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Senate met at Vela’s house prior to standoff

Efficiency plan to be revised after public input

By Jordan Rudner @jrud

Hours before graduate public affairs student Gene Vela, a member of the Senate of College Councils’ Leadership Team, was involved in an armed standoff with police officers, the Senate’s Executive Board convened at his house for a scheduled meeting. Though multiple board

members referred The Daily Texan to the Senate’s faculty sponsor, Dean of Students Soncia Reagins-Lilly, for comment, Reagins-Lilly denied any knowledge of the meeting in a statement. Reagins-Lilly said she was unavailable for an interview. “We are unaware of any Senate of College Councils organizational or business activity scheduled on the evening in

question,” Reagins-Lilly said in a statement. “Our priority in this matter remains the safety and well-being of our students.” Senate President Andrew Clark said Senate board meetings are regularly scheduled events and are occasionally held off campus, as the board meeting was on Nov. 10. “We meet every Sunday at 7 p.m., whether it be

Leadership Team or the Executive Board of Senate,” Clark said. “We meet every single Sunday, and sometimes we do meet off campus, but I don’t know how often.” Clark said Reagins-Lilly would provide information and said despite the board meeting at Vela’s house, the standoff is not a Senate issue. “Gene was a member of Senate and obviously was a

contributor to the organization, but beyond that, this is something that’s kind of transcended the scope of Senate,” Clark said. “So that’s why it’s Dean Lilly’s responsibility. In any student conduct related matters, or legal things, it’s Dean Lilly’s role to take on.” On Nov. 10, Austin Police Department officers

A&M went to the SEC,” Holmes said. “It’s a Texas tradition, and we have to make sure that it continues on.” Kimmel said the weather is expected to change Tuesday morning, and Austin should not expect any ice in

HEX page 2

SERVICES page 2

SENATE page 2

Weather forces Hex Rally cancellation By Wynne Davis @wynneellen

Amy Zhang / Daily Texan Staff

Students walk by the McCombs School of Business on a rainy Monday afternoon.

Conference last season, Texas played Texas Christian University in 2012 and will play Texas Tech University on Thursday. Senior geography lecturer Troy Kimmel said the current weather Austin is experiencing came in early on Friday morning. The cold air

arrived first and the upper air systems arrived after and combined to create the cold, moist environment. Rain gauges at Camp Mabry have recorded approximately 2.74 inches of rain since last Thursday at midnight. The lowest temperatures have been around 36 degrees.

Journalism junior Eleanor Holmes said she understood why the Texas Exes canceled the event, but she still wanted to carry out the tradition started in 1941. “I think it’s important that the student body [makes sure] the Hex Rally, and these traditions didn’t die when

@madlinbmek

The UT Shared Services Plan will be revised to address public concerns collected at campus dialogue sessions regarding job security, funding and restructuring. The plan is a list of recommendations intended to reduce University costs. The plan outlines the elimination of 500 jobs in order to combine services in the areas of finance, information technology, human resources and procurement into one centralized office. Currently, those services are provided through individual units within varying colleges and departments, according to Kevin Hegarty, executive vice president and chief financial officer and chair of the Shared Services Steering Committee. University officials predict the bulk of these jobs will be eliminated through staff reductions — in what they hope will mostly be regular attrition — and retirements. The steering committee hosted a variety of dialogue sessions throughout the past few months to present a detailed overview of the plan and address questions and concerns raised by those in attendance. The campus dialogue will end later this month, following two small scale meetings with IT governance groups, UT spokesman Kevin Almasy said. Christopher Adams, manager of the department of geological sciences, said he thinks the time allotted for campus discussion should be extended to accommodate the drastic change outlined in the plan. “We don’t always have a lot

CAMPUS

The Texas Exes canceled the annual Hex Rally on Monday because of inclement weather and the effects of the rain on all the participants and electrical equipment involved. “You got a lot of equipment out there that the rain was likely to effect — it wasn’t the cold,” said Tim Taliaferro, vice president of communications and digital strategy for the Texas Exes. “You’ve got Longhorn Network that’s going to be out there to do the show, and they’ve got equipment, and the band’s going to be out there. … Bevo wasn’t going to be able to be there.” The tradition began in 1941 after a local fortune teller advised the Longhorns to burn red candles to perform a “hex” on Texas A&M University, which was ranked No. 2 going into the Thanksgiving Day game. Texas won the game 23-0 in College Station. Since then, the rally has only ever been canceled once before — in 1999 out of respect for 12 Texas A&M students who died after the Aggie Bonfire famously collapsed during Thanksgiving week. After Texas A&M moved to the Southeastern

By Madlin Mekelburg

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

UT to unveil new supercomputer By Leslie Zhang A new supercomputer at UT will transform numbers into pictures, an intuitive way of sharing information. Beginning in January 2014, students and faculty will have access to a supercomputer called “Maverick,” which specializes in visualization and data analysis. The Texas Advanced Computing Center recently announced Maverick will replace its current counterpart, “Longhorn.” “This will be a whole new system with … [a] faster processor, significantly more memory for each processor and top of the line graphic processing cards,” said Niall Gaffney, the center’s director of data intensive computing.

