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CAMPUS

Balloon victims lack legal recourse By Alberto Long @albertolong

Gregory Vincent, vice president for the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, issued a statement to UT students saying that water balloon attacks in West Campus are more than just “school yard pranks.” But according to the victims, criminal investigations into the attacks may be fizzling. Eduardo Belalcazar, an

international relations and global studies junior who had a water balloon thrown at him outside 26 West on Sept. 7, said authorities in charge of handling his case have been lax in their followup investigation, although he said he has not pressed the matter further. “UTPD hasn’t contacted me [and] neither has APD,” Belalcazar said. “The University just gave me some type of outreach, but when I asked

what the school was doing about it, they didn’t respond. It’s just a very disheartening thing for me to see the lack of importance that this has on my campus. I honestly don’t know what else I could do.” Because he was not actually hit by the balloon, Belalcazar is at a legal impasse, according to UTPD chief of police David Carter. “If there’s no crime that can be prosecuted because it fails to meet the criteria

listed in the penal code, then we’re limited to what we can do,” Carter said. “That’s why we wanted to know if there was bleach or some caustic chemical in the balloon that can hurt somebody. That would be more than a class C misdemeanor and could conceivably be prosecuted.” An attempted water balloon attack that does not cause physical harm would fall well below what is considered “criminal,” Carter said.

According to Carter, penalty groups include capital felony, first-, second- and third-degree felonies, as well as misdemeanors A, B and C. “A Class C misdemeanor for assault, which refers to assaults by physical contact, is the very lowest of its kind,” Carter said. “There’s nothing below that. So if an assault is attempted, it’s not even on the legal spectrum. It can’t be prosecuted.”

What do “Beloved,” “The Kite Runner“ and “Captain Underpants” all have in common? These three books all made the list of the most frequently challenged books in the United States for 2012. According to the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom, 464 books were challenged in the U.S. last year. Banned and challenged books are very similar.

Randolph Lewis, American Studies, “1984” “I am going to go with ‘1984’ by George Orwell, which has been banned in schools because it’s thought to be sympathetic to one political ideology or another. It is misunderstood often, yet I think it is one of the essential books for understanding the 20th century and the

world we are living in now.” Jacqueline Jones, History, “Their Eyes Were Watching God,” “Beloved” “Zora Neale Hurston’s book, ‘Their Eyes Were Watching God,’ is a very evocative novel about a black woman in Florida in the early 20th century and her struggles. Certainly, ‘Beloved’ by Toni Morrison [too]. It’s based on a real incident where an enslaved woman kills her own child rather than [let it] grow up

@jacobrkerr

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Readers bound by banned books seven UT faculty members and graduate students about their favorite banned and challenged books.

By Jacob Kerr

BANNED page 6

Photos by Jarrid Denman, Gabriella Belzer and Marshall Nolen / Daily Texan Staff

Banned books have been removed from public shelves, while challenged books are books people have attempted to remove from public shelves. This week is National Banned Books Week. It serves to remind people about the consequences of censorship, draw attention to books that are currently banned and celebrate the frequently challenged books remaining on bookshelves today. The Daily Texan asked

Fisher v. UT case placed on appellate schedule

Sara Saylor, English, “Fun Home” “I would say my favorite is Alison Bechdel’s book ‘Fun Home.’ This is a graphic memoir. The reason people object to this book, especially for high

BALLOON page 2

Professors Randolph Lewis, Julia Mickenburg and Jacqueline Jones pose with their favorite banned and challenged books. National Banned Books Week draws attention to frequently challenged and currently banned books, as well as emphasizes the consequences of censorship.

@EllyDearman

UNIVERSITY

Hearings for Fisher v. University of Texas are scheduled to be given for the second time on Nov. 13 in the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals. The case was initiated by Abigail Fisher, who sued UT in 2008 after she was denied admission into the University. Fisher, who has since graduated from Louisiana State University and currently lives in Austin, claimed the University violated her right to equal protection because its admissions policy considers race as a factor for students who do not automatically qualify under the Top 10 Percent Law. Judges Carolyn King, Patrick Higginbotham and Emilio Garza will hear oral arguments from both sides. The judges heard the case when it last reached the Fifth Circuit Court in 2009 and the appeals court originally determined the University could use race as a factor in its admissions policy. After hearing the case in October 2012, the Supreme Court ruled in June that the Fifth Circuit Court did not apply strict scrutiny to UT’s admissions policy when it ruled in the University’s favor. In the 7-1 decision to relegate the case to a lower court, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg provided the only dissent. Applying strict scrutiny will require the court to look into whether the University’s diversity goals can be achieved without using race as a factor in admission decisions, according to Gregory Vincent, UT law professor and vice president for diversity and community engagement. “[UT has] to demonstrate that there are no other race-neutral ways

LITERATURE

By Eleanor Dearman

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and allow it to be a slave. I was struck by the number of books on the list called banned and challenged classics that I’ve actually used in class.”

