Issuu on Google+

1

COMICS PAGE 7

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 8

MULTIMEDIA ONLINE

Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

@thedailytexan

facebook.com/dailytexan

Thursday, January 30, 2014

dailytexanonline.com

bit.ly/dtvid

CITY

NATIONAL

UT, city bike programs may not mesh

Court to decide on cell phone seizures

By Alyssa Mahoney @TheAlyssaM

Austin will add three new bike kiosks near campus to its bike sharing program, but the additions may conflict with an existing student-run bike-rental program.

B-cycle manages the Bike Share of Austin, an Austin government-sponsored program that began in December. The program allows users to pay a day rate or buy an annual membership to rent a bike, which can be returned to any of 11 bike

kiosks throughout the city. By Sunday, B-cycle will construct 15 additional kiosks, two of which will be located on Guadalupe near 21st Street and the West Mall. One other will

BIKE page 2

Multimedia Austin’s new bike share program is tested to see if it is a viable transportation alternative for students. Watch online at dailytexanonline.com

undergraduate students, faculty and staff. Louise Meeks, manager of the museum’s gift shop, said her job would most likely remain intact because the gift

MUSEUM page 3

PHONES page 2

Petition to save museum gains traction By Nicole Cobler @nicolecobler

Eunice Ali / Daily Texan Staff

Because of a $700,000 budget cut in the College of Natural Sciences, Texas Memorial Museum is close to letting go eight of its 11 employees. More than 1,750 people have signed a petition opposing the cut in an attempt to preserve the 75-year-old museum.

budget cut would harm the important educational tools the natural history museum provides. “It’s been an important resource for local school children and teachers, as well as students at the University

studying paleontology, biology or art,” Newcomb said. Newcomb said she is worried that, if budget cuts are implemented, exhibits will not be maintained as well. Hicke was not available for comment, according to

natural sciences spokesman Lee Clippard. Clippard said larger state budget cuts over the last several years have made the museum difficult to fund. Clippard said the college wants to focus its funding on its

@juliakbrou

When questioned by the police, one has a constitutionally protected right to remain silent, but the contents of one’s cell phone may speak for themselves. The Supreme Court agreed to hear oral arguments on two cases last week, both of which center on the authority of police to search phones without a warrant — a practice that dates back to the 1970s. A Supreme Court ruling in 1973 established law enforcement officers’ right to perform searches of any containers found on a person they had arrested. In April, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments for one state case, Riley v. California, and one federal case, U.S. v. Wurie — each involving a different type of mobile phone. U.S. v. Wurie involves an outdated flip phone, but, in Riley v. California, the device in question is a smartphone, which is capable of holding much more personal data. Austin Police Cpl. David Boyd said Austin Police Department officers must at least have grounds for searching a person’s cell phone, but what constitutes fair grounds is determined by the circumstances of the arrest. “Officers won’t search cell phones each and every time they make an arrest,” Boyd said. “It depends on the crime or the situation at the

UNIVERSITY

More than 1,750 people have signed a petition opposing the budget cut to the Texas Memorial Museum, which would cause eight of 11 employees to lose their jobs, according to UT alumna Mary Newcomb, the petition’s founder. In September, the College of Natural Sciences announced plans to cut approximately $600,000 from the Texas Natural Science Center, which includes the Texas Memorial Museum, according to Edward Theriot, director of the Natural Science Center. Currently, the center’s total budget is $860,000. “We will be able to make up some of the University’s cuts but not all of them,” Theriot said. “It will have a traumatic effect.” Newcomb will be meeting with natural sciences dean Linda Hicke on Monday to raise concerns about the cut. “It seems that, if you’re cutting the museum funding back that far, you’re basically giving it a death sentence,” Newcomb said. Newcomb, whose father was director of the museum from 1957-1978, said the

By Julia Brouillette

CAMPUS

THROWBACK

Talk examines MLK’s iconic speech

‘Our three Russians’ reveals cultural misunderstandings

By Nicole Stiles @thedailytexan

When Martin Luther King Jr. first delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech, it wasn’t immediately considered iconic, according to British journalist Gary Younge, who spoke about his research on the speech Wednesday. Younge said King delivered his speech to a crowd that was passionate — but also overheated and tired. Younge said many audience members traveled all night to be at the March on Washington, D.C., on Aug. 28, 1963. “It was a hot day — 87 degrees by noon — and King was the 16th of 18 speakers,” Younge said. Younge said King had hoped civil rights could be achieved without holding a march. Activists and politicians were anxious in the

Brianna Holt / Daily Texan Staff

British journalist Gary Younge discusses his newest book, “The Speech; The Story Behind Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Dream” with Eric Tang, director of the University’s Social Justice Institution, at the Joynes Reading Room on Wednesday evening.

days prior to the March on Washington. “There was actually a kill switch planted inside King’s microphone,” Younge said. King had given similar speeches hundreds of times before — even the week before, during a march in

Detroit — but the well-known “I Have a Dream” section was not in the final draft of his intended speech, Younge said. According to Younge, this speech in Washington, D.C., was neither the birth nor the

MLK page 2

Texan First Pitch

Samuel Robinson, Louis Moses Chokla and Solomon Lifshitz (right to left) were the three Russian students at UT in 1912. All three were respected engineering students.

By Brett Donohoe @BrettDonohoe1

With the upcoming Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia, it is easy to forget how inaccessible Russian culture and society once was to the U.S. — and to UT students. In a Nov. 30, 1912, article published in The Texan, three Russian students were profiled for their achievements in the engineering department. The men, labeled

Get the scoop on this years baseball and softball teams in a special edition to the Daily Texan.

Charlie Pearce Daily Texan Staff

as “our three Russians,” became “bona fide Varsity Engineers” in their time at UT. While the October Revolution had not yet taken place at the time of publication, the article nevertheless approaches Russia as

an enigma. “Each man has known the bitings [sic] of poverty, and each has gone through intellectual civic fire,” the article said. “Each has worked his

TBT page 2


2 2

Thursday, January 30, 2014

TBT

FRAMES featured photo

continues from page 1 own way in the world against great odds, and when we contrast their condition ten [sic] years ago in Russia with their prospects today, their lives read like romances.” While no relevant information is given on their lives in Russia specifically, the article supposes that merely having been born in Russia deprived the students of their full career potential, which they then overcame through immigration. “They are no longer Russians, except by birth,” the article said. “They are now full-blooded Americans, patriotic, appreciative, and thoroughly conversant with their new country’s ideals and history.” In agreement with their supposed cultural realignment, the names of the three men — Solomon Lifshitz, Samuel Robinson and Louis Moses Chokla — reveal their Americanization, in that none of their names are Russian or even Russian-sounding. According to the article, Lifshitz “arrived in our

Volume 114, Issue 93

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor Laura Wright (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Shabab Siddiqui (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Sports Office (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office (512) 232-2209 dtlifeandarts@gmail.com

BIKE

continues from page 1

Retail Advertising (512) 471-1865 Classified Advertising (512) 471-5244 classifieds@ dailytexanonline.com

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

CORRECTION Because of an editing error, a column about internal college transfers in the Jan. 29 issue of The Daily Texan incorrectly described what the policy applies to. These polices apply to all colleges at the University.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2013 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER Low High

77

Zoe Davis / Daily Texan Staff

Workers set up a dining hall at the Etter-Harbin Alumni Center on Wednesday afternoon.

