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SPORTS PAGE 6

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 8

COMICS PAGE 7

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UNIVERSITY

Patterson named as athletic director By Anthony Green @AnthonyGrreen

After a month-long search, the University has hired Steve Patterson to replace DeLoss Dodds as the new men’s athletic director. Patterson, who has been Arizona State University’s athletic director since March 2012, was selected

by an eight-member advisory committee, which included former and current members of the UT System Board of Regents and President William Powers Jr. Patterson and West Virginia athletic director Oliver Luck were finalists for the position, but Patterson beat out Luck in the interview process conducted over the

weekend, according to UT spokesman Gary Susswein. Under his new five-year contract at UT, Patterson will receive an annual salary of $1.4 million as well as performance bonuses of up to $200,000 per year. The performance bonuses are based upon whether the athletics department is financially solvent and whether it can

Who is Steve Patterson?

avoid any NCAA violations, Susswein said. Dodds currently collects a full, annual salary of $1.1 million, including bonuses. Mark Killian, vice chair of the Arizona Board of Regents, said he was angry about Patterson’s decision and said he was completely unaware of Patterson’s acceptance of the athletic

Find out more about new athletic director Steve Patterson and his sports career. PAGE 3 director position before the announcement Tuesday.

PATTERSON page 3

FRAMES featured photo

bit.ly/dtvid

ELECTION RESULTS

Prop. 1

Homestead tax exemption for spouses of deceased military personnel

PASSED

Prop. 2

Elimination of State Medical Board and Education Fund

PASSED

Prop. 3

Extension of time period aircraft parts are tax exempt

PASSED

Prop. 4

Tax exemption for homes donated to disabled veterans

PASSED

Prop. 5

Allow reverse mortgage loans to be used to purchase property

PASSED

Prop. 6

Creation of state Water Implementation Fund

PASSED

Prop. 7

Allow cities to fill government vacancies by making appointments

PASSED

Prop. 8

Create hospital district in Hidalgo County

PASSED

Prop. 9 Debby Garcia / Daily Texan Staff

Kimberly De Loera, a student from Del Valle High School, climbs upstairs during the “Artists Anonymous” event hosted by The Contemporary Austin Tuesday.

HEALTH

Expand political sanctions against judges

PASSED

STATE

Weight loss affects appetite for intimacy Abortion law sparks

controversy over care

By Julia Brouillette @juliakbrou

Lack of intimacy and feelings of resentment in relationships may be some unexpected drawbacks to weight loss, according to a recent study conducted by researchers at UT and North Carolina State University. The study’s results indicated substantial weight loss may cause tension in relationships when one partner resists the other’s healthy lifestyle changes. “I think when people lose weight, they usually expect their relationships to get better,” said Lynsey Romo, a recent UT graduate who co-authored the study. “The fact that in some cases there are these negative repercussions was surprising.” Researchers surveyed 21 couples from across the country. One partner in each couple had experienced at least a 30-pound weight loss in the time span

By Amanda Voeller @amandaevoeller

Illustration by Hannah Hadidi / Daily Texan Staff

of less than two years. Reasons for weight loss varied from diet and exercise to medical procedures. Each

member of the couple described the effects of weight loss on their relationship. When both partners

embraced healthy changes, couples reported

WEIGHT page 2

One clinic in Travis County can no longer provide abortions because of Texas’ most recent abortion law, and three clinics currently open will close next year when the remaining provisions of the law are implemented, according to Planned Parenthood spokeswoman Sarah Wheat. Wheat said part of the law that has not yet been implemented includes regulations on sizes of janitor’s closets, parking lots and air vents in health centers, though, none of the clinics in Travis County meet the requirements that must be implemented by September 2014. Planned Parenthood’s South Austin location is the only clinic in Travis County that has stopped providing abortion services because of the law, Wheat said.

Savanna Faulkner, Texas Students for Life president, said 43 percent of women seeking abortions are collegeaged, and the bill will improve abortion safety for students by helping ensure that doctors are well-equipped to perform procedures. “A lot of times abortions go really wrong,” Faulkner said. “[The provision] shows that these doctors are quality doctors and … an abortion is a surgical thing that happens, so why are they not held to the same standards as all other surgical doctors?” Julia Quinn, an executive board member of Texas Law Students for Reproductive Justice, said the law makes it impossible for a woman to exercise her constitutional right to an abortion. “The district court recognized in its ruling that the admitting privileges

ABORTION page 2

NEWS

OPINION

SPORTS

LIFE&ARTS

ONLINE

REASON TO PARTY

$9.3 million donated to computational sciences. PAGE 3

Rape prevention should be aimed at both sexes. PAGE 4

Texas soccer enters Big 12 Championship as 3-seed. PAGE 6

UT student Sara Davis sings with local band. PAGE 8

Graduate students use Obamacare as case study. PAGE 3

SMOCs offer a promising new teaching model. PAGE 4

Safety Mykkele Thompson adjusts to playing defense. PAGE 6

Jessica Lange is the glue that holds AHS together. PAGE 8

Get the facts on just how much alcohol students report they drink and how much it affects their academics. dailytexanonline.com

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Wednesday, November 6, 2013

NEWS

UNIVERSITY

New core topic analyzes Obamacare Volume 114, Issue 60

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor Laura Wright (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Shabab Siddiqui (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@ gmail.com Sports Office (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office (512) 232-2209 dtlifeandarts@gmail.com Retail Advertising (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising (512) 471-5244 classifieds@ dailytexanonline.com

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

By Cinnamon Cornell @CinnamonCornell

The Policy Research Project, a required graduate course ranging in topics as diverse as children’s welfare and lobbying in the Texas legislature, has introduced a new core topic for the 20132014 school year — the Affordable Care Act. The two-semester course, “Enrolling in Health Insurance Through the Affordable Care Act: An Austin Case Study,” is the latest Policy Research Project at the LBJ School of Public Affairs. The course primarily aims to put together a study of how Texas is implementing the Affordable Care Act, according to public affairs professor David Warner. “Policy Research Projects are a core course that are policy-related and involve student research,” Warner said. “This is the first on the ACA, but they range from transportation policy for the state to diabetes policy and maternal and child health on the US-Mexico border.” Despite political controversies surrounding the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, including a related government shutdown last month, LBJ assistant professor Sam Richardson said the goal of the project is not to make politicized recommendations. “The purpose of the study is not to say what

Marshall Nolen / Daily Texan Staff

Sam Richardson, assistant professor of public affairs, teaches a core graduate course, which examines the implementation of the Affordable Care Act in Texas and issues with the program’s enrollment website.

should happen, but to provide a scrupulously evenhanded explanation over time of what is happening,” Richardson said. Warner said the study is part of a national effort to study the implementation of the Health Insurance Marketplace conducted by a network of field research analysts in 27 states. Richardson said the project will have two

interrelated parts. The first will focus on analysis of the state’s readiness to implement the Affordable Care Act and will examine the availability of the marketplace. The second focuses on the initial workings of the exchanges themselves. Warner said students this spring will do a more indepth analysis of how the online insurance market initially worked out in the

state. In order to get a better picture of how the ACA is unfolding, all of the members of the class have become certified application counselors and are volunteering with Foundation Communities, an organization focused on getting low-income Texans enrolled in new insurance plans through the website. “The students in the class will have a publication that will be part of a

UNIVERSITY

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2013 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER Low High

68

45

Subject Line: “Astrodome.”

