kpelletier@austin.utexas.edu 512-232-3312

Friday, February 14, 2014 Board of Operating Trustees Meeting 1:00 p.m. William Randolph Hearst Bldg Room #3.302 2500 Whitis Avenue

Visitors Welcome

We encourage any community member who has any kind of temporary or permanent disability to contact Texas Student Media beforehand so that appropriate accommodations can be made. Anyone is welcome to attend.

The Daily Texan • Texas Student TEXAS T Television • KVRX 91.7 FM • STUDEN MEDIA Texas Travesty • Cactus Yearbook • Longhorn Life


W&N 3

NEWS

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Thursday, February 13, 2014

STATE

STATE

Texas attracts more African Davis comes out for medical pot students than any other state By Jeremy Thomas @JeremyOBThomas

By Kate Dannenmaier @kater_tot7

Thirteen percent of all African students enrolled in American universities come to study in Texas — more so than in any other state — according to data from the Student and Exchange Visitor Program’s quarterly review. Although a large percentage of African students come to Texas, only about 2 percent of them end up at UT, according to a fall 2012 report by the Office of Information Management and Analysis, known as IMA. Teri Albrecht, director of International Student and Scholar Services, said the reason for the low number of African students at UT could be that a large number of the students are undergraduates. “UT-Austin admits very few undergraduate international students compared to other colleges and universities,” Albrecht said. According to a fall 2013 report by IMA, international students account for 9.2 percent of the total student population, with 106 of them originating from Africa. Wilson Amadi, biology senior and president of the African Students Association, said he believes the large African populations in large metropolitan areas such as Houston and Dallas could play a major role in Africans’ decisions to move

WEATHER

continues from page 1 she used were not. “It was sleeting on top of the road no matter if it [was] treated or not,” Meeks said. “Especially where there [was] paint [tended] to be slicker.” Nation said the city stores

Amy Zhang / Daily Texan Staff

Rhetoric and writing senior Sophia Feleke is the public relations chair for Students of East Africa. Thirteen percent of African students enrolled in American universities attend schools in Texas.

to Texas. “When you move, you bring your family and people you’re closer to,” Amadi said. “And there’s a following, kind of like a trend of thinking there’s more Africans, and there’s more people that I’m similar to in this city, so I’d rather go to this city and start up there.” Sophia Feleke, rhetoric and writing senior and public relations chair for Students of East Africa, said she believes UT offers many opportunities for African students to find community on campus. “For foreign students, overall, there are a wide variety of cultural groups on campus,” Feleke said. “African students have different organizations on campus, like Students of East Africa, African Student Association, African

American Culture Committee and many more that give them opportunities to meet other students on campus of similar backgrounds.” Feleke said she believes the hard work put in by people’s families to come to America could be a motivating factor for African students to come to UT. “Something stressed in the African culture is the importance of education,” Feleke said. “No matter which country in Africa we’re from, I believe that’s something many of our families share. You just understand that your family worked hard to come to this country in order to give you all the opportunities they never had. Coming to an outstanding university like UT gives African students that chance.”

one major stockpile of dolomite on Kramer Lane and distributes to stockpiles located at other service centers throughout Austin — on Dalton Lane, St. Elmo and Harold Court. According to Nation, the number of times the city has to replace the stockpile depends on how much the city uses per event.

Nation said the city monitors local weather forecasts and buys from a local vendor who transports the dolomite to the city’s service centers within 48 hours. “We have some kind of emergency every year and we sort of prepare for it that way,” Nation said. “We either have ice or a little flood.”

As Texans and UT students continue to debate whether medical marijuana should be allowed in the state, gubernatorial candidate and state Sen. Wendy Davis expressed her support for it in an interview with the Dallas Morning News Editorial Board on Tuesday. “With regard to medical marijuana, I personally believe that medical marijuana should be allowed for,” Davis said in the interview. “I don’t know where the state is on that, as a population. Certainly as governor I think it’s important to be deferential to whether the state of Texas feels that it’s ready for that.” At the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in January, Gov. Rick Perry said he opposed full legalization of marijuana but is looking for ways to reduce jail time for some nonviolent marijuana users. Twenty states and the District of Columbia allow marijuana usage for medical purposes. In accordance with Texas penal codes, the possession of 2 ounces or

Greg Abbott

Wendy Davis

Lieutenant governor

less of marijuana is a class B misdemeanor, which could result in fines and jail time. Representatives of the Greg Abbott campaign did not respond to requests for comment. A 2011 poll, sponsored by Texas Lyceum and conducted by UT researchers, found that one-third of Texans support the legalization of marijuana. Michelle Willoughby, government and Plan I Honors junior and communications director of University Democrats, said she doesn’t think there are many singleissue voters whose single issue is medical marijuana. “I doubt this issue will have a huge effect on the gubernatorial race,” Willoughby said. “While I think every issue is important, I think the most

State senator

‘hot button’ issues currently are probably reproductive health care access, education, roads [and] transportation and gun control. I think marijuana is probably a little lower down most voters’ priorities.” Zach Berberich, accounting junior and communications director of College Republicans of Texas, wrote in a statement that the organization could not comment on the issue at this time. Physics junior Lisandro Rodriguez Jr. said he feels there are benefits to legalization. “If it serves a medical purpose and can help people by all means use it,” Rodriguez said. “It has the potential to make money if it is legalized too. Legalize it, put a high tax on it and let people do as they please.”