62

No, I cried alone. In the bathroom.

be built near the Blanton Museum of Art. B-cycle’s executive director Elliot McFadden said the bike share program allows people to more easily travel throughout Austin and avoid traffic congestion. “It’s a great way to get around and make short trips if you’re worried about a bike getting stolen or having to take care of a bike,” McFadden said. Sam Cortez, bicycle coordinator for Parking and Transportation Services, said transportation services and the city have not yet agreed to merge the city’s program and the Orange Bike Project, the University’s bike-sharing program. Cortez said the city’s program may not integrate well with the University’s program, and Transportation Services is considering other bikesharing platforms. “Most of these bike share programs are more successful in downtown business districts,” Cortez said. “We’re not necessarily sure that’s the right model for the University campus.” Cortez said students on campus typically want to use a bike longterm, so the cost of the city program’s membership may not be feasible

for students. “Depending on how long you kept your bike out, you could theoretically buy a bike for that price,” Cortez said. “We’d have to have kiosks everywhere — if they live in Jester and want to go to RLM, their rental would be active the whole time they were [in class].” Victor Harris, director of the Orange Bike Project, said demand for the University’s bikes is high and students must be added to a lengthy wait list to obtain them. “Most people usually wait about a semester or longer to get a bike,” Harris said. According to Harris, at least 60 percent of the Orange Bike Project’s funding comes from the Office of Sustainability’s $5 fee, which is added onto students’ tuition payments. Harris said the organization obtains additional funding through an annual bike auction and bike sales. B-cycle’s executive

director McFadden said the demand for B-cycle’s bike rentals exceeded its estimate but did not exceed the program’s capacity. According to McFadden, 95 percent of members and 40 percent of daily users are local. “We’re just thrilled that we’re getting higher-thanexpected usage,” McFadden said. According to McFadden, Bike Share of Austin received a $1.5 million federal grant and $500,000 from local companies and organizations. He said the overall projected annual budget is about $700,000 to run 40 stations. Harris said he thinks that as the city’s bike share program expands its presence around campus, students will transition from its short-term rentals to longer-term rentals with the University’s Orange Bike Project. “I think it’ll open people’s eyes,” Harris said. “It’ll be more permanent instead of a one-day thing. … That’s where we would step in.”

MLK

continues from page 1 peak of King’s popularity. After King’s speech, he began to speak on topics other than civil rights, and, by the time of his assassination, he was considered to be irrelevant in the view of the public. “He spoke on the economy and the redistribution of wealth. … He had lost control; he [was] no longer relevant. That’s how he was viewed when he died,” Younge said. Although the King speech was not remembered by that generation as iconic, a 1999 public opinion poll revealed that King was viewed as the second most influential historical person of the 20th century, only behind Mother Teresa, according to Younge. Younge attributed the change in the public’s perception of the speech to the broad language King used. “There was something for

TEXASNT STUDDEIA ME

TEXAS STUDENT MEDIA

BOARD OF OPERATING TRUSTEES

This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25 Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Wright Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala, Riley Brands, Amil Malik, Eric Nikolaides Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shabab Siddiqui Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan Rudner Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Antonia Gales, Anthony Green, Jacob Kerr, Pete Stroud, Amanda Voeller Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Julia Brouillette, Nicole Cobler, Alyssa Mahoney, Madlin Mekelburg Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Reinsch Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brett Donohoe, Reeana Keenen, Kevin Sharifi Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Mitts Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hirrah Barlas, Bria Benjamin, Alex Dolan, Omar Longoria Multimedia Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charlie Pearce, Alec Wyman Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sam Ortega Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jonathan Garza, Shweta Gulati, Pu Ying Huang, Shelby Tauber Senior Videographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor Barron, Jackie Kuenstler, Dan Resler, Bryce Seifert Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Smothers Associate Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren L’Amie Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Eleanor Dearman, David Sackllah, Alex Williams, Kritika Kulshrestha Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stefan Scrafield Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Hummer Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Evan Berkowitz, Garrett Callahan, Jori Epstein, Matt Warden Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Hadidi Senior Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cody Bubenik, Ploy Buraparate, Connor Murphy, Aaron Rodriguez, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephanie Vanicek Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeremy Hintz Associate Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarah Stancik Special Ventures Co-editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard, Chris Hummer Online Outreach Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fred Tally-Foos Journalism Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Michael Brick

Tryouts

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Danielle Lopez, Nicole Stiles, Jeremy Thomas Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eunice Ali, Zoe Davis, Fabian Fernanez, Brianna Holt, David Lopez, Michelle Toussaint Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blake Carter, Marty Eischeid, Calhan Hale, Andy McMahon, Amanda Nguyen Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Drew Lieberman, Jacob Martella Columnist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .David Davis, Jr. Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Virginia Scherer, Iliana Storch

Business and Advertising

(512) 471-1865 | advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Interim Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frank Serpas, III Executive Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chad Barnes Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barbara Heine Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcasting and Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Event Coordinator and Media Consultant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindsey Hollingsworth Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Carter Goss, Lindsey Hollingsworth Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ted Sniderman Student Assistant Advertising Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rohan Needel Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dani Archuleta, Aaron Blanco, Hannah Davis, Crysta Hernandez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robin Jacobs, Erica Reed, Mayowa Tijani, Lesly Villarreal Student Project Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Aaron Blanco Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mymy Nguyen Student Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dito Prado Senior Graphic Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Hublein Student Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Karina Manguia, Rachel Ngun, Bailey Sullivan Special Editions/Production Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michael Gammon Longhorn Life Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ali Killian Longhorn LIfe Assistant Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrew Huygen

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 4711865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

The Daily Texan Mail Subscription Rates One Semester (Fall or Spring) $60.00 Two Semesters (Fall and Spring) 120.00 Summer Session 40.00 One Year (Fall, Spring and Summer) 150.00 To charge by VISA or MasterCard, call 471-5083. Send orders and address changes to Texas Student Media', P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713-8904, or to TSM Building C3.200, or call 471-5083. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713.