VOLLEYBALL

Longhorns defense, blocks contributing to early success By Matt Warden When the Longhorns begin conference play on Wednesday night, they’ll be under much less pressure than they were before. Fifth-ranked Texas (6-2) opens up Big 12 play against TCU after notching its third comeback victory of the season against Nebraska. The Longhorns amassed 16 blocks to the Cornhuskers’ nine, showcasing a defense that has propelled the team

to victory all season. “Blocking is an important aspect of this,” head coach Jerritt Elliot said. “Not so much about numbers, but more about how we are getting touches and putting pressure on teams.” Texas has registered 91 total blocks this season compared to 65 for its opponents, while only recording 14 block errors. In the team’s eight games, only three foes have compiled more blocks. Sophomore middle blocker Molly McCage has

emerged as one of the Longhorns’ premier blockers after seven blocks against Nebraska brought her season total to 35. The top-ranked recruit of the class of 2012 takes special pride in defending the net. “[Blocking] not only fires me up, but it fires my whole team up,” McCage said. “To have that solid defense on our side of the court is a huge advantage. All around we are a great blocking team, but to

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UT professor writes computer programs to analyze videos, help the elderly and memory-impaired PAGE 2

Why Austin should share the Colorado River PAGE 3

If Brown goes, who’s the next head football coach? PAGE 4

Female broadcasters face extra pressure to be pretty PAGE 6

UT professors escavate World Heritage Site

Comparing school diversity policy at UT and Alabama PAGE 3

Freshman setter Collins has quick success PAGE 4

Wearable technology continues to be a rising trend PAGE 6

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Shelby Tauber / Daily Texan Staff

Texas’ early season success has been due, in large part, to its ability to get blocks and force opponents to work around its forwards. The Longhorns take on TCU in BIg 12 action tonight.

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CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor Laura Wright (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Shabab Siddiqui (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@ gmail.com Sports Office (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office (512) 232-2209 dtlifeandarts@gmail.com Retail Advertising (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu

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The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

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Video algorithm may help elderly, memory-impaired By Madlin Mekelburg @madlinbmek

Researchers at the University are working to perfect a computer algorithm designed to summarize first-person perspective films, with the hope of aiding the elderly and memory-impaired. Kristen Grauman, a computer science associate professor and project leader, said her team produced an algorithm capable of analyzing long segments of video and creating short, storyboard summaries. The algorithm uses a combination of machine-learning technology and optimization to predict the important elements in a video and demonstrate how they are connected. The story-driven video summarization technology is the first of its kind to focus on egocentric, or firstperson perspective, video. Grauman said this allows

for greater applications of the summarizing feature and may be of use for memory-impaired individuals. “If you think about who needs a first-person video summarized, you first think about life loggers, people who just do this for fun or for social media,” Grauman said. “What I would say are even more serious applications are clinical health or elder care kind of things where you need to monitor someone’s ability to do activities of daily living, or to help them recap or re-experience visual memories to help them jog [their] memory.” Grauman conducted her initial research with former postdoctoral research fellow Lu Zheng and former doctoral student Yong Jae Lee. Lee said he focused on how machine-learning techniques can make the technology predict important objects. “Since the video can be

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continues from page 1 University Towers is currently investigating the Aug. 22 balloon attack on government senior Bryan Davis, which occurred outside the apartment complex. Davis said police have suspended his case until further evidence is produced. Ronnie Davis, community manager for University Towers, said the complex could not give specific information as to whether anyone has been caught or evicted. Gina Cowart, a spokeswoman for American Campus Community, which manages several West Campus apartment complexes, including 26 West, could not be reached for comment.

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many hours, we aimed to find the frames that contain the most important people and objects,” Lee said. “In order to find these frames, we train an algorithm to predict important image regions using egocentric cues, like how often objects appear in the center of the frame.” Zheng said he worked closely with Grauman in order to shape their ideas and formulate solutions to problems they encountered. “I was mainly responsible for coming out with the research ideas, working on details of the algorithm, programming the algorithm and designing and performing experiments,” Zheng said. “Professor Grauman worked with [us] closely in various ways, such as shaping the initial idea and suggesting possible solutions to difficulties encountered along the way.” Carter said he ultimately thinks incidents such as water balloon attacks are issues best handled at the administrative level. “Just because certain incidents can’t be prosecuted as crimes, that doesn’t mean that [they’re] not wrong,” Carter said. “It may mean that the incident should be handled at the administrative level. For instance, there’s Student Judicial Services, and their jurisdiction is primarily on campus, but they can respond to certain incidents that occur off campus.” According to Vincent, students responsible for the attacks in West Campus are held accountable under the University’s disciplinary system.

