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LIFE&ARTS PAGE 8

SPORTS PAGE 6

COMICS PAGE 7

Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014

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UNIVERSITY

Powers, Paine deflect TSM blame By Jordan Rudner @jrud

Almost a full week after new broke that Texas Student Media, commonly known as TSM, would move under the domain of the Moody College of Communication, it remains unclear who — if anybody — ultimately made that decision. In an interview with the Texan on Friday, President

William Powers Jr. said he did not make the final decision on the move, although he considered the absorption of TSM properties — which include the Texan, Texas Student Television, Cactus Yearbook, KVRX 91.7 and Texas Travesty — a plausible solution for TSM’s financial woes. Gage Paine, the vice president for student affairs, and Roderick Hart, dean of the

Moody College of Communication, denied making the final decision to move the properties earlier in the week, though they acknowledged they played roles in the process. Last week, the Texan reported that TSM properties, including The Daily Texan, would be moved into the domain of Moody college from their current home in the Division

Does the trust need to be changed? Do the regents need to get involved in changing the trust? I would have anticipated that all of that would have been worked out in advance. —William Powers Jr., President

@ellydearman

Pu Ying Huang / Daily Texan Staff

James Magnuson’s new book, “Famous Writers I Have Known” offers a saterical perspective on the writing world and recalls many of Magnuson’s daily tasks at the Michener Center for Writers.

PHOTO BRIEFLY

when you become an old dog. You start thinking about your legacy. I’m so proud of all of these young writers who have done so well. You know it’s interesting how personal it can be, the idea of creating an institution.”

@TheAlyssaM

BUS page 3

By Eleanor Dearman

just a salary to support his writing career, but he began to love his students and care about their careers. “Teaching has become an important part of my life,” Magnuson said. “You know you start thinking about this

By Alyssa Mahoney

NOVEL page 8

Students inspire novel-worthy figures

creative writing programs in the country. Magnuson came back to Texas and took the director position in 1994 after a stint as a television writer in Hollywood. He said that at first the Michener center job was

CapMetro to open new bus system this week

It is his work directing the Michener center and building its reputation that has allowed him an insider view into the world of MFA students and famous authors.

TSM page 2

LITERATURE

For the past 20 years, James Magnuson has been waking up early to write before coming into work as the director of the Michener Center for Writers. Magnuson’s newest of nine novels, “Famous Writers I Have Known,” gives a satirical look into the workings of the Master-of-FineArts culture. The plot centers on Frankie Abandonato, a con man who pretends to be V. S. Mohle — a resident writer at the Fiction Center, which is based on UT’s Michener center. In the novel, the Fiction Center is funded by author Rex Schoeninger, who is a transparent version of the Michener center’s namesake, James Michener. UT’s Michener center is a three-year residency program for aspiring writers. Students can apply to concentrate in one of four writing fields: fiction, poetry, screenwriting or playwriting, and receive a $27,500 stipend each year. With an acceptance rate hovering around 1 percent — the center only accepts 12 writers each year — it is recognized as one of the top

CITY

To increase public transit and reduce Austin congestion, Capital Metro will launch MetroRapid, a bus line which will include more direct routes, fewer stops and the use of transit-priority lanes, on Sunday. The new service includes higher-capacity vehicles with free Wi-Fi and technology that syncs with stoplights to hold the light green if the bus is behind schedule. Stations will have arrival information that refreshes every 90 seconds. CapMetro spokeswoman Melissa Ayala said fare changes will include a $1.50 premium for services that offer more direct routes and limited stop service, such as MetroRapid. There will be no fare changes to regular service in 2014. According to Blanca Juarez, UT Parking and Transportation Services spokeswoman, University students, faculty and staff will continue to have free access to CapMetro transportation, including MetroRapid, with valid University IDs. “During the early development stages of this new service, the University worked closely with [CapMetro] to make sure that these routes provided service to the University,” Juarez said. There will be 77 stations along MetroRapid routes 801 and 803, including 12 stations near the University and downtown areas. Ayala said CapMetro projects up to 21,000 boardings per weekday in the first two years of operation of Rapid 801. According to Juarez, 2 to 3 million rides per year are

“I don’t have a dog in the hunt of how the issue is

of Student Affairs. Powers said he was comfortable with the move, though it wasn’t originally his idea.

bit.ly/dtvid

CITY

Half marathon celebrates 20 years By Zachary Keener @thedailytexan

Check out our video online at dailytexanonline.com Sarah Montgomery / Daily Texan Staff

Community remembers life, legacy of MLK Jr. The Austin community honored the life of Martin Luther King Jr. during the 21st annual community march Monday. This year’s march began with a rally at

the MLK Jr. statue on the East Mall, then continued past the state capitol toward Huston-Tillotson University, a historically black university in East Austin. At

the march, themed “Dream Even Further,” marchers were asked to bring canned goods and other nonperishable food items. —Jordan Rudner

More than 5,000 runners ran in the 20th annual 3M Half Marathon on Sunday. This year, the race started at the corner of Stonelake Boulevard and Capital of Texas Highway, continued through the UT campus and finished at Waterloo Park. Jane Kovacs, the event’s public relations supervisor, said the race catered to seasoned runners and those new to running half marathons. “Topographically, if you follow it, it’s a downhill race,” Kovacs said. “But, you know, there’s a guy running his 20th race, and he runs so he can eat Blue Bell Ice Cream. How fabulous is that?” The race comes at a good time for running-inclined UT students, according to government senior Zach

Flores, who ran in the event. Flores is also part of the University’s Texas Running Club and ran more than 1,000 miles in 2013, with 180 in December alone. “It’s a good race for the UT students because we’re getting back into [running].” Flores

said. “It’s also a good way to start a New Year’s resolution.” Jodi Ondrusek, a UT marketing and advertising communications alumna, has been running the race for four years, since her arrival at UT.

REASON TO PARTY

Sam Ortega / Daily Texan Staff

David Stransky from Anchorage, Alaska runs the 3M Half Marathon on Sunday. More than 5,000 participants ran in the marathon.