Texan Ad Deadlines

1/30/14

Monday .............Wednesday, 12 p.m. Thursday.................Monday, 12 p.m. Tuesday.................Thursday, 12 p.m. Friday......................Tuesday, 12 p.m. Word Ads 11 a.m. Wednesday................Friday, 12 p.m. Classified (Last Business Day Prior to Publication)

TSM IS ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE UPCOMING ELECTIONS POSITION

TERM

The Daily Texan Editor-In-Chief

June ‘14 - May ‘15

Board of Trustees MemberCollege of Communication student (two places)

June ‘14 - May ‘16

Board of Trustees MemberAt-Large Student

June ‘14 - May ‘16

DEADLINE TO APPLY: 4:00 p.m. Friday January 31, 2014 APPLICATIONS DROP OFF: HSM 3.200

1 FEBRUARY 23, 2011

an advertising special edition

of The Daily Texan

INSIDE

> SAVE SPACE and DECORATE using these tips pg. 3-4 > SPICE UP your new pantry with four simple ingredients pg. 9 > YOUR GO-TO GUIDE for today’s Housing Fair pg. 10-11

QUESTIONS? Contact us at serpas@austin.uetxas.edu

For more information visit: www.utexas.edu/tsm

NEWS

country a lonesome, almost helpless Russian boy, who could not speak a word of our language.” At the time, these three men were the only Russian immigrants on the UT campus. In fall 2013, there were approximately 20 students born in Russia studying at UT, with the amount staying close to that number during each of the past four years, according to the Office of Information Management and Analysis. Additionally, the University opened the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies in 1984, which is housed in the College of Liberal Arts. The Sochi Olympics, which open Feb. 7, have brought Russian culture to the forefront of many media publications, but the societal misrepresentations and conflict date back to long before the 2014 Olympics were even a thought. “Read their stories,” the article said. “It is as they come from their own hearts, and realize what possibilities open up before a poor boy in Texas and her University.” everyone in that speech,” Younge said. Eric Tang, an assistant professor in the African and African diaspora studies department and director of the University’s Social Justice Institute, said he hopes Younge’s talk is just one of many civilrights-themed events the University will host this year. “This event is part of what I hope will be several campus activities that mark the 50th anniversary of a pivotal two years in the long civil rights movement — 1963 and 1964,” Tang said. Sociology professor Ben Carrington said he hopes people don’t oversimplify the civil rights movement. “We want students to leave knowing the civil rights movement wasn’t attributed to one man and one speech, but it was a much wider movement,” Carrington said. “It’s about changing the world.”

PHONES

continues from page 1 time. They determine whether or not to search on a caseby-case basis.” The UTPD procedure for cell-phone searches requires officers to have a subpoena — a document requiring certain documents or testimony to be produced in court — before going forward with the inspection. “We have to have probable cause as a result of a crime,” UTPD spokeswoman Cindy Posey said. “And we would never do a search without a subpoena.” If a car accident occurs and the driver is suspected of texting while driving, officers would request the driver’s phone records, according to Posey. “A hypothetical example would be if a pedestrian is hit and killed by a driver on campus,” Posey said. “At that time, we would subpoena phone records to find out whether or not the driver was texting or on a call.” With the Supreme Court set to determine whether police officers can have warrantless access to the potentially large amount of personal data carried on smartphones, mechanical engineering senior Evan Bartilson said he would be outraged if the information on his cell phone were examined without a warrant. “I can hardly believe this practice is up for debate,” Bartilson said. “I see it as an immediate violation of our Fourth Amendment rights.” Undeclared sophomore Alex Bureau said she thinks unauthorized cell phone searches are unacceptable unless there is a warrant out for one’s arrest. “Honestly, if the police have a warrant out for your arrest, I believe they have the right to search your phone,” Bureau said. “But, if you are randomly arrested, like maybe for drunk driving, the police shouldn’t be able to search your phone or car until they have permission for it.”


CLASS/JUMP 5

NEWS

3

Thursday, January 30, 2014

UNIVERSITY

CAMPUS

City, UT prepare for wildfires

Lectures detail plight of immigrant workers

By Julia Brouillette @juliakbrou

By Jeremy Thomas

While fire departments around Austin gear up for wildfire season, the University is working to establish its own official outdoor fire procedures. On campus, the division of Fire Prevention Services focuses on landscaping guidelines in order to prevent fires. “[The] landscaping processes follow a guideline, which was put together after the Bastrop fires [of 2011],” UT fire marshal Jimmy Johnson said. The division also focuses on making sure the community is educated on issues related to fire prevention. “We want all of our students, faculty and staff on campus to recognize that there is a potential for fire, whether it’s in buildings or based off of some type of wildfire,” Johnson said. “We want people to be cognizant of their surroundings, know how to exit when directions are given to do so and to take all alarms seriously. If you have a plan in place, that will serve you well.” On Jan. 13, a bush caught fire outside of the Belo Center for New Media. Someone pulled the fire alarm, prompting students and faculty to leave the building and walk toward the source of the fire. After the bush fire, The Daily Texan learned there

MUSEUM

continues from page 1 shop is self-funded. Meeks, though, signed the online petition to preserve the museum’s funding. “It’s very unnerving because I wonder what’s going to happen to the institution as a whole,” Meeks said. “I’m very discouraged by what’s happening and I’m afraid that, if we don’t get any state support, the museum will close down.” Meeks said she has already noticed changes in the museum, including the departure of one employee who left

UNS AD IRNE FOR ONL

E! FRE d wor

ad s

only

@thedailytexan

Fabian Fernandez / Daily Texan file photo

In the aftermath of the Belo Center for New Media brush fire, UT safety and security officials plan to meet soon and discuss establishing an outdoor fire evacuation policy.

was no clear evacuation plan in place for outdoor fires on campus. Campus safety and security officials said they plan to meet to discuss the establishment of an outdoor fire evacuation policy but have not yet announced an official outdoor procedure. The University is equipped with an outdoor warning system that can be used in case of fires. The Pickle Research Center and Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center were recently added to the system in fall 2013. When performing fire prevention procedures, the fire department must go through the City Arborist

Program, which grants permits based on compliance with tree ordinances. “The City of Austin is one of the few towns that actually has extremely strict tree ordinances,” Austin Fire Department Capt. Josh Portie said. “It reduces what we can remove and how we can remove it.” City Arborist Michael Embesi said any type of tree is protected by law once it reaches 60 inches in circumference. “The ordinance exists to protect our largest trees, which provide the greatest service to the citizenry,” Embesi said. “A full-grown tree cleans the air, cleans our water and has more aesthetic value.”

An area with more trees does not necessarily make it more susceptible to fires, according to Embesi. “Trees help create shade, which helps keep the area cooler,” Embesi said. “They also help prevent vegetation from growing because that shade blocks the light, so trees could actually assist in helping to prevent the spreading of a grass fire, for example.” According to Portie, fires are inevitable no matter how many precautions are taken. “At the end of the day, there’s nothing we’re going to be able to do to stop all fires,” Portie said. “Fire is a natural phenomenon.”

because they knew their job would be cut. A case of modern mammal skulls was completely removed from the museum, and Meeks said the staff has discussed removing other collections as well. Since the planned cuts were announced, two additional employees have retired, and Theriot said these positions will not be filled, which will help save money. If implemented, budget cuts to the 75-year-old museum will result in the elimination of several administrative and technology support staff jobs, bringing the museum’s

staff from 11 positions to three. Theriot’s job would also be changed so that it would no longer guarantee him a summer salary. “Exactly what my duties would be are still be discussed,” said Theriot, who does not teach any classes this semester. “I would be a professor first and director of the museum second.” Theriot said the remaining positions would include a security guard, gift shop manager and an administrative assistant. “It would be very difficult to operate the museum

with three people, and we’re making every effort we can to make sure it doesn’t get to that,” Theriot said. To generate revenue, Theriot said he has considered charging an admission fee for the museum. If the museum had an admission fee, it would have to independently pay for custodial staff, electricity and water, possibly making its budget problems worse. “My personal perspective is we should be conservative in our budgeting,” Theriot said. “I’d rather have money left over at the end of the year than cut a bunch of staff.”