to meet that [goal],” Vincent said. “The University feels that it met the strict scrutiny standard.” UT law professor Joshua Fishkin said the Supreme Court decision means the appeals court will have to more thoroughly analyze UT’s admissions policy. “The Fifth Circuit thought it was applying strict scrutiny,” Fishkin said. “The Supreme Court basically concluded that the Fifth Circuit had been too deferential to UT about the question of whether this kind of program was really needed.” Fishkin added that the Fifth Circuit Court might send the case further down to the district court so that UT’s admission policy can undergo even further analysis before the Fifth Circuit makes another ruling. Vincent said the case could eventually reach the Supreme Court a second time. “Once the Fifth Circuit has determined those questions, I am sure there will be an appeal in whatever they decide,” Vincent said. “I am sure that the Supreme Court will have to consider that again.” According to Vincent, the use of race in admissions has long been a point of debate in federal courts. In the 1978 Regents of the University of California v. Bakke case, the Supreme Court decided institutions of higher education could consider race in their admission decisions. In 1996, the Fifth Circuit ruled in the Hopwood v. Texas case that Texas universities could not use race in their admissions policy. The Hopwood ruling was overturned by a 2003 Supreme Court ruling in the Grutter v. Bollinger case. UT has since used race as a factor in its

The Fifth Circuit thought it was applying strict scrutiny. The Supreme Court basically concluded that the Fifth Circuit had been too deferential to UT about the question of whether this kind of program was really needed. —Joshua Fishkin, UT law professor

admissions policy. In discussing the history of affirmative action cases, Vincent noted that race is not the only factor used by universities in admitting students. “One of the things that we note from Bakke, as well as the Grutter decision, is that race is just one among many factors,” Vincent said. According to UT spokesman Gary Susswein, law firm Latham & Watkins will again defend the University at the Fifth Circuit hearing, as it did before the Supreme Court. Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott defended the University when the case first reached the Fifth Circuit. Edward Blum, director of the Project for Fair Representation, who has represented Fisher in the case, could not be reached for comment. Student Government president Horacio Villarreal said the Fisher case could impact the demographical make-up at universities. “Not only is it a case that could potentially affect students across the nation, but it could change the diversity on our campus,” Villarreal said.

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COLUMN

Austin should share the river UT beats ‘Bama on diversity One of the most important and overlooked episodes in the history of the American West was the battle over the water of Owens Valley in California around the turn of the 20th century. The California Water Wars, as the quarrel became known, began a long tradition of conflict between the cities and rural areas of the West for the region’s most precious resource. One such dispute is taking place right now in Texas, over Austin’s share of the Colorado River. The Owens Valley, populated mostly by small farmers and ranchers, had the misfortune to be the most accessible source of fresh water to the growing city of Los Angeles. The leaders of that city, eager to sustain its rapid expansion, engaged in a decades-long campaign of deception and underhanded tactics to strong-arm the locals out of their water. Once the rights to the water were secured, they built a 223-mile-long aqueduct to divert it from Owens Valley to Los Angeles. Owens Valley dried up, and everybody knows what happened to Los Angeles. Cut to central Texas in the present day. The Lower Colorado River Authority, which manages water, energy and flood control for much of Central and Southeast Texas, came under fire in August for debating whether to artificially lower the level of Lake Austin by 2 to 4 feet to capture more rainfall and deal more effectively with the current drought. Lake Austin is normally kept at a constant level with inflows from Lake Travis and Lake Buchanan further upstream. Many Austinites, primarily those with lakefront property that would be devalued if the water receded, vehemently protested the plan to lower the water level. LCRA Chairman Timothy Timmerman announced on Sept. 12 that the idea had been shelved. “Our board is looking at innovative ways to expand and extend our water supply, but the idea of lowering the lakes is not and has not been a serious consideration,” Timmerman said. The next innovative proposal, it seems, is to shut off the flow of fresh water from the High-

In such a severe drought we fail to understand why the lawns need to be watered at all. They’re lawns.