NEWS

OPINION

SPORTS

LIFE&ARTS

ONLINE

Professors awarded for early career achievement. PAGE 3

Horns down: The Davis campaign fudges truth. PAGE 4

Horns gain first top-10 win since 2011. PAGE 6

Magnuson’s ninth novel is a love letter to Austin. PAGE 8

Blanton tour examines hidden symbolism. PAGE 3

Professors against Accenture partnership. PAGE 4

Texas falls to TCU for first time in school history. PAGE 6

“Devil’s Due” manages to bring few surprises. PAGE 8

See how Dolce Neve, a newly opened local gelato shop, makes its traditional gelato. dailytexanonline.com

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014

NEWS

FRAMES featured photo Volume 114, Issue 86

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor Laura Wright (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Shabab Siddiqui (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@ gmail.com Sports Office (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office (512) 232-2209 dtlifeandarts@gmail.com Retail Advertising (512) 471-1865 Classified Advertising (512) 471-5244 classifieds@ dailytexanonline.com

Stephanie Tacy / Daily Texan Staff

A local street artist, known as Briks, quenches his thirst while painting at The Baylor Street Art Wall on Saturday afternoon.

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2013 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER Low High

69

38

I already told you it’s like a library, but clearly you don’t go there.

HALF

TSM

“It’s kind of hard to be [in Austin] and not get sucked into [exercising],” Ondrusek said. “It was part of my way to deal with [graduate] school stuff. [The race] has a good history and is well organized.” The city identified the 3M Half Marathon as a historic, traditional and iconic Austin race last year. More than 600 volunteers helped prepare for the large crowd, and a local company supplied 3,600 gallons of water to the race. “We’ve got entertainment all the way down the way — anywhere from bagpipes to Blender to Brian McCloud,” Kovacs said. After the race, Flores said he would enjoy the atmosphere for the day — but not for long. “There’s a lot of people on the streets — it’s a great [feeling],” Flores said. “I’m going to hang out with friends, rest and eat barbecue. And then I’m going to get up the next day to train.”

[resolved], of how progress is made,” Powers said. “Gage had an idea it would help to have, from the University’s point of view, some structural change — journalism, rather than Student Affairs. My view was that [the move] was a plausible solution — if it works, it’s fine with me.” Powers said the extent of his personal involvement was helping to facilitate discussion with Hart. “I don’t think he went out looking for it, but [Hart] was a good soldier, and he said ‘Yes, if that would help, I’ll do this,’” Powers said. “I did a little bit of legwork for [Paine] — that was my role.”

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In an interview Thursday, Paine said she recommended to Powers that TSM properties should be moved, but that she did not make the final decision. “[In a regular meeting with the president], I said I think it’s in the best interest of TSM to move — that would be my recommendation at this point,” Paine said. “Ultimately, the administrative home [of TSM properties] is a presidential decision, in consultation with all of the administrative units. It’s his decision; it wasn’t a vote.” Paine could not be reached for additional comment or clarification after the Texan interviewed Powers on Friday afternoon.

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Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Wright Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala, Riley Brands, Amil Malik, Eric Nikolaides Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shabab Siddiqui Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan Rudner Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Antonia Gales, Jacob Kerr, Pete Stroud, Amanda Voeller Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Julia Brouillette, Nicole Cobler, Alyssa Mahoney, Madlin Mekelburg Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Reinsch Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brett Donohoe, Reeana Keenen, Kevin Sharifi Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Mitts Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hirrah Barlas, Bria Benjamin, Alex Dolan, Omar Longoria Multimedia Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charlie Pearce, Alec Wyman Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sam Ortega Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jonathan Garza, Shweta Gulati, Pu Ying Huang, Shelby Tauber Senior Videographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor Barron, Jackie Kuenstler, Dan Resler, Bryce Seifert Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Smothers Associate Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren L’Amie Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eleanor Dearman, David Sackllah, Alex Williams, Elizabeth Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stefan Scrafield Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Hummer Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Evan Berkowitz, Garrett Callahan, Jori Epstein, Matt Warden Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Hadidi Senior Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cody Bubenik, Ploy Buraparate, Connor Murphy, Aaron Rodriguez, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephanie Vanicek Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeremy Hintz Associate Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarah Stancik Special Ventures Co-editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard, Chris Hummer Online Outreach Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fred Tally-Foos Journalism Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Michael Brick

Tryouts Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emma Acosta, Zachary Keener, Natalie Sullivan Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarah Montgomery, Stephanie Tacy, Lauren Ussery

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RECYCLE

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 4711865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

administration has applied and interpreted the trust in past years has made the board toothless — we’ve been turned into a powerless entity.” The student Declaration of trust is a document cre-PO ated in 1971, when TSM — then called Texas Student Productions — was trying to ensure editorial independence, while locked in a legal battle with the UT System Board of Regents. The Trust made the organization an independent entity, although its assets and certain staff positions were still to be controlled by the regents. Powers said he had many questions he had assumed someone would answer before the move was made. “I mentioned, we’ve got the trust — I have no idea,” Powers said. “Does the trust need to be changed? Do the regents need to get involved in changing the Trust? I would have anticipated that all of that would have been worked out in advance.” In a letter announcing the decision to the Division of Student Affairs written last week, Paine said details about the move would be settled in the coming weeks. “We look forward to working with Dean Hart on a smooth, thoughtful and deliberate transition of leadership and TSM resources,” Paine wrote in her letter.

Current Research Opportunities

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(512) 471-1865 | advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Interim Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frank Serpas, III Executive Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chad Barnes Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barbara Heine Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcasting and Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Event Coordinator and Media Consultant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindsey Hollingsworth Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Carter Goss, Lindsey Hollingsworth Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ted Sniderman Student Assistant Advertising Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rohan Needel Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dani Archuleta, Aaron Blanco, Hannah Davis, Crysta Hernandez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robin Jacobs, Erica Reed, Mayowa Tijani, Lesly Villarreal Student Project Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Aaron Blanco Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mymy Nguyen Student Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dito Prado Senior Graphic Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Hublein Student Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Karina Manguia, Rachel Ngun, Bailey Sullivan Special Editions/Production Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michael Gammon Longhorn Life Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ali Killian Longhorn LIfe Assistant Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrew Huygen

Powers also said he was surprised TSM board members were not alerted to, or included more fully in, the decision-making process. “I would have anticipated they would’ve been part of the process,” Powers said. “I don’t know all the legal ins and outs of it, but I would have anticipated it would’ve taken some action by the board.” Dave Player, the president of the TSM board, said he was not surprised the board was not consulted beyond a visit by Paine and Hart at a meeting in September. “I can understand why the board was an afterthought because we’ve been completely cut out of the decision-making processes,” Player said. “The way the

