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Friday, September 13, 2013

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UNIVERSITY

Engineering center’s funds approved By Jacob Kerr @jacobrkerr

The UT System Board of Regents unanimously approved new funding for the planned Engineering Education and Research Center on Thursday, allowing UT to start working on the project this semester. Funding for the $310 million project, which was initially approved by the regents in 2010, became an issue earlier this year when it did not receive a tuition revenue bond because of disagreement between the House

and the Senate during the final days of the legislative session. The tuition revenue bond proposal was not discussed in any of the three special sessions this summer because Gov. Rick Perry did not place it on the legislative agenda. “This is obviously a very important project. It’s an exciting day for UT and the whole UT family,” board Chairman Paul Foster said at the meeting. “We obviously have had some challenges and appreciate what everyone has done to come up with this plan.”

Under the regents’ new plan, the University will be responsible for providing an initial $50 million in donations to go toward the project. Over the course of the project, the University will have to pay a total of $105 million in bonds. The UT System will loan UT up to $55 million initially and will pay a total of $95 million over the course of the project in bond debt. The system’s loan and contribution will come from

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Photo courtesy of UT System

The Engineering Education and Research Center, which received funding Thursday, will allow space to add approximately 1,000 more undergraduate students.

By Amanda Voeller @Amandaliz94

Students and employees at apartment complexes along the Cameron Road and Wickersham Lane bus routes may have to adapt to the closure of the shuttle routes near their apartments. Capital Metro is considering closing the Wickersham Lane UT shuttle route and altering the Cameron Road UT shuttle route to serve only the Camino La Costa area beginning in the spring semester. This revision would only last until the end of spring 2014 when the Cameron Road route would be canceled altogether. The average number of daily riders on the Cameron Road shuttle in spring 2013 was 870 and 880 on the Wickersham Lane shuttle, according to CapMetro. This is a decrease from the previous semester. Cameron Road’s route served an average of 960 people each day

Shelby Tauber / Daily Texan Staff

History doctoral candidate Jason Morgan waits for the Cameron Road shuttle to arrive Thursday afternoon. Capital Metro is considering closing the UT Wickersham Lane shuttle route and altering the Cameron Road UT shuttle route beginning in the spring.

Austin proposes plan to lessen MoPac traffic By Anthony Green @littletoastboy

In a recent study of traffic patterns across the globe, Austin ranked fourth in cities with the worst traffic, even surpassing New York City. Transit developments such as the MoPac Improvement Project will aim to fix to that. The MoPac Improvement Project is a transit development project fostered by a partnership between the Texas Department of Transportation and the Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority. The completed project will add express lanes, sound walls and bicycle and pedestrian facilities to MoPac highway from Cesar Chavez Street going north to Parmer Lane. “There’s no one-size-fits-all to traffic solutions, but it’s going to be a very important step in untangling the congestion we have in the city area,” said Chris Bishop, spokesman for the Austin Branch of the Texas Department of Transportation.

Traffic problems within Austin are nothing new, but have recently become more severe, with INRIX — the group that conducted the traffic survey — reporting that Austin has jumped from eighth to fourth in traffic congestion nationally since 2011. Danielle Hamilton, biology sophomore and Austin native, has long experienced the woes of the local rush hour. “The traffic is ridiculous,” Hamilton said. “If I were to be going to an interview and needed to take the highways, I would have to leave like 20 minutes earlier than usual.” The escalating number of traffic problems may be largely attributed to the influx of new residents attracted by the local economic boom. “I think when you look at the economic data, Austin is one of the fastest growing and economically vibrant places in the country.” said Steve Pustelnyk,

MOPAC page 2

UT System investment linked back to chancellor @bobbycblanchard

Canceled routes would strand students

CITY

SYSTEM

By Bobby Blanchard

CITY

BUSES page 2

bit.ly/dtvid

Behind the fresh, glamorous exteriors of the newly built private off-campus dorm, The Callaway House, is American Campus Communities, a private student housing developer that the UT System has invested more than a million dollars in. And sitting at the top of American Campus Communities is R.D. Burck, the chairman of the board of directors for American Campus Communities — and a former UT System chancellor. The University of Texas Investment Management Company, an external investment company that manages investments for the UT and The Texas A&M University systems, invested in American Campus Communities in 2008. Currently, UTIMCO owns stock in American Campus Communities valued at more than $1.5 million, according to the company’s latest audit reports from 2012. The investment was made with the Permanent University Fund, a state endowment that funds a part of the systems’ budgets. As chancellor, Burck served on UTIMCO’s board of directors beginning in 2000. While Burck stepped down as chancellor in 2002, he continued to serve on the board until 2005. Burck became a chairman of the board of directors of American Campus Communities in 2004. UTIMCO spokeswoman Christy Wallace said the investment company does not

BURCK page 2

PHOTO BRIEFLY

Shelby Tauber / Daily Texan Staff

UT hosts Food Network show host Ina Garten

Ina Garten, New York Times best selling cookbook author and Emmy-winning host of the Food Network’s

“Barefoot Contessa,” spoke with Texas Monthly’s Patricia Sharpe at Bass Concert Hall on Thursday evening. Food-lovers and Garten fans from all over Austin at-

tended the event to learn how “Barefoot Contessa” really began. Garten shared her story of leaving her budget analyst job in Washington, D.C. In 1978 Garten began

NEWS

OPINION

SPORTS

LIFE&ARTS

ONLINE

Islamaphobia from the Crusades to 9/11. ONLINE

Workers in West Campus deserve fair treatment. PAGE 4

No. 2 Volleyball faces Arizona State, No. 14 Illinois. PAGE 3

Olivia Wilde charms in “Drinking Buddies.” PAGE 5

Austin-based artist makes sexually charged paintings.