land lakes to Matagorda Bay, the second-largest estuary system on the Texas Gulf Coast. On Sept. 18, the LCRA board voted to request an exemption from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality’s requirement that it release fresh water from the lakes to the bay. If the LCRA gets its way, the denial of water to Matagorda Bay would persist for 120 days, or until the combined level of Lakes Travis and Buchanan returns to 900,000 acre-feet. It currently sits at 638,000 acre-feet, or 32 percent full, and in the current climate such a rise seems unlikely. Matagorda Bay depends on the consistent influx of fresh water from the Colorado to sustain its ecosystem, which includes a wide variety of fish, shellfish, waterfowl and other wildlife. Salinity levels have risen in the estuary due to cuts LCRA has already made to the freshwater flows, and cutting the flows off completely would almost certainly push the salinity to lethal levels. It’s not only a question of environmental conservation. One of the state’s largest shrimping fleets operates in Matagorda Bay, and local officials say the rising salinity levels have already hurt the area’s fishing industry. Cutting the bay’s fresh water would save less than 5 percent of the amount Austin uses in a year. Austin currently operates under Stage 2 water restrictions, and residents can only water their lawns once a week. The city has done an admirable job in recent years of lowering its total water consumption despite increasing its population, but in such a severe drought we fail to understand why the lawns need to be watered at all. They’re lawns. We agree with those in the Matagorda Bay area that the estuary needs the water far more than Austin does if Austin still has enough left over to water lawns and preserve expensive lakefront property. The amount of water that goes to Matagorda Bay is insignificant next to the amount used by Austin, and in times of scarcity, it’s only fair that the most demanding consumers should bear the heaviest burden. Sadly, the protesters from the bay area and from state environmental groups failed to persuade the LCRA, as the louder voices of Austin’s lakefront property owners had succeeded less than a week before in convincing the agency to not lower Lake Austin. But the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality has a little under two weeks to approve the agency’s request. We hope they send the LCRA back to the drawing board.

By Chuck Matula

Daily Texan Columnist @chucketlist

The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Alabama are two very different campuses. The football teams have had varying degrees of success in recent years, both schools have distinct takes on the Southern aesthetic and a raincoat might actually be worth buying in Tuscaloosa. However, it’s become clear that there is a more meaningful gulf between the two schools in how their respective administrations approach diversity. Every historic Southern state university has to deal with the vestiges of discrimination on its campus. As a student at Texas and a former student at Alabama, I’ve had an opportunity to see how each institution approaches what can be a delicate issue. In the past two weeks, coverage by UA’s student newspaper, the Crimson White (for which I wrote during my time at Alabama), revealed that multiple sororities at the University of Alabama had declined to bid a particularly qualified applicant because she was black. According to an article in the Guardian, people familiar with the university’s historic Greek system, including UA alum and Alabama governor Robert Bentley, have suggested that the outsize influence of Greek alumni has led to the sustained segregation. For years, senior administrators like President pro tempore of the University of Alabama Board of Trustees Paul Bryant, Jr.; UA president Judy Bonner; and before her president Robert Witt, who is now Chancellor of the University of Alabama system, have shrugged off the responsibility to instigate change, despite the fact that, according to the Crimson White, other Southern schools with comparable Greek systems like Auburn and Ole Miss have made meaningful strides toward an integrated campus community. Although Bonner worked with sororities to initiate a new round of rush that culminated in multiple African-American girls receiving bids, there is no denying that there’s a serious problem with racism on a school’s campus when it takes days of negative national media attention to force the school’s administration to address decades-old blatant, institutional discrimination.

The severely delayed actions of the UA administration stand in stark contrast to those of the University of Texas in the Fisher v. Texas Supreme Court case. In the publicity surrounding the case, President William Powers Jr. and his administration received significant attention for the racial component of the holistic evaluation used in UT’s admissions process. Although the use of racial background in admissions decisions is a concept with its own merits and problems, the University’s strong defense of it demonstrates its clear commitment to diversity. UT spent years and, according to Inside Higher Ed, almost $1 million dollars defending its diversity policy in front of the Supreme Court, whereas Alabama felt it was enough to simply pay lip service to the concept in press releases that shrug off real responsibility to lead institutional change. At Alabama the segregation of the Greek system, barring a few newer organizations, was an open secret. Although I can only speculate as to the reason why segregation and deep class divisions at Alabama are so persistent, the administration there has shown itself to be unwilling to address the problems from which these issues stem. While the University of Texas deals with its own challenges in regard to race, defending its admissions policy in Fisher and, according to CNN, renaming a residence hall previously named after a Klansman show a good-faith effort on the part of the president and the regents to remove obvious legacies of discrimination from campus. Although the University can’t promote diversity in every aspect of campus life, it can strive to create an environment in which racial divides are not openly tolerated. The past several months have shown stark differences in how administrations can confront these issues. Alabama’s administration chose to ignore racial problems until BuzzFeed and The New York Times reported on it. UT’s administration chooses to confront them head-on, even at steep financial cost. So even though these universities may be facing difficulties, be they in the performance of the football team or the prejudices held on campus, it is important that the administration lead its students in achieving all the glittering generalities laid out in the admissions brochures. Matula is a finance junior from Austin.