CITY

City council to review stealth dorms Thursday By Amanda Voeller @amandaevoeller

Austin City Council will discuss decreasing the number of unrelated adults who may live in a single-family residence from six to four at its meeting Thursday. The council has received various complaints from families in areas near these types of houses, mainly north of UT campus, which opponents refer to as “stealth dorms,” councilman Chris Riley said in November. Riley said the city’s rising housing costs are an overall trend, which hurts permanent

residents as well as students. “Vacancy rates are at historic lows, and we see continued growth pressures, and we need to find ways to accommodate that growth in ways that are convenient and affordable,” Riley said. “The answer isn’t to ignore current zoning and change the character of existing neighborhoods.” Riley said the city will work to address Austin’s rapid student growth without relying on single-family houses. “We absolutely need to find ways to accommodate the student population, so we’re going to continue to work on providing good

options like we see in West Campus and along Guadalupe,” Riley said. “But the answer to accommodating our student growth is not to take out the single-family homes in single-family zone neighborhoods and replace them with dormitories.” In November, the council directed the city manager to begin working on a code amendment to address the issue of stealth dorms. The council will hold a public hearing and possibly vote on approving this change to the city code at its meeting Thursday at Austin City Hall, which begins at 10 a.m.

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4A OPINION

LAURA WRIGHT, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / @TexanEditorial Thursday, February 13, 2014

4

GALLERY

COLUMN

Shared services plan presents UT opportunity to cut costs By Thomas Gilligan Guest Columnist

University finances across the country are in the midst of a long-term transformation, challenging higher education leaders to respond strategically to control costs while continuing to deliver value to students. Documenting the financial threat to “business as usual,” the American Council on Education in late 2012 highlighted that, despite growing demand for higher education since the mid-1970s, U.S. public funding has been in retreat for the past three decades, with 2011 funding for public universities down by 40.2 percent, compared to fiscal year 1980. A March 2013 report from the National Association of State Budget Officers, financed by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, focused on the increasing difficulty for public colleges to offset declines in state revenue by raising tuition, and advocated strong action to increase administrative efficiency in higher education. This dynamic has led universities around the country to join forces to share investments such as software licenses, health services and science facilities, and to streamline administrative functions — such as HR, accounting, procurement and IT — that can consume more than 20 percent of university budgets. UT President William Powers Jr. has emphasized the importance of achieving new administrative cost savings and efficiencies to free up resources for the University’s core missions of teaching and research. This ongoing effort is a difficult but important aspect of making UT-Austin the best public university in the country. Powers knows great organizations never stop trying to improve how they operate.

The University appropriately selected Accenture to support the UT-Austin-driven effort to assess approaches to achieve greater administrative efficiency. Shared services was not and is not an Accenture initiative.

There is neither a one-size-fits-all solution for university financial woes nor one type of reform initiative sufficient to address all financial challenges. But fundamental benefits of standardizing some transactional administrative processes via shared services — reducing costs through economies of scale, increasing opportunities for administrative staff and improvements in service quality standards — make the approach increasingly attractive to higher education. This is why shared services are being piloted at UT-Austin, and why the McCombs School of Business has already implemented some shared services and is now participating in the new initiative at the pilot stage. The University has made headway over the past year in part by drawing on appropriate outside resources to provide the expertise and staff needed to advance the drive for greater administrative efficiency in a timely manner, including charting a pathway targeting savings of $30-40 million annually in perpetuity. A well-respected global firm with a large presence in Texas, Accenture focuses on helping businesses, government agencies, educational institutions and nonprofits to operate more efficiently and improve services. The firm has a long history of successfully serving business, government and education organizations in Texas, with more than 1,000 employees in Austin and strong ties to UT for recruiting new graduates. The University appropriately selected Accenture to support the UT-Austin-driven effort to assess approaches to achieve greater administrative efficiency. Shared services was not and is not an Accenture initiative. It was launched and has been managed by the University, and, as the project moves into pilot phase in units around campus, Accenture’s role, supporting the assessment and planning phase, has concluded. As Powers said, UT-Austin is already one of the most efficient and effective public universities in the nation. A pervasive spirit of restlessness and discontent with the status quo is a large part of what makes it so, and is essential to advancing Powers’ goal of making UT-Austin the number-one public University in America. Shared services deserves to be in the mix of ways that UT-Austin can improve quality, increase efficiency and keep a lid on cost increases. This way, the University can focus more resources on student and faculty needs in the long term. Thomas Gilligan is the Dean of the McCombs School of Business.