Donation creates potential for innovation By Lizzie Jespersen @LizzieJespersen

The O’Donnell Foundation committed a $9.3 million gift to the UT Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences to support the program’s students and faculty. The institute’s graduate program, ICES Computational Science, Engineering and Mathematics Graduate Studies, allows students to pursue a multidisciplinary computational science

This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25 Permanent Staff

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national analysis of the implementation [and will] have learned a great deal about the health insurance system and the state government,” Warner said. Graduate student Jane Vance, who is currently enrolled in the course, said the format departs from the standard graduate class. “[This] isn’t a standard lecture-based course,” Vance said.

NEWS BRIEFLY Election for governor promises a close race

degree that includes faculty and subjects from 18 different departments. The donation will be used over the next five years to fund three areas. A $3 million portion of the grant will go to the creation of 12 additional graduate student fellowships, bringing the program total to 34 students. Another $1.3 million is designated for faculty support. The final $5 million will support faculty recruitment efforts to improve the quality of instruction for the program. Since 1983, Peter O’Donnell, his wife Edith and the O’Donnell Foundation have given more than $135 million to the University. Peter O’Donnell has worked with the institute director, Tinsley Oden, for

more than 20 years and said he considers Oden an inspired leader. “His vision for the potential of computational simulation and modeling was my inspiration to support his work and that of his colleagues,” O’Donnell said. “[What is] very important to me is the fact that the ICES faculty is preparing the next generation of young computational leaders who will continue the work toward discoveries to improve every aspect of our lives.” Robert Moser, the institute’s deputy director and professor, said he is looking forward to using the donation to recruit new faculty. “We’re very excited about the opportunity we have to attract some of the best

scientists and mathematicians to the University of Texas,” Moser said. “That’s one of the most exciting things we do, and I think that helps out in a big way.” Graduate student Nick Fitzsimmons, a current recipient of the institute’s fellowship, said he agreed the introduction of new faculty would contribute to the learning environment of the program. Fitzsimmons said he thinks it is wonderful more students will be given fellowship opportunities. “It is pretty important that some of this money goes toward us new researchers so that we have time as poor graduate students to … focus on the things about this University that make it great,” Fitzsimmons said.

WEIGHT

According to the study, pressure to change their appearance prompted individuals who had not lost weight to feel insecure and less interested in sex, threatened by their partner’s surging confidence. “We want to date people and be with people who are like us,” said Julie Drake, operations director for the Fitness Institute of Texas. “So when they start going a different direction, you fight it because you want them to hang out and eat Cheetos, too.” Biochemistry sophomore Shirin Sajjadi said she found it odd that an individual who made an effort to lose weight

would face opposition from someone close to him or her. “If you’re trying to make such a substantial change in your life, it’s really important for your partner to support you,” Sajjadi said. “I think it’s weird that someone would try to sabotage their partner like that.” Music performance junior Christy Scanlan said significant others are a crucial source of encouragement in a relationship, especially when it comes to positive dieting and exercise habits. “You need that extra kick in the butt to make you do it anyway,” Scanlan said. “It’s about personal motivation in a way.”

A joint UT/Texas Tribune poll released Monday shows a close gubernatorial race shaping up between Greg Abbott, the likely Republican nominee and state attorney general, and state Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, the likely Democratic candidate. The poll lists Abbott in the lead, with 40 percent of likely voters, and Davis trailing behind with 34 percent. In the case of a three-way race between Abbott, Davis and Libertarian Kathie Glass, Glass would net five percent of the votes, with Abbott’s share of the vote unchanged and Davis’ totaling 35 percent. Glass said Libertarian candidates typically attract voters who would otherwise vote Republican, but it is not yet clear how much that will affect the race. “Just how critical that effect will be will depend on how the campaigning unfolds,” poll co-director Jim Henson said. In June, a UT/Texas Tribune poll found 58 percent of likely voters had no opinion on Wendy Davis, compared with only 16 percent in Monday’s poll. “When you look at the favorable and unfavorable numbers for Abbott and Davis, you see that many more people have opinions about Davis than they did in June,” Henson said.

abortion law unconstitutional. Although the plaintiff — Planned Parenthood and other organizations — asked the Supreme Court Monday to reinstate Yeakel’s ruling declaring parts of the law unconstitutional, the law will remain in effect until at least January 2014. Planned Parenthood spokeswoman Danielle Wells said hospital admitting privileges are not necessary for an abortion to be safe. “The Texas Hospital Association opposed this provision because it’s medically unnecessary,” Wells said. “It doesn’t help women. In fact, it hurts woman because

it creates a barrier to safe medical care, so it’s clear that this provision was designed to limit a woman’s access to safe abortion and that it does nothing to protect the health and safety of women — just the opposite.” Wells said although some providers are still open, the amount of abortions they will be able to provide may be reduced because some clinics may have some physicians without admitting privileges. Faulkner said she supports the law because it will ultimately benefit women who have abortions. “Pro-choicers call it a

war on women, but really, it’s a war for women,” Faulkner said. “We are bettering the circumstances for women and their health. We’re not taking away abortion completely.” Quinn said the law makes it unnecessarily difficult for women in Texas to obtain abortions because they will have to travel far distances to find an abortion provider. “Austin still has clinics that offer abortion services, but at least one has stopped providing abortions in the wake of the law, making it more difficult for students to access abortion care,” Quinn said.

continues from page 1 improved communication and increased intimacy, but when only one partner focused on lifestyle improvements, the results tended to indicate a strain on the relationship. “Where problems occurred, it appeared as if one individual began to focus their self-identity around their healthy diet and activity, and the other did not,” said John Bartholomew, kinesiology and health education department chair. “This seemed to lead to a question of ‘Why won’t you change with me?’”

ABORTION

continues from page 1 requirement served no medical purpose and had no relation to safety,” Quinn said. “We completely agree. The sad fact of the matter is that, because so many hospitals are affiliated with religious institutions, even highly qualified abortion practitioners will be denied admitting privileges on ideological grounds.” On Oct. 31, the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals reversed a previous ruling made by U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel, which declared two provisions of the


W&N 3

NEWS

3

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

UNIVERSITY

STATE

Committee selects ‘perfect candidate’

Higher education board applications continue

In this March 2007 file photo, Portland Trail Blazers president and general manager Steve Patterson announces his departure from the team. Patterson, Arizona’s athletic director, accepted the athletic director’s job at UT Tuesday.