COLUMN: EBBELER ON EDUCATION

Greek history class shows advantage of team-based learning By Jen Ebbeler

Daily Texan Columnist @jenebbeler

Editor’s Note: This column is the first in a series by associate classics professor Jennifer Ebbeler on the changing nature of higher education at UT-Austin and other institutions. Look for Prof. Ebbeler’s column in the Opinion section of this paper every other Wednesday. At the start of the semester, each student in assistant history professor Adam Rabinowitz’s CC 301: Introduction to Ancient Greece class was assigned to a permanent team of seven students. These groups work together on structured in-class activities each Friday and also produce a group project at the end of the semester. Every Friday morning, the students find their assigned seat near their teammates, pick up their team folder and get ready for the day’s activity. This past Friday, the topic was the date and effect of the eruption of Thera in the Bronze Age. In preparation, the class had watched a PBS documentary and also read scholarly articles presenting various theories about the possible role of the eruption in the disappearance of Minoan civilization. At the start of Friday’s class, students took a short i>clicker quiz on their own and then took the same quiz in their groups, using a scratch-off “lottery” card. Once the group agreed on an answer, they scratched off that space. They kept going until they got the correct answer, marked by a star. The classroom was loud as students debated one another, working to persuade their group members but also learning

to be more sensitive to the limits of their own expertise. Most of all, though, they were reminded that their peers are an important source of knowledge. “Almost invariably,” notes Rabinowitz, “the group scores are better than the individual scores.” Using the feedback from the i>clicker quiz, Dr. Rabinowitz briefly clarified points of confusion and common misconceptions and then turned the groups loose to work together on a more challenging discussion question. The groups were asked to adopt a position and defend that position with evidence-based arguments. For instance, one available position in Friday’s class was, “The decline or collapse of a complex civilization or social order is most often the result of a major natural disaster, and is most likely to happen fairly quickly (in the space of a generation).” Once the groups had had time to decide on their position and arguments, the class came together and each group was asked to hold up a card indicating its position. Dr. Rabinowitz then called on groups to present their case. Frequently, other groups weighed in with correctives or additional arguments. The result was a spectacularly rich, deep and thoughtful discussion of a complex issue. Rabinowitz’s approach to his class draws on the principles of team-based learning, a method of instruction that is well studied and has proven to be extremely successful in university classrooms. It is clear from watching Rabinowitz’s enthusiastic and engaged students and listening to their perceptive analyses of a complicated historical event that his approach is working — and it is working at scale (CC 301 enrolls 225 students each semester) with non-majors who have rarely had previous exposure to the subject matter. The current form of the class is the result of several cycles of evolution and was very much shaped by the feedback Rabinowitz received from previous classes. For instance, he

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

has created a detailed rubric and decreased the work required for the final group project (an addition to the Geo-Dia spatial timeline designed by Rabinowitz); and has developed a formal procedure for groups to “fire” members who are not pulling their weight. Still, using the techniques of team-based learning in such a large course has not been without its challenges. Perhaps the most significant one is logistical: how to arrange students in groups in an auditorium that was designed for lecture (FAC 21)? The solution was assigned seating, which necessitated the creation of a seat map — something that had not previously been done for this classroom. Similarly, it took a lot of time and a dash of creativity to figure out how to manage the distribution and collection of materials for the groups (the solution was numbered folders). Perhaps the biggest challenge for Rabinowitz was the sense that he was trying to problem-solve in a vacuum. “Both staff and faculty were willing to share ideas and solutions when I asked,” Rabinowitz said, “but I had a hard time finding people who were trying these methods in large classes. When I did, I realized that sometimes they had already developed resources that I really could have used — I just didn’t know they were out there. I’d like to see some sort of central place emerge where we could share our tools and experiences.” When I asked Rabinowitz why he decided to incorporate elements of team-based learning into his large enrollment course, he explained, “I feel very strongly that students learn best when they can take ownership of information, not just passively consume it. Explaining ideas to someone else, defending a position, building an argument — that helps you internalize what you’ve learned. Team-based learning is a way to get students learning by doing in a big humanities lecture course where we don’t have labs.” Lecture nevertheless has a prominent place in the course. Monday and Wednesday

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

class meetings are structured around lectures that review content. “On one level, I see myself in this class as a tour guide for a visit to a place that’s both familiar and strange. It’s like taking the students to a foreign country, though this one happens to be distant in time as well as space,” Rabinowitz said. As he lectures, however, Rabinowitz regularly pauses to ask and answer questions. Frequently, lectures morph into interactive discussions. Attendance in this large enrollment course is regularly more than 200 students and, not unexpectedly, in the fall 2012 version, grades on midterm exams and in the course were noticeably higher than usual. From what I observed in Rabinowitz’s class, his approach is working, but we need to hear more from UT students themselves. Have any students taken this class or another class that utilizes team-based learning? What experience did you have? Did you think it helped you to learn the course material better or more efficiently? Was it too much work? What is the value of team-based learning? Drawbacks? These are all questions we must answer going forward, and I am interested in hearing student responses. If you are interested in sharing yours, you can reach me at jebbeler@ austin.utexas.edu. Ebbeler is an associate professor in the department of classics from Claremont, Calif. Follow Ebbeler on Twitter @jenebbeler.