James Jackson gives a toxicology seminar on cancer. ONLINE

Horns Up to the UT System Board of Regents. PAGE 4

Soccer heads to Colorado for two games. PAGE 3

“Insidious: Chapter 2” is a disappointing sequel. PAGE 5

dailytexanonline.com

a new life in East Hampton, N.Y., as a store owner of 400 square-foot complex called “Barefoot Contessa.” —Erika Storli

REASON TO PARTY

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MOPAC

FRAMES featured photo

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Volume 114, Issue 22

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor Laura Wright (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Shabab Siddiqui (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@ gmail.com Sports Office (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com

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The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

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TOMORROW’S WEATHER Low High

98

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Happy birthday, Rachel!

Fabian Fernandez / Daily Texan Staff

Early Childhood Center student Grant White plays on the playground with his friends Thursday afternoon.

Life & Arts Office (512) 232-2209 dtlifeandarts@gmail.com

revenue financing system bond proceeds. About $105 million from the Permanent University Fund and $5 million in Unexpended Plant Funds will go toward the building. These contributions were part of the original funding plan and did not change. President William Powers Jr. criticized the state’s method of funding construction projects in his State of the University Address on Wednesday. “What this does allow us to do is to get going on the building,” Powers said at the meeting Thursday. “If we wait, we are very likely to have increased costs.” According to UT spokesman Gary Susswein, the University has already raised $35 million in gifts toward the building and has an additional $30 million lined up in verbal commitments. “We have about $65 million already,” Susswein said. “[It] is more than we have ever raised for any building in UT-Austin history.” The building will replace the Engineering-Science Building as well as temporary facilities at the engineering complex. With the new facility, the Cockrell School of Engineering will be able to add 1,000 more undergraduate students as

BUSES

well as increase its faculty. Gregory Fenves, the outgoing Cockrell School of Engineering dean, said the new building will allow for more project-based learning and interdisciplinary research. “This building absolutely is essential for developing our future engineering education programs,” Fenves said. “Our facilities, which are 25 to 50 years old, were never designed for this type of engineering education.” Fenves said the University will immediately begin scheduling the project. The first phase of the project is expected to begin this semester. Fenves said after the Engineering-Science Building is demolished in either December 2014 or January 2015, construction on the new building would begin and last two-and-a-half to three years. Fenves, who will begin serving as executive vice president and provost of the University on Oct. 1, expects the new facility to be completed by 2018.

continues from page 1 in fall 2012, and Wickersham Lane’s route served an average of 1090, CapMetro said. According to CapMetro, the transportation system uses information gathered from UT to determine how many students live on each particular shuttle route. Courtney Kinsey, manager of the Villas of La Costa apartment complex, said she thinks this information is flawed. “They’re basing that number off of what address UT students are giving UT, and a lot of them are going to use their parents’ address,” Kinsey said. Margaret Demirs, MacKenzie Pointe apartment complex employee, said although CapMetro is considering revising the Cameron Road shuttle route, the eventual closure of the route would negatively impact the students who live at MacKenzie Pointe. “That is a good concession, but I think it’s just going to

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The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 4711865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

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Member of

Chancellor

Executive commitee of the chancellor

Manages

UT Investment Management Company

Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Wright Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands, Pete Stroud Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shabab Siddiqui Associate Managing Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon, Kelsey McKinney News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarah White Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 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Jack Mitts Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hirrah Barlas, Omar Longoria, Jenny Messer Multimedia Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pu Ying Huang, Alec Wyman Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chelsea Purgahn Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gabriella Belzer, Sam Ortega, Charlie Pearce, Shelby Tauber Senior Videographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor Barron, Jackie Kuentsler, Dan Resler Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sarah Grace Sweeney Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Smothers, Alex Williams Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Stuart Railey, Elizabeth Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Hummer Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stefan Scarfield Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Evan Berkowitz, Garrett Callahan, Brittany Lamas, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peter Sblendorio, Matt Warden Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephanie Vanicek Senior Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cody Bubenik, Ploy Buraparate, Hannah Hadidi, Aaron Rodriguez Director of Technical Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayley Fick Special Ventures Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alexa Ura Special Ventures Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Christine Ayala, Hannah Smothers, Zachary Strain Enterprise Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard, Jordan Rudner Social Media Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katie Paschall Journalism Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Michael Brick

Matthew Guthrie said if the Wickersham Lane bus route is canceled, taking the 100 bus would double his commute time. Shultz said she would be okay with CapMetro changing the Cameron Road route to only go as far north as Camino La Costa, and she does not blame CapMetro for proposing to cancel the two routes. According to CapMetro, the University has not increased funds for the shuttles in the past several years. If the routes are canceled, students will have to walk farther to get to a different bus stop, and some students, including Shultz, are worried that the area is not safe. “The St. John’s area is not really well known for being a nice, safe area like our neighborhood on the bus route is,” Shultz said. A public hearing will be held on Sept. 16, and the CapMetro Board of Directors will consider the proposed changes at a meeting on Sept. 23.