Gaffney said in the research process, visualization is essential to reveal patterns and trends in data that scientists may otherwise have missed. “Visualization can show you things you weren’t explaining, which is important when you’re doing research,” Gaffney said. “I call that the ‘aha’ process. You look at something and say, ‘Oh that’s funny.’ Often the only way you find things is looking at things differently than the way you normally look at them.” Computer science senior Bo Chean said transforming data into pictures, Maverick’s specialty, makes analyzing information easier. “When you have words and numbers, there’s an extra step your brain has to go through,” Chean said.

“Pictures are more intuitive.” In the past, supercomputers at UT have been funded by the National Science Foundation, which has required they be available for scientists across the country. Because funding for Maverick came from the O’Donnell Foundation — which is run by Peter and Edith O’Donnell, a pair of wealthy donors who have given to UT and the center in the past — Gaffney said the center would be able to reserve more of Maverick’s use for students and faculty at UT. “This is a system not being funded by National Science Foundation, so we’re running this for the folks we will be working with,” Gaffney said. “About 50 percent [of its use] will be reserved for people here in the

NEWS

OPINION

Code Compliance department cites safety violations. PAGE 3 UT’s Energy Institute looks at energy in social policy. PAGE 3

@ylesliezhang

Sam Ortega / Daily Texan Staff

Dan Stanzione, deputy director of the Texas Advanced Computing Center, demonstrates a part of the Stampede supercomputer, the sixth fastest computer in the world.

UT system.” Data mining in social media has recently been a source of large amounts of data, and scientists and statisticians are beginning

to explore its applications, Gaffney said. “You could use this information real time from social media sites to do things very powerfully you

wouldn’t be able to do otherwise,” Gaffney said. “We want to push forward on that from the data mining

SPORTS

LIFE&ARTS

ONLINE

REASON TO PARTY

UT not that diverse for black male students. PAGE 4

David Ash’s season officially comes to an end. PAGE 6

The pumpkin spice trend takes over local shops. PAGE 8

Horns Up, Horns Down: ZBT doesn’t get the issue. PAGE 4

Texas basketball loses for first time this season. PAGE 6

Billie Joe Armstrong collaborates with Norah Jones. PAGE 8

From Thanksgiving football to an NBA player dating a musician, check out the Sports tab during the day. dailytexanonline.com

COMPUTER page 2

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Tuesday, November 26, 2013

NEWS

FRAMES featured photo Volume 114, Issue 74

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor Laura Wright (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Shabab Siddiqui (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2013 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission. Shelby Tauber / Daily Texan Staff

CORRECTIONS

Johnny Rendon power washes filters outside of Cain and Abel’s in West Campus on Monday morning.

Because a reporting error, an article on the Nov. 25 issue of The Daily Texan about Gene Vela’s court hearing misstated the bond amount. Steve Brand, prosecuting attorney for the District Attorney’s Office, argued to increase Vela’s bond to $1 million on Nov 22. The judge did not rule to change the amount of the bond, which remains $100,000. Because of a reporting error, an article in the Nov. 21 issue of The Daily Texan about a construction project in Bellmont Hall misstated the project’s cost. The project’s current cost is $330,000.

CLARIFICATION The Dean of Students is currently looking into Zeta Beta Tau fraternity through an informal investigation, according to Elizabeth Medina, assistant dean of students who handles discourse involving Greek life.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER Low High

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SENATE continues from page 1 arrived at Vela’s North Campus apartment, close to St. David’s Medical Center, after Vela called a friend and hung up abruptly. Police said the unidentified friend was concerned enough to call 911. When the police arrived, Vela aimed a handgun at them through his window, according to police department Assistant Chief Raul Munguia. After officers fired bullets into the corner of the window, Vela

retreated, at which point police heard what they believed to be Vela loading and discharging more firearms. Vela returned to his apartment window and pointed his laser-equipped handgun directly at the officers’ chests, and officers Leo Cardenas and Adrien Chopin fired, Munguia said. Vela was hit in the left torso and fell back. Clark said he was not aware Vela, who is a Marine

Corps veteran who served in Iraq in 2002, kept weapons in his apartment. “Gene is a veteran, we all knew that,” Clark said. “All I know is what’s been reported in the papers. I had no idea that he had weapons or any sort of anything else.” Clark denied any further knowledge of what might have caused Vela to aim a handgun at officers that night. “I had no idea about any of the stuff that went on

after the fact,” Clark said. “All I know is what’s been reported in the papers.” In the days since the standoff, multiple members of the board have denied comment completely or referred to Clark and Reagins-Lilly for comment. Student Government President Horacio Villarreal said he was surprised at the seeming lack of transparency, but said he felt certain circumstances require private handling.

SERVICES

cost going toward replacing the Departmental Financial Information Network, the current enterprise resource planning software. The plan estimates the University will save $120 million to $140 million in the same time frame, which includes the predicted cost and profit of the plan. Adams said he has concerns about how quickly the plan is being finalized. He said by attempting to transition to a new enterprise resource planning software while simultaneously implementing the plan, the administration could negatively impact work quality.