I feel very strongly that students learn best when they can take ownership of information, not just passively consume it. —Adam Rabinowitz, professor

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CHRIS HUMMER, SPORTS EDITOR / @texansports Wednesday, September 25, 2013

VOLLEYBALL Freshman setter Chloe Collins’ early success has been a pleasant surprise for coach Jerritt Elliott. The Cypress, Texas, native has played an important role in Texas’ 6-2 start this season.

Shelby Tauber Daily Texan Staff

Collins shines bright By Rachel Thompson @texansports

Chloe Collins remembers her first time on a volleyball court. She was a child in Cypress, Texas, clad in a YMCA uniform. “I remember the exact place and time,” Collins said. “[With] our little blue jerseys. I was in the back row.” Since then, the freshman setter has grown a few inches and swapped blue for burnt orange to become one of three freshmen on the defending national championship team. “Texas was always my number one school,” Collins said. “I committed really early. As soon as Texas offered, I took it.” Collins’ path to Texas

included a trip to Turkey for the 2011 FIVB World Championship as a member of the United States Girls’ Youth National Team. It also included an explosive senior season at Cypress Woods High School, where Collins helped catapult the team to a 40-4 record, contributing 305 kills, 51 aces, 318 digs, 1,313 assists and 62 blocks. That season landed her a spot among honorees on the Under Armour High School All-America First Team. Collins opted to leave Cypress Woods a semester early and enroll at Texas. “It was an all-around great decision,” Collins said. “I was able to get ahead in academics, as well as learning the offense and defense at Texas.”

As spring play commenced, Collins suited up and went onto the court without hesitating. In her first game at Gregory Gym, a 3-2 win over Wichita State in April, she tallied 18 assists, four kills and three digs. “We had the best friends here yelling and cheering and the atmosphere was amazing,” Collins said of her first game. “Having the support that we have here and the team being so supportive of us coming in is great.” The spring semester in Austin allowed Collins to fine-tune her competence on the court, as well as work on her time management skills, responsibility and priorities. She found a mentor in senior setter

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Hannah Allison, a team leader who helped pave the way for the Longhorns’ national championship. As the team’s fall schedule kicked off, Collins added a match-leading 33 assists against UTEP in Honolulu. Against Penn State, the No. 1 team in the country at the time, Collins added her first double-double of the season with 22 assists and 16 digs. Her second straight double-double came the following day against No. 2 Stanford. While Collins didn’t expect to contribute so much at the start of the season, head coach Jerritt Elliott quickly saw potential, calling her “one of the best pure athletes I have ever coached.”

Collins, who cranks up music and dances before games to shake out the jitters, has quickly established herself as an enthusiastic presence on the court. “It can be a little whiffer ball and I’ll get crunk on it because it’s a point,” Collins said. “Just being on the court really excites me because I have a passion.” While adjusting to college life and navigating the pressures of intense play make for a interesting set of challenges, Collins’ goals for her first season remain simple. “[To] better my team, learn my role more and continue to get better every day,” Collins said. Additional reporting by Evan Berkowitz

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continues from page 1 be able to contribute to that is a great feeling.” The Longhorns’ stellar defense has buoyed the offensive charge as the team has outhit opponents .242-.226 this season. That production has forced opponents into 38 more attack errors this season and spearheaded a 4-1 record against ranked opponents for Texas. “This team is really big on consistency, and I’ve improved in that as well by playing with my amazing teammates,” McCage said. “Everyone on the team has so much to contribute. I’m going to try my best to give them everything that I have, because they would and will do the same.” Although Iowa State is the only other team in the Big 12 ranked in the Top 25, the Longhorns know the road doesn’t get any easier. “We’re super excited. I feel like we ended preseason on a good note,” McCage said. “We’re ready to get back to the Big 12 and really ready to compete because we have a lot of in-state rivals, and I feel like that’ll prepare us well for the tournament.”

This team is really big on consistency, and I’ve improved in that as well by playing with my amazing teammates. Everyone on the team has so much to contribute. I’m going to try my best to give them everything that I have, because they would and will do the same. —Molly McCage, middle blocker

FOOTBALL | COLUMN

Who’s next in line for Texas with Brown on his way out? By Joe Capraro

Daily Texan Columnist @texansports

With last week’s win over Kansas State, head coach Mack Brown still has hope the Longhorns can run the table and win the Big 12. That dream will be shattered by early November and it seems likely that Brown will either resign or be fired at the season’s end. Let the rampant speculation as to who will coach next year begin. Candidate: Mack Brown Currently: University of Texas head coach Pluses: A UT legend. Longevity here means he knows almost all the three-letter building codes. Minuses: Just a 23-19 record since Colt McCoy hurt his shoulder. Chances: Likely none. Texas had to improve on last year’s 9-4 mark for Brown to keep boosters’ support. The win over Kansas State was impressive, but the meat of the schedule is still to come — 5 percent. Candidate: Nick Saban Currently: University of Alabama head coach Pluses: Four national championships, including three since Colt McCoy hurt his shoulder. Minuses: He may not stay very long, and we don’t know how he looks in burnt orange. Chances: Although Texas is one of a handful of programs that arguably occupy a higher position on the college football ladder than Alabama, Saban seems to have found his home in Tuscaloosa. But if he wins again this year, maybe he reaches for a higher rung —

David J. Phillip / Associated Press

Kevin Sumlin and Nick Saban are a couple of the coaches who could possibly make the move to Texas in 2014.