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W&N 3

NEWS

3

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

CAMPUS

ART

Professors win early career award

Blanton tours explain symbolism behind art

By Emma Acosta @thedailytexan

Although their research topics vary from humancomputer communication to the relationships between neuron movement and decision making, three UT professors each won one of the 102 presidential awards given this year to science and engineering professionals in early stages of their research careers. Kristen Grauman, Mattan Erez and Jonathan Pillow each received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. UT tied with Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley with three award winners. Only Princeton University had more recipients. Grauman, an associate computer science professor, researches how humans and computers communicate. Her research focuses on methods to efficiently search images. Adriana Kovashka, a computer sciences graduate student, said doing research with Grauman is enjoyable because Grauman doesn’t get angry with her students if there is a problem with a lied particular project. rust “Working with her is rethe ally great,” Kovashka said. e’ve “[Grauman] encourages us wer-

ion cre-POLICE M— ent ing ded in By Julia Brouillette UT @juliakbrou nts. ga- Austin activist Antoentnio Buehler filed a lawsuit setsagainst several members of onsthe Austin Police Departlledment on Dec. 31 for preventing him from filming police anybehavior, which, according medto Buehler, is a violation of be-his civil rights. Buehler was first argotrested Jan. 1, 2012 after ea,”he filmed what he derustscribed as a brutal enthecounter between a woman vedand APD officers. Buehler ? Isaid the officers’ behavior thatsurprised him. een “As I saw the cops putting

By Natalie Sullivan @thedailytexan

Jonathan Garza / Daily Texan Staff

Jonathan Pillow, assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience, is one of three UT professors to receive the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

to come up with our own ideas. She’s always expecting a lot of her students, but doesn’t make them feel stressed. She’s reasonable.” Erez, an associate electrical and computer engineering professor, is working on a super computer with interconnections that can address problems. Erez said he has had a passion for technology since childhood. “It was something that interested me at a very young age,” Erez said. “I’ve been playing on computers since the first grade.” Erez said he hopes graduating students work hard to

achieve their goals. “Be committed to what you do and don’t sell yourself short,” Erez said. “Don’t compromise your expectations, and follow your passion.” Electrical engineering professor Yale Patt said Erez goes out of his way to help his students succeed. “[Erez] is a good human being and cares about his students,” Patt said. “Anytime you go by his office, there’s a student in there. Mentoring develops the students.” Pillow, an assistant psychology and neuroscience professor, has done research in neural coding

and computation. Through his research, he has been able to learn about different neuron spikes that convey information during decision making. Pillow said it was difficult for his parents to fully understand his research. “My own mom has a hard time understanding what it is I do,” Pillow said. “She used to keep a note by the phone so that she could tell our relatives exactly what it was I was doing.” The three professors will receive their awards at a ceremony in Washington, D.C., later this year.

As part of its weekend tour schedule, the Blanton Museum of Art hosted a public tour of its permanent collection Sunday afternoon, titled “Persuasion: Messages and Meanings in Art.” The tour, led by docent Connie Shortes, explored the symbolism behind a variety of artistic works, ranging from 14th century religious paintings to more modern, abstract compositions by artists such as Ben Shahn and Adolph Gottlieb. Shortes said art often serves a purpose other than just aesthetics. “Art has always been used to propagate ideas and to persuade,” Shortes said. “There’s this whole story unfolding in the paintings; there’s message, there’s meaning.” The museum hosts themed tours each weekend at 3 p.m., designed to explore different aspects of the Blanton’s collection. The “Persuasion” tour especially focused on how historical events and trends impacted artists’ styles. “Many artists, like Ben Shahn, were influenced by socialism and communism and were sympathetic to [those] ideas,” Shortes said. “You can see the emotion

coming out in their paintings. [That] period in American history [was] just so interesting, when America was so powerful in the world. The art is big. It’s bold. It’s brash. It’s different.” Ray Williams, director of education and academic affairs for the museum, said one feature of the tour is its ability to allow people to confront abstract ideas through art. “It’s about putting issues of the day in front of viewers for their contemplation and things that are maybe a little uncomfortable,” Williams said. English sophomore Deborah Seow said learning about the hidden meanings behind the paintings helped her understand them better. “It made me appreciate [the paintings] more, knowing their backgrounds,” Seow said. Psychology sophomore Paula Horstman agreed. “I thought [the tour] was very informative and eyeopening,” Horstman said. “It brought out a bunch of different perspectives on the same paintings. I never really thought about it much before, but it’s very cool, the fact that you can extract meaning from all the different symbols in art.”

Activist files suit alleging APD did not allow him to record arrest

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Ayala said MetroRapid costs $47.6 million, and 80 percent of the project was funded through a Federal Transit Administration grant program. According to Ayala, CapMetro currently has planned only MetroRapid routes 801 and 803, but there is a possibility for expansion through the Project Connect partnership with Austin, the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization and Lone Star Rail. The increased services follow a controversial decision in the fall to phase out shuttle routes on Cameron Road and

[the woman] into a torture move; it shocked the hell out of me,” Buehler said. “I just never imagined I would see that.” When one of the officers, Patrick Oborski, noticed him filming, Buehler was arrested and charged with failure to obey a lawful order. “When I was sitting in jail that night, it was just surreal. … I couldn’t believe what was happening,” Buehler said. “That’s when I realized that my world has changed.” In April 2013, a grand jury dropped charges against Oborski of tampering with a governmental record and Wickersham Lane based on ridership data. The Cameron Road route will be shortened and renamed Camino La Costa, which will operate until the end of the semester, while the Wickersham Lane route will be merged into two other stops: Route 20 Manor/Riverside and Route 100 MetroAirport. Columbia Mishra, Graduate Student Assembly president, said University and CapMetro liaisons attended assembly meetings in December to discuss the PRC route, which connects the main campus to the Pickle Research Campus. The route will transition to Rapid 803 this summer, but she said she is concerned with how the PRC route change will affect students. “As pointed out by students during discussion at our December meeting, there will be more stops, as this is not a direct route from campus to PRC campus and will have both students and local passengers,” Mishra said.

official oppression. “It is clear that, after reviewing all of the evidence in these cases and applicable statutes, the grand jury found that interfering with officers during the course of their duties is, in fact, a crime,” Police Chief Art Acevedo said in a statement. While filming police actions is generally lawful, Acevedo said failure to obey a lawful order and resisting arrest are not tolerated. Since his first arrest, Buehler has been detained multiple times, once for disorderly conduct and a second time for failure to obey a lawful order. Buehler said

APD’s failure to reprimand the officers who arrested him is part of why he’s suing the department. “There is absolutely no accountability for police who commit a crime,” Buehler said. “This is a problem that certainly predates my incident.” Buehler said the Office of the Police Monitor, which exists to handle cases of alleged violations of APD policy, along with APD’s Internal Affairs department, is not effective at holding APD officers accountable. Biology freshman Aleyda Lopez said she thinks videotapes can serve as evidence in

cases of police cruelty. “The cops should not be afraid of being filmed, because if they act in a decent way they should have nothing to be afraid of,” Lopez said. “[Buehler] has been arrested because the cops do not want their corrupt behavior to be exposed.” Soon after his first arrest, Buehler founded the Peaceful Streets Project, a nonpartisan police-accountability organization that organizes groups of citizens to film law enforcement officers. Acevedo said APD strongly supports the right of members of the public to

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record, photograph or film APD officers. “Evidence of the department’s support of this fundamental right can be found on the [Internet], which is replete with instances of the public lawfully recording the activities of departmental personnel,” Acevedo said. In addition to APD, Buehler has also filed suit against the City of Austin, the police chief and several officers. “We strongly believe that Mr. Buehler’s lawsuit is without merit and look forward to refuting his claims in court,” Acevedo said.