Invests in

Sponsors

Serves as chairman of board of directors

director of Community Relations for the MoPac Improvement Project. “When you have that sort of situation you’re going to have more people on the road, which creates additional challenges in regards to mobility for new and long-standing residents of the area.” Zack Buschmann, a computer science sophomore who frequently visits his brother in North Austin off MoPac, said he would be enthusiastic about any effort to improve the commuter experience. “Any kind of improvement project for the roads here has my support,” Buschmann said. “I just hope the project sticks to its timetable — lots of roads around here seem to just be perpetually under construction.” Pustelnyk said he is hopeful Austin commuters will begin experiencing less severe traffic in the near future. “We expect drivers to be taking advantage of the new facilities in late 2015,” Pustelnyk said.

hit us in the future,” Demirs said. “We’ll adapt, we’ll make it, but we just don’t think it’s fair to our residents. We’re not happy about that.” Kinsey said if the Cameron Road bus route is canceled, it will affect how they advertise the Villas of La Costa apartments. “We won’t market [to students] as much as we do now, especially because in a lot of our advertising, we do advertise that we’re right across the street from the shuttle,” Kinsey said. “I don’t know if [we] will appeal to students as much as we do right now.” Biology senior April Shultz said it is likely she would move to a different apartment that is on a UT bus route. Students who use the Wickersham Lane shuttle would still have access to the University via routes 20 and 100, said CapMetro Communications Specialist Melissa Ayala. Physics graduate student

American Campus Communities

R.D. Burck

NEWS

Serves on board of directors Advises

Francisco Cigarroa

BURCK continues from page 1 purchase stock directly but instead hires investment managers. These managers cannot invest in companies on a restricted list, which includes companies associated with members of UTIMCO’s board of directors. “[American Campus Communities] public equity securities were on the restricted list when Mr. Burck was on the UTIMCO board, so none of UTIMCO’s investment managers held any of their securities at that time,” Wallace said. “As Mr. Burck is no longer chancelCOLLEGE SKI & BOARD WEEK breckenridge

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lor or on the UTIMCO board, [American Campus Communities] securities are no longer on the restricted list.” Burck is not employed by American Campus Communities and instead represents the company’s shareholders as an independent chairman, according to American Campus Communities spokeswoman Gina Cowart. UTIMCO is one of the shareholders Burck now represents. “What an independent board member means is there is no affiliation with the company and no employment,” Cowart said. “That’s an important distinction.” Burck is currently a member of the Executive Committee of the University of Texas Chancellor’s Council, which advises the current chancellor, Francisco Cigarroa. Cigarroa and several other regents sit on UTIMCO’s board of directors. UT System spokeswoman Jenny LaCoste-Caputo declined to comment and instead

deferred questions regarding investments and a possible conflict of interest to UTIMCO. This year, American Campus Communities opened a private off-campus dorm, The Callaway House, in West Campus and now owns six other apartment complexes in the area. The company, which owns complexes across the United States, also recently became the “Official Student Housing Sponsor of UT Athletics,” which allows the properties to use the University’s Longhorn logo. “Our properties have no formal relationship with the University of Texas other than our sincere desire to be a good neighbor,” Cowart said. While UTIMCO has invested in American Campus Communities, Burck has been openly critical of the UT regents. The former chancellor wrote an editorial during the height of the recent conflict between the regents and the University in February. In

Our properties have no formal relationship with The University of Texas other than our sincere desire to be a good neighbor. —Gina Cowart, American Campus Communities spokeswoman

the editorial, Burck said some of the regents have not fulfilled their duties. “Some of the most recent regents selected by the governor have worked to dilute, undermine and even attack the mission that they swore to protect,” Burck said in his editorial that ran in the Austin AmericanStatesman. “We need regents who respect the diversity of those interests and support the institutions in their quest to achieve their missions.”


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CHRIS HUMMER, SPORTS EDITOR / @texansports Friday, September 13, 2013

VOLLEYBALL

SOCCER

Longhorns ready for road-trip redemption By Brittany Lamas @brittany_lamas

Shelby Tauber / Daily Texan Staff

Texas volleyball faces Arizona State and No. 14 Illinois this weekend with the hopes of continuing its win streak after beating both Penn State and Stanford at home.

Texas hopes for continued success By Matt Warden @texansports

After knocking off the top two teams in the country, the road for Texas holds more challenge this weekend. The second-ranked Longhorns will travel to Illinois to take on Arizona State and No. 14 Illinois. Despite a climb back up the rankings, the Longhorns still have no room for relaxation. “Our focus is making sure the team does not have big heads and think they are ‘all that,’” head coach Jerritt Elliott said. “We have got to get back, ready to battle because both teams that we are competing against this weekend are more than ready for us.” Although this year’s temperament is different from last

season’s national championship team, it shows an ability to thrive in the clutch with a five-set win over Penn State and a four-set victory over Stanford. One-hundred and two kills combined in those matches verifies the potency of the Texas offense, but changes need to be made to sustain that level of play. “Both of those games could have gone either way,” sophomore Amy Neal said. “There are some areas in the game that we still need to work on because clearly we were a little rough at times, but it helps our confidence knowing we can be really good.” The gray areas in the Longhorns’ success last weekend were plays at the net and their defense on the middle of the floor. Stanford

tallied eight blocks to seven for Texas, which snapped the team’s streak of threeconsecutive matches of out blocking opponents. Similar to the third set against Penn State, the second set against Stanford saw Texas surrender 18 kills while being outhit .273 to .146. The rowdy environment at Gregory Gym did a lot to help Texas shake off slow starts, but that luxury will be absent this weekend. “We just have to keep up our energy and keep that focus level,” sophomore Molly McCage said. “When we’re put in stressful environments, we can still come out of it with a win.” All negatives aside, the Longhorns should carry an abundance of confidence into this weekend’s matches. Haley Eckerman, the 2012