12 percent. Candidate: Will Muschamp Currently: University of Florida head coach Pluses: The former UT “coachin-waiting” is performing well in his internship at Florida. Minuses: Can we trust him to stay this time? Chances: This makes the most karmic sense, and it’s not a bad football move either — 27 percent. Candidate: Greg Schiano Currently: Tampa Bay Buccaneers head coach Pluses: Proven success at Rutgers, defensive-minded and an excellent recruiter. Minuses: May have culture shock after living his whole life in New Jersey, Chicago and Florida. Chances: The 0-3 record and locker room grumblings means he won’t survive the season with Tampa Bay, and it seems the college game is a better fit for him — 17 percent. Candidate: Bill O’Brien

Currently: Penn State University head coach Pluses: Took on an impossible task at Penn State and succeeded. Minuses: May be uncomfortable working in an environment not rife with institutional failures. Chances: He’ll be hard to pry away, but his sterling reputation means he’ll at least get a phone call — 11 percent. Candidate: Kevin Sumlin Currently: Texas A&M head coach Pluses: Stellar record, impeccable resume and reputation. Minuses: He’s an Aggie. Chances: He’s deserving and would be a fine choice, but he already makes $3.1 million and might not be ready to leave College Station — 18 percent. Candidate: The field It’s doubtful the search pool will include any unknowns or first-time head coaches. The agents for Brett Bielema, Mark Richt and Art Briles will probably all get phone calls. Chances: 10 percent.


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6

SARAH GRACE SWEENEY, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR / @DailyTexanArts Wednesday, September 25, 2013

EVENT PREVIEW

‘Barbie’ reports the news

6

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

By Elena Keltner @elenaket

Barbie may be a childhood toy, but her name is also the term Mary Bock gives to women in the video journalism industry today. “We have women who are still expected to uphold very unrealistic beauty standards while also doing this very physical job,” said Bock, assistant professor of journalism at UT and author of “Video Journalism: Beyond the One-Man Band.” Bock, who had a 20-year career in television journalism before becoming a professor, will give a talk Wednesday titled “Barbie is a Zombie: Women, TV Journalism, and the Rise of the One-WOMAN-Band.” Barbie, in Bock’s eyes, refers to the physical appearance of women in television journalism after they have been dolled-up and given extensive makeup and hair treatments. Bock thought the expectation for women to look like Barbie would die away, but so far that hasn’t been the case. “Women have a much tougher task,” Bock said. “They are carrying shoes into the field. Their gear bags have not only their makeup kits and their hair kits, but they also now have to carry an extra pair of shoes.” According to Bock, being a female television journalist who is attractive has even more challenges. “Actually, some of the prettiest women have had the hardest time being taken seriously,” Bock said. “Jessica Savitch was brilliant, but was treated like an idiot because she was very, very beautiful … The idea is that if you are beautiful then you are not thinking.” Kate Dawson, senior lecturer in the broadcast journalism department, noticed the pressure women felt to achieve physical perfection in her career as a television journalist. “I was at Fox News Channel, where certainly we had correspondents who felt pressure to look younger,” Dawson said. “They did Botox. The idea that you have to stay young and attractive is really important.” Kris Wilson, also a senior

Mark Lennihan / Associated Press

Vincent Nguyen, editor-in-chief of SlashGear, wears Google Glass while covering the introduction of the Microsoft Surface

Wearable tech unites fashion, innovations By Jeremy Hintz @jeremy_hintz

Illustration by Alex Dolan / Daily Texan Staff

lecturer in the broadcast journalism department, said men do not face the same challenges to appear young. “Men can age on TV, but if a woman starts to age she gets taken off the air,” Wilson said. Bock is concerned a woman’s physical appearance will always be important in television journalism. “I’m not optimistic at this time, mostly because most news is still commercially supported, so ratings matter and faces matter,” Bock said. Nina Hernandez, a senior journalism major and

former student of Bock’s, is also worried about future working conditions for female television journalists. “The way that TV news is run, the way that any news is run, the standards are only going to get higher, and the conditions are only going to get worse,” Hernandez said. Bock said audiences also face a problem when pressure is put on women in broadcast journalism to achieve physical perfection. “It’s not only a problem for the women who are being the journalists, it’s a problem for

MARY BOCK

What: “Barbie is a Zombie: Women, TV Journalism, and the Rise of the One-WOMAN-Band” When: Wednesday from 3:30 p.m. - 5 p.m. Where: Burdine Hall, Room 214 Cost: Free

people who have unrealistic expectations,” Bock said. “It’s a problem for the audience. It perpetuates the notion that it’s our job to decorate the world. And it’s not our job to decorate the world.”