HORNS UP: TEXAS BEATS CALIFORNIA IN TECH PRODUCTION In 2012, Texas companies shipped out more than $45 billion in technology, including semiconductors and computers, outperforming California for the for first time, according to the Dallas Morning News. Texas now leads the nation in tech exports, supporting 331,000 jobs in the state and sending most of its products to Mexico. The numbers are up by $3 billion in Texas since 2011. Texas has long promoted itself as an ideal place to build a startup or grow a business, and the numbers are beginning to reflect this trend. Horns up to Texas’ progress in the high-tech field and coming out from under Silicon Valley’s shadow.

HORNS DOWN: HALL INVESTIGATION COSTING TIME, MONEY Attorney’s fees for the UT System and the investigation of Regent Wallace Hall by the Texas House Select Committee on Transparency in State Agency Operations have totaled more than $400,000, according to the Dallas Morning News. Hall was under scrutiny for micromanaging and his constant open-records requests for UT documents. The System has since re-evaluated its policies for regents requesting information from UT institutions. The investigation and the tension surrounding the requests and subsequent investigation have distracted administrators and the UT community enough, and knowing that this drama played out at the highest level of state politics and is amounting to a big waste of money only makes the embarrassing debacle worse. It’s time for everyone to refocus on the students and faculty instead of the regents’ drama.

Knowing that this drama played out at the highest level of state politics and is amounting to a big waste of money only makes the embarrassing debacle worse. HORNS UP: DAVIS’ PLATFORM INCLUDES ACCESS TO PRE-K On Wednesday, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis called for increased access to full-day prekindergarten programs, along with an expansion of Texas’ early-childhood reading program. The proposal is a central point in her campaign’s overall push to restore $5.4 billion worth of spending cuts to public schools in 2011. Although Davis doesn’t put a price tag on the cost of her plan, funding could come from a new grant through the Texas Education Agency or by restoring funds to the Pre-K Early Start Program. And, although Abbott’s spokesperson, Avidel Huerta, has already dismissed the proposal as a “mere talking point” that will “add billions in new spending,” in a statement to the Texas Tribune, we think there is something to be said for Davis’ willingness to address the near-bankrupt state of public education in Texas.

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Lucy Griswold / Daily Texan Staff

COLUMN

Valentine’s day vendors leave out LGBTQ buyers By David Davis

Daily Texan Columnist @daveedalon

Walk into the University Co-op anytime this week and you’ll find plush teddy bears and Longhorn lingerie. These Valentine’sthemed gifts would be perfect for my girlfriend, if I were not gay. Of all the burnt-orange gifts, there was not one geared toward men. Had I been searching for a gift for a male significant other, my choices would have been slim-to-none. The Co-op, like many other Valentine’s Day merchandisers, caters to a traditional view of couples that promotes the idea of heteronormativity, which asserts that a heterosexual relationship that adheres to traditional gender roles is the only type of relationship around. While I don’t believe that the Co-op is intentionally alienating consumers that don’t fit a heteronormative ideal, it’s Valentine’s Day selection exemplifies how limited celebrations of this holiday can be. When I think of the perfect Valentine’s Day — a vision that is not at all in sync with my reality as a gay man — I think of a man coming home to his wife with long-stemmed red roses, a heart-shaped box of chocolates and the bracelet that she has always wanted from Tiffany’s. They go out for a lovely dinner, and the night ends in smoldering passion because the male in this scenario has performed his duty of procuring gifts for his

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to editor@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

wife, who must show her appreciation. Valentine’s Day merchandisers market to this image, and, consequently, Valentine’s Day advertisements generally speak to the man who is in a heterosexual relationship, leaving out a large group of people who also love and are loved. Men in same-sex couples who would like to buy presents for their significant others have fewer options because, despite the overwhelming idea that gay men are inherently effeminate, they do not all want the same gifts that women receive on Valentine’s Day. Flowers and jewelry do not appeal to all gay men. This is not to say that there should be an influx of gifts that are considered stereotypically masculine, but it would be nice to see a Valentine’s Day card specifically geared toward the LGBT community, perhaps depicting a same-sex couple as madly in love as the heterosexual couple in another card on the same shelf. Advertising doesn’t speak to women who are in same-sex relationships, either. Although, in such a relationship, a woman is the recipient of a gift, advertisements enforce the idea that a man should buy it. Images of a woman buying her female partner a Valentine’s Day gift are not common. The University Co-op is certainly not the only store that reinforces the idea of heteronormativity during Valentine’s Day, but the store is the most recognizable vendor of Longhorn-themed items. It would be great to see a more progressive Co-op that sells Valentine’s Day items to cater to all types of couples. Davis is an international relations and French junior from Houston.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@TexanEditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