“I just feel like there are a lot of things changing all at once and it’s kind of like a roller coaster,” Adams said. Almasy said the committee has kept a detailed record of the questions raised during public meetings and those submitted via email. “We have a listing of over 350 comments we’ve received,” Almasy said. “That is all kind of being reviewed and we’re trying to develop a set of major themes, which are the same kinds of questions and topics that were repeated over and over, and those are

going to be reincorporated into a set of recommendations that will build off the draft plan and be delivered to the President [William Powers Jr.].” The recommendations will likely be delivered to Powers in January and include a recommendation to conduct a pilot program of the plan before implementing it campus-wide, Almasy said. “The steering committee has been charged with identifying a number of things: what would be tested in a pilot, what would determine the success or failure of a

continues from page 1 of time to just sit and ponder the consequence or the positive outcomes that could come with something like this,” Adams said. The plan is projected to cost the University $160 million to $180 million over 10 years, with much of the

This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25 Permanent Staff

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COMPUTER continues from page 1 side and explain to people what’s going on.” The center’s deputy director Dan Stanzione said in the digital age, people can easily generate large amounts of information, but the difficulty is finding significance in large data sets. “Our ability to

“This does somewhat surprise me,” Villarreal said. “In dealing with the Senate Executive Board this year, they’ve been incredibly transparent — but I trust them, they’re good people and I trust they’re making the right decision.” Vela, who is being held in the Travis County Jail, has been charged with aggravated assault against a public servant. Currently, his bond remains set at $100,000.

pilot and who would be the participants,” Almasy said. Staff Council Chairwoman Erika Frahm said the council will continue to collaborate with the steering committee, even though the formal dialogue phase has ended. “I have been incredibly proud of how the staff has approached this plan,” Frahm said. “All questions, concerns and suggestions raised by A staff have been intelligent,por respectful and professional.Aus Communication with theter shared services project teamcal will be ongoing through allaro to U phases of this project.” Cin M Em continues from page 1 vice par weather as the system leaves. the mean time. rive “I’m not too concerned,” “We just weren’t cold a.m enough to get the ice … but Carrender said. “I prefer that fere we just missed it by a couple it didn’t rain, but, as long as sym of degrees, being a little bit there’s not ice on the road, I’m not too concerned.” too warm,” Kimmel said. On Tuesday, the temperaComputer science junior Rebecca Carrender said she ture is expected to dip to 31 will be traveling home for degrees, with a high of 49 the Thanksgiving holiday degrees, according to the but is not worried about the National Weather Service.

HEX

generate data is huge,” Stanzione said. “It’s easy to generate trillions of bytes of information. That’s way too much information to read. It’s one thing to say you have a hundred terabytes of information about cancer and it’s another thing to say you know what that means.”

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NEWS

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Tuesday, November 26, 2013

CITY

RESEARCH

Few students use UT legal for apartment violations By Amanda Voeller @amandaevoeller

Austin’s Code Compliance department has written 1,700 violations for 126 Austin rental properties since 2007. Meanwhile, UT’s Legal Services for Students represents an average of 15 students per year in court regarding health and safety code violations in those rental properties. According to data obtained by the Austin-American Statesman, the city has taken legal action against 25 of those 126 properties since 2007. Thomas Butler, assistant director of legal services, said one-third of the legal services department’s clients inquire about landlord and tenant matters. “Whether or not [a student’s problem] rises to the level of allowing them to breach the lease is pretty much determined on a caseby-case basis,” Butler said. The only apartment code violations that would warrant legal action or a lease termination are health and safety violations, Butler said. “There is a state statute that says that the landlord has the duty to remedy a condition which materially affects the health and safety of the ordinary tenant,” Butler said. “If the dishwasher’s broken — it’s not leaking — and you can still wash the dishes by hand, that’s probably not a health and safety violation. If there’s a hole in the roof, obviously it is.” There have been issues with rental properties flooding lately because of the recent rain, Butler said. Biology sophomore Alison Sidoran said her apartment at 26 West had a

crack in the ceiling because a pipe broke, and although the apartment complex fixed the pipe quickly, the crack is still there. “The [landlords] wait until pipes leak all over people’s things, then don’t give any pay for the damage done,” Sidoran said. Though students have the ability to take action through student legal services, some city leaders think the city should play a larger role in monitoring apartment living conditions. Councilwoman Kathie Tovo said she wants Austin to implement a rental registration program requiring regular inspections of certain multi-family and single-family housing developments. “[In other cities], it’s been a really successful way of making sure that the city can spot unsafe conditions in housing before it gets to a point of being really unsafe for the tenants who live there,” Tovo said. “Because we’ve had several situations where housing and apartment complexes deteriorated to the point where people were really in danger and had to be immediately removed from those properties, we needed as a city, I believe, to take some more assertive action.” Tovo said this program would be successful because inspections based solely off of tenants’ reports are not proactive enough. “People who are living in apartments may not want to call in and complain to the city, and they may not want to complain to the landlord because they may fear that they’re going to lose their housing as a result,” Tovo said.

POLICE

Student rushed to hospital Monday in stable condition By Julia Brouillette @juliakbrou

A student was transported to St. David’s South Austin Medical Center after experiencing a medical issue Monday morning around 9:35 a.m., according to University spokeswoman Cindy Posey. Multiple vehicles from Emergency Medical Services, the Austin Fire Department and UTPD arves. rived on the scene at 9:44 ed,” a.m. The student sufthat fered non-life-threatening g as symptoms related to an oad,

illness, according to Mike Benavides, Travis County EMS spokesman. EMS assessed the student’s condition and provided care on the scene before transporting the student to the hospital, Benavides said. The student’s illness was not severe, and EMS provided the basic care it provides to all patients, Benavides said. Posey declined to provide information on what kind of care was provided, citing the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

Courtesy of the Austin Business Journal

Professor Michael Webber, deputy director of UT’s Energy Institute, and research partner Sheril Kirshenbaum have been working together to promote energy awareness since 2010.