By Anthony Green @AnthonyGrreen

Steve Patterson, the University’s new men’s athletic director, was hired for his commitment to success and impressive resume, according to UT President William Powers Jr. Patterson, who will replace current director DeLoss Dodds, was nominated by an eight-person committee that included Powers. Powers said Patterson was the ideal contender in the selection process. “Steve Patterson emerged as the perfect candidate to build on Texas’ athletic success and DeLoss Dodds’ legacy,” Powers said. “Steve helped build an NBA championship team and brought the Super Bowl game to Houston. Far more important, he’s run a winning program at Arizona State that places students first and is committed to their lifelong success.” Patterson, who started as athletic director for Arizona State in 2012, has a long history of involvement in professional sports. From 1989 to 1993, Patterson served as the general manager of the NBA’s Houston Rockets, and oversaw recruitment of much of the 1993-1994 roster that won the franchise’s first NBA championship.

PATTERSON

continues from page 1 “I think it’s just disgusting, but that’s the world of sports,” Killian said. “[Collegiate] institutions who have the money can afford to hire whoever they want, and I’m not critical of that,” Killian said. “But when someone makes a commitment, they should honor it. I was raised that your word

Doug Beghtel Associated Press

Patterson also helped establish the Houston Texans’ NFL franchise and served as the team’s senior vice president and chief development officer from 1997 to 2003. During his Texans tenure, Patterson assisted in planning the construction of Reliant Stadium, established the team’s business operations and brought Super Bowl XXXVIII to Houston. “He’s well equipped to handle the challenges at the University of Texas,” Houston Texans owner Bob McNair said. “He is extremely intelligent and poised and will be able to address and handle any challenges that may arise during his tenure. He’ll represent the University well.” Mark Killian, vice chair of the Arizona Board of

Regents, was completely unaware of Patterson’s acceptance of the athletic director position before Tuesday. Killian said the great work Patterson had done in Arizona State’s athletic department made his decision to leave even more surprising to him and ASU officials. “We had such high hopes for Mr. Patterson and what he could bring to the table,” Killian said. “Everyone was ranting and raving about the great job he was doing. I had not heard one complaint about him [during his tenure]. Most comments were that ASU was lucky to have him. That’s the main reason we’re all picking ourselves up off the floor.” ASU President Michael M. Crow said that during his time at Arizona State, Patterson put the

university’s athletic department on sound financial footing and positioned the department to continue moving forward. “I well understand his desire to return to his home state and wish him well at the University of Texas,” Crow said. “We do not intend to slow our forward progress in the least.” Killian said the board being unaware of Patterson’s procurement by UT is not standard procedure and said he feels Patterson’s decision to accept the UT position is a question of ethics. “No one has ethics anymore — you sign a contract and it doesn’t mean anything,” Killian said. “I hope for the taxpayers’ sake that Mr. Patterson has some integrity. I wish him the best, but it’s really screwed up things here in Arizona.”

is [your] bond.” Killian said he disapproved of the financial motivations he thought were behind Patterson’s decision. “We’ve devolved in our society – that money speaks louder than words,” Killian said. “And that’s a damn shame.” Patterson earned his undergraduate degree at the McCombs School of Business and graduated from the UT School

of Law. Patterson’s son, Austin, is an advertising senior at UT. Because Patterson’s salary as athletic director will exceed $250,000, the appointment is subject to approval by the Board of Regents. Regent Steven Hicks, who was on the search committee, said Patterson is the ideal candidate for the position. “Steve Patterson is the perfect candidate to build

upon UT’s successes,” Hicks said. “His track record of achievements with finances, facilities, personnel and business operations in high achieving athletics programs makes him a perfect fit for UT, and I’m especially proud that he has UT and Texas roots.” Dodds announced his impending retirement in October.

By Leslie Zhang @ylesliezhang

Several representative positions are available for student applicants until Friday for the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board and the board’s committees, which influence public policy in Texas. UT is looking to nominate five students for the nonvoting student representative position and two students for each of the five advisory committees, according to Marilyn Russell, deputy advisor to Dean of Students. At each university, student government nominations are sent to the president, who then sends it to the governor. The governor will ultimately appoint the student representative. The advisory committee representatives are selected by the committee members. The student representative serves for one year, while the advisory committee representatives serve for two. Student Government President Horacio Villarreal said funding has increasingly become a priority as the state makes cuts to its budget. He said he would like to see student representatives speak on behalf of college students across the state to increase funding to higher education institutions. “I know UT-Austin has been under a tight budget, as well as other public institutions across the state,” Villarreal said. “I think the student representatives to both the committee and the boards need to possess a strong will to increase funds for UT and other schools and translate that to the others on the coordinating board on behalf of the students.” In addition to focusing on financial resources for the University, Villarreal

said he hopes to see transparency from the student representatives surrounding policy making. “I hope the student representatives are visible on campus so others can voice their opinions and wants, so they can relay those onto the appropriate people,” Villarreal said. Texas A&M University student Alice Schneider, a current student representative, said her position has afforded her opportunities she would not have had otherwise. “Being in this position allows me to have dialogues with presidents of community colleges [and] state senators on higher education committees [and] to hear different opinions,” Schneider said. Schneider said being on the board and shaping public policy on higher education while being a student was a new experience. “There’s a lot that goes on behind the scenes, policywise,” Schneider said. “There was a steep learning curve. In the legislative session this spring, I had no idea higher education policy-making was so intensive.” Since the positions opened in 2008, Russell said seven UT students have served as representatives on advisory committees, but not one has served as the student representative on the board. “We always want our students in leadership roles, and any representative from this institution would have access to this student body,” Russell said. The application can be found online at the Dean of Students’ website and must be submitted to the Dean of Students office in the Student Activity Center 3.104 by 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8.