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4A OPINION

4

LAURA WRIGHT, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / @TexanEditorial Tuesday, January 21, 2014

HORNS DOWN: DAVIS’ RAGS TO RICHES STORY BENDS THE TRUTH The Dallas Morning News reported Saturday that the story of Sen. Wendy Davis’ rags-to-riches rise to the top of Texas politics has a few fudged elements and omitted details, a potentially major problem for her current campaign for governor. The details in question include the amount of time Davis spent living in a trailer park and the extent of her second husband’s financial support for her education at Harvard Law School. The true(r) version of Davis’ background doesn’t give any impression that she had it easy, but that just makes the decision to sugarcoat her already-compelling backstory all the more confusing: Does she not think people who are smart enough to vote for her are smart enough to fact-check her? In any case, we’re disappointed that Davis let this misinformation hold for so long. As Davis’ second husband Jeff Davis told The Dallas Morning News, “She got a break. Good things happen, opportunities open up. You take them; you get lucky. That’s a better narrative than what they’re trying to paint.”

She got a break. Good things happen, opportunities open up. You take them; you get lucky. That’s a better narrative than what they’re trying to paint.” —Jeff Davis, Wendy Davis’ ex-husband

LM Ottero / Associated Press

Sen. Wendy Davis speaks at a roundtable meeting in Arlington, Texas on Jan 9.

HORNS DOWN: MLK JR. DAY MISUSED FOR AGENDA PUSHING On Monday, Sarah Palin, former vice presidential candidate and Governor of Alaska, took to social media to celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s legacy — but with a twist. After quoting from King’s historic “I Have a Dream” speech, Palin went on to admonish President Barack Obama for “playing the race card” in a strangely caustic plea to end “the racial divide.” PETA also took advantage of the holiday to push its agenda, with a series of tweets claiming that the best way to honor Dr. King is to “seek justice for EVERYONE who is disadvantaged,” presumably also including animals. These comments are in poor taste on a day meant to celebrate Dr. King’s life and legacy, not one to use as cannon fodder for our own unrelated political goals.

COLUMN

UT’s ties to Accenture should raise questions By Alberto Martinez Guest Columnist

In 2006, the Texas Comptroller denounced consulting firm Accenture’s mishandling of Texas welfare, Medicaid enrollments and the Children’s Health Insurance Program. Instead of saving the state money as the company had promised, Accenture cost the state $99.9 million more than their budget had allowed. Because of Accenture’s shoddy work, families in need were wrongly denied food stamps, many health insurance applications were mistakenly faxed to a warehouse in Seattle and 81,504 children lost health insurance coverage in just 9 months — some of them seriously ill. The State of Texas has since terminated its contract with Accenture, but not before paying $243 million for these horrors. Now some students worry about Accenture’s plans to transform UT in the form of the University’s new Shared Services plan, which will begin being implemented this semester and which was planned with the help of Accenture. In 2011, the chief executive of Accenture’s Health and Public Service, Stephen Rohleder, published an op-ed in the Austin American-Statesman in which he argued that public institutions, such as UT-Austin, should adopt shared services practices from the private sector. Rohleder worked with Accenture for 30 years, several of them as a chief operating officer at the company. Months later, Rohleder chaired a committee advising UT on business productivity. UT paid Accenture staff $960,000, without competitive bidding, meaning that no other companies were given a chance to compete for the contract. A subcommittee chaired by Stephan James recommended that UT’s operations be centralized into shared services in the process, eliminating hundreds of jobs. James, too, was an Accenture executive, for 38 years, and another chief operating officer. Given Accenture’s past history, some faculty and students voiced concerns about the company’s involvement in the initiative last semester. UT’s Chief Financial Officer Kevin Hegarty replied, “Shared Services at UT is not an Accenture-driven project.” At a faculty meeting, Hegarty also admitted, “If it’s an Accenture plan, it’s not going to be successful.” But even after the original proposal was finished, Accenture’s involvement on the UT campus continues. The project team tasked with creating the UT Shared Services plan has six leaders, including three Accenture executives, Tim Mould, Ryan Oakes, Jamie Wills, plus a former Accenture executive, Brad Englert, now the University’s chief information officer. To implement the Shared Services plan, administrators will have to buy a “hugely

expensive” system called Workday for more than $100 million. Workday publicizes its Services Partners, and its first partner is Accenture — despite the fact that Workday does not list its partners in alphabetical order. Accenture even describes itself as “one of Workday’s most strategic, experienced and successful deployment partners,” further underscoring the relationship between the company and Workday. Englert will oversee the implementation of Workday. Julienne VanDerZiel, another Shared Services planning leader, is also a former Accenture executive. It remains to be seen how their experience at Accenture will affect the University. Accenture developed shared services for the University of Michigan. At a meeting of UT’s Staff Council, Hegarty explained the importance of Michigan’s Shared Services as a model for implementing the system at UT: “They’re probably the closest institution to us of any out there. They’re about the same size, the same scope, everything. And so we think: That’s really a good test case to look at, watch and monitor …. They look very, very much like we look when you look at how they’re organized.” And what does shared services look like at Michigan? It looks like Michigan has paid $22.5 million for Accenture’s shared services to cut 50 staff jobs and relocate 275 jobs out of other departments. Longtime employees must reapply for jobs, which they might lose. Department chairs received “an unprecedented gag order” not to discuss shared services. An investigative committee of alumni and students concluded that Accenture “cannot be trusted with the University of Michigan’s financial management, its IT systems or with other sensitive information.” They begged for the vice president of finance, a former Accenture executive, to be replaced immediately to avoid conflict of interests. Michigan’s IT Governance Council complained that Accenture underestimated costs and overestimated savings. Finally, scores of Michigan professors denounced shared services as “a misguided venture that will irreparably harm our cherished institution.” An unprecedented 1,169 faculty have signed a petition, including the chairs of 29 departments. They begged their president to terminate the project immediately: “We implore you to restore sanity to the University.” But UT, which has just begun the implementation of the Shared Services plan on campus, can prevent a similar crisis before it begins at home. I urge that instead of paying companies in California, Ireland and Bermuda through Accenture, UT should hire UT staff and Texas programmers to custom build its administrative systems. Alberto A. Martinez is a member of the UT Faculty Council, and an associate professor in the department of history.