CLASS/JUMP 5

MANTIS

continues from page 8 stealth. Not only will he creep around, avoiding detection, but, if spotted, he will stand perfectly still, in some cases with a leg frozen in midair. Mantis vision is based on movement, so, by keeping

UNS AD IRNE FOR ONL

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Thursday, February 13, 2014

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still, the male effectively becomes invisible to the predatory female. But, what if she does catch him? He’s got another ace up his sleeve. Instead of telling bodies when to mate, mantis brains tell the bodies when not to by actively inhibiting sexual reflexes. When the female takes a bite out

of the male’s head, the remaining body does everything it can, perpetually gyrating, in an effort to mate with whatever is in the vicinity — be it female mantis or an experimenter’s finger. These movements will continue even after the female finishes his head and moves on to his abdomen. As Howard

noted, “nothing but his wings remained.” The competition of natural selection occurs between individuals and not between species. Though there are genuine examples of altruism in specific cases — humans being the prime example — sacrificing one’s life is rare, indeed. The beauty of nature arises

from individuals looking out for themselves, trying to spread their genes and theirs alone. Though computer models have come up with situations where it may be beneficial for the males to be eaten, it’s unlikely they apply often in real life, if at all. This is almost certainly true in the mantis, where

CLASSIFIEDS THE DAILY TEXAN

observations record the male doing everything in his power to actively avoid becoming the female’s next meal. So, the next time a hot date orders the lobster after having offered to pick up the check, remember that it could be a whole lot worse: He could have ordered you.

ADVERTISING TERMS There are no refunds or credits. In the event of errors made in advertisement, notice must be given by 10 am the fi rst day of publication, as the publishers are responsible for only ONE incorrect insertion. In consideration of The Daily Texan’s acceptance of advertising copy for publication, the agency and the advertiser will indemnify and save harmless, Texas Student Media and its officers, employees and agents against all loss, liability, damage and expense of whatsoever nature arising out of the copying, printing or publishing of its advertisement including without limitation reasonable attorney’s fees resulting from claims of suits for libel, violation of right of privacy, plagiarism and copyright and trademark infringement. All ad copy must be approved by the newspaper which reserves the right to request changes, reject or properly classify an ad. The advertiser, and not the newspaper, is responsible for the truthful content of the ad. Advertising is also subject to credit approval.

Self-serve, 24/7 on the Web at www.DailyTexanOnline.com

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910 Positions Wanted WEBSITE DEVELOPER WANTED Building a new business and in need of website development and management assistance. A SEO class would be preferred. I have ran my own business for 30 years. 10-20 hours a week at our office near the Y in Oak Hill. Summer or permanent position would be possible for the right person. Email johnjgormaniv@ gmail.com Salary and hours negotiable.

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Upgrade, set-up, and monitor the company’s wide area networks and local area network. Perform maintenance, evaluation, installation, and training tasks to ensure LAN and WAN performance and user requirements and assess network performance. Deploy new accounting/managing software for newly acquired sites. OneSite Knowledge. Develop receipt software for non-accounting staff members using Clarion. Analyze products and recommend use of new products and services to managers and corporate. Establish and implement policies and procedures for LAN/WAN usage throughout the organization. Administer network workstations, utilizing one or more TCP/IP or non-TCP/ IP networking protocols. Requires bachelor degree in computer science. Send resumes to The Preiss Company. austinjobs360@gmail.com. Job is in Austin, TX.

920 Work Wanted

TUTORS WANTED for all subjects currently taught at UT. Starting at $10/hour. Apply online at www.99tutors.com or call 512-354-7656.

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6 SPTS

STEFAN SCRAFIELD, SPORTS EDITOR / @texansports Thursday, February 13, 2014

6

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SIDELINE No. 15 TEXAS

2

VS.

4

UTSA

UTSA shocks Texas in home opener By Jacob Martella

in contributing to Texas’ only two runs of the game, committing three errors in the second while Texas had just one hit in the inning. The Roadrunners, on the other hand, took advantage of their opportunities. After

WIZARDS

ROCKETS

NCAAM SYRACUSE

PITTSBURGH

TEXAS TECH Shweta Gulati / Daily Texan Staff

With sophomore outfielder Erin Shireman on deck, sophomore first baseman Holly Kern and the Longhorns whiffed in the home opener Wednesday night 4-2 to UTSA. After averaging six runs a game in its first six games, No. Texas struggled to score.

trailing for most of the game, UTSA pulled within one in the fourth on a bloop RBI single and then seized a 3-2 lead on a two-run home run by junior catcher Megan Low. “[Low] jumped on the first pitch and put a pretty good bat on it,” Smith said. “I kind of left it over the plate, and she hit it over.” In the sixth, UTSA tacked on

an insurance run with a triple followed by a sacrficial flyball. Texas had a chance to tie the game in the seventh when freshman shortstop Devon Tunning and junior Marlee Gabaldon got to second and third, respectively, with one out, but senior outfielder Brejae Washington grounded out and sophomore Lindsey Stephens flied out to center field.