Institute encourages energy literacy By Wynne Davis @wynneellen

UT researchers have found that women in underdeveloped countries are in need of energy education to increase society’s efficiency and better the surrounding environment. Researchers Michael Webber, UT’s Energy Institute deputy director, and Sheril Kirshenbaum, the Energy Management and Innovation Center associate director, looked at energy education, which includes basic knowledge of its technologies and household usage. Webber said women’s roles in energy matters came up after years of studying and teaching about it. “It’s hard to cover this topic in depth without realizing the important role

women have as decisionmakers in the household and as victims of bad energy decisions — from pollution, old technologies … and beneficiaries of good energy decisions because of reduced burdens for manual labor,” Webber said. The research is not technical-based but rather involves looking at energy issues in policy and social justice contexts, Webber said. Organizations focused on educating people in lesser developed countries travel and teach the local people about a variety of topics, often including health care or religion, but energy is not known to be a priority topic. For energy to play a bigger role in any society, there needs to be an educated body willing to teach, Kirshenbaum said.

“Energy literacy is very low, which isn’t surprising because it’s not a standard subject we learn about at school,” Kirshenbaum said. “It’s very interdisciplinary, but we tend to compartmentalize energy into ‘policy’ or ‘engineering,’ without providing the comprehensive context for how they interact. Fortunately, this is beginning to change.” Even though the level of energy literacy is currently low, it’s a growing field, Webber said. “I think awareness is growing about the importance of energy literacy,” Webber said. “At the same time, STEM education has been identified as a top priority for many stakeholders. Done the right way, education programs could tackle STEM and energy in ways that are

good for society.” As outreach efforts to these areas continue, researchers may be able to help make energy a part of the platform, Webber said. “I think that educators like myself need to propose that energy be included in their philanthropic efforts,” Webber said. “Most philanthropists are open to good ideas, so if we make the case effectively, they will support it.” While women are a group of focus for energy education, Webber said everyone needs to be knowledgeable about the subject. “If we do energy the right way, then women and the whole world will benefit,” Webber said. The researchers have been working together since Kirshenbaum joined the Webber Energy Group in 2010.

Prosecution questions Fawcett’s last wish LOS ANGELES — A trial over the ownership of an Andy Warhol portrait of Farrah Fawcett opened Monday with lawyers for Ryan O’Neal and UT each telling jurors they have evidence that shows they should be awarded possession of the artwork. The University’s lawyers told the panel of six women and six men that Fawcett repeatedly described herself as the portrait’s owner before her death in 2009, and her dying wishes included that all her artwork be given to the school. O’Neal’s lawyer said that the University is relying on witnesses who had animosity toward the Oscar-

nominated actor, and evidence would show the disputed artwork was a gift to O’Neal from Warhol. David Beck, an attorney for the University, told jurors that O’Neal took the disputed portrait from Fawcett’s home after her death and should have to give it to the school. O’Neal’s lawyer Marty Singer rejected the University’s characterization of O’Neal’s actions, saying the actor had permission to take the portrait from Fawcett’s home. O’Neal contends he introduced Warhol to Fawcett and requested that he receive one of the artist’s portraits of the model and “Charlie’s Angels” star.

Warhol gave Fawcett and O’Neal several pieces of art during his lifetime, including a napkin drawing that the actor says the University should return to him, Singer said. “Apparently for this university, one iconic Warhol portrait is not enough,” Singer said. Beck showed jurors Fawcett’s living trust and told the panel that the actress chose not to leave anything to O’Neal. There’s evidence that Fawcett described both of the portraits as her own, Beck said. “We are now told, since Farrah is now dead and can’t speak for herself, and Andy Warhol is dead and can’t speak for himself, Mr. O’Neal says

that portrait was never Farrah’s to begin with,” Beck said. Warhol created the two portraits in 1980 from Polaroid pictures he shot of Fawcett for a television special aired by “20/20.” The two portraits were slightly different and meant to be displayed side-by-side, Beck said. He showed the jury a picture of Fawcett with both images in the background, one which had her hair colored in and the other one colorless except for her eyes and lips. The University wants to make sure the portraits are available for viewing by the public at its Blanton Museum of Art, Beck said. —Associated Press

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4A OPINION

4

LAURA WRIGHT, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / @TexanEditorial Tuesday, November 26, 2013

HORNS UP: NEW COMMITTEE ON JUDICIAL IMPARTIALITY Last Thursday, a group of concerned citizens met to hash out the possibilities for reforming judicial selections in Texas, according to the Austin American-Statesman. The conversation, which was dominated by talk of concerns with the current judicial selection system, will continue over the next year as a special legislative committee tackles the question of how to best select judges in Texas. Texas is one of the few states that require its judiciary representatives to run in general elections. As a result, concerns of the judiciary being sold to the highest campaign donor are perpetual. And judges often worry about the implications of asking for campaign money from wealthy donors they may later meet in court. While the problem of judicial corruption has taken a backseat in Texas, this might not be the case if the political landscape in Texas shifts to that of a more two-party state. The judicial branch of the government, both historically and theoretically, has been the one of great integrity and even greater impartiality. We must be confident that our judges can make decisions based on the facts of the cases in front of them, rather than on who the prosecuting counsel is or whose business is at stake. We’re glad the legislature will start to brainstorm ideas on how to keep the integrity of the system intact.