EDITORIAL

Why work for The Daily Texan? Fame, fortune and a soapbox Carolyn Kastor / Associated Press

Sarah Palin speaks at the Faith and Freedom Coalition Road to Majority 2013 conference on Jan 10, 2014

HORNS UP: VENTURE CAPITAL ON THE RISE IN AUSTIN Venture capital funding in Austin for early-stage companies finished 2013 with renewed vigor, according to a survey by PricewaterhouseCoopers and the National Venture Capital Association. In the fourth quarter of 2013 alone, 20 Austin companies combined to raise $99.4 million in funding, a 67 percent increase from the third quarter. This past Saturday, the Austin American-Statesman reported that investment activity is up in several areas in which Austin has been a major player — software, chip design and medical devices — as well as newer areas, such as social media, cloud computing and data analytics. Startups often spend capital inflow quickly to capture market share and grow their businesses — which often translates to an increase in local employment. But we’re also happy because we know the entrepreneurial spirit runs deep with many Longhorns, and we’re encouraged that venture capital is responding.

In the fourth quarter of 2013 alone, 20 Austin companies combined to raise $99.4 million in funding, a 67 percent increase from the third quarter.

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Editor’s Note: Tryouts for opinion and all other Daily Texan departments are currently underway and will continue until Friday, Jan. 31. Apply online at dailytexanonline.com/ employment or walk into our basement office at 2500 Whitis Ave. If you’re a student at the UT, it’s safe to assume that you’re interested in learning valuable skills, preparing for a career and making a name for yourself. If you fit that description and don’t have a million-dollar NFL contract awaiting you, there’s no better place at UT to accomplish all three of those goals than The Daily Texan. However competent a writer you are before you start at the Texan, your skills will grow more than you ever expected as a result of the job. At the Texan, you’ll learn through practice and example how to produce intelligent, professional and compelling work on a quick deadline. You’ll also learn to represent something much bigger than yourself alongside some of the most talented and driven members of the UT community. As an opinion columnist in particular, you’ll have your views read, considered and critiqued by an audience of thousands on one of the nation’s biggest university campuses. You’ll choose your topic so you

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to editor@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

DAILY TEXAN TRYOUTS WHERE: dailytexanonline.com/employment WHEN: January 12 — 30 WHO: All UT students (including graduate and law students) interested in jobs in the Texan’s news, sports, Life&Arts, comics, design, multimedia, tech and opinion departments

can find what’s important to you as a UT student and have a space to show the rest of the 40 Acres why your issue of choice should be important to all of us, too. As wide-ranging as your column’s impact can be, the words will be yours to show off, now and for years to come. Few jobs past college encourage you to both build your soapbox and then stand on it and yell. As a Texan opinion columnist, you’ll do just that. Obviously, this is a hiring pitch, but let it also serve as a word to the wise. The Texan is one of the largest and most award-winning student newspapers in America, and Texan staffers go on to great things in a multitude of industries. Many of them can attribute much of their success to their time here. Don’t let the opportunity go to waste.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@TexanEditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


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Tuesday, January 21, 2014

MOVIE REVIEW | ‘DEVIL’S DUE’

Horror film delivers fleeting scares but fails to fulfill potential By Alex Williams @alexwilliamsDT

In any film genre, familiarity is something of a given. In action flicks, the bad guy dies in explosive fashion. Romantic comedies always end with a passionate confession, usually in public and always followed with a kiss. But some genres, especially ones such as horror that are based on the ability to surprise the audience, are constantly struggling to bring something fresh to the table, a lofty goal that only rarely succeeds. “Devil’s Due” is neither a hit nor a miss, playing in well-established territory, but still packing in enough clever, disconcerting moments and likable characters to keep its brisk 89-minute runtime from lagging. After an appropriately ominous opening featuring a bloodied Zach McCall (Zach Gilford) in a police interrogation room, “Devil’s Due” jumps back nine months to the eve of his wedding to Samantha (Allison Miller). After a fairy-tale ceremony, Zach and Sam go on a SouthAmerican honeymoon, the last night of which is a hazily remembered night of drinking with a strange taxi driver. A few weeks later, Samantha turns up pregnant, and, as Zach and his new bride come to terms with the terrors of starting a family, a much more satanic threat starts to emerge

DEVIL’S DUE Directors: Matt BettinelliOlpin and Tyler Gillett Genre: Horror Runtime: 89 minutes

— from inside her uterus. It’s rare for a horror flick to have characters likable enough for the terrors inevitably inflicted upon them to register as more than empty jump scares, but “Devil’s Due” takes its time developing its central couple. In his time on “Friday Night Lights,” Gilford mastered the art of evoking the audience’s sympathy, and he puts that skill to admirable use here as his character struggles to deal with the threat to his family. Gilford has solid chemistry with Miller, who is charmingly tender as a wounded young woman terrified about losing control of her body, but she’s unfortunately sidelined halfway through the film, relegated to demonically blank stares and agitated tones after a few great scares. One of the more interesting aspects of “Devil’s Due” is the creative team behind it, a quartet of filmmakers dubbed “Radio Silence,” who also made the memorable final segment

Michele Short / Associated Press

This image shows Allison Miller in a scene from “Devil’s Due.”

of horror anthology “V/H/S.” While “Devil’s Due” shares that short’s found-footage trappings, it’s never quite as nightmarish, though the quartet puts forth a valiant effort. Working with producer Chad Villella, directors Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett stage their sequences with efficiency, and cinematographer Justin Martinez makes the moments of fleeting terror linger for their unassuming composition.