TENNIS

Begley set for senior season By Christopher Caraveo struggles in the past, that @ChrisCaraveo31

Elizabeth Begley waits in anticipation of senior day, when her family and friends will come to celebrate her time at Texas. If not for her parents who supported her, that day may have never been in her sight. As a child, Begley participated in basketball, soccer and tennis. Her parents attended all of her games and supported her fully. Most importantly, they never pressured her to focus solely on tennis. “I’ve always had a racket in my hand,” Begley said. “I played different sports as a kid, but I really wanted to play tennis.” Begley started playing competitively at age 7. Her parents put her in tournaments because she had the itch to compete. Her parents’ support carried over into her college career at Texas. They attend almost all of her matches, and include her teammates in their frequent family dinners and events. “They’re so supportive,” Begley said. “They say certain things, like inside jokes that remind me of big

help me push through when I’m down.” This season Begley will take on responsibilities she never had to worry about as an underclassman. As a team leader, she organizes practice and is responsible for pushing her teammates, including junior Annat Rabinovich. “I played right next to her in one of my first dual matches last year,” Rabinovich said. “It was one of my best life experiences because I was nervous and having Elizabeth next to me made me feel less nervous. I was pumped up because she was cheering for me and was always there for me.” Begley has a newfound appreciation for her coaches because of the work it takes to organize a team and the role they play in improving her as a player. “They’ve found angles in my backhand that no one else has seen before,” Begley said. “If anyone knows how to develop a tennis player, it’s Patty. My coaches are one of the reasons why I want to go into college coaching.” But Patty Fendick-McCain wants to see her on the court as long as possible.

“I’d like to see her pursue tennis as far as it takes her before she makes that move, but she’s already showing great leadership skills as a role model, her work ethic and understanding of the game,” Fendick-McCain said. Begley heads into this weekend’s Duke Invitational after a summer of nonstop tennis preparation. This summer, Begley competed in six tournaments and trained in the Texas heat, which included track exercises to improve her court mobility. On the night before the match, Begley will prepare the same way she always has — by loading up on carbohydrates. On game day, she will go through the longest warm-up of anyone on the team. With plenty of orange Gatorade and blueberry Clif Bars in her bag, she will be ready. The season presents a challenge to Begley, as she attempts to fill the shoes Aeriel Ellis left behind after an impressive four-year career. “She was small, but she had big feet,” Begley said. “I know I can’t replicate what she did, but there is an unknown factor of what I can do.”

Player of the Year, and Bailey Webster continue to buoy the Texas attack, already amassing 58 and 61 total kills respectively. Young players such as Neal, with her 25 kills, and freshman Chloe Collins, who holds a team-high 98 assists, have given the team a needed boost to push toward another successful season. Three of the Longhorns’ five matches this season have come against ranked opponents, and the Fighting Illini bring the same challenge at home in Urbana-Champagne, Ill. Texas has outhit its opponents .239 to .234 thus far, which tells the tale of competition. If Texas can continue its relentless attack this weekend, its chances at claiming another NCAA title become more convincing.

Texas soccer will face off against the Air Force Academy and Colorado College this weekend in Colorado for its second road trip of the season, after sweeping two home matches in its last outings. In their last road trip, the Longhorns lost both games despite outshooting their opponents. Last weekend, the Longhorns were able to capitalize on a total 32 shots to beat Samford 2-0 and top Illinois State 2-1. Before the home stand, Texas had outshot opponents 62-29 on the season but only had one win to show for it. Texas will play the Air Force Falcons, who hold a 1-3-1 record this season, on Friday. The team won its first match Sept. 8, beating Grand Canyon 1-0. The Falcons finished 5-9-3 in the Mountain West Conference in 2012. Freshman Ashley Greco has been consistent through her first five career games, assisting on all three of the Falcons’ goals. Senior goalkeeper Kelly Stambaugh leads the Academy record in goals-against average, or goals allowed per 60 minutes of play, at 1.06. Stambaugh also ranks second in career shutouts with 14, and third in wins, minutes and saves for the program. The Colorado College Tigers go into the weekend holding a 2-3-0 record so far this season, but will play a match against Ball State University on Friday before Sunday’s matchup against Texas. The Tigers competed

Sharis Lachappelle Midfielder

in the Marquette Tournament last weekend, splitting their two matches with a 2-0 win over Loyola University of Chicago followed by a 3-1 loss to Marquette. Senior Lynn Froetscher has one goal and three assists, but sophomore Sarah Schweiss and freshman Chanisse Hendrix have two goals apiece on the season. On offense, Texas will rely on junior midfielder Sharis Lachappelle, who totaled six shots and her first goal of 2013 against Illinois State, and junior Brooke Gilbert, who tallied her team-leading third goal in the same game. The Longhorns will also look to freshman defender Isabelle Kerr, who recorded an assist in the game and earned Big 12 Newcomer of the Week honors. Sophomore goalkeeper Abby Smith stepped up against Illinois State, blocking a penalty kick in the 87th minute and recording three saves, securing her ninth career shutout. Those performances earned her Big 12 Defensive Player of the Week. Smith has played every minute in goal for the Longhorns in 2013 and features a .80 goals-against average.