Visiting professors painted sharply contrasting pictures of the treatment of undocumented workers in the U.S. and of immigrants in Argentina in two separate talks given Wednesday. Pablo Ceriani, professor of law and coordinator of the Migration and Human Rights Program at the National University of Lanus in Argentina, focused on the improving legal status of immigrants in Latin America with his talk “Human Rights and the Politics of Migration.” He focused on Argentina, where he said major reforms are being implemented. A recent appointee to the United Nations Committee on Migrated Workers, Ceriani said since Argentina implemented a new immigration law in 2004, the country has attempted to focus on the human rights of migrants in its policies. “With [Argentina, Bolivia and Uruguay], you can see the recognition of social rights to all migrants, regardless of their immigration status,” he said. “I mean access to education, health care and — an important thing to recognize — that migration is a human right.” Lindsey Carte, a recent geography doctoral graduate, said learning about Argentina’s immigration policies made her want to compare them to the way migrants are treated in the U.S. “What I think is really interesting is how countries in Latin America have more and more progressive-seeming policies,” she said. “I really thought it was interesting to compare to our own context of laws.” Despite Argentina’s laws and recent reforms, Ceriani added that immigration is still a sensitive issue in Latin America and these changes remain a work in progress. In a separate talk, Sergio Chavez, assistant professor of sociology at Rice University, presented the challenges faced by undocumented

CLASSIFIEDS THE DAILY TEXAN

When you are [a] roofero, and you are on top of a rooftop, roofing plays a lot of tricks on your mind. So if you are thinking about your family, and all of a sudden you don’t see that you’re on gravel, you’ll slip and could break every bone in your body. —Sergio Chavez, Assistant professor of sociology, Rice University

workers in America in his lecture titled, “‘Rooferos’: The Occupational Networks of a Highly Mobile Labor Force.” Chavez interviewed nearly 40 migrant workers — 39 undocumented — from Guanajuato, Mexico, once they returned from working as roofers in the U.S. He said the workers described the job as physically dangerous and mentally challenging. “When you are [a] roofero, and you are on top of a rooftop, roofing plays a lot of tricks on your mind,” Chavez said. “So if you are thinking about your family, and all of a sudden you don’t see that you’re on gravel, you’ll slip and could break every bone in your body.” Nicole Guidotti-Hernandez, associate director of the Center of Mexican American Studies, said the mental health of migrant populations is an understudied issue. “I actually think, in the body of scholarship, studies on mental health care are where we need to go next,” said Guidotti-Hernandez, who introduced Chavez. “Then we may be able to interact with them and better serve those communities, or provide support in those ways.”

ADVERTISING TERMS There are no refunds or credits. In the event of errors made in advertisement, notice must be given by 10 am the fi rst day of publication, as the publishers are responsible for only ONE incorrect insertion. In consideration of The Daily Texan’s acceptance of advertising copy for publication, the agency and the advertiser will indemnify and save harmless, Texas Student Media and its officers, employees and agents against all loss, liability, damage and expense of whatsoever nature arising out of the copying, printing or publishing of its advertisement including without limitation reasonable attorney’s fees resulting from claims of suits for libel, violation of right of privacy, plagiarism and copyright and trademark infringement. All ad copy must be approved by the newspaper which reserves the right to request changes, reject or properly classify an ad. The advertiser, and not the newspaper, is responsible for the truthful content of the ad. Advertising is also subject to credit approval.

Self-serve, 24/7 on the Web at www.DailyTexanOnline.com

HOUSING RENTAL

380 Furn. Duplexes ROOM FOR MALE OPEN NOW Beautifully furnished 1470 sq. ft. house has 1 bedroom available for male. ABP. No pets. 4 blocks from UT. Pics: www.homestayfinder.com 512-585-7093

EMPLOYMENT

790 Part Time

FUN JOB, GREAT PAY! Mad Science needs animated instructors to conduct entertaining hands-on, after-school programs and/or children’s birthday parties in Austin area schools. Must have dependable car, be available after 1:00pm at least two weekdays, and prior experience working with groups of elementary age children. We provide the training and equipment. If you enjoy working with children and are looking to work only a few hours per week, this is the job for you! Pay: $25 - $35 per 1 hr. class. Call 892-1143 or website at www.austin.madscience.com

CALLING ALL LONGHORNS! UTalk is currently seeking 10 quality applicants for a flexible, on-campus job throughout the spring semester! Earn up to $9/ hr with incentive based bonuses. Applicants hired before February 1st will be eligible to receive Tuition Assistance for the spring semester. All applicants must have great communication skills and a drive to succeed. Boost your resume while helping your peers, your school, and your professional development! For more information contact Morgan Brooks at morgan.brooks@ ruffalocody.com or apply at utalk.thecallingcenter.com.

920 Work Wanted THE HEADLINERS The Headliners, a private club is now hiring AM/PM Banquet waitstaff & bus boy positions. Scheduling is flexible around semester schedules and there is an employee meal provided for each shift as well significant employee benefits for full-time employees. Please apply Monday thru Friday between 2pm and 5pm.. The club is located on the top floor of the downtown Chase Bank Bldg at 221 W 6th St Ste 2100.

FOR SALE

Sell Textbooks SCIENCE FICTION: After a global catastrophe, how will we rebuild our world? What vision will we follow? And who will corrupt it? WILDERNESS, a science fiction novel, is by Alan Kovski. Available via Amazon.com SCIENCE FICTION: Changes may be genetically engineered, outside us or inside us, with or without our consent. WONDERS AND TRAGEDIES, a science fiction novel, is by Alan Kovski. Available via Amazon.com SCIENCE FICTION: The future may be beautiful, terrible, bewildering. People will have to deal with it somehow. REMEMBERING THE FUTURE: science fiction stories by Alan Kovski. Available via Amazon.com

875 Medical Study

Seeks College-Educated Men 18–39 to Participate in a Six-Month Donor Program

Donors average $150 per specimen. Apply on-line

www.123Donate.com

RECYCLE RECYCLE

keep an eye out for the SEE WHAT OUR

ONLINE SYSTEM

super TUESDAY COUPONS

has to offer, and place

YOUR AD

NOW!

dailytexanclassifieds.com

REMEMBER! you saw it in the Texan

clip and save!

every week

PICK UP TEXAS FIRST PITCH BASEBALL PREVIEW THIS FRIDAY recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle

recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle recycle

Sign up for the Daily Digest and receive coupons DAILY! Scan this code >


4A OPINION

4

LAURA WRIGHT, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / @TexanEditorial Thursday, January 30, 2014

EDITORIAL

Students should question true value of MOOCs A year after UT began rolling out nine Massive Online Open Courses, the results are in: Completion rates for the classes, which offer anyone with Internet access free online courses from high-ranked UT professors, but no course credit, are very low — ranging from 1 to 13 percent, according to the Texas Tribune. The University hasn’t laid out long-term goals for the MOOCs, and the numbers don’t bode particularly well for the courses’ overall success. Still, the System says they will continue funding UT’s MOOCs to the tune of $150,000-$300,000 to produce each new online course. We’re confused as to why an unproven and unused educational experiment that isn’t even aimed at UT-system students is something the System feels they should continue funding. MOOC supporters suggest that the low completion rates are not a valid measure of success for a course anyone could sign up for and never return to. After all, students have little incentive to finish the courses other than an interest in the material. And the low rates were by no means unexpected. Similar results were seen at other universities’ MOOC programs as well. Inside Higher Ed reported that San Jose State paused