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4A OPINION

4

LAURA WRIGHT, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / @TEXANEDITORIAL Wednesday, November 6, 2013

EDITORIAL

Rape prevention efforts should target both sexes On Monday, this newspaper published a front-page story with the headline “Breaking the Silence.” That story was about sexual assault on the UT campus and how, despite growing awareness of the issue, many cases still go unreported. That story, unlike this piece, was not editorial. It provided only the facts about sexual assault on campus, as well as the words of two female survivors of sexual assault. That same day, The Daily Campus, an independent newspaper serving Southern Methodist University in Dallas, published an opinion column on its website with the headline “Women: prevent sexual assaults, drinking responsibly may reduce risk factor.” Also on Monday, The Badger Herald, an independent student newspaper serving the

University of Wisconsin-Madison, published a letter to the editor with the headline “‘Rape Culture’ does not exist.” Both of these pieces, though editorial in nature, demonstrate the bravery it took for both women to speak openly as survivors of sexual assault. These articles also highlight the need for a major revision about how we think about the link between alcohol and sexual assault on this campus and on campuses across the country. As art history senior Kaila Schedeen told the Texan, her assault involved alcohol, a fact which caused close friends and relations to pin the blame for her assault on Schedeen herself. In a multimedia video that accompanied the print story, Schedeen tells an offcamera interviewer, “I’ve lost

a lot of relationships to people blaming me for something that is not my fault.” She’s right: Her assault was not her fault. Seventy percent of sexual assaults involve alcohol consumption, but alcohol does not cause sexual assault; the cause of sexual assault is perpetrators committing the act. Rape prevention efforts centered on alcohol consumption should be aimed at confronting rape perpetrators, not rape victims. But to do that, we have to confront major misconceptions about rape prevention. In the Badger Herald’s letter to the editor, author David Hookstead writes, “You’ll often hear very uneducated people make statements like, ‘If people taught their sons not to rape women, then we wouldn’t have a problem.’ There are

COLUMN

a couple of problems with this statement. [I]t’s incredibly ignorant. Anybody who’s ever watched the news knows that rape is illegal, and yet the above paints the picture that our society is failing to educate young men on rape. Secondly, it implies that education can prevent true acts of evil.” When Hookstead characterizes rape as “evil,” it makes it easier for us to see rape as something done only by “evil people.” But regular people, even people perceived by their friends and family as good, are capable of committing horrific acts like rape. And if rape isn’t an act committed only by “evil people,” then who commits rape? The answer, just like the answer to the question of who can be the victim of sexual as-

sault, is anyone. Anyone is capable of committing a crime. And committing the crime of sexual assault is only made easier when you don’t understand the definition of consent. The connection between alcohol abuse and sexual assault, then, must be made clear to everyone, not just women but men as well. Moreover, the association should change, from drinking potentially putting you in a dangerous situation to drinking potentially removing your ability to understand others’ needs and desires. On the UTPD website, the page on “rape prevention” cautions students to drink responsibly, be careful whom they trust and to learn selfdefense techniques. At the end of the list, it asks students to “keep [their] aggression (and alcohol consumption) in

check.” As the page goes on to explain, “Research has found that when men are under the influence of alcohol, they are likely to interpret a variety of verbal and nonverbal cues as evidence that women are interested in having sex with them.” It’s messages like these that should be the focus of rape prevention education, not the one spread by Daily Campus contributor Wiley, who concludes her column by saying, “Young women, please wake up and realize that the majority of these incidents happen when the victims are intoxicated.” The problem with that statement? It will never be the victim’s fault. Wiley, like far too many people, is aiming her efforts at the wrong side of the equation.

HORNS DOWN: TEXANS CLINGING TIGHTLY TO THE RIGHT

Humanities deserve funding By Samer Ali

Guest Columnist

The Chronicle of Higher Education reported Oct. 24 that Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Alabama, had submitted a letter to the National Endowment for the Humanities. Sessions, the senior Republican on the Senate Budget Committee, asked the NEH to justify grant funds it has awarded this year. The NEH made awards this year to promote discussions among the general public about perennial questions, such as “What is the meaning of life?” Likewise, it has sponsored discussions about Muslim cultures, under the auspices of its Bridging Cultures program. In the letter sent to the NEH, Sessions states that he questions the value of these “indefinite” questions and worries that the NEH is “promoting” Islamic culture at the expense of Christian and Jewish cultures. As a UT scholar involved in the Muslim Journeys program at the local library in Smithville, I find Sessions’ understanding of the “humanities” to be fundamentally misguided. First, the humanities do not promote a parochial culture or vision. Rather, the humanities of the world have been in creative dialogue for the past 7,000 years, since the dawn of cities and civilizations, in the form of art, stories and poetry that have crisscrossed the world. They represent the best of humanity in general, regardless of cultures of origin. In prin-

ciple, the humanities of the world cultivate self-reflections, independent thinking, as well as communication and community across lines of difference. Second, deep philosophical questions, such as those proposed and funded by the NEH, bring us together as Americans, regardless of our identities, so we can talk about what matters and share our values as human beings and citizens. Third, NEH programs about Islamic cultures serve a key purpose in helping to defuse unwarranted fears of Muslims in the United States and around the world. If there were widespread fears of Catholics or Jews, the NEH would have a duty to promote dialogue in the U.S. and help allay those anxieties. These programs are designed and led by scholars and educators to foster healthy debate, dialogue and mutual understanding. The humanities in the U.S. should never be a partisan issue: They are prime examples of the very best in American public life and democratic values, which should instill dignity and pride. But as Ronald Reagan said in his 1989 farewell speech, for pride to count, it must be “grounded in thoughtfulness and knowledge.” What better way to encourage thoughtfulness and knowledge than to support and fund our society’s great humanities projects. Ali is an associate professor of Arabic studies in the department of Middle Eastern studies from Chicago.

Newsweek recently reported that U.S. Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, has been losing popularity in his home state since his decision to remove his name from a letter threatening to shut down the government this past summer. Grassroots activists are trying to recruit David Barton instead, a radio host who argues that the U.S. should be a Christian nation with no separation between church and state, putting him even further right than tea party senator Ted Cruz. While many Democrats point out that this growing wedge between tea party and moderate Republicans will help the Democratic Party, which may be a good thing, it’s disappointing to know that fellow Texans are leaning so far to the right at a time when the Republican Party’s overall ranking is down due to the aftermath of the government shutdown.

HORNS DOWN: TEXAS NEEDS MORE EARLY CHILDHOOD ED Texas ranks in the bottom third of states for the percentage of low-income children in preschool, according to a report the Annie E. Casey Foundation released Monday. The ranking is one of many areas in which our state falls behind the national average. We agree with Frances Deviney from the Center for Public Policy Priorities, who highlighted this education gap in a statement he made to the Dallas Morning News in which he said “it is imperative that our kids get a strong early start that helps counteract the effects of poverty and our failure to sufficiently invest in our kids.” This is especially important in Texas, where a third of children live in poverty, according to the 2012 U.S. Census. While we often focus on the challenges state universities face with regards to budget and funding, we must remember that education starts in early childhood. The first few critical years of schooling should not be ignored.