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4A OPINION

4

LAURA WRIGHT, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / @TEXANEDITORIAL Friday, September 13, 2013

EDITORIAL

Worker mistreatment in West Campus must stop Current freshmen not withstanding, UT students couldn’t have missed the new high-rise apartment complexes being built in West Campus last year. However, beneath the cranes and exposed beams of 2400 Nueces and The Callaway House, it has been alleged that construction workers suffered repeated and systemic mistreatment by their employers. As The Daily Texan reported on Sept. 6, construction workers have filed complaints with the City of Austin alleging that the contractors overseeing the two sites denied them breaks and water throughout their daylong shifts. Austin — although not the state of Texas — requires that workers be given 10-minute breaks for every four hours of work. In an interview with the Texan, one worker at 2400 Nueces anonymously attested that he and his fellow workers had not been given any health insurance or workers’ compensation. “We had no safety, no water, no breaks — nothing,” he said. “They just wanted to finish the job fast.” During construction, a different worker fell six stories, injuring himself and two others. All three received treatment at a hospital. Workers have made other charges of ill treatment at The Callaway House. Workers Defense Project, a nonprofit representing Texas construction workers, has won more than $60,000 in unpaid wages from HarveyCleary, the site’s contractor. These accusations are not unusual.

According to a report by faculty from UT and the University of Illinois at Chicago along with Workers Defense Project, 39 percent of surveyed Texas workers said they had been denied breaks. Fifty-nine percent said they had not been provided with water. Seventy-eight percent said they did not have health insurance. Sixty percent said they had received no safety training. Forty-one percent — as well as the 2400 Nueces worker who spoke to the Texan — claimed that they had previously been victims of a workplace fraud in which construction workers are misclassified as contractors. This misclassification often prevents them from receiving overtime pay, safety equipment or health insurance, since under this designation they are legally perceived as “self-employed” and therefore responsible for their own benefits and equipment. More than half of workers also reported earning poverty-level wages, and 22 percent claimed to have been denied pay entirely. State government protections for workers are sorely lacking. However, the UT System itself employs a remarkably exhaustive vetting process when picking firms to build campus buildings. Dave Dixon, the executive director of UT’s Office of Facilities Planning and Construction, told the Texan that the UT System requires prospective contractors for its projects to undergo a multi-step safety verification process. In consequence, the UT System typically scores higher than its peers in

“Could you please stop pretending the Arab Spring was all about a ‘free, democratic, pluFRIDAY FIRING LINES ralistic, inclusive, secular.... ” blah, blah, blah? You know and I know the Arab Spring led to the downfall of hideous dictators only to be replaced by hideous theocrats. If the Arab Spring taught us anything, it taught us that Islam and ‘free, democratic, pluralistic, inclusive, secular...’ ideals cannot coexist.” - From commenter “Arafat” on guest column “Why the U.S. should intervene in Syria.”

Occupational Safety and Health Administration safety metrics by 40-60 percent. We would like to have that same standard of scrutiny applied to off-campus projects that are set up to serve students. UT could have some leverage to bear on some of those projects. The land for 2400 Nueces is owned by UT and leased to EdR, the student housing company that owns and manages the complex. It’s not a great leap to imagine that lease and others like it be-

ing contingent on safe and fair building practices. Indeed, one wonders why they aren’t already. Moreover, when choosing housing, students should be aware that their comfortable apartment may be made affordable by the hard work and unrecorded abuses of construction workers. By choosing to live in a complex that has a history of mistreating workers, students may be making it harder for more responsible builders to survive in the market.

Zachary Strain / Daily Texan Staff

COLUMN

Friday Firing Lines: Football Co-op housing provides safe, frustrations, traffic and trains affordable option for students

Every Friday, the Daily Texan editorial board will publish a selection of tweets and online comments culled from the Daily Texan website and the various Daily Texan Twitter accounts, along with direct submissions from readers. Our intention is to continue the tradition of the Firing Line, a column first started in the Texan in 1909, in which readers share their opinions “concerning any matter of general interest they choose.” Just like in 1909, the Texan “will never express its approval or disapproval of opinions given under the [Firing Line] header.” In other words, take your shot. Submissions can be sent to firingline@dailytexanonline.com.

FOOTBALL FOLLIES

ARAB SPRING

“Why did we reassign Diaz instead of firing him? We hand out participation awards at UT?” - Commenter “Uh Oh” on the response to the Longhorns’ performance on defense against the BYU Cougars last Saturday.

“Could you please stop pretending the Arab Spring was all about a ‘free, democratic, pluralistic, inclusive, secular....” blah, blah, blah? You know and I know the Arab Spring led to the downfall of hideous dictators only to be replaced by hideous theocrats. If the Arab Spring taught us anything, it taught us that Islam and ‘free, democratic, pluralistic, inclusive, secular...’ ideals cannot coexist.” - From commenter “Arafat” on guest column “Why the U.S. should intervene in Syria.”

“Because Mack can’t actually ‘fire’ someone...because he has no spine.” - John Ramsey on Twitter in response to the news of Manny Diaz’s reassignment. “Racking weights? Scoreboard operator? North End concessions assistant manager?” - John Adolph on Twitter with suggestions for Manny Diaz’s new position in the athletics department.

TRAFFIC’S NOT THAT BAD “Austin’s traffic isn’t even comparable to the terrifying hellhole that is New York traffic.” - From Hailey Brecosky on Twitter on the news that Austin traffic has been ranked as worse than New York gridlock.

TEXAN’S GOT NO CLASS “This is just the most inappropriate and classless article I have ever read by The Daily Texan!” - From commenter “Tyler” on our website in response to Sexy Sally, the first of four new Daily Texan sex columns.