Ultimately, “Devil’s Due” wouldn’t be much of anything if it wasn’t scary, and the film certainly has a knack for getting under the viewers’ skin. There are solid scares throughout, but the moments that truly stick subtly draw creepy significance from established character details. When the vegetarian Samantha lingers over the ground beef aisle in the supermarket, or causes a birthing class to go

horribly wrong, it’s far more effective than the barrage of special effects that overwhelm the film’s finale. In its climax, “Devil’s Due” cranks up the scares but also removes the subtlety that made them sing to begin with, leaving viewers with an effects-driven ending that succumbs to the predictability that the film has dodged thus far. There’s plenty to like about “Devil’s Due,” and it’s clear that

the Radio Silence team has it in them to make a horror classic, but this, unfortunately, is not it. For all the dedicated character work and creeping sense of helplessness, “Devil’s Due” ends on a note with too much familiarity and not enough personality, which takes it from being a potentially solid horror effort to a mixed bag, destined to be shrugged into a DVD discount bin within a year or two.

in the pasteurizer, cooling the mixture, adding the desired flavor and, finally, freezing it. Francesca Ferrarese said this handmade process creates a product richer than ice cream but with less fat content. “What I learned there

was how to make the gelato from scratch because a lot of gelato shops use premade mixes,” she said. “Working with people who really knew how to do it in the artisanal way was very helpful.” Silvestrini said that open-

ing your own business is hard, but it’s worth it to see the customer’s happiness with the shop and to own and run a business for yourself. “Now, this is our business and we have no one to tell us what we can do, so

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GELATO continues from page 8 memories so much while in Columbus, Ohio, that she went to Italy to learn how to make the dessert. After going to culinary school to master gelato-making, she worked at one of the most well know gelaterias in Italy, Gelateria De’ Coltelli.

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KANSAS

By Chris Hummer @chris_hummer

The Longhorns have not toppled a top-10 team since a win over No. 2 Kansas in 2011, which is also the last season Texas was ranked in the AP poll. On Saturday, that streak ended with a win over No. 8 Iowa State — and the unranked streak could soon follow suit. “We want to compete with the best,” sophomore guard Javan Felix said. “And tonight was a chance for us to do that and we performed well. We feel like we’re as good as anyone when we put our best on the floor.” In the win, the Longhorns (14-4, 3-2 Big 12) withstood a furious comeback from the Cyclones (14-3, 2-3 Big 12), who went on a 15-5 run after Texas secured a 75-61 lead. The Longhorns did not make a field goal for more than five minutes during that stretch. But they endured, converting 7-for-8 free throws in the final minute to seal the game. Jonathan Holmes, a junior and Texas’ lone upperclassman, led the way for the Longhorns. He paced the team with a career-high 23 points and added seven rebounds, each of which came in the second half. This proved to be a common theme for the team. Texas responded to a 22-12 rebounding deficit at halftime to outboard the Cyclones 25-18 in the second frame, a charge led by an energized Texas frontcourt. “When the bigs play good inside it opens up everything for us because there is always a size advantage inside,”

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Junior forward Jonathan Holmes drives to the basket during Saturday’s matchup against Iowa State. Holmes, Texas’ only upperclassman recorded a career-high 23 points to lead the Longhorns’ upset against the No. 8 Cyclones.

Felix said. “When they play hard and are getting on the boards, it’s easier to us to attack closeouts and get open shots. That’s how we try to run our offense. We didn’t do a good job of it in the first half, but in the second half it got better. I think that was the difference in the game.” Sophomore center Cameron Ridley provided a spark for Texas in the second half following a quiet showing of only four points in the first. Ridley finished 7-for-10 from the field for 16 points and 11 rebounds, his fifth doubledouble of the season. “I thought [Ridley] was just terrific today,” head

coach Rick Barnes said. “It’s what he does — everyone [was] game planning to try and keep him out of there, as he’s fighting for space. I thought he was just really good.” Ridley also single-handedly created the biggest momentum shift of the game. With Texas up 55-51, Ridley funneled toward the basket after a missed Isaiah Taylor jumper and followed the miss with a deafening twohanded slam. The dunk put the crowd on its feet, and before they could sit down, Ridley sprinted down the floor and made a huge block, producing a second roar

from the fans. “After the dunk, it gave us a lot of momentum on offense and defense,” Ridley said. “It gave us the spark, got the bench and crowd into to the game. It’s the kind of stuff we need.” Two other Longhorns finished in double-figures. Felix added 17 points, despite 5-for-17 shooting, and Taylor contributed 12. The Longhorns forced Iowa State into 18 turnovers and held the Cyclones to only 33 percent shooting behind the arc. This was huge for Texas; Iowa State relies on the three offensively and entered the game with the best assist/

turnover rate in the country. The latter statistic also proved to be defining for Texas, according to Barnes when asked about the biggest difference in the team’s play Saturday versus its 0-2 conference start. “One stat,” Barnes said. “Today we had eight turnovers and 12 assists, whereas normally it could be the other way.” The win gives the Longhorns three straight victories in the Big 12 and will provide momentum as they enter a stretch against three of the conference’s best: Kansas State, Baylor and Kansas. Texas plays No. 22 Kansas State on Tuesday night at the Frank Erwin Center.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Horns ‘lack desire,’ fall to TCU for first time By Jori Epstein @JoriEpstein

Struggling with poor firsthalf defense and 26 turnovers, the Longhorns suffered their first loss against TCU in program history Sunday. The Horned Frogs jumped out to a 30-18 halftime lead en route to a 54-48 victory. “We didn’t put forth the effort in the first half against a team that’s hungry and never beaten us,” head coach Karen Aston said. “We didn’t have the desire to win in the first half.” Satiating TCU’s hunger left the Longhorns (12-6, 3-3 Big 12) with an empty plate in the first period. They battled a 5:29 scoreless stretch and allowed the Horned Frogs (126, 3-3 Big 12) a clear advantage in the paint. The Longhorn season has been characterized by domination in the paint, as they have outrebounded opponents by an average of 12.6 rebounds per game and outscored opponents in the paint by an average of 33.9 to 18.0. But, in Sunday’s first half, the Horned Frogs tripled the Longhorns’ inside

production — outscoring them 24 to 8 in the paint — and outrebounding them 24 to 19. “We were absolutely horrible on the defensive end in the first half,” Aston said. “Every hustle play was theirs and we didn’t have the effort it takes in a Big 12 game. You can’t kid yourself about what the Big 12 is like, and we showed up very lackadaisical.” Texas sought to reclaim a chance at victory with an 11-0 run to open the second half. Cutting the deficit to one, the Longhorns paired offensive production with long-awaited hints of defense as they forced three TCU turnovers. Texas also kept the Horned Frogs scoreless for around eight minutes before junior Natalie Ventress broke through and scored at the 11:22 mark. From there, the in-state squads traded baskets and leads. Sophomore guard Brady Sanders’ three second-half 3-pointers kept the Longhorns in the game until free throw woes troubled them down the stretch. Both senior guard Chassidy Fussell and junior forward Nneka Enemkpali

TOP TWEET Mack Brown @UT_MackBrown

I’m tweeting all my tweets. Still learning. Thx for having fun with it.