COLUMN: EBBELER ON EDUCATION

UT-Austin SMOCs show promise as new teaching models By Jen Ebbeler

Daily Texan Columnist @jenebbeler

In the fall of 2012, psychology professors James Pennebaker and Sam Gosling launched a bold teaching experiment: They moved their face-to-face, lecture-based Psychology 301 course from the classroom to the Internet. They live-streamed the course to an audience of approximately 900 enrolled students. Twenty-five to 30 students were invited to attend each taping, to play the part of the studio audience, but the majority of students took the semester-long course online. The pedagogical, logistical and technical challenges of such an undertaking are enormous, not least because it meant that UT had to ensure that there was sufficient bandwidth available on campus for such a large number of students to access the recordings simultaneously. To facilitate the delivery of the course, the Liberal Arts Instructional

Technology Services (LAITS) worked with Pennebaker and Gosling to design and build an in-house platform called TOWER (Texas Online World of Educational Research). At present, the functionality of TOWER can be embedded in the CANVAS learning management system that UT-Austin has adopted and begun to implement across campus. The TOWER platform allows the instructor to capture data about how students use the available tools, navigate quizzes and interact with content, thus providing instructors with valuable insights into how students are learning the course content. In a very real way, it has taken a village of coders, graphic designers and a talented audio and video team, as well as two talented faculty, to produce this innovative learning experience for UT-Austin students. This fall, Pennebaker and Gosling returned to the recording studio with renewed energy, an improved version of TOWER and an even more ambitious plans for their course. They have renamed it a SMOC, that is, a Synchronous Massive Online Course. Their plan is to offer it not only to UT-Austin students but to learners around

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

the state, country and even world for the very reasonable price of $550 — substantially less than a 3-credit, campusbased UT-Austin course. This fall, the students are primarily UT-Austin students, approximately 750 of them, but with some aggressive marketing, that audience could expand to include current high school students, lifelong learners and others. Also this fall, the live streaming course experiment has expanded to include a second large-enrollment course, Government 310L, American Government. The course is led by the veteran teaching team of government professor Daron Shaw and associate government professor Eric McDaniel. It was capped at 700 students, but on the model of Psychology 301, could be scaled up to reach thousands of students at once. In both Psychology 301 and Government 310L, the twiceweekly, 75-minute class sessions begin with a 10-minute online benchmark quiz that assesses students’ mastery of previous material. The quizzes are individualized and the TOWER platform makes it possible to have previously missed questions reappear in altered form on future quizzes.

In the SMOC format, largerstakes midterm exams have been entirely replaced by these short, formative assessments that require students to stay engaged with the course content on a class-to-class basis. As Pennebaker noted, “There is now compelling research evidence going back 25 years that students learn more and more effectively if they are tested frequently and learn from their mistakes.” The challenge, he continues, is managing the logistics of frequent assessment in a large-enrollment class. Moving the quizzes online, with the capacity to offer immediate feedback, has made it possible to apply this research to the pedagogy of a large class. Following the benchmark quiz is a live, interactive lecture. Both teams of instructors sit at a desk with their laptops in front of them and discuss the course content, often with a significant amount of entertaining banter, video clips and demonstrations. For the student on the other end (full disclosure: I played the role of student for several weeks in Psychology 301), the experience is somewhat akin to watching an informative talk show. Guest experts visit the studio to speak about

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their research and there are repeat segments, such as “In the Laboratory” or “Psychology in the News.” The element of synchronicity comes into play when students are asked to take surveys, participate in polls and engage in group discussions. Additionally, over the course of the semester, functions have been added to TOWER that allow students to send in questions. For Pennebaker and Gosling, the fact that their lectures are live streaming is essential. “The live broadcast … allows the class to generate a shared sense of excitement about learning,” Gosling said. The SMOC is still very much an evolving model of course delivery. With each iteration and expansion to new courses, instructors are learning more about what students need to learn effectively in this brave new online environment. They are experimenting with the interplay of synchronous and asynchronous learning and figuring out how best to engage students during a live streaming lecture. At the same time, as all of the current instructors report, it is a challenge to teach at a distance from students. “The

biggest weakness with this is that we cannot read students’ faces,” McDaniel said. “While students have the opportunity to post questions in the chat room, few do … This medium requires the students to be much more active in asking questions.” Psychology 301 and Government 310L have been trailblazers in the world of synchronous course delivery. While we still have much to learn about the pedagogy of synchronous delivery, for what courses this mode is best suited and how we can produce high-quality courses at a reasonable cost, it is certain that the SMOC will play a role in the future of UT-Austin students. As McDaniel put it, “Students should still have the opportunity for traditional intro classes, [but] I believe that [the SMOC] can relieve the burden on professors to teach massive lecture courses and give students more freedom in how they take these courses. While there will be trial and error, I believe that its benefits far outweigh the costs.” Ebbeler is an associate professor of classics from Claremont, Calif.

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CLASS/JUMP 5

DAVIS

continues from page 8 a lark and legitimately makes us sound better than we are without her. Singing with her is a crazy joyful experience. If we had it our way, [we’d] be singing on her record soon.” On Oct. 9, Davis played with Penny and Sparrow at Stubb’s, where the band opened for The Shouting Matches and The Blind Boys of Alabama. “When we were leaving that show, we were like, ‘Let’s pray that in a year we’re back here and playing outside,’” Davis said. “And then we get a call the next week [that we would] be playing there in two weeks. [I thought] not many people were going to be there, and then we walk out and it’s really full. I literally had to come off the mic a few times and put my hands over my face. I was just overwhelmed. It was such a huge blessing.” Penny and Sparrow will perform at Common Grounds in Waco on Nov. 8, where Davis will be the band’s opening act. Davis hopes to keep playing with Baxter and Jahnke and keep music at the forefront of her life. “I look up to [Baxter and Jahnke] so much,” Davis said. “I’m honored that they want me to play with them at all. They’re a huge part of how this has started for me. I’m just grateful for how it’s happened so far.”

only

Rumor Mill: A mysterious floating barge in San Francisco Bay Over the past week, mysterious barges have been

MUSIC

continues from page 8 “Memoria” — the Hungarian word for memory — is how Williams attempts to connect with his ancestry. “I asked my mother about my ancestry, and there really wasn’t much she could tell me,” Williams said. “She could remember a handful of stories. If I think about my connection to Hungary, then it’s a tiny thread. That is the basis for this piece.” “Memoria” is a two-movement piece, including a prelude and a fantasy. The prelude is a nostalgic record of Williams’ own experiences and memories growing up.

spotted floating in San Francisco Bay. CNET reported that these belonged to Google, but had no indication as to what they could be. Many speculated they could be giant floating data centers powered by waves, a retail location for Google Glass or perhaps a new office for the company’s secretive branch, Google X. The most widely accepted explanation is that the barges will be used as an invite-only showroom for some of Google’s most secretive projects, privy to its largest investors. App of the Week: Sworkit This week’s AOTW is Sworkit. The iOS and Android app creates randomized circuit-training workouts that can be done in short amounts of time and The fantasy represents the non-nostalgic aggressive search and desire for a lost memory or a memory he does not have. Williams has also collaborated with the society’s executive director, Matthew Hinsley. Hinsley said Williams’ compositions are best described as authentic. “I was quickly impressed with both his playing and his unique and exciting compositional voice,” Hinsley said. Hinsley’s first major collaboration with Williams was in October 2011 when Williams wrote a piece titled “Austin Pictures,” which he said provides a snapshot of his experiences in Austin.