We’re confused as to why an unproven and unused educational experiment that isn’t even aimed at UT students is something the System feels they should continue funding.

its MOOC program in July — just before UT launched its own — after the first round of classes showed similarly disappointing completion results. Understandably, these courses are a different animal, but if we can’t gauge their success from completion rates — the classic measure of success in college courses for years — how can we? The problem with other measures, such as student engagement or course transformation, is that the MOOC structure isn’t quantifying that information into data that we can evaluate. And we can be certain that the measure of a MOOC’s success will not be profitability. The MOOCs were, apparently, designed without revenue in mind, though the System invested $10 million to both develop the MOOCs and to host the courses on edX, an online platform created by Harvard and MIT. Pharmacy professor and MOOC instructor Janet Walkow told The Daily Texan that there are ways to squeeze revenue out of the courses, including charging $50 for completion certificates, selling e-books created for the course and asking for donations from MOOC students. None of those revenue initiatives, however, were considered in the initial planning of the courses. The System has made large and unproven investments in online education platforms before — MyEdu rings a bell. The Tribune recently reported that the System will see no financial return on its $10 million investment in MyEdu, which was ultimately sold to Blackboard. Again, there was no long-term financial plan in mind, but there was a lot of money on the table. The System should stop investing millions of dollars on gambles like these, which lack financial exit strategies and viable forms of revenue. If the founding structure of a project doesn’t include a business model for growth

and profitability for the University, who is expected to fund it? “Our initiative with MOOCs is evolving as we search for a sustainable business model, and this transition is part of that evolution,” UT System spokeswoman Karen Adler said. Math professor and MOOC instructor Michael Starbird said his course, which launches in February, required hundreds of hours of work to put together. “We are at a moment of experimentation,” Starbird said. “The expectation should be that many things go wrong. Is it a good idea for UTAustin and the System to be involved in experimentation in new ways to deliver [education].” Germanic Studies professor and MOOC instructor John Hoberman said that more than 1,500 people completed his MOOC — one of the four launched in the fall — around the world, which is more than he has taught in person in the past 30 years. “Criticism of MOOCs for not providing instant revenue streams is naive,” Hobermand said. “The economic future of MOOCs, like the future profitability of Amazon, is unknown at this time.” This semester, five more experimental MOOCs will be launching, despite the results seen by the last four. The UT System has rushed into investing in online innovation in an effort to be the first to find the “future” of higher education. But its strategy of throwing a few million dollars here and a few more there and hoping the investments pay off is irresponsible and short-sighted.

MyEdu $10 million invested $5 million course development $5 million edX

Understandably, these courses are a different animal, but if we can’t gauge their success from completion rates — the classic measure of success in college courses for years — how can we? Fall 2013 MOOC completion rates Age of Globalization: 13 percent Energy 101-: less than 3 percent Ideas of the Twentieth Century: less than 3 percent Take Your Medicine - The Impact of Drug Development: about 10.8 percent

Cost of producing UT-Austin’s first MOOCs ranged from $150,000 to $300,000 each. MOOCs $10 million invested total:

COLUMN

GALLERY

UT should consider restricting admissions for transfer students By David Davis Jr. Guest Columnist @ daveedalon

Illustration by Conor Murphy / Daily Texan Staff

HORNS UP: TEXAS LEADS NATION IN JOB GROWTH According to state-by-state data released Tuesday by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Texas led the nation in job growth in 2013 with 252,400 new jobs added. In fact, Texas saw nearly 20,000 more new jobs than California, the second-best performing state, and nearly 60,000 more than Florida, the third best. Texas’ unemployment rate also fell to 6 percent from 6.2 percent last December. While it is comforting to know we live in a state that is outperforming the entire rest of the nation in job growth — especially since many of us will be actively searching for employment in the next several years — the news isn’t all good. Texas job growth has slowed from 3.2 percent in 2012 to 2.3 percent last year, and the state added 80,000 fewer new jobs in 2013 than it did in 2012. But, still, horns up to Texas for being the national leader in the recovery from the Great Recession.

HORNS UP: OBAMA STICKS UP FOR SEXUAL ASSAULT VICTIMS In a speech Saturday, President Barack Obama announced the creation of a White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault. According to Obama, the task force will combat the sexual abuse commonly experienced on college campuses by both strengthening the criminal justice system to prevent future assault and by reaching out to survivors to assist in the healing process. The announcement left out many details on how such a task force would operate and how it would realistically address the problem, but horns up to Obama anyway for promoting greater awareness of the issue. We hope Obama’s words will soon result in real actions to fight sexual assault and abuse.

The announcement left out many details on how such a task force would operate and how it would realistically address the problem, but horns up to Obama anyway for promoting greater awareness of the issue. We hope Obama’s words will soon result in real actions to fight sexual assault and abuse.

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Toward the end of the fall semester, many hopeful future Longhorns received an early holiday gift — admission to UT. These lucky students, most likely, will be proud to call UT their home away from home. While a majority of these acceptances went to automatically admitted students, some went to transfer students who may have applied to UT for the second or third time. While most public higher education institutes in Texas by law must automatically admit the top 10 percent of students in any high school’s graduating class, UT is allowed to admit a smaller percentage, partly because of its already-expansive student population, which currently exceeds 50,000 students. During the 2013-2014 academic year, only the top 8 percent of high school graduating classes were automatically admitted to the University. Students in the top 9 to 10 percent may potentially be denied admission in the holistic review process. These students’ chances of being admitted as freshmen are low, as the majority of the freshman class are automatic admits: 9,963 of the 12,413 students admitted to the University from Texas high schools in 2013 were in the top 8 percent of their graduating class. But some students can’t take no for an answer. Many attend community college and apply to UT again after spending a year or two taking core courses. Undeclared sophomore Lila Tribolet was recently admitted to UT as a transfer student

I really wanted to live in Austin and go to UT because it’s one of the best schools in Texas..I knew that it would be a lot easier for me to get into UT as a transfer student versus as a high school senior.