LONGHORNS IN THE NFL Earl Thomas Seattle Seahawks 4 solo

Phil Dawson S.F. 49ers 5 points

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Michael Huff Denver Broncos 1 tackle

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Sophomore guard Brady Sanders sets up a play during Texas’ game against Kansas earlier this season. On Sunday, the Longhorns fell to TCU, the first loss to the Horned Frogs in program history.

missed their free throws before TCU sank four straight from the line. Aston said that, though defense was the deciding factor, the team must also reassess its mental preparation on the road. “Some people need to get hungry again,” Aston said.

WOMEN’S TENNIS / CHRIS CARAVEO Miami on Saturday went to three sets. After sweeping Memphis’ Alyssa Hibberd on Day 1, No. 22 Addison lost in three sets to No. 64 Kelsey Laurente the next day. First semester freshman Neda Koprcina helped pick up two of Texas’ six wins. She defeated Clementina Riobueno in a third-set tiebreaker 10-8 for her first collegiate victory. Then, on Sunday, Koprcina teamed up with Begley and won in doubles against

ISLANDERS

6 tackles

WEEKEND RECAPS The Longhorns took 12 matches to tiebreak decisions, but experienced few victories at the Miami Spring Invite. Over the course of the three-day event, the team won six of the 30 matches it competed in. Half of those wins came Friday, as sophomore Breaunna Addison, senior Elizabeth Begley and freshman Ratnika Batra won their singles matches against Memphis. Six of the Longhorns’ seven singles matches against No. 9

FLYERS

“You get in the situation where you’re getting a lot of minutes and you get comfortable. We’ve got to get some ‘uncomfortableness’ about us again.” Sanders and sophomore center Imani McGee-Stafford led Texas with nine points each, while McGeeStafford and Enemkpali

grabbed seven and 12 rebounds respectively. Enemkpali fouled out for the second consecutive game. Texas returns to the friendly confines of the Frank Erwin Center this Saturday at 3 p.m., as the Longhorns host West Virginia (17-2, 5-1 Big 12).

TRACK & FIELD / GRANT GORDON a Memphis duo. It was the Longhorns’ lone win Sunday and second doubles victory at the invitational. The meet offered the Longhorns a look at No. 16 Vanderbilt, whom they will face at home in February. Texas struggled victory-wise as the Commodores swept all 10 matches. Texas begins the dualmatch season with 10 straight non-conference home matches. Its first opponent will be UT-San Antonio on Wednesday.

The men’s and women’s track and field teams traveled to Fayetteville on Friday for their seasonopening dual meet against Arkansas. Despite several promising individual performances, both were easily defeated by the Razorbacks. But the losses also could be partly attributed to several key male and female performers were held out of the meet as the teams ease their way into a long and arduous season. There were also several strong early season

performances that bode well for the rest of the year. On the men’s side, freshman sprinter Carlton Anumnu won the 60 meters in a time of 6.90 seconds, and junior throwers Blake Jakobsson and Will Spence won the weight throw and shot put, respectively. For the women, senior Shanay Briscoe won both the high jump and shot put, while junior Kaitlin Petrillose came up just short of breaking her own UT record in the pole vault.

1 solo

SPORTS BRIEFLY Four former Longhorns play in all-star games Offensive lineman Trey Hopkins appeared in the NFLPA Collegiate Bowl in California, while cornerback Carrington Byndom, kicker Anthony Fera and offensive lineman Donald Hawkins played in the East-West Shrine Game in Florida. Byndom and Fera, who appeared for the West team, went against Hawkins on the East, which ended up winning 23-13. Byndom posted three tackles during the game, including one for a loss, while the Lou Groza finalist, Fera, made two of his three field-goal attempts. Former wide receiver Mike Davis will also represent the Longhorns in all-star game during the Senior Bowl on Saturday, which is set for 3 p.m. and will be aired on the NFL Network. —Garrett Callahan


COMICS 7

COMICS

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014

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Edited by Will Shortz

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HANNAH SMOTHERS, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR / @DailyTexanArts Tuesday, January 21, 2014

8

CITY

Italian family opens gelato shop By Eleanor Dearman @ellydearman

In their little shop on South First Street, Italian family Leo Silvestrini, Francesca Ferrarese and Marco Ferrarese shared — in thick Italian accents — the story of how they left their fast-paced lives behind to move to Austin and open their own gelato shop, Dolce Neve. The gelateria had its grand opening on Jan. 10 and hired three UT students to keep up with business. Dolce Neve’s initial opening took much longer than the owners anticipated. After searching for a location for six months, brother and sister Marco and Francesca and her fiit inance Leo had almost given ssic,up on finding a building in notSouth Austin. har- After months of getenseting the proper permits, Due”installing equipment and uchdecorating the shop, Dolce ughNeve was finally ready to itopen. At the grand openoliding, customers waited in bag,line for their authentic Italintoian gelato. in a “We started the grand opening at 5 o’clock but before 5 o’clock we start to see people in the line, out the door, and we start to serve the gelato,” Silvestrini said. “We didn’t expect all these people. We started to make the gelato and we didn’t see what was happening outside.” The family all agreed that customers in the U.S. were much more welcoming and happier than those in Italy. “When all the people showed, they treated us as family,” Francesca Ferrarese said. “They were talking with us, talking about their experiences in Italy, giving us advice on where to get ingredients, putting us in contact with other restaurants that they really like where we could provide them gelato. I think everyone was very much happy.” The owners met Andrew Curtis, vice president of UT’s Italian organization Circolo Italiano and a supply chain management senior, about a year ago when they went to speak with the

Multimedia

See the full process of how Dolce Neve makes its traditional gelato at dailytexanonline.com club. After getting to know the family, Curtis expressed an interest in working around the shop. “The owners are really just wonderful people,” Curtis said. “I think they really have a passion for it and their mission is what gelato’s mission should be: to make people feel happy and create a sense of community.” Dolce Neve arose from each owner’s dissatisfaction in their former career. Silvestrini was in Milan, Italy at the time, working for one of the country’s biggest computer design sites. Marco Ferrarese was a management consultant, and Francesca Ferrarese was working on her doctorate in finance. “I started to think about what I wanted to do years

We started talking. Marco one day on the phone told us, ‘Hey guys what do you think about gelato? Francesca is a great cook. We love gelato so why can we not try to do that?’ I thought, ‘yes! —Leo Silvestrini, Co-owner

from now and I realized that that part was done,” Marco said. “I kind of decided I wanted to have something mine.” It took only a phone call from Marco Ferrarese for Silvestrini to leave his job for the world of gelato-making. “We started talking,” Silvestrini said. “Marco one day on the phone told us, ‘Hey guys what do you think about gelato?