COLUMN Black student population at UT

842 Black male students enrolled in 2011

1,298 Black female students enrolled in 2011

51,112 Total student population enrolled in 2011

HORNS DOWN: CONTINUED BOARD OF EDUCATION REVISIONISM On Thursday, members of the Texas State Board of Education singled out a Pearson Education biology textbook, questioning the book’s assertions on natural selection and the theory of evolution. The board voted to have three of its members pick outside experts to scrutinize the book, despite the fact that the book in question is already being used in more than half of U.S. classrooms. While a 2011 state law gives school districts the authority to choose their own books, most adhere to the recommended list suggested by the Texas Education Board. In addition, Texas is so large a state that the textbooks selected by Texas are often also the ones marketed nationally. We think the comments of the board’s vice chairman, Republican Thomas Ratliff, sum up our views on the issue: “I believe this process is being hijacked, this book is being held hostage to make political changes. … To ask me — a business degree major from Texas Tech University — to distinguish whether the earth cooled 4 billion years ago or 4.2 billion years ago for purposes of approving a textbook at 10:15 on a Thursday night is laughable.” Colleagues, on the other side of the debate, shot back that they “weren’t laughing.”

Eric Gay / Associated Press

Texas Board of Education members David Bradley, left, and Thomas Ratliff, right, take part in a SBOE meeting on Thursday.

HORNS DOWN: TED, DEFINE “COMPROMISE” On Sunday, U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz openly criticized the deal struck between President Barack Obama and the Iranian government, in which Iran agreed to halt its development of nuclear weapons in exchange for relief of $6 to $7 billion in economic sanctions for the next six months. The deal, which is the first diplomatic accord between the two countries since the Iranian Revolution in 1979, could be a major step toward a larger, more comprehensive agreement still to come, and it is at least a temporary reprieve from the escalating tensions in the region. But Cruz argued that the deal didn’t go far enough in our favor: “According to the interim agreement regarding Iran’s nuclear program that was reached this weekend in Geneva, not one centrifuge will be destroyed. Not one pound of enriched uranium will leave Iran. Not one American unjustly detained in Iran’s notorious prisons will be released. But Iran will start to receive, in a matter of days, $7 billion in relief from international economics sanctions. … The administration has gotten it backwards, and it is time to reverse course before any further damage is done.” All the facts Cruz cites are correct, but he ignores the key point that Iran has frozen its capability to enrich uranium to the level needed for nuclear weapons, which is the greatest diplomatic success on this issue in decades. Moreover, it is clear that in foreign policy, as well as domestic governance, Cruz doesn’t understand what a compromise is. Instead, his unrealistic foreign policy goals bring to mind President Harry Truman’s naive and ill-fated 1945 assertion that, although he couldn’t expect to get 100 percent of what he wanted in negotiations with Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, he did expect to get 85 percent. With hubris like his, we’re glad the person leading American negotiations with hostile foreign governments is anybody but Cruz.

GALLERY

Omar Longoria / Daily Texan Staff

For black male students at UT-Austin, data tells different story about diversity

By Jasmine Johnson Daily Texan Columnist @AllThatJasss

On Nov. 4, Sy Stokes, an African-American male student at UCLA, uploaded a video to YouTube entitled “The Black Bruins [Spoken Word].” In the video, Stokes and nine other black male students at the school address the lack of diversity in UCLA’s undergraduate student population in chilling spoken word poetry. In the video, Stokes reveals that black males make up only 3.3 percent of the student population at UCLA, and that 65 percent of those black males are student-athletes. He goes on to imply that UCLA only cares about increasing diversity if it helps the school win national championships. The video is so startling that it’s tempting to pretend that problems with racial diversity are unique to UCLA. But the numbers at UT tell a different story, and unfortunately for the black male students at UT, it’s even worse. In the fall of 2011, the University had a total black male enrollment of 842 students. That’s approximately 39 percent of the total black population and about 1.6 percent of UT’s total population. Sharon Davies, executive director of the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at Ohio State University, found that out of the 7,199 freshmen enrolled in 2009, a startling 129 of them were black males. And, of those few African-American males, only 78 were predicted to graduate as the graduation rate for African-American males at UT is only 60 percent. It gets worse: The University of Pennsylvania’s Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education found a 66 percent difference between the percentage of players on the UT football and basketball teams that are black and the percentage of black men in the total undergraduate student body — the highest such difference in the Big 12 Conference. UT’s 1.6 percent black male presence is

In the fall of 2011, the University had a total black male enrollment of 842 students. That’s approximately 39 percent of the total black population and about 1.6 percent of UT’s total population.