TRAIN TROUBLES “The LSTAR service plan for the last three years has featured local service, stopping at all 16 (or more) stations, and a downtown Austin to downtown San Antonio express service in the peak periods (stopping at San Marcos and New Braunfels en route). Not sure where the speed references came from. Maximum speed for the LSTAR at deployment will be 79 mph for all trains; the District will incrementally increase speeds as demand justifies and in cooperation with Union Pacific. The maximum theoretical speed, given the alignment’s curvature and grades, is 110 mph.” - Commenter “Jay_Bee67” on a “reporting error” in a story on a plan to build a commuter rail line connecting Austin and San Antonio.

HORNS DOWN: CARNEY’S TOO STUPID TO TWEET Dave Carney, an adviser to Texas Attorney General and gubernatorial candidate Greg Abbott, got into hot water Thursday by retweeting a link titled “Total Recall in CO (and why Wendy Davis is too stupid to be governor).” The post the tweet linked to referred to Davis as “retard barbie” — this after Abbott was slammed last month for responding positively to a tweet from a supporter that referred to Davis by the same disparaging name. While we have no problem with political candidates or their personnel disparaging each other’s intelligence, we don’t think “retard barbie” is an acceptable term to use in any context.

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Mark Birkenstock Guest Columnist As freshmen are settling into their dorms or off-campus apartments this semester, many will discover that some inconveniences become apparent once the novel shine wears off their new homes away from home. Maybe your upstairs neighbors insist on partying until 3 a.m. on a Wednesday night. Or perhaps your quaint North Austin condo has equally quaint plumbing, and your landlord has adopted a decidedly relaxed attitude toward fixing it. But there’s nothing you can do about that, right? Especially if you want to live close to campus, it’s just accepted that you have to pay a high price for a mediocre living space. Faced with this bleak landscape, I found an appealing alternative to typical student housing: co-ops. This year I am living at the Taos Student Housing Cooperative — one of seven co-ops that make up the College Houses cooperative organization — and I’m happy to confirm that cooperative living is definitely worthy of consideration for any student living in Austin. Austin is home to many jointly-owned, student-run housing cooperatives that offer students affordable living space close to campus and allow residents to assume direct responsibility for keeping their housing looking nice and running smoothly. In addition to the seven College Houses, there are nine co-ops operating as part of the Inter-Cooperative Council, as well as some other independent co-ops. While rules vary between each house, co-op residents are generally expected to contribute a handful of hours each week to clean communal spaces, cook meals and help out with anything else their house needs to stay functioning. It may not seem appealing to have to cook and clean in between doing homework and studying, but cooperative living does bestow some great benefits. Co-opers are never beholden to the whims of a lazy super when something needs fixing. And if your neighbor is too loud, you can bring them to task during regular house meetings. The Taos

Co-op also has designated “quiet hours” during which it is agreed that everyone needs to turn down the music and let others sleep, a courtesy sorely lacking in dorm life. Austin’s co-ops also work hard to keep rent low for students. The cost of living at a College Houses co-op is, on average, about half the price of living at the UT dorms. That price includes utilities, meals and a wellstocked pantry and fridge. “I like the fact that many resources which I could not afford became available to me by living in a co-op,” said Nathan Prisco, chemical engineering senior and director of Taos Student Housing Cooperative. “[We] always have a fully stocked kitchen with crates of avocados. We have almost every cable channel imaginable.” Living in a co-op is also a great way to take part in the larger cooperative movement, which encompasses much more than just housing. Any business in any industry can be organized as a cooperative, valuing its members and its community as much as its bottom line. The International Co-operative Alliance defines the core values of a co-op as self-help, self-responsibility, democracy, equality, equity and solidarity. Another way to think of the cooperative movement is that it encourages people to be thoughtfully engaged with both the production and consumption of the goods and services used in their community. Austin has many businesses that operate according to these principles. The Wheatsville Co-op is a member-owned grocery store that provides fresh, high-quality foods. Then there’s the Red Rabbit Bakery, a vegan bakery owned entirely by its workers. So even if you’re stuck in a dorm and can’t move into a co-op house, there are a ton of ways to participate in Austin’s co-op culture. Joining local cooperatives is a great way to directly support the people of your community and promote the not-so-radical principles of self-reliance and responsibility toward your neighbors. Birkenstock is a linguistics junior from Long Island, N.Y.

HORNS UP: REGENTS COME TO THE RESCUE After funding from the Legislature failed to come through last session to build UT-Austin’s new engineering building, it looked like the project would indefinitely be put on hold. However, the UT regents unanimously approved a plan to build the $310 million building on Thursday when they voted to proceed with the project and provide UT-Austin with $150 million in bonds. We’re grateful to the regents for recognizing the importance of this new building, which is scheduled to be completed in 2017, and glad that they saw fit to swoop in and fix the situation when the state wouldn’t.

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@DTeditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


Life & Arts 5

5

SARAH GRACE SWEENEY, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR / @DTlifeandarts Friday, September 13, 2013

OFFBEAT

Childhood stories all grown-up By Kelsey McKinney @mckinneykelsey

Somewhere between assigned readings and the creation of the Facebook feed, the passion for stories we had as children got lost. Returning to reading isn’t easy. Lack of familiarity with literary authors can be intimidating, and unless you are an English major, tackling “classics” draws up traumatizing memories of rote memorization and plot analysis. But fear no more. If you haven’t read for enjoyment since childhood, this is a list for you. You had a favorite book as a child, and we’ve found an adult counterpart. The first titles should be familiar, nostalgic of lemonade stands, first kisses and backto-school clothes shopping. Their counterparts are older. Some of them pack a punch, leave a scar or heal a previous wound. They are all a great foray back into reading for fun and reading for you. For the prairie girl If you grew up pretending to live in a mud hut out on the open range, you were probably reading “Little House on the Prairie” by Laura Ingalls Wilder. The same golden grass waves through “My Antonia” by Willa Cather. Created out of immigration woes, childhood crushes, family deaths and heartbreak, “My Antonia” is a perfectly crafted American masterpiece that might just make you want to leave the city. Maybe. For the adventurer Sure, Shia LaBeouf ’s thenDisney Channel stardom changed the way we think of Louis Sachar’s “Holes,” but the novel itself gave childhood a sense of fear and adventure. The unlikely hero, direct prose and visions of home that make “Holes” so beloved are also found in “The Brief and