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

— Lila Tribolet, Transfer student

from Austin Community College. “I really wanted to live in Austin and go to UT because it’s one of the best schools in Texas,” Tribolet said. “I knew that it would be a lot easier for me to get into UT as a transfer student versus as a high school senior.” Students who were admitted to UT straight out of high school may feel that transfer students, specifically those from community colleges, got to UT by circumventing the traditional barriers to admission. Nutrition junior Meredith McKenzie believes such barriers include hard work. “When I applied to UT, I had to be in the top 9 percent of my class to be automatically admitted, and I worked very hard in high school,” McKenzie said. “People who transfer from community colleges don’t have to work as hard, and they get admitted to UT more easily.” Transfer students are, in fact, subject to less-strict admission criteria. While high school seniors not admitted under the automatic admission policy have to go through the holistic review process, transfer students do not. Standardized test scores and the rigor of courses taken do not factor into transfer admission. What most first-time admits fail to realize about transfer students is that, even though the transfer admissions process is not holistic, it is impossible to be admitted to the University without some hard work. “I came to UT with a 3.7 GPA, so I still had to work hard while I was at ACC because I knew that without a high GPA, I would not get in,” Tribolet said. Furthermore, community colleges, such as Austin Community College, whose motto is, “Start here. Get there,” have the sole mission of preparing students to transfer to universities. Yes, in admitting transfer students, the University rewards one to two years of hard work at a community college in the same way that it rewards four years of hard work in high school. Still, the relative ease with which transfer students are admitted to UT counteracts the school’s necessary attempts at restricting the student population. The University would do well to control the number of students that transfer to the University each semester with stricter transfer admissions guidelines. Davis is an international relations and French junior from Houston.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@DTeditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


Recycle your copy of

W&N 3


6 SPTS

6

STEFAN SCRAFIELD, SPORTS EDITOR / @texansports Thursday, January 30, 2014

NFL

‘DBU’ set to take Super Bowl stage

GET YOURS TEXERCISE PASS FITNESS

STARTS HERE utrecsports.org

Baseball and Softball preview

By Drew Lieberman @DrewLieberman

When Super Bowl XLVIII concludes on Sunday, at least one former Longhorn defensive player will be hoisting the Lombardi Trophy. This year’s game features Seattle’s Earl Thomas against Denver’s Michael Huff and Quentin Jammer, continuing a tradition in which a former Longhorn has made it to the Super Bowl every year since 2007. Texas junior cornerback Quandre Diggs, who is Jammer’s younger brother, is excited for the matchup and to see the trio represent Texas as “Defensive Back University.” “It means a lot just to know that pretty much every year for a long time there has been a DB in that game,” Diggs said. ”No matter who wins, we know a DB will get the Super Bowl.” Earl Thomas, safety: Thomas was drafted No. 14 overall by the Seahawks in the 2010 NFL draft, following a sensational redshirt sophomore season in which he was a Jim Thorpe Award finalist. Thomas is regarded by many to be the best safety in the NFL and is a crucial piece in the Seahawks’ secondary. If the Seahawks are going to win, they will need their defense to step up, which means Thomas playing at a high level. Though it wouldn’t be a surprise if he makes a crunch-time play, Thomas is focused on just doing the little things right. “You see a lot of guys that aren’t tackling as well; they’re not doing as well as they started,” Thomas said. “That’s what it’s all about — sticking to your core beliefs, sticking to who you are and everything else will take care of itself.” Of the three Longhorns in the game, Thomas has the most potential to decide the game with a decisive interception or pass breakup. Michael Huff, safety: Huff was drafted seventh overall by the Oakland Raiders in the 2006 NFL draft, following the 2005 season, in which he became Texas’ first Thorpe Award winner while helping the Longhorns to their first national title in 35 years. Huff ’s best season was in 2010 when he recorded career-highs in tackles, sacks,

Friday, January 31, 2014

SIDELINE NBA ROCKETS

MAVERICKS

BULLS

SPURS

THUNDER

HEAT

NCAAB IOWA STATE

KANSAS

TOP TWEET Carrington Byndom @cbyndom23

Mark Humphrey, Ed Andreiski / Associated Press

On Super Bowl Sunday, three former Longhorns will take the field in New Jersey. All-Pro safety Earl Thomas (top) will represent the Seahawks, while safety Michael Huff (left) and cornerback Quentin Jammer (right) will wear the white and orange of the Denver Broncos.

forced fumbles and interceptions en route to being named a second-team AllPro safety. He spent his first seven seasons in Oakland before being cut in March 2013, he was later picked up by the Ravens before being cut again mid-season. Now Huff is on the verge of winning the Super Bowl, having been picked up by the Broncos in November. With the humbling experience of losing in Oakland behind him, he realizes the need to seize the moment now.

“Those years in Oakland, getting cut by two teams this year,” Huff said. “To know nothing but winning in college, struggle for seven years and never even get to the playoffs, all of those losing seasons, just makes what I’m feeling right now extra special.” Quentin Jammer, cornerback: Jammer was drafted fifth overall in 2002 by the San Diego Chargers, after being named a unanimous AllAmerican in 2001.

 

You see a lot of guys that aren’t tackling as well; they’re not doing as well as they started. —Earl Thomas, Seahawks safety

In 2009, Jammer was named to the Chargers’ 50th anniversary team as a cornerback. After 11 seasons with San Diego, the Broncos picked him up and he is now primarily cornerback Champ Bailey’s backup. Like Huff, Jammer probably won’t have

TODAY IN HISTORY

1994

The Dallas Cowboys defeated the Buffalo Bills, 30-13, in Super Bowl XXVIII in Atlanta, as Emmitt Smith took home the game’s MVP award.

SOFTBALL

Tunning sets lofty expectations By Jacob Martella @ViewFromTheBox

Plenty  of  FREE  PARKING!  

512-­‐443-­‐3911   3005  South  Lamar  #110-­‐A  •  512-­‐462-­‐4646  

  Now  OPEN  TO  BUY  at  3005  So.  Lamar  between  Torchy’s  &   Kerbey  Lane!    Bring  in  your  gently  worn  designer  &  trendy   clothing  for  guys  &  girls  before  our  Grand  Opening  in  March   and  get  FIRST  SHOT  with  a  VIP  ticket  to  our  Pre-­‐G.O.  Event!    

   

much impact in the game, though he should see some important playing time. “I am excited to be able to share it with him and go up there and be by his side through the rest of the weekend and hope they go out and get the win,” Diggs said.

40 time gonna shock some people!! #GetMoney #GrindMode

Coming into college, not many freshmen are expected to make an impact on their team right away, especially on a team coming off of as strong of a season as Texas had last year. But shortstop Devon Tunning hopes to do just that and has already set high goals for herself this season. “I would like to be Big 12 Freshman of the Year and then help lead the team to the College World Series again,” Tunning said. Tunning comes to Austin after a stellar high school career at Montgomery High School, where she was named twice to the Texas Girls Coaches Association 4A AllState team. In her senior year, she hit four home runs with a .580 batting average. Head coach Connie Clark said Tunning’s athleticism stood out during the recruiting process. “Her athleticism separates her from everyone else,” Clark said. “She has a great swing, and, on defense, she makes things look easy, but she makes the big plays.” Tunning will have to make

the adjustment from being the top player in her district to being one of many top players at Texas. While she admitted that it has been nerve-racking at times, Tunning said it’s been a different experience. “Everyone is pushing each other, and no one person is really better than the other,” Tunning said. “We’re all together pushing each other.” Tunning showed some of her talent in the fall season, swatting two doubles and driving in three in a doubleheader with Incarnate Word and Odessa College. Then against St. Edward’s she hit a home run. While the fall season is not as competitive as the regular season, Tunning said it helped her get into the swing of college softball. “It set a solid base for me to build off of this spring,” Tunning said. In addition to adjusting to the college game, Tunning might also have to adjust to a new position. Tunning is primarily a shortstop, but that position is currently occupied by senior Taylor Thom. Clark said they’ll probably move her around to keep her bat in the lineup. “We’re working with her at