Junior pitcher Gabby Smith had a solid outing until the fifth inning. Smith had four strikeouts in five innings pitched. Kern led what offense Texas had, going 2-for-4 and scoring the game’s first run of the game. The loss is the third-straight defeat for the Longhorns, who began the year with four wins, including three

In need of an easy win against the second-worst team in conference, Texas struggled to pull away in Manhattan, Kan., against Kansas State, before eventually winning 69-63. “It was not our best performance but, again, credit to K-State,” head coach Karen Aston said. Although senior guard Chassidy Fussell eventually helped Texas secure the win with three rebounds and a team leading 15 points, the Longhorns were fighting for victory until the buzzer. “I thought it was a hardfought game that our team pretty much just grinded out,” Aston said. “It was tough.” The game started off back and forth with a feisty Kansas State team (9-14, 3-9 Big 12) before the Longhorns pulled out to a 7-point lead at halftime. Texas looked in control and poised to make a run in the second half. After a 6-3 run to start the half, Texas’ 12-point lead looked commanding. The Longhorns began to give way to the Wildcats, and, within five minutes, Kansas State’s Ashlynn Knoll put up eight points and the score was tied at 49. The Longhorns (16-7, 7-4 Big 12) kept

pulling ahead, but the Wildcats seemed to always have an answer. Freshman forward Nekia Jones finally put the Longhorns up for good — with just over six minutes to go — with a three to break a tie. Kansas State cut the lead to three with a minute left, but the leading scorer in the game — Fussell — hit a big three and sunk two free throws to ice the game. “We had a better stretch of defense in the last seven to eight minutes,” Aston said on pulling out the win at the end. “We sort of turned our attention towards defending a little bit better.” Fussell ended the game with 15 points, connecting on three shots from behind the arc to help maintain Texas’ first-place rank in the Big 12 in 3-point field goal percentage. Last season, Texas finished last in the Big 12 in 3-point field-goal percentage. Sophomore guard Empress Davenport scored 12 points with six rebounds and five assists off the bench. Junior forward Nneka Enemkpali ended her night one rebound shy of a double-double, posting 10 points and nine boards. The Longhorns will take on No. 7 Baylor on Sunday in Texas’ annual “Shoot for a Cure” game at the Frank Erwin Center.

Lauren Ussery / Daily Texan Staff

Junior forward Nneka Enemkpali helped Texas route Texas Tech earlier in the year. Her 10 points and nine boards helped Texas win again on Wednesday in Manhattan against Kansas State.

victories against ranked opponents. Texas will be back in action this weekend, taking on Kentucky, Indiana UniversityPurdue University Fort Wayne and Louisiana Tech in the Texas Classic. Going forward, Smith said the team can’t look back at these past few losses. “We just have to stay positive,” Smith said.

FOOTBALL

Late-game stretch helps Texas beat Kansas State @RachelWenzlaff

PACERS

CELTICS

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

By Rachel Wenzlaff

MAVERICKS

SPURS

@ViewFromTheBox

Getting runners on base was easy for the No. 15 Longhorns. Getting those runners across was another story. Texas left 16 runners on base, while UTSA capitalized on its scoring opportunities as the Longhorns fell 4-2 for their first home-opening loss since 2007 Wednesday night. “We were getting runners on and we were making things happen, but we weren’t getting them in,” sophomore first baseman Holly Kern said. After averaging six runs in its first six games, Texas (4-3) struggled to score with runners on base. The Longhorns loaded the bases in five innings, but only scored in one, leaving 16 runners on base. Kern said UTSA freshma starting pitcher Nicole Merril threw a number of off-speed pitches, which the Longhorns had trouble hitting in those key spots. “We kind of needed to slow it down and look for that pitch and square it up,” Kern said. “And I don’t think we did a good job of that.” UTSA (4-0) played a big part

NBA

Anthony Fera made 20 of 22 field goals and was a finalist for the Lou Groza award, while kickig for Texas this season. Now, Fera prepares for the NFL draft where he is expected to be a late round pick.