Illustration by Hannah Hadidi / Daily Texan Staff

Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao” by Junot Diaz. Oscar de Leon is no less overweight, nerdy or heroic than Stanley Yelnats IV, but Leon’s nights of drinking and smoking are more frustrating because they’re so much more relatable. For the poet Shel Silverstein’s “The Giving Tree” is precise in word choice

and flow. Silverstein’s social, familial and environmental commentaries leap through the beautiful story of a boy who grows up with a tree. Hoa Nguyen’s earthy writing in her recently released collection of poetry, “As Long as Trees Last,” uses the same simple, careful language of Silverstein with harder commentary such as “We doom in nation rooms.”

For those who like to cry You probably remember Katherine Paterson’s “Bridge to Terabithia” as one of the first books to rip your heart out and stomp on it in the creek where the two main characters built a fantasyland. The grown-up version feels the same. Toni Morrison’s debut novel “The Bluest Eye” powerfully tackles death, abuse,

MOVIE REVIEW | ‘INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2’

race, childhood and incest in a little volume full of heartbreak. The tears will come, but this time for society as much as poor Pecola. For an escape What child didn’t dream about pushing open the wall of a hedge in a giant British garden to reveal not only a magical world, but also

a bounty of family secrets? Frances Hodgson Burnett’s “The Secret Garden” created that dream-like experience, and Marilynne Robinson’s “Housekeeping” can keep it alive. Though there are no giant shrubs, the little town of Fingerbone, Idaho, is quite the mystery in itself. It doesn’t

BOOKS page 7

MOVIE REVIEW | ‘DRINKING BUDDIES’

Olivia Wilde stands out in insightful indie flick By Alex Williams @alexwilliamsdt

Photo courtesy of Matt Kennedy

Danielle Bisutti in a scene from “Insidious: Chapter 2.”

Newest installment of ‘Insidious’ series falls short of frightening expectations By Alex Williams @alexwilliamsdt

James Wan and Leigh Whannell have made some memorable, terrifying films together, from their debut with 2004’s “Saw” to the first “Insidious” back in 2011. As good as they are at kicking off horror franchises, “Insidious” wasn’t the sort of film that demanded a sequel. Their attempt to continue the story is somewhat lethargic, with a scatterbrained screenplay that makes many of the same mistakes as the “Saw” sequels. As one might guess from

the title, “Insidious: Chapter 2” picks up right where the first one ended, with the Lambert family reunited after Josh (Patrick Wilson) plucked his son Dalton’s (Ty Simpkins) consciousness out of a foggy ghost dimension called The Further. Unfortunately, something has followed Josh back into the mortal realm, and with the family in danger, Renai (Rose Byrne) and Josh’s mother Lorraine (Barbara Hershey) struggle to save Josh before it’s too late. “Insidious: Chapter 2” is commendable for refusing to backpedal on the

cliffhanger from the first film. While it’s competently told and staged, there is never a sense of urgency to the film, never a sense that this story needs to be told. Whannell also wrote the first three “Saw” films, and it has become clear that his sequels look back as much as they look forward, which, in the case of “Insidious: Chapter 2,” resulted in a film that is filling in holes in the continuity that barely existed in the first place. Much of “Insidious: Chapter 2” is spent detailing the backstory of the ghost who is trying to take

INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 Director: James Wan Genre: Horror Runtime: 105 minutes

over Josh’s body. While it’s all horrific, the killer is ultimately lifted right out of “Psycho.” Wan does a great job instilling each big scare

SCARY page 7

Joe Swanberg’s “Drinking Buddies” had its world premiere at South By Southwest earlier this year, and at first glance, it easily fits among the improvised, thinly plotted indie films that fill out the lineup of most film festivals — many of them from Swanberg himself. “Drinking Buddies” is a much more prickly, insightful work than it appears, squeezing magnificent performances from its leads and genuine tension out of seemingly harmless moments between friends on the verge of romance and couples on the verge of collapse. Olivia Wilde is a long way from her role in “Cowboys & Aliens” with her complex performance as Kate, a brewery employee who spends most of her days goofing off, drinking and flirting with Jake Johnson’s character Luke. They would be perfect for each other if they weren’t both in committed relationships. When Kate’s boyfriend, Chris (Ron Livingston) invites Jake and his girlfriend Jill (Anna Kendrick) to his cabin for the weekend, the film’s quiet conflicts are set into motion. This is easily the most established cast Swanberg has ever worked with, and the career-best performances he coaxes out of his leads elevate his game as well. While Swanberg sticks to his style of having his actors improvise dialogue off a detailed outline, he’s got a sharp sense of which moments are worth capturing. “Drinking