continues from page 8

Photo courtesy of Sworkit

Sworkit creates circuit training workouts that students can do anywhere.

on the go. This app is handy for college students who desperately want to make time to work out. “Austin Pictures” was a five-movement piece, including Hill Country, Floating on Lady Bird Lake, and Dance of the Grackles. “The music is so beautiful because it takes literal experiences and expands on a more subconscious experience,” Williams said. “How you feel when you see the light shine off of Lady Bird Lake.” As a young boy, Williams’ first experience with music was at his brother’s house when he saw a piano. From then on, music became a “beautiful world” he wanted to know everything about. “When I picked up my first classical guitar, it seemed so

behavior, Jude’s arc was intensely transformative and often tragic. At first glance, her character was villainous and cruel, but as her caretaker/patient mentality was reversed, Jude emerged as a hopelessly lost soul desperately racing to escape the mistakes of her past. Her redemption in season two’s finale gave viewers a surprisingly tender send-off. While that ending was unusual for such a typically dark show, “Asylum” effectively nurtured a growing knack for mature and nuanced character development that has continued into the first few episodes of season three. With “Coven,” Lange appears to be returning to her purely antagonistic season one roots with her nasty performance as Fiona Goode. Goode is natural in my hands, to my ears,” Williams said. “The piano and the classical guitar have things in common. You can play multiple lines of music at the same time, a bass, a melody and an accompaniment.” Adam Holzman, one of Williams’ professor at UT’s Butler School of Music, first met Williams at the Boston GuitarFest international guitar competition in 2006, where Williams tied for first place. The thing that struck Holzman about Williams was his creativity and enthusiasm. “His compositions are first-grade,” Holzman said. “His growth as a composer and performer has been

the current “Supreme,” a generational title given to the most powerful witch in the coven. Goode’s obsession with eternal youth and her ruthless defense of her status gives Lange’s performance plenty of power-hungry material to play with, though viewers don’t have much reason to sympathize with her. Goode’s hilariously antagonistic relationship with Kathy Bates’ immortal Delphine LaLaurie is the biggest selling point of this season so far and the escalation of their conflict is going to be exciting to watch. Lange’s terrific performances consistently draw viewers into the morbid world of “American Horror Story.” Here’s hoping her winning streak continues as “Coven” draws to a close and that Murphy and Falchuk’s next horrifying yarn amply features her wicked versatility and commanding presence.

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wonderful to watch. Joe has turned out to be a wonderful teacher.” For Williams, classical music is his way of understanding more about himself and the world at large.

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6 SPTS

ENTER NOW CHRIS HUMMER, SPORTS EDITOR / @texansports Wendesday, November 6, 2013

6

SOCCER

Horns set for Big 12 tourney

ALL INTRAMURAL BASKETB TEAMWORK

STARTS HERE utrecsports.org

SIDELINE NBA SPURS

By Brittany Lamas @brittany_lamas

Texas soccer surpassed preseason expectations during its conference matchups, finishing third in the Big 12 instead of a projected sixth, despite its core offense consisting of underclassmen. Now, coming off a loss to Texas Tech, the young team must rally as it takes on Oklahoma State in the Big 12 Championship Wednesday. “This is cup time,” head coach Angela Kelly said. “It’s do or die, and we have to win. Our sense of urgency has to go up, but at the same time have the same philosophy that we’ve shared since day one. We have to execute and take care of everything. There’s no added preparation or pressure. [We] just have to go after it.” In 2012, Texas lost in the semifinals to TCU in a 4-2 shootout after a scoreless game. Last season the team finished with a poor 8-10-2 overall record, including a mere 4-4 record in the Big 12. This year’s team improved its overall record to 12-5-2 and 5-2-1 in conference. The only two conference losses came to West Virginia and Texas Tech, the two teams ranked higher than Texas. Despite going into the tournament coming off a loss, sophomore forward Kelsey Shimmick doesn’t think that will affect the outcome. “I don’t think it gave us

NUGGETS

LAKERS

MAVERICKS

NHL STARS

BRUINS

SPORTS BRIEFLY Joe Caparo / Daily Texan Staff

Head coach Angela Kelly leads her team into this week’s Big 12 Championship in Kansas City. The Longhorns enter the conference championship as the third seed, behind West Virginia and Texas Tech. They’ll take on Oklahoma State in the opener.

a bad mindset,” Shimmick said. “It lit a fire under us. We like our chances if we have to play them again, because they didn’t see the real Texas Longhorns. We can beat any team in the tournament.” A young team, most of Texas’ statistical leaders are sophomores and juniors. Three freshmen have scored at least one goal, and the only senior to log real playing

time this season is midfielder Gabby Zarnegar, who has two goals and four assists. Shimmick’s four goals put her in a tie for the team lead, along with junior midfielder Sharis Lachappelle, sophomore midfielder Lindsey Meyer and junior defender Brooke Gilbert. Sophomore forward Chantale Campbell, who has three goals of her own, leads the team in assists

with five. Kelly said her team is dynamic all over the field and that makes it hard for other teams to keep up. “They look at the personalities and have to figure out how to stop us,” Kelly said. “How are they going to stop Abby Smith’s distribution? How are they going to break down our backs? How are they going to deal with Kelsey,

Sharis and Chantale?” Meyer believes the team is prepared for the tournament, but knows progressing in the tournament will add challenges. “The way we’re looking at it is one game at a time,” Meyer said. “We’re focusing only on Oklahoma State. Our coaches have been helping us take care of our bodies to play three games in six days.”

Midfielder Zarnegar succeeds in third season with Longhorns By Jacob Martella @viewfromthebox

As a freshman, Gabby Zarnegar felt lost. Despite seeing substantial playing time, Zarnegar bounced from position to position and struggled to find stability. That changed her junior season. New head coach Angela Kelly gave Zarnegar the stability she sought, helping Zarnegar find her role. Now, with her senior year winding down, Zarnegar is a strong leader for a Longhorn team that has a shot to win the Big 12 tournament this week. “I’m more confident going into the tournament than any other year,” Zarnegar said. “I just need to do my role as a senior.” Zarnegar’s Texas career got

off to a fast start. She played in 20 of the team’s 21 games and posted her first career goal in her freshman debut. But things went downhill from there. Zarnegar got sick near the end of the season and saw less playing time. When Zarnegar did get on the pitch, she had a hard time finding her place on the field. “I didn’t know where to go,” Zarnegar said. “I went from outside midfielder to outside forward to mid center.” Her fortunes changed with a new head coach. Thenhead coach Chris Petrucelli stepped down and Kelly took over the job. With the change, it gave Zarnegar a chance to start anew, establishing a consistent role on the team. “[Kelly] put a lot of power into the player’s hand,”