third base, and we could put her as the designated player to keep her in the lineup,” Clark said. Going into the season, the Longhorns will be missing the bat of Taylor Hoagland, who graduated last spring. In 2013, Hoagland led the Longhorns with a .424 batting average, hit 14 home runs and drove in 45 runs. While she might not be the vocal leader Hoagland was, senior first baseman Karina Scott said Tunning will still be a big leader on this team. “Hoagland was a different kind of player and they both bring different kinds of aspects,” Scott said. “But, can [Tunning] bring the impact that Hoagland did? Yes, she can.” Tunning’s spot in the starting lineup isn’t guaranteed as Clark said it’s still a day-to-day competition to figure out who will be in the lineup, but she plans to keep working at it and getting better. If she does that, Clark said she’ll be a big part of the team’s success. “She gives us a lot,” Clark said. “She’s one of our top four hitters and she’s going to be an impact player.”


COMICS 7

COMICS

7

Thursday, January 30, 2014

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Thursday, January 30, 2014

Edited by Will Shortz

Crossword

SUDOKUFORYOU

ACROSS 1 Some tubers 7 Anyway 15 Unqualified 16 Jamaican rum liqueur 17 Many a Manhattan Project worker 19 Search for, in a way 20 Undiluted 21 Brown shade 24 Toward safety 25 One on One: ___ vs. Larry Bird (old video game) 28 Growth on wet rocks or the surface of stagnant water 31 Pre-Susan B. Anthony dollar coins, informally 33 Bygone Brazilian airline 34 What a coiled spring or charged battery has, in physics

41 Public, as dirty laundry 42 Skinny 43 Targeted area? 48 Hit with an electric bolt 49 Silents sex symbol 50 Bogged down 52 Animated greetings 55 Oscillates 58 Chaos … or a hint to the contents of 17-, 28-, 34- and 43-Across 62 Dubai-based airline 63 California’s ___ National Forest 64 Private dining area? 65 Maxim

S U D O K SUDOKUFORYOU U SUDOKUFORYOU 1t 3 4 F 1 39 4S 4 O 6 8 1 3 7 U 9 4 5 1 2 R D 9 4 6 7 6 8O1 3 7 Y 2 6 7 Prep to 8 1 4 3 9 O the highest 5 K 1 2 3 8 degree. U 5 2 8 U 6 7 9 4 t

1 3

4

9 4 6 8 1 3 7 5 1 2 9 4 6 7 2 6 7 8 1 4 3 9 3 8 5 2 8

t Arrr matey. This scurrvy beast is today’s answerrrrrr. Crop it out, or it’ll be the the fishes for ya!

1 3 6 7 4 5 2 8 9 7 8 5 9 2 3 4 6 1 4 2 9 6 8 1 5 3 7 3 7 8 5 6 4 9 1 2 5 9 4 8 1 2 6 7 3 2 6 1 3 9 7 8 4 5 8 1 2 4 3 9 7 5 6 6 5 3 2 7 8 1 9 4 9 Today’s 4 solution 7 1will5 6 here3next2issue8 appear

Today’s solution will appear here next issue

9 3 4 5 1 6 8 2 7

6 7 5 2 8 4 3 1 9

8 1 2 7 3 9 4 6 5

3 5 9 1 2 8 6 7 4

1 6 7 9 4 3 2 5 8

4 2 8 6 5 7 1 9 3

5 4 6 8 7 1 9 3 2

2 8 1 3 9 5 7 4 6

7 9 3 4 6 2 5 8 1

DOWN 1 Golfer BakerFinch, winner of the 1991 British Open

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE C H I S

H U R T

A L E E

O F F T O

W E I R S

L A V A S

S N O B

H O H O

A R N O

D O N E E

S M T A E N L I E L L A L P D U G O L E S T I A A C R T A R U U S S O

S U D R E C E S S I O N

U S U R P

M D S A L I E N

R K I A M B U E K M I B E N R S S Y N A C N D Y

P O S E R S Y R I A C

A F O R E S A I D C O R N Y

D E M O

D A N A

S T I R

T U N I S

E D G E R

P E S T O

S A G S

S T E T

E E L S

2 Sedate, say 3 Using the bow, in music 4 Purity rings? 5 Old iPod Nano capacity 6 More rough around the edges, perhaps 7 Partook of 8 End of a French film 9 Auto necessities 10 Discharge 11 Completely tuckered out 12 Site of some piercings 13 Name on a property deed, maybe 14 Brobdingnagian 18 Surrealist Magritte 22 Silver Stater 23 Fastidious to a fault 25 Skinny-___ 26 1929’s “Street Girl” was its first official production 27 Deep black 29 “The Way I ___” (2007 Timbaland hit) 30 Architectural designer of New York’s Museum for African Art 32 Vikings, e.g. 35 Zip 36 Nickname for a junior’s junior 37 Yesterday: It. 38 Cartoonist Chast 39 1.0 is not a good one, in brief 40 “You betcha!”

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

15 17

10

11

12

13

14

38

39

40

18 19

20 21

25

9

16

26

27

31

22

23

28 32

34

24 29

30

33 35

36

37

41 43

42

44

45

49

46

50

52

53

54

58

55 59

47

48 51 56

60

57 61

62

63

64

65

PUZZLE BY TIM CROCE

43 Flower cluster on a single stem, as in the honey locust

47 Continental pass name

44 Many Shiites

51 Like chestnuts

45 Language of Pandora

53 Alternative to hell?

46 Richard ___, former chief of the N.Y.S.E.

49 Embellish, in a way

54 Be plenty good for 56 Slips

57 “The poet in my heart,” per a Fleetwood Mac song 59 Sports anchor Berman 60 48 U.S. states observe it: Abbr. 61 Ship’s departure?

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

MCAT® | LSAT® | GMAT® | GRE® Available:

8

No. 1226

In Person

LiveOnline

Use promo code DailyTexan$150 to save $150 on classroom prep. PrincetonReview.com | 800-2Review


8 L&A

HANNAH SMOTHERS, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR / @DailyTexanArts Thursday, January 30, 2014