Sam Ortega Daily Texan Staff

Fera preparing for NFL draft, continuing Longhorn legacy

Longhorns in the Draft By Jeremy Thomas @jeremyOBthomas

It’s no anomaly seeing a Texas placekicker in the NFL. Justin Tucker was named first-team All-Pro this season and helped the Baltimore Ravens to a Super Bowl in his rookie season. Phil Dawson holds the Cleveland Browns’ franchise record for most field goals made — more than Hall of Famer Lou Groza. And next season, the man who tied Dawson for the Texas consecutive field goal record, Anthony Fera, should be the third kicker on an NFL roster in 2014. CBSSports.com, powered by nfldraftscout.com, rated him as the second-best kicker in the draft behind Rice’s Chris Boswell, and project him to be taken in the sixth round. But Fera’s college football journey wasn’t simple. Rivals.com had Fera as the

second-ranked kicker in the nation out of St. Pius X High School in Houston, but he opted to leave the state to go to Penn State. During his time at Happy Valley, Fera broke multiple records, became a candidate for the Ray Guy Award — an award for the nation’s best punter — and a semifinalist for the Lou Groza Award, an award for the nation’s best kicker. After Fera’s second year with the Nittany Lions, scandal broke in Happy Valley. With Penn State facing a slew of penalties, the NCAA allowed Penn State players to transfer immediately without adhering to customary NCAA rules for transfers sitting out a year. Fera decided to transfer, but for a different reason: He wanted to be closer to his mother who had multiple sclerosis. “Shortly before I arrived on campus, the most important person in my life was diagnosed with MS, making it more and more difficult to travel each weekend from Texas to see me play,” Fera said in a statement following his decision to transfer. “The Lord works in mysterious ways, and I’ve been afforded the opportunity to give back to my family and make their lives a little easier by transferring to a university much

closer to home, The University of Texas.” Fera was hampered by injuries in his first season at Texas. He missed the first four games of the 2012 season with a groin injury and then a hip injury in the latter half of the schedule caused him to miss the final three. Fera entered his senior year healthy and started in all 13 games, accounting for 105 points. The Longhorns scored a total of 381 points in 2013. Fera went 20-for-22 on the year with field goals and missed one extra point out of 46 attempts. He was also the No. 1 punter in the depth chart, punting the ball 75 times with 32 of those downed inside the 20, averaging 40.7 yards per punt. Those stats helped Fera become UT’s first consensus AllAmerican and the first Groza Award finalist in Longhorn history. His 90.9 field goal percentage placed him second on the Longhorns all-time singleseason field goal accuracy list. He didn’t kick a gamewinning field goal as a Longhorn, but his perseverance and consistency on and off the gridiron has landed him as the second ranked kicker in this year’s draft class. As a possible late round pick, Fera has the potential to continue the legacy of successful Texas placekickers at the next level.

OKLAHOMA

OLYMPICS

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NETHERLANDS

UNITED STATES

CANADA

GERMANY

TODAY IN HISTORY

1920

National Negro Baseball League organized. TOP TWEET Mike Magic Davis Jr @MikeDavis_1

I guess my daughter gon be my valentine since i don’t have one..

SPORTS BRIEFLY Mack Brown receives severance and new job

Mack Brown will receive the $2.75 million that Texas would have owed him if he had been fired, along with a position as a special assistant to the president for athletics, which will pay him $500,000 per year. According to UT Athletics spokesman Nick Voinis on Wednesday, Texas is honoring the terms of Brown’s final coaching contract, which ran through 2020. In Brown’s contract, Texas would owe him $2.75 million in four annual installments if he were fired before Dec. 31, 2014. The contract also included the job with the annual salary, in case he resigned. Brown stepped down Dec. 14 as a “mutual” decision amoung himself, President William Powers Jr. and men’s head Athletic Director Steve Patterson. —Evan Berkowitz


COMICS 7

COMICS

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Thursday, February 13, 2014

IT’S A LOVE-SAVE RELATIONSHIP.

WINES · SPIRITS · FINER FOODS The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 (512) 366-8260 · SPECSONLINE.COM For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 Cheers to Savings! ® For Release Thursday, February 13, 2014

Edited by Will Shortz

Crossword ACROSS 1 Flies (along) 5 Clutter 8 What spies collect 13 Voyaging 14 Flaming Gorge locale 16 Who has scored more than 850 points in an official Scrabble game 17 Frolic 18 “Beloved” author Morrison 19 Bagpipe music, maybe 20 Delt neighbor 21 You might slip on it 22 Fragrant compound 23 Lucy ___, title character in Sir Walter Scott’s “The Bride of Lammermoor” 25 Security Council veto

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27 Sure-___ 29 Shellacs 31 First name in folk 32 ___ factor 37 Drippings, maybe 38 City in southern California 40 Unloading point 41 Food processor? 43 Overseas 44 Like some numbers and beef 45 Bill producers, for short 48 You might slip on it 51 Extemporizes 54 Theater’s ___ Siddons Award 55 Assign stars to 57 Distillery sight 58 Prefix with type 59 Plaintiff 60 Agree 61 Western German city 62 Shade providers

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

5 9 8 1 2 4 3 7 6

Today’s solution will appear here next issue

4 2 7 3 5 6 1 8 9

1 3 6 7 8 9 5 4 2

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U L T R A

R P E E H S P A T B O B P A C S O D E M B B L I S S Q S T S A U P E

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I R K S O M E

N E W I S S U E

I L O

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A T O B

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63 Genesis locale 64 Big name in tractors 65 ___-square 66 Wallop