This is easily the most established cast Swanberg has ever worked with, and the careerbest performances he coaxes out of his leads elevate his game as well. Buddies” hits some nerves that anyone who has been in a committed relationship may not be thrilled to recognize, but the film’s expert navigation of the emotionally muddled concerns of friendship, jealousy and intimacy is refreshingly honest and quick-witted. Swanberg’s dialogue-heavy approach puts a lot of pressure on his actors, but his cast is more than up to the challenge. While Kendrick’s expressive, squirrelly charm and Livingston’s refined charisma are both well-deployed here, Johnson and Wilde give performances that reveal surprising depth and emotional range. Wilde is easily the film’s standout, equal parts playful, tender and vivid, and her chemistry with Johnson is effortless. The full-bearded Johnson has a goofy hobo charm, and he absolutely nails the dramatic moments in the second half of the film. The dynamic between Luke and Kate is precisely measured, carefully walking the line between friendship and sex. There is

WILDE page 7


6 COMICS 6

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O R I O L E S

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S U D O K U F O R Y O U

Today’s solution will appear here tomorrow

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continues from page 5 hurt that Robinson’s thin volume is packed with beautiful language that lingers.

Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures

Olivia Wilde and Jake Johnson in “Drinking Buddies,” a Magnolia Pictures release.

WILDE

continues from page 5 a long stretch in the back half of the film that finds the two in an escalating series of situations that grow less and less innocuous, each stepping onto a new level of intimacy played with the perfect amount of nervous casualness by the actors. It is a testament to Wilde’s performance that even something as simple as watching another character sleep becomes riveting and dramatic. Once the film forces its characters to

confront their unresolved tensions, both of them react as if it is something of a betrayal, and Johnson and Wilde tear into the film’s finale with alternating ferocious and regretful turns, carrying “Drinking Buddies” to its lackluster conclusion with grace. Though “Drinking Buddies” concludes without tying much together, it remains a wise, insightful film about love and friendship. While the performances from the quartet are all beyond reproach, the most surprising talent here is Swanberg,

DRINKING BUDDIES Director: Joe Swanberg Genre: Comedy Runtime: 90 minutes

For those enchanted by fantasy “The Phantom Tollbooth” by Norton Juster is a fairytale story of a little boy who is transported to a magical world for the afternoon. Juster’s classic is a notorious favorite among English teachers for its exemplification of English idioms. “Midnight’s Children” by Salman Rushdie is known for much darker themes. Rushdie’s magical realism and sweeping prose will evoke Juster’s, and his themes of colonialism, revolution and sickness will remind you that there is still plenty to learn. For the international explorer The multi-cultural darling of the young-adult fiction world is Pam Munoz Ryan’s “Esperanza Rising.” Immigration and poverty issues are exemplified in the story

of a young Mexican girl’s redemption and adjustment during the Great Depression. “Small Island” by Andrea Levy, set in the British throes of World War II, follows four characters as they learn to survive and understand the war-torn society they live in. Levy’s grip on language and grasp of the time period create a whirlwind of emotion that is a pleasure to read. For those who want to be special The protagonist in Jerry Spinelli’s “Stargirl” was interesting, different and untied to social norms. Plus she was beloved by a total cutie. The women of Nell Freudenberger’s short story collection “Lucky Girls” are equally intriguing. The stories set in America, India, Thailand and Vietnam are led by characters who possess eccentricities perfect for the phase in between high school and settling down. For those in sticky situations “Anne of Green Gables” by Lucy Maud Montgomery is a

novel about the sweeping Canadian countryside and what it’s like to have adopted parents who were hoping you’d be a boy. The book is imaginative, funny and has a happy ending that ties everything together better than a fairy tale. As adults, we’re less optimistic. Jesmyn Ward’s National Book Award winning “Salvage the Bones” treats hardship as it really is. The main character is just as creative and smart, but not granted the fairy-tale ending of her youthful counterpart. For the feminists Judy Blume taught many of us about first bras, sanitary pads and religious confusion when no else would. “Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret” is a coming-of-age story peppered with all the controversy that makes growing up hard. Margaret Atwood, in her novel “Surfacing,” tackles feminism. The novel is a good next step for discussions about women’s rights, women’s bodies and the path through adulthood. And it’s wildly entertaining, which is ultimately why we loved reading in the first place.

whose observant direction and layered characters make “Drinking Buddies” a low-stakes but highly memorable charmer.

SCARY continues from page 5 sequence with plenty of atmosphere and dread, and there are one or two moments that are legitimately terrifying, but the film is way too enamored with the jump scare, a strategy that gets tired a lot quicker than Wan anticipated. After crafting the year’s best horror film, “The Conjuring,” earlier this summer, Wan seems to have used all of his best material on that film, and the only truly inspired moment here is the clever inversion of one of the first film’s most iconic images. However, the biggest problem in “Insidious: Chapter 2” is its deeply unfocused approach to

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character. It is hard to say who the film’s protagonist is, since none of the characters have any discernable development or arcs. The actors have more or less perfected the science of looking terrified in the buildup to a jump scare, but no one gets to play anything we have not seen before. Only Wilson gets to step outside of the box, playing a menacing note with a giddiness that the charismatic actor rarely brings to his work, and even his dialogue is laced with the same unconvincing plasticity as the rest of the script. If “Insidious: Chapter

2” could measure up to its predecessor, it would be easy to recommend. If it was particularly scary, or interesting or had any characters worth mentioning, then it would probably be worth going to see in theatres. Unfortunately, the film is a fairly shameless cash-in, expanding on a story that did not need it. Its unfocused, uninspired riff on the first film is not worth seeking out. Horror aficianados will find something to like here, but they are better off waiting for the inevitable Netflix release than seeing this one on the big screen.

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The Daily Texan 2013-09-13  

The Friday, Sep. 13, 2013 edition of The Daily Texan

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