even lower than UCLA’s 3.3 percent, so this is clearly an area where improvement is needed. Overall, UT is perceived as diverse, and rightfully so. But these low levels of black male representation make clear that there is still much progress to be made, even at “diverse” schools. Student Government Vice President Ugeo Williams, one of the black students at UT, said he has completed research focused on the cohort of black men who entered UT in the fall of 2011. “If we take a deeper look into University data, most times, African-American male students are one of the lowest groups represented at a university equivalent to the size of UCLA and UT,” Williams said. Williams said that he wonders if non-athlete black men are applying at high rates and just not being admitted or if non-athletes are being admitted but not receiving the same financial support as black male athletes. I asked Marcus Hutchins, a third-year offensive lineman on the UT football team and a physical culture and sports junior, whether the claim that UCLA strives for “diversity” only insofar as it increases national championships holds true at UT. Hutchins replied, “To a certain extent, yes … but at the same time, we [student-athletes] get punished for not going to class and study hall or missing a group meeting.” Despite the low number of black males at UT, Hutchins doesn’t feel isolated as a minority. “I feel I have every chance as my other race counterparts to compete at this University for a degree.” Undeclared freshman Derek Orji, also a black male, said, “I don’t feel isolated because there are a lot of ethnic communities on campus.” But with UT’s holistic admissions policy in which race is a factor currently being reviewed by the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, we can’t be blind to the low number of black men attending UT. Since Stokes’ video was posted on Nov. 4, it has been viewed more than 1,480,000 times. The video made its way to The Huffington Post and even provoked a response from Don Lemon, a black “CNN Newsroom” anchor. Though the video centers on UCLA, it’s apparent that the issue of low black male representation applies to UT as well. “The video is well done and it serves as a catalyst for starting a conversation. The question is how does this issue get resolved,” said Philemon Brown, president of the UT Black Faculty and Staff Association. “We live in a time that many people deny issues of race exist and everything is equal,” Brown said. “That is a part of the fallacy.” Johnson is an undeclared junior from DeSoto.

HORNS DOWN: MORE LEWD MURALS FROM ZBT

Connor Murphy / Daily Texan Staff

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

On Friday, the Daily Texan reported that the fraternity Zeta Beta Tau, commonly known as ZBT, painted over lewd murals depicting women performing sex acts on members of the military after recognizing, according to the national chapter, that the murals were a “poor decision.” On Monday, this newspaper reported that ZBT had made another poor decision: painting over said murals with only slightly less lewd depictions of women in sexual positions. The new murals, for example, “included a woman clothed in a bra and jeans bending over with an armed gunman firing a missile toward the woman to the words “REP ANAL.”” Another charming pictograph scrawled on the walls of the party’s set pieces included the words “Chinese Whore House.” ZBT’s decision to “remedy” the situation by adding a bra to a bent-over woman in a blatantly sexualized position is absurd. It’s no wonder the murals’ offensiveness is lost on the brothers of Zeta Beta, who can’t seem to understand that the explicit sexuality of the murals isn’t the problem — it’s the explicit misogyny and disrespect of the military that has everyone up in arms.

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@DTeditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


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CHRIS HUMMER, SPORTS EDITOR / @texansports Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Ash officially out for season FOOTBALL

By Garrett Callahan @CallahanGarrett

Texas officially announced Monday what most fans have been expecting for quite a while — David Ash is out for the remainder of the season. Kenny Boyd, head athletic trainer for football, released a statement Monday morning, which announced that Ash and his family, along with the medical staff, believe that the best decision for his recovery is for him to sit out for the rest of the season. “Though he’s made a lot of progress, we have not been able to clear him to return to competition,” Boyd said. “Due to the duration of symptoms, we are now at a point that we all believe the best approach for him is to not return this season.” After suffering a concussion earlier in the season against BYU, Ash experienced another head injury against Kansas State and has been out since late September. Without their starting quarterback, the Longhorns have gone 5-2 with senior Case McCoy under center. In the three games he appeared in, Ash recorded eight touchdowns, including one rushing, with 760 passing yards.

“He’s been at practice every day,” head coach Mack Brown said. “He’s in shorts. He’s not dressed out but he’s not practicing. But he’s out there every day. He seems to be doing fine, upbeat and I know he’s a competitor so he wants to come back.” With all the current talk about concussions in the game of football, no one is a stranger to the seriousness of his injuries. “That was a scary deal,” McCoy said. “You can tell now, as long as it’s taken to analyze the situation. I think our trainers have handled it exceptionally well. It’s a scary thing for anyone in that situation. But they’ve handled it the right way. It looks like he’ll be able to come back and play. So, yeah, we’re thankful for David.” In Texas’ game against Oklahoma State, Ash was on the sideline to provide support for his team, though it is unclear whether or not he’ll be on the sideline for the remainder of the games this season. “When things get hectic David always has a way of settling everybody down,” senior offensive lineman Mason Walters said. “So I think he’ll help out with that. But it’s about getting better,

Chelsea Purgahn / Daily Texan file photo

Junior quarterback David Ash, who played in just three games for the Longhorns this season, is officially finished for the year after struggling with recurring concussion symptoms since Week 2.

I think that helps us all out a little bit.” There is still no timetable for when Ash will be able to return. Coaches have said he has continued to get better every

week, but every eight days or so concussion symptoms arise. Brown still stays hopeful that Ash will be back on the field in the spring and will appeal to get his year back.

“I just wasn’t sure [on Ash’s condition] because we had to wait,” Brown said. “We cant even talk to David really without medical people being there, without him feeling pressured

we want him back. The doctors and trainings talked to his family and [Monday] is really the first day that we all decided for him not to play and get a fresh start in the spring.”