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PUZZLE BY CALEB EMMONS

34 Make pieces of pieces? 35 OPEC member: Abbr. 36 Barrett of Pink Floyd 38 ___ Israel Medical Center 39 Experiment site 42 The speed of sound

44 See 46-Down

52 Genesis locale

46 With 44-Down, “key” invention of the 1830s

53 Blocked vessel opener

47 500 people? 48 Carefully examine 49 Appeared 50 Something to pare, informally

54 Tore 56 Agenda part 60 One of the Bushes

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

MCAT® | LSAT® | GMAT® | GRE® Available:

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DOWN 1 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee with only one Top 40 hit 2 British ___ 3 Sign of puberty, maybe 4 For example 5 Certain horror film villain 6 Alma mater for David Cameron 7 Site of slippage … both geographically and in this puzzle 8 Thorough 9 “Make some ___!” 10 Calorie-heavy dessert 11 Richard ___, “War Zone Diary” journalist 12 What womanizers do 15 Glistening, as Christmas ornaments 21 Haunted house sounds 24 Actor Maguire 26 Lead-in to plane 28 Site of a piercing 29 Forest female 30 ___ Burgundy, the anchorman in “Anchorman” 33 Splenda competitor

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No. 0109

In Person

LiveOnline

Use promo code DailyTexan$150 to save $150 on classroom prep. PrincetonReview.com | 800-2Review


8 L&A

HANNAH SMOTHERS, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR / @DailyTexanArts Thursday, February 13, 2014

8

THEATER & DANCE

Local actor shines in spotlight By Kritika Kulshrestha @kritika88

Film and theater actor Andrew Bosworth believes he hasn’t done enough to satiate his curiosity as an artist. In his newest stage role, Bosworth performs as Caleb in The City Theatre Company’s production of Matthew Lopez’s play “The Whipping Man.” Bosworth will perform Friday along with co-actors Robert Pellette and Richard Romeo. “Being on stage with Bosworth is like being on stage with the sun,” said Trevor Bissell, a veteran actor at the theater company. “You want to step into the glow with the hope that you can be as radiant as he is.” Born in New Hampshire, Bosworth was raised in a family in which no one was really interested in the arts or in music. “When I was younger, I never really liked myself very much,” Bosworth said. “So I tried staying quiet for a long time, but that wasn’t really a good outlet for my energy, so I took a drama class on a lark just because it was there. Luckily, I had a good teacher and it was a lot of fun, and I kept doing it and one thing led to another.” Bosworth graduated in December 2008 with a double major in theater and sociology from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. While in college, he received his first big opportunity to star in a Broadway production, “Chess,” as part of the North Carolina Theatre. “One of the main roles was not cast and they just wanted somebody to stand in, and I was like, “I’ll do that,’ so I was standing in and they said,

Pu Ying Huang / Daily Texan Staff

Film and Theater actor Andrew Bosworth will be performing at The City Theatre in Matthew Lopez’s award winning production of “The Whipping Man.” Bosworth plays a wounded Jewish confederate soldier who returns home only to find it destroyed and abandoned except for his two slaves.

‘Why don’t we just give it to this kid?,’” Bosworth said. “So I got pumped up from the ensemble to the supporting lead in the show, which I was not, at all, expecting.” In spring 2010, Bosworth toured all over North Carolina performing a series of Shakespearean plays, including “Hamlet” and “Taming of the Shrew,” as part of the North Carolina Shakespeare Festival educational tour.

“The shows were zany and whacky,” Bosworth said. “These were hour-long adaptations, where we each had up to three roles per show, going back and forth switching characters. I even got to play a girl.” In 2013, Bosworth starred in the Austin Theatre Project’s “Falsettos,” an operetta, which is how he met Jeff Hinkle, director-in-residence at the theater company. “He has this terrible intensity,” Hinkle said. “He

had such a depth of performance during auditions ,and I just knew that he was going to get better and better during rehearsals. He was the most professional, committed actor I’ve ever worked with.” Bissell, who has worked with Bosworth only on “Othello” so far, hopes to work with him more in the future. “His performance in ‘Falsettos’ evoked a visceral

and true emotion,” Bissell said. “Every movement is deliberate. Every silent moment calculated.” Bosworth believes improvisation is a key skill and likes to get into the details of his character and the story before every performance. “He’s incredibly gifted, and, once he gets the part, he’s truly committed to doing the research for the character,” Hinkle said. Although opportunities

have come his way by chance, Bosworth has been eager to learn and to grow. “My professor of theater in college told us, ‘You have to want it more than you want to eat. You have to want it more than you want to own a home,’ and then he paused and said, ‘You have to want it more than you want to be happy,’ and that really stuck with me,” Bosworth said. “That’s tough and not many people realize that.”