Zarnegar said. “That really helped me become a great leader.” Kelly, who didn’t watch any film of the players and didn’t worry about them prior to coming to Texas — allowing everyone a fresh start — said she’s just there for all her players. “She knows she can call me at any time and I’ll be there,” Kelly said. Zarnegar found her spot on the field as a forward and midfielder. She prides herself on being a nuisance for opponents in the middle of the pitch, leading Kelly to call her the team’s “Energizer Bunny.” She’s been able to turn her bad early experiences into one of her best characteristics. “When things start to go bad for us, she doesn’t let us get down,” sophomore for-

Joe Caparo / Daily Texan Staff

Junior midfielder Gabby Zarnegar has come into her own in her third season at Texas, thriving under coach Angela Kelly.

ward Kelsey Shimmick said. With only five career goals, Zarnegar hasn’t exactly lit up the box score. But the plays not shown in the stats — her hustle and fighting for the ball — do not go unnoticed by her teammates. “When she goes in for a hard tackle and doesn’t give up, it makes you want to get the ball the way she does,” Shimmick said. Zarnegar said she will probably be done with

soccer once her college career is over, and with a spot in the NCAA tournament not guaranteed for the Longhorns, each game could be her last. But she isn’t thinking about that. Instead, Zarnegar is focused on leading Texas to a Big 12 tournament title. “It would be the pinnacle of everything I want this season,” Zarnegar said. “It’s been a long road for us. I feel like this year it’s our time.”

FOOTBALL

Thompson makes tough transition from offense to defense By Garrett Callahan @CallahanGarrett

Pu Ying Huang / Daily Texan Staff

Mykkele Thompson went from leading his offense in high school to being the last line of defense as a safety at Texas.

Three years ago, defensive back Mykkele Thompson came to Texas with a set of skills opposite of those he uses now. Thompson was a quarterback in high school, regarded as one of the best athletes in the state of Texas. He recorded 5,322 all-purpose yards and a total of 62 touchdowns during his final two seasons. But when he arrived at the 40 Acres, he started his career on the other side of the ball, which proved to be quite the challenge. “It was a struggle for me,” Thompson said. “It was a totally different side of the ball from what I played.” For Thompson, the hardest part about becoming a defensive player was hitting. The junior only played defense in one game before becoming a Longhorn and had no real experience tackling. Secondary coach Duane Akina said Thompson’s struggles were normal, though. Former Longhorn and current New

York Giant Aaron Ross went through the same transition. “You are going to go through some growing pains when you play in the secondary, especially with one that is as aggressive as ours,” Akina said. “We put some guys on islands back there. We can go through it with Aaron Ross and some of those great ones who had some struggles early in their careers and did fine by the time they left here. I see Mykkele much in that same stride.” Thompson is moving in the right direction. This season he is a force in Texas’ defensive backfield and attributes much of that success to Akina. “Coach Akina is really encouraging, and he’s always pushing you,” Thompson said. “He just told me that I had the potential, so I went out and worked on it.” There are some things the safety can improve on, though. The 6-foot-2-inch, 186-pound athlete is used to the pressure he faces, but still feels the stress when it

becomes his job to stop the ball carrier. “I’m the last defensive help back there,” Thompson said. “It’s a really scary moment when a guy is running with a full head of steam at you and you have to take him down. It’s very nerve-racking.” Nevertheless, Thompson has helped turn around a defense that started the season 1-2. After that start, which cost defensive coordinator Manny Diaz his job, many believed Texas would end up with another losing season. But Thompson and his defensive squad rose to the occasion. “I feel like everybody is just doing their assignment,” junior defensive back Quandre Diggs said. “Playing assignment football, everybody is in the right spot, the right place they’re supposed to be. We don’t have guys trying to do too much and trying to execute other people’s assignments. You can definitely see a team that’s maturing at the right time and continuing to grow as a football team.”

Ware expected to play for Dallas Sunday

IRVING, Texas — Cowboys owner Jerry Jones said on his radio show Tuesday that defensive end DeMarcus Ware was likely to return after missing the first three games of his nine-year career with a thigh injury. The Cowboys also waived defensive tackle Marvin Austin, who missed Sunday’s game against Minnesota with a back injury. Coach Jason Garrett said Austin injured his back in Friday’s practice. Austin played against Detroit less than a week after signing with Dallas, recording one tackle in his only game. The Cowboys have been shuffling defensive lineman on the roster and their lineup since backup Tyrone Crawford and starter Anthony Spencer were injured at the start of training camp.

Texans head coach Kubiak out of hospital

HOUSTON — Texans coach Gary Kubiak is out of the hospital after suffering what the team said was a mini-stroke, but there’s no word on when he will resume coaching duties. The team said the 52-year-old Kubiak suffered a transient ischemic attack at halftime of Sunday’s loss to Indianapolis. He was released from the hospital on Tuesday and is expected to make a full recovery. “I’ve been through an ordeal and my focus now is to get back to good health,” Kubiak said in a statement released by the team. “Doctors have told me I will make a full recovery.” Kubiak collapsed on the field and was rushed to a hospital. The Texans blew an 18-point lead without him and the 2724 setback was the team’s sixth straight loss. —Associated Press


COMICS 7

COMICS

7

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Edited by Will Shortz

Crossword

SUDOKUFORYOU

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36 Sch. near Beverly Hills 37 Letter closing 39 Bar from Mars 40 Avril follower 41 Grammy-winning blues guitarist Jonny 42 In need of some manscaping, say 43 Puzzles as gifts? 47 Web site that users themselves may revise 48 Many a Rolling Stone cover subject 49 You’ll need to take steps to get to it 52 ___ sci 54 Lerner/Loewe musical set in Paris 58 Be startled by singing monks? 61 Suit to ___ 62 ___ dire (court examination) 63 Seat for a stand-up

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64 Coloratura’s practice 65 1990s compacts 66 What a verb ending may indicate DOWN 1 Suckers 2 Employ 3 Deuce follower 4 1940 Disney film 5 Big bang letters 6 Sound of disgust 7 Digs in an old warehouse, maybe 8 Prevalent, as a rumor 9 Sound of disgust 10 When repeated several times, child’s entreaty 11 Sitar master Shankar 12 Stat for 26-Down: Abbr. 13 Stun with a charge 18 Option on “Wheel of Fortune” 19 Arctic language 24 Booking 26 Cascades, e.g.: Abbr. 27 Old Renault 28 Stan’s film partner 29 Toupee alternative 30 Lose-lose 31 Car mentioned in the Beach Boys’ “Fun, Fun, Fun” 32 Hot, like a hunk