8

CAMPUS

Journal questions city’s future By Brigit Benestante @DailyTexanArts

Through Austin’s endless traffic, bustling nightlife and growing population, one group is attempting to catalogue the rapid evolution of America’s fastest growing city. The End of Austin, known as TEOA, is an online journal started by American studies professors and graduate students in fall 2011. The journal features different works of art and writing pertaining to Austin in some way. Randolph Lewis, American studies professor and editor of TEOA, watched the publication start as an in-class project. “We wanted to have a group project that would live beyond the course,” Lewis said. “People seemed to like it so we thought, ‘What if we turned it into sort of a regular publication?’” The project did just that. After two years, the journal continues to come out every six months and involves collaboration from students, professors and Austinites alike. Some of those who were involved in End of Austin’s first publication are still contributing today. Two key members of TEOA’s editorial board, Carrie Andersen and Sean Cashbaugh, both doctoral candidates in the American studies program, contribute to the publication with works of their own and by scouting other

possible contributors. “If people are doing interesting things around the UT campus or around town, we reach out to them,” Andersen said. Lewis said he looks for the flow of each piece with the next in every publication. “I often really enjoy just seeing one [piece] next to another,” Lewis said. “I like the collage effect. I think we try to look for a balance of perspectives. We probably thought originally we’d have more people writing for us who were lamenting Austin’s changes, but so many people have only been in Austin for a short period.” According to Andersen, TEOA is broadening its search for perspectives, particularly in the field of science. TEOA includes different works ranging from editorials on the change in Austin, obituaries on dead shopping malls and storytelling through photography. The pieces, although put together by different people, follow a familiar theme and message. “I think a lot of people have very similar concerns on where the city’s going,” Andersen said. “It’s sort of a natural thematic thrust that develops.” People creating the different works in the publication are concerned with things such as sprawl, traffic and the gentrification of Austin. TEOA has not gone unnoticed. The publication currently has 35,000 hits on the site, and that number continues to grow.

David Lopez / Daily Texan Staff

(From left to right) American studies professor Randolph Lewis and American studies doctoral candidates Carrie Andersen and Sean Cashbaugh help run The End of Austin, an online journal that explores urban identity in the city. “People are responding,” Cashbaugh said. “Part of the interesting thing is putting something out there and seeing what happens to it.” Steven Hoelscher, an American studies professor, has even incorporated the journal into his Introduction to American Studies curriculum. Hoelscher said the site, like the field of American studies, questions uneven economic development, symbolism, identity and

popular culture. “I wanted to make a point that American studies is not just about the past; it’s ongoing and living, and it’s a vibrant field today,” Hoelscher said. “One example of that is the End of Austin project. Elements of this long history of American studies are found in that project.” Lewis hopes the publication will cause people to look at the greater consequences facing the city. “There’s discussion between

people in a democracy about the kind of place they live in, and it needs to happen more often,” Lewis said. “Rather than just being passively floating down the river like a leaf and not caring about whatever future happens.” Although TEOA brings some serious issues to light on people’s perspectives of this changing city, Lewis does not think the site is necessarily about the “doom” of Austin. “We’re not pessimistic, but we’re trying to ask, ‘What if

the rhetoric doesn’t play out the way people assume it will?’” Lewis said. TEOA is not only for the community but also serves its creators. “End of Austin is a way for us to look right over the fences of UT, look into the community, be a part of the community and create discussions about what the city’s going to be like,” Lewis said. The latest issue of TEOA can be found at www.endofaustin.com.

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Babies and their toys reveal gender dichotomies

By Robert Starr @robertkstarr

The triplewart seadevil can grow to 44 centimeters long, according to FishBase, but no male of the species exceeds 7.3 centimeters. The male finds a female seadevil, attaches himself to her and impregnates the fish while parasitically sucking away her nutrients. Human men and women may sometimes seem like they’re worlds apart, but, compared to the seadevil, they’re really not all that different. These differences arise early on. It’s more or less accepted that boys like playing

with toy cars and girls with dolls, but what’s unclear is whether this comes about naturally or through cultural indoctrination. We’re nowhere near answering that question — if that’s even possible — but scientists have done research to get a better idea of the situation. By looking at babies — the younger, the better — researchers can uncover hints about whether these sexbased differences are innate or developed. The go-to research task involves infants choosing between a toy truck, generally considered a boy’s toy, and a doll, a girl’s toy. Some of the most recent tests do this by tracking eye movements to determine which of the two the babies spend more time looking at. And, across multiple studies, the results are consistent: Girls spent more time looking at the doll than boys did. Likewise, boys spent more time fixating on

the truck than girls did. But here’s where things break from intuition. Even though the boys spent more time looking at the truck than the girls did, they didn’t necessarily look at it more than they did the doll. Indeed, the youngest baby boys tested seemed to prefer the doll — just not as much as the girls did. This is baffling because it’s unclear as to what exactly the babies are responding. In the researchers’ efforts, they managed to eliminate many of the obvious possibilities. Boys and girls prefer the same colors, on average, so that can’t be it. They also don’t have any major differences in the kinds of shapes they like, so the effect didn’t come from girls preferring the rounded edges of the doll, either. But once they’re old enough to use crayons, girls tend to draw in a more rounded fashion, compared to the angular nature of what

Belmont Village - VIRTUAL JOB FAIR We welcome you to attend our Virtual Job Fair from the comfort of your home:

boys produce. To make things even more bizarre, researchers produced the same effect when testing male and female monkeys of at least two different species. It turns out boy monkeys like toy trucks more than girl monkeys do. But what does this all mean? Maybe not a whole lot. The results are all averages: Girls tend to look at the doll more than they do the truck, but individual girls didn’t. In fact, the results varied wildly from child to child, with some unable to produce any data in portions of the experiments because of a compounding variable that the researchers describe as “fussiness.” While the results may be statistically significant, they aren’t necessarily meaningful. When given the choice between the two toys, baby girls still spend over 40 percent of the available time looking at the truck on average.

Illustration by Ploy Buraparate / Daily Texan Staff

Throughout all of this, the elephant in the room is the issue of gender itself. The experimenters, for the most part, treat it as a definitive and absolute label, but that’s not quite right. Yes, there are men and women, but there’s also a lot in between, and these studies slide the issue of transsexuality under the carpet. There’s more to masculinity or femininity than the genitals one is born with, and there are plenty of men initially labeled as girls, as well as women initially labeled

as boys. This makes things even more complicated when looking at gender, which is already confusing enough when we think of male and female as the only options. While these studies may shed some light on the differences between two groups of people, they’re unlikely to contradict the obvious: We’re all individuals. Gender is certainly an important part of someone’s identity, but it’s still only a part of it.

PHOTO BRIEFLY

Friday, January 31st through Sunday, February 9th This Virtual Job Fair can be accessed online at:

www.bvWestLakeHills.com Join us in our brand-new State-of-the-Art Community! Belmont Village is a PREMIER nationwide developer, builder, owner and operator of Senior Living communities for the elderly. We are a growing, dynamic organization providing state of the art services and programs for active seniors. Join us today! We have openings for the following positions at our newest location: West Lake Hills - Austin, Texas

• • • • •

LVN Activity Assistant Caregiver Concierge Driver

• • • • •

Sous Chef Line Cook Dining Room Supervisor Waitstaff Dishwasher

Belmont Village West Lake Hills Austin, TX

Brewed: Home brewing is more than just a hobby

Please DO NOT visit the property. We are only accepting applications online at this time. Equal Opportunity Employer/Drug-Free Workplace We Make Aging Better.

The Community Built for Life • belmontvillage.com 11166bel.indd 1

Check out our video online at dailytexanonline.com

1/22/2014 2:42:05 PM

Austin is home to a large home-brewing community. Some brew their beer in small batches on their stovetops; some have upgraded to large garage operations; some

have future plans of opening their own breweries. We interviewed three local home brewers and learned about their different approaches and inspirations.


The Daily Texan 2014-01-30