Wearable tech brings users one step closer to being glued to their devices by integrating technology into clothing and accessories. Wearable tech is not a new concept, but it has grown in popularity and general relevance the past two years, going back to when Google unveiled Google Glass at their annual I/O conference in 2012. Glass and Samsung Galaxy Gear are the two devices most touted by the tech community, but both are generally considered unattractive to those outside the community. “It’s not our forte,” computer science associate professor Kristen Grauman said. “We don’t always know how to make the best design or [user interface] or what have you. We think about it and recognize the importance, but it somewhat falls outside our scope.” Wearable tech combines two industries with very different dynamics and skill sets: tech and fashion. “We don’t know everything about computer science,” textiles and apparel lecturer Karen Bravo said. “You’re always going to have computer scientists inventing these new innovations, but unless there are talented designers working on these products to make them more appealing to real humans, they’re not going anywhere.” Bravo teaches an apparel design class where students integrate technology into their designs. Students make pieces

BANNED

—Karen Bravo, textiles and apparel lecturer

such as jackets with blinkers for cyclists or hoods with cameras built into them for action sports athletes. “It’s where that line is between arts and design,” Bravo said. “We don’t want to just make it good to look at. It has to be used by real humans for a real purpose.” Tilde Snyder, a student in Bravo’s class, plans on integrating microphones and cameras into her garments to create active wear that can be used as a field recording device. “I’m researching available technology and how to incorporate it without sacrificing aesthetics,” Snyder said. “As a former [computer science] major, I’m very interested in the intersection between the two fields.” Wearable tech faces some major challenges in order to make its way into the daily lives of American consumers. It will take time to iron out the new technology and design methodologies. But there is no denying that wearable tech is quickly becoming a hot new trend. “It’s exciting and it’s current,” Bravo said. “It’s what people want to do now.” Professors Lance Bertelsen and assistant instructors Maley Thompson and Sara Saylor pose with their favorite banned and challenged books. 464 books were challenged in the U.S. last year.

continues from page 1 school age, or younger readers, is partly that it represents sexuality in picture form. It’s really one of my favorite books across the board. It just happens to be banned. In particular, this is a story about a young woman who goes to college and experiences some major challenges in the way she understands her own sexuality and her relationship to her family.” Maley Thompson, English, “The Witches” “I would say my favorite banned book is ‘The Witches’ by Roald Dahl. It is a children’s book, but it is so funny, and it is so scary, and it is so engaging and it takes you away to this other world. I remember reading it and other Roald Dahl books as a child and again as an adult, and he really captures what it’s like to be a child in a scary world. This book was banned because it said witches could only be female. Books get banned for smaller reasons

We don’t want to just make it good to look at. It has to be used by real humans for a real purpose.

Photos by Jonathan Garza, Gabriella Belzer and Debby Garcia Daily Texan Staff

than that. People should be able to determine for [themselves] and I guess for their own children what constitutes a useful book.” Lance Bertelsen, English, “Essay on Woman” “My favorite is a poem called ‘Essay on Woman’ by John Wilkes, a famous radical politician in 18th century Britain. It’s a lewd parody

of Alexander Pope’s famous poem called ‘Essay on Man.’ It was so notorious that Wilkes was actually prosecuted by the House of Lords for its publication. Not a lot of people know about it, and it’s pretty funny, so if you do know about Pope’s ‘Essay on Man’ you can see the kind of crazy things that Wilkes is doing with it. And then there’s a lot of inside stuff

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that wouldn’t mean a lot to the general public that makes it interesting as well.” Julia Mickenberg, American Studies, “Harriet the Spy” “I started looking at some list of banned books, and it’s amazing how many there are to choose from, but I picked ‘Harriet the Spy,’ partly because one of my

specialties is children’s literature. It’s my favorite for some of the same reasons it was banned. At the end, Ole Golly, her nurse, tells her sometimes you have to lie. But the book, I think, as a whole is controversial because it sets up a new dynamic between adults and children that had not been seen before. I think it’s great literature, and it gives great

insight into how some people were starting to think about children and the role of children and adults in the 1960s.” In honor of National Banned Books Week, UT’s English department will host a Banned Book Q&A Session on Sept. 26 in the Perry-Castaneda Library between students and censorship experts.

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The Daily Texan 2013-09-25