1

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PUZZLE BY PAULA GAMACHE

33 Cesspool 37 American, in England 38 Moving stealthily 39 Party in the parking lot 41 Classic shooter 42 Doc bloc 44 Acquires with sticky fingers 45 Crude fleet

46 Guarantor of financial accts. 49 Open a crack 50 Hippo’s wear in 4-Down 51 Eliot Ness and others 53 Home of Miami University 55 Wise to

56 Classic muscle cars 57 Archipelago part 59 “The whole family can watch” program rating 60 33rd president’s monogram

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

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8 L&A

8

SARAH-GRACE SWEENEY, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR / @DailyTexanArts Wednesday, November 6, 2013

MUSIC

Singer brings talent to local band By Hillary Hurst @hillary_hurst

A sheet of music does not mean much to Sara Davis. Even though Davis has been playing the guitar since fifth grade and was singing for audiences by the time she was in middle school, the UT freshman never learned to read musical notes. Instead, she relies solely on listening to learn a song. In March, Davis caught the attention of the local band Penny and Sparrow and has been contributing her vocals to the band’s work ever since. “Really, with music, there are only so many notes, and there are only so many chords, but there’s an endless amount of creativity out of that,” Davis said. “Songs are similar melodically or lyrically, but there’s never been the same song over and over again. It’s endless creativity. It’s this universal tool that everyone relates to.” After showcasing her singing at a church service, Davis began writing her own songs in high school and continues to hone her skills in college. Religiously grounded, Davis believes her work is strongly influenced by her Christianity, but does not categorize her music under the worship genre. “I’m not a Christian artist. I don’t really want to be, honestly, just because the title turns a lot of people away,” Davis said. “If you know the Lord, you hear it in the lyrics. And people

Jarrid Denman / Daily Texan Staff

English sophomore Sara Davis is a singer in the local band Penny and Sparrow. Davis, a self-taught musician, joined the group in March after the band discovered her on YouTube and will perform her first solo act this Friday in Waco at the Common Grounds.

who don’t know the Lord, I think can hear that and start asking questions. So that’s kind of my goal.” In early 2013, a friend posted videos of Davis singing on YouTube, where they collectively garnered over 6,000 views. Soon after,

EVENT PREVIEW

Davis received a phone call from Andy Baxter, the YoungLife area director of Northwest Austin, and guitarist Kyle Jahnke. Together, Baxter and Jahnke are the band Penny and Sparrow. “I had known she was talented but never really heard

it until I watched the video,” Jahnke said. “I was sitting in a coffee shop and was crying about halfway through the video. I don’t think I even finished the song. I just called Andy and told him we needed to have her play with us.”

Penny and Sparrow just wrapped up its Southeast Tour and is now recording an upcoming album. Because she has to balance school and extracurricular activities, Davis comes in to record when she can, but she emphasized that it’s

stress-free and never a burden to go rehearse with the band she considers family. “Sara is more talented than Kyle and I, for sure,” Baxter said. “She plays multiple instruments well, sings like

DAVIS page 5

TECHNOLOGY

Hopes high for launch of public Twitter stock

By Jeremy Hintz @Jeremy_Hintz

Tweet, tweet. A little bird told me we could see an IPO this week.

Twitter’s public stock market launch, or IPO, is getting closer every day, with most analysts predicting the website will go public this week. People haven’t forgotten Facebook’s woeful IPO, when the stock’s price dropped to levels roughly 50 percent of its initial offering. Facebook is up more than 200 percent since the beginning of June, and that recent success has created buzz

for the potential of social media and technological IPOs in general. Many analysts say investors are overly optimistic about Twitter’s prospects as a publicly traded stock, but there are some key differences between Facebook and Twitter that reveal potential red flags. The most obvious difference between the two is in revenue. Twitter has a revenue of $422 million,

compared to Facebook’s $5.287 billion. While Facebook had a net income of $977 million for the first three quarters of 2013, Twitter netted losses of $134 million. This difference in revenue is expected to some degree. Facebook has roughly five times more users than Twitter’s. But Facebook also earns over twice as much per user at

IPO page 5

TELEVISION REVIEW

Actress leads series back into macabre Fabian Fernandez / Daily Texan Staff

Joseph V. Williams II is the 2013-2014 Composer in Residence for the Austin Classical Guitar Society.

Musician incorporates memories with music By Kritika Pramod Kulshrestha @kritika88

For Joseph V. Williams II — a classical guitarist, composer and UT alumnus — music has always been “an expression of the human experience.” As the 2013-2014 Composer in Residence at the Austin Classical Guitar Society, Williams is involved in everything the society does, from creating learning modules for students to writing new musical pieces for ensembles and groups. The society’s educational outreach extends to more than just schools in Austin where student guitarists are encouraged to take guitar classes. As part of this education program, Williams also plays his own

compositions in outreach concerts and collaborates on compositions with other musicians. Williams’ first big collaboration as a composer is with Randy Avers and Benoit Albert of Les Freres Meduses. The origins of this piece, titled “Memoria,” can be traced back to Williams’ Hungarian ancestry. His great-grandparents were Hungarian immigrants, and Williams always felt he had a connection to Hungary. “When we think of our past and of our ancestors, what we have from them are passed down,” Williams said. “We have memories that are shared. There’s only so much you can get from that direct experience.”

MUSIC page 5

By Wyatt Miller @WyattMillerDT

After two self-contained seasons of terror, “American Horror Story” easily embodies the term “crazy pants.” Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk have taken their hypersexual horror anthology to a new level with season three, titled “Coven.” Minotaur-pleasuring, human voodoo-dolling and Stevie Nicks-worshipping insanity have appeared already, but one constant holds the show together like glue. That glue is Jessica Lange. Playing a wildly different character in each season, Lange is a staple of this terrifically twisted series. After winning her Oscar for “Tootsie,” Lange consistently took challenging roles that eventually garnered her four additional Oscar nominations. In 2011, Lange brought her talents to television in the first season of FX’s “American Horror Story.” Her performance as Constance Langdon, the villainous neighbor of the doomed

Illustration by Cody Bubenik / Daily Texan Staff

Harmon family, was deliciously wicked, exhibiting a deadly motherly charm that hid even deadlier secrets. In the span of just 12 episodes, Lange made Mrs. Voorhees look like June Cleaver. Her powerhouse portrayal dominated the 2011 television season and won

her both an Emmy and a Golden Globe. Lange’s excellence carried over into season two, “Asylum.” Though the storyline, set in an asylum with aliens, human experiments and demonic possession, was appropriately insane, “Asylum” was ultimately a

quieter season. As Sister Jude, the head nun of Briarcliff Mental Institution, Lange gave fans a decidedly more sympathetic character to obsess over. Where Langdon’s arc was permeated with constant sinister

COVEN page 5


The Daily Texan 2013-11-6  

The November 6, 2013 edition of The Daily Texan.

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