CITY

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Anti-Valentine’s Day events offer chance to break up with tradition

Mantis mating brings new meaning to Darwin’s theory

By Sarah Montgomery @WithALittleJazz

Valentine’s Day is a day for singles and couples to reflect on their relationship statuses and assess just how much chocolate is acceptable to consume in one 24-hour period. The Daily Texan compiled a list of events that attempt to break the heart-shaped monotony of the year’s mostromantic holiday. The Love Bites Sing-Along at Alamo Drafthouse Nothing cures a broken or bruised heart like passionately belting out a song. The Love Bites Sing-Along includes the music of Bon Jovi, Journey and other ’80s and ’90s relics. Beginning with an air guitar competition, viewers will also participate in holding complimentary lighters in the air and pounding “fists at the sky in defiance of those who would dare not love” them. There will be prizes for people who share the best break-up stories. Hash out unrequited love and listen to Steve Perry’s uplifting message that love will find you. Check online for show times. Valloween at Space 12 Instead of facing the holiday, pretend it’s a different one. Valloween is a chance to dress up like it’s Oct. 31. Go as a lonely troll monster or slap on a set of fairy wings. This Valentine’s-Halloween hybrid is the love child of the community rental residence Space 12 and the Inside Book Project, a volunteer organization that donates books to incarcerated citizens and promotes incarcerated education. Admission is a $5-$10 donation with proceeds benefitting the Inside Book Project. The event will have live

By Robert Starr @robertkstarr

Illustration by Hannah Hadidi / Daily Texan Staff

music, free beer and two DJs. Sixth Annual Anti-Valentine’s Day Burlesque Show at Speakeasy If a heart-shaped box of chocolates and watching “The Notebook” proves to be too mild of a night, turn up the heat with Austin’s Bat City Bombshells. Combining the theatrics and sensuality of classic burlesque, the local group will perform its sixth annual anti-Valentine’s show at Speakeasy. Eleven female thespians will take the stage in handmade costumes to strip and tease. The yearly show is intended to be a celebration of “lust, broken hearts and beautiful ladies,” filled with laughter, lingerie and seduction. Oh my! Valentine X by the House of Torment Trade in love for blood-curdling fear. The House of Torment is hosting a new event called Valentine X. House of Torment is known for its multilevel sets with characters and scenarios portrayed by local actors. The haunted house will have all the usual horror but with a Valentine’s Day twist. It stars the Bear Butcher — an evil character looking for victims to satisfy his lustful vengeance. The Bear Butcher leaves nothing of his victims but an ‘X’

THE LOVE BITES SING ALONG When: Various times Where: Alamo Drafthouse Cost: $12

VALLOWEEN When: Friday 9 p.m. - 1 a.m. Where: 3121 E. 12th St. Cost: $5 - $10

Feb. 12 of every year marks Darwin Day, a holiday celebrating the anniversary of the birth of the famous scientist who offered what is, arguably, the single greatest theory of modern times. Natural selection provides an explanation for how order can come from disorder and how an unthinking process can, given time, give rise to a thinking creature who can uncover said process and give it

a name. But natural selection works in strange ways, and “survival of the fittest” doesn’t explain how every trait evolved. Take the praying mantis, for whom the term “battle of the sexes” takes on new meaning. In a Science magazine article from 1886, author L. O. Howard describes his observations of a male mantis attempting to court a female: “She first bit off his left front tarsus and consumed the tibia and femur. Next she gnawed out his left eye. At this, the male seemed to realize his proximity to one of the opposite sex and began to make vain endeavors to mate.” By contrast, human dating sounds downright pleasant. Female mantises do occasionally eat their mates. This has been observed in the lab as well as in the wild. But

it’s unlikely that there’s any evolutionary advantage to the male allowing himself to being eaten. Like most insects and arachnids, female mantises are larger than their male counterparts and can easily overpower them. Since this father-to-be won’t stick around to help raise the kids — don’t judge, neither will the mother — the female might as well get some use out of last night’s mistake by eating him. It’s not that she can’t tell the difference between mantises and other insects; it’s that she doesn’t care. Given the opportunity, she will even eat the male before he has a chance to mate with her. It’s for this reason that the male mantis is equipped with two abilities to help him in his efforts. The first is his ninja-like

MANTIS page 5

SPEAKEASY When: Friday at 9 p.m. Where: 412 Congress Ave. Cost: $12 - $15

VALENTINE X When: Friday and Saturday 7:30 - 10:30 p.m. Where: The House of Torment at Highland Mall Cost: $24.99

carved into their foreheads. Swoon. Whether alone or with someone, pants-wetting fear will take precedence over relationship status during the 30-minute tour. If not, maybe that cute stranger will agree to hold hands until the end of the “candlelit horror.”

Illustration by Ploy Buraparate / Daily Texan Staff

The Daily Texan 2014-02-13  

The Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014 edition of The Daily Texan

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