Horns, Raiders differ offensively By David Leffler

Daily Texan Columnist @Leffler_David

Texas and Texas Tech could not be more different. Led by

its former quarterback-turnedcoach Kliff Kingsbury — who may or may not moonlight as Ryan Gosling’s stunt double — the Red Raiders feature a high-octane offense that moves the ball effortlessly. The Longhorns, on the other hand, have relied on the leadership of a veteran coaching staff and strong running game to win six

of their seven Big 12 games. During his tenure as quarterback for the Red Raiders, Kingsbury threw for 95 touchdowns and more than 12,000 yards. He has restored this gunslinger mentality in Lubbock — absent after the school split ways with Mike Leach in 2009 — as Texas Tech enters with the nation’s top passing attack despite instability at the

Presented by

quarterback position. Through 11 games this season, Texas Tech quarterbacks Baker Mayfield and Davis Webb have collectively covered more than 300 passing yards in nine games, including four 400-yard performances and four 40-point games. This is an offensive philosophy that could not differ more from the Longhorns’, who have only scored more than 40 points once this season. Between junior quarterback David Ash and senior quarterback Case McCoy, Texas has had just one 300-yard passing game this year, which came against New Mexico State. The Longhorns choose to rely on a running game, averaging nearly 200 yards per game. But it is the matchups on defense that will decide the outcome of this game. On paper, the Longhorns hold a clear advantage. Thanks to a talented veteran secondary, Texas has not surrendered a

Foo Admi / Associated Press

Texas Tech head coach Kliff Kingsbury has helped engineer the nation’s top-ranked passing offense.

300-yard passing game all season. Instead, its Achilles heel is defending the run — far from a strength for Texas Tech. The Texas Tech defense faces a tougher matchup. During their 7-0 start, the Red Raiders allowed opponents to run for 200 yards once. But in its past four games — all losses — Texas Tech has allowed an average of 297 rushing yards per game. In each of those contests, its opponents have run the ball at least 45 times and averaged

more than 5 yards per carry. This bodes well for the Texas offense. The Longhorns have topped 200 rushing yards three times in Big 12 play and have run the ball 48 times per game in their last five contests. From their playing styles to their coaches’ styles, these teams have little in common. But when they share the same field on Thanksgiving night, the Longhorns’ weaknesses and strengths will overwhelm the Red Raiders.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Longhorns fall to BYU, suffer first loss of the 2013-14 season

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Texas pounded BYU inside for most of the game, but the Longhorns could not stop Cougar junior guard Tyler Haws down the stretch. The 6-foot-5-inch guard scored 19 of BYU’s final 21 points leading to an 86-82 Cougar victory. The Longhorns (4-1) and Cougars (5-1) were locked in a back-and-forth battle, as neither team held a lead larger than five points the entire game. But Texas couldn’t find an answer for Haws’ shooting late. BYU led 81-80 at just under a minute left. But after a stellar defensive possession by Texas, the Cougars had only a few seconds left on the shot clock. A hard screen near the right corner gave Haws enough space to take a onefooted jumper from just inside the arc, which, despite twisting his body 90 degrees in the air, touched nothing but net. Texas had a few opportunities for the equalizer, but freshman guard Damarcus Croaker’s attempt from behind the arc clanged off the back rim with 13 seconds remaining,

Shelby Tauber / Daily Texan file photo

Javan Felix (3) led Texas’ players with 17 points, but it was not enough to overcome BYU on Monday.

sealing BYU’s victory. The Longhorns, who entered the game with five scorers averaging double digits, received another balanced offensive effort in the loss. Sophomore guard Javan Felix led the Longhorns with 17 points on 6-for-18 shooting, while adding four assists, three rebounds and four steals. Felix, who started the first three games of the year, came off the bench for the second game in a row with Croaker starting in his place. Felix has shown a knack for providing a scoring presence in the sixth man role, averaging 15.5 points over the

last two games. Croaker missed the potential game-tying shot, but contributed 14 points, which included a trio of threes, and four rebounds. Texas’ pair of sophomore centers, Cameron Ridley and Prince Ibeh, each had productive evenings against a smaller Cougar frontcourt. Ridley posted his first doubledouble of the season, 12 points and 10 rebounds, while adding six blocks. Ibeh added 11 points and six rebounds. It’s only the second time in Ibeh’s career he surpassed double digits in points.


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For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

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SARAH-GRACE SWEENEY, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR / @DailyTexanArts Tuesday, November 26, 2013

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FOOD

Fall lattes spice up the season By Eleanor Dearman @EllyDearman

Sugar, spice and everything nice — that’s what pumpkin spice lattes are made of. Since Starbucks revealed the now-popular fall flavor in 2003, the chain has sold more than 200 million pumpkin spice drinks. This year, the drink turned 10 years old, causing a new wave of pumpkin spice obsession to surface. There are countless pictures on Instagram under the hashtag “pumpkinspice” of people holding Starbucks’ signature red holiday cup, as well as other pumpkin spice items. Some show off their Coffeemate pumpkin spice creamer, and others flaunt their freshly made pumpkin spice cupcakes and bread. According to Starbucks’ website, there have been more than 29,000 tweets that have featured the hashtag “pumpkinspice” since August 2012. “I know that on Instagram and Facebook and Twitter, it’s hyped up by Starbucks first off, but also it’s hyped up by a lot of people just ordering them,” theatre and dance freshman Sandro Cervantes said. After noticing the public’s love for Starbucks’ winter drinks such as the peppermint mocha, the coffee powerhouse decided to capitalize on the fall season as well. It created a drink embodying all of the sweet flavors of autumn, put them in a cup with some steamed milk and called it the pumpkin spice latte. The infatuation with pumpkin spice has spread to other big coffee brands, as well as local shops. One of the big companies jumping on the pumpkin spice bandwagon is The Coffee Bean &