BOOK REVIEW | ‘FAMOUS WRITERS I HAVE KNOWN’

Magnuson’s ninth novel reads as satirical love letter to city By Robert Starr @robertkstarr

Upon first arrival, Austin can be something of a shock. A pleasant one, but not one without its little quirks that we put up with, like strange roads that never lead where one wants them to and intense fear of cold weather that strikes whenever the temperature falls below 60 degrees. But Austinites allow these things and enjoy them because they contribute to why people fall in love with this strange city. James Magnuson’s “Famous Writers I Have Known” is a kind of love letter to Austin, even as it pokes fun at it, just as the novel is an affectionate ribbing of the world of literary fiction. It’s fluff, but it’s entertaining fluff without a hint of pretension. Frankie Abandonato, a self-described “world-class liar,” cons the wrong man and finds himself on the run from the mafia. He ends up in Austin, impersonating a reclusive writer who hadn’t been seen in years, teaching starry-eyed students how to write.

Just from the set-up, it is clear what to expect: the close calls where Abandonato has to bluff his way through topics he knows nothing about, the close friendships that form using his new identity and the moments where, for the first time in his life, he chooses to do the right thing. These elements are all here, and perhaps some of the literary characters in the book might look down at the familiarity of the story, but why change what works? He also takes the advice of writing what you know. Magnuson is the director of the Michener Center for Writers at UT, and he creates believable interactions between the students in the novel, who are just as likely to encourage each other as look down on their peers as a way to hide insecurity. Magnuson uses his Austin know-how to create a genuine portrait of the city as well as genuine laughs with Abandonato’s reaction to it. It’s unfortunate that Magnuson doesn’t use the novel’s setting more. It might have been amusing for Abando-

FAMOUS WRITERS I HAVE KNOWN Author: James Magnuson Pages: 313 Genre: Satire

nato to witness what happens to the city during the utter chaos of South By Southwest — perhaps that may have even made a better backdrop for the climax than what the book ultimately provides. Still, the authenticity Magnuson provides helps elevate “Famous Writers I Have Known” above the typical con-man imposter story. The novel has no pretenses about what it is and, though it’s unlikely to win the Pulitzer, it’s equally unlikely that readers will have much of a need for their bookmark as they plow through this delightful look at the city we love through the eyes of an Austin virgin.

Pu Ying Huang / Daily Texan Staff

(Top) Leo Silvestrini, Francesca Ferrarese and Marco Ferrarese, left to right, are the owners of Dolce Neve, an authentic gelato shop on South First Street. The gelateria features coffee and expresso, homemade gelato, custom cakes and ice cream sandwiches. (Above) Yellow pepper with goat cheese is one among many flavors offered at Dolce Neve.

Francesca is a great cook. We love gelato so why can we not try to do that?’ I thought, ‘yes!’” The owners all grew up eating the frozen treat. Francesca and Marco Ferrarese

NOVEL

continues from page 1 He used these observations as the basis for “Famous Writers I Have Known.” “I have known Jim Magnuson for a long time,” said Stephen Harrigan, a faculty member at the Michener center. “We are close friends so I read the book in advance years ago, and I thought it was a brilliant and subversive look at his own profession. He knows the world he’s writing about intimately enough to kind of sabotage it in a way.” “Famous Writers I Have Known” is both a satirical look at the writing world and a recollection of Magnuson’s daily task at the Michener center, one of which is picking up authors at the airport with only a jacket photo as identification. This is how Abandonato’s character was formed. “I came up with this idea of a con man passing himself off as a writer, writers not being that different anyway in some cases,” Magnuson said. “They are both liars, con men and writers. They are both inventors, and they’re self-invented.” Michener wrote more than 40 different and popular books throughout his career, but he received little recognition as an author of literary merit. He left all of his money to the University to create the Michener center.

fondly remember their hometown of Fabriano’s gelateria, one of the oldest in Italy. “When were kids it was a tradition that in the evening, after dinner, all the “I think that what [Michener] got really right was the way there is this kind of towering presence that is infused into the life of the program,” former Michener center student Dominic Smith said. “As a student, there was never a time I got a stipend check that I didn’t think, ‘This is coming from the Michener estate.’” Michener’s life inspired the book’s second plot, as Magnuson was able to observe it first-hand. The two worked together for many years, and Magnuson saw the sadness under Michener’s generous front. “I knew Michener the last 10 years of his life, and I was very aware of lots of people trying to get a hold of his money in one way or another,” Magnuson said. “He had no children. There was something very painful about it.” “Famous Writers I Have Known” is a satire, and one of the most obvious objects of satirization is Michener through Shoeinger. Magnuson was careful to show the duality of Michener. While Michener was caring and giving for the most part, he was also troubled and could be somewhat difficult to work with. “On one hand it is fictionalized,” Magnuson said. “On the other hand, I would say that he wasn’t always easy near the end of his life. He could blow up

kids went together to get gelato,” Francesca Ferrarese said. Francesca Ferrarese missed these childhood

GELATO page 5 from time to time. It’s much different having to work for someone as opposed to having them shower you with all this largesse.” The students and their writing workshops were playfully mocked in the book, but Magnuson said the students are not based on anyone in particular. “I feel like some of the dialogue in his book came from real classes that I’ve had with him, but students of past years will say the same thing because writing workshops have something kind of repetitive about them,” former Michener center student Domenica Ruta said. “They all fall under similar structures. There are different types and tropes, and [Magnuson] captures them all very well.” The book’s satire is not hurtful or mean-spirited. Instead, it points out poignant truths about Magnuson’s experiences with the Michener center, and writers in general. “My feeling is everyone gets dusted up a good amount in the book but everyone gets their dues,” Magnuson said. “There are different kinds of comedy. There is some comedy that really is totally vicious and delightful and there’s other comedy that is a little gentler and warmer. This is not the most savage book. I hope people can be moved by it, and I hope people can laugh.”

The Daily Texan 2014-01-21  

The Tuesday, January 21, 2014 edition of The Daily Texan.

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