Illustration by Connor Murphy / Daily Texan Staff

Tea Leaf. “Everyone loves the flavor of pumpkin and our flavor here at The Coffee Bean is amazing,” said Sylvia Gomez, shift supervisor at The Coffee Bean on Guadalupe. “It’s like pumpkin pie in a cup.” Coffee Bean uses its own brand of syrup to make its pumpkin spice lattes. Starbucks uses Fontana Pumpkin Sauce — a syrup anyone can purchase on the store’s website or other sites online — which contains no pumpkin. The drink is popular at Coffee Bean and many other large chains, but because of the extra expenses

involved in making the latte, it may not be practical for smaller shops. “Products cost a lot, so you have to buy them in bulk,” Gomez said. “So with a smaller company it may not be worth their while. And, usually, smaller coffee shops have a stable set of guests who just like their cappuccinos or their regular coffees and they don’t really stray from the menu very much.” Thunderbird Coffee is an example of a local shop that opted not to offer the fall treat. While it has some basic syrups such as hazelnut, Thunderbird

chooses to focus on the actual flavor of the coffee. “We used to have a bunch of syrups — pumpkin spice being one of them — but they didn’t sell very often,” Thunderbird Coffee owner Ryan McElroy said. “They’d just sit there, and that’s kind of gross just in and of itself. For months, even years to be honest, there would be syrup sitting there that never got used.” This idea of smaller shops not offering the flavor does not always hold true. Quack’s 43rd Street Bakery, a local coffee shop and bakery, sells pumpkin spice lattes

seasonally. Quack’s offers the flavor beginning around mid-October along with other pumpkin baked goods. “I think that when fall rolls around a lot of people look to big companies like Starbucks, The Coffee Bean and Caribou Coffee, and start going after that trend,” Quack’s General Manager Heather O’Connor said. “I think it’s up to us little guys to provide that for customers to keep them interested in local coffee shops versus big chain stores.” Whether a fan or a critic, it’s easy to see that pumpkin spice is taking over the

Everyone loves the flavor of pumpkin and our flavor here at The Coffee Bean is amazing. It’s like pumpkin pie in a cup. —Sylvia Gomez, shift supervisor at The Coffee Bean on Guadalupe

coffee world. It seems this hyped-up seasonal treat will be returning for many falls to come.

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ALBUM REVIEW | ‘NIGHT TIME, MY TIME’

Crossing over from indie to pop, Ferreira creates synth-heavy songs By David Sackllah @dsackllah

With nude photos, arrests for drug possession and reports of inconsistent live performances, indie pop sensation Sky Ferreira has built quite a name for herself in 2013. Now a near-perfect pop album can be added to the list of things worth talking about concerning Ferreira. Night Time, My Time does the rare job of living up to its hype. Ferreira has been making music since she was 15. She signed to a major label at a young age and spent years dealing with producers who dismissed her input and attempted to exploit her professionally and sexually. She did not make a mark until last year with “Everything Is Embarrassing,” a melancholy and catchy single co-written with Dev Hynes of Blood Orange that exposed her to the indie community. She followed it up with an unfocused EP. Now she has teamed up with Ariel Rechtshaid, the producer who worked with HAIM and Vampire Weekend on their newest albums. Together, they made an album that could possibly make Ferreira a bona fide pop star. Throughout Night Time, My Time, Ferreira delivers with moody and introspective synth-heavy pop songs that display her personality.

Rather than falling into the trap of writing the same song over and over as her contemporaries in Icona Pop do, Ferreira expresses varied emotions and experiences throughout. There is a lot of anger, whether it is directed toward the rest of the world in the super catchy anthem “Nobody Asked Me (If I Was Okay)” or inward with reflective tracks such as “I Blame Myself,” where Ferreira takes full responsibility for her damaged reputation. There are euphoric tracks like “24 Hours,” and rebellious girlpower anthems like “Boys” and “Ain’t Your Right.” The only time she falters is when she tries too hard to sound like someone else, such as on the heavily Cat Powerinfluenced title track. Besides that, Night Time, My Time is a confident and diverse

SKY FERREIRA Album: Night Time, My Time Label: Capital Songs to Download: “Nobody Asked Me (If I Was Okay),” “I Blame Myself” and “24 Hours”

debut. Ferreira is poised to be a true crossover between the pop and indie scenes, most evident by the fact that she is touring with Miley Cyrus early next year. While she may not be making the headlines that Cyrus is, Ferreira is making better music.

Photo courtesy of Hedi Slimane

Sky Ferreira’s debut album Night Time, My Time could be one of the best pop releases of 2013.


The Daily Texan 2013-11-26