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SUMMER EDITION

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OUT AND ABOUT Make the most of your free time with these ATX activities / page 6


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MONDAY, JULY 8, 2013

TABLE OF CONTENTS NEWS Volume 114, Issue 5

CONTACT US

UT students studying in Egypt were evacuated to Morocco last week following political unrest in the country. / PAGE 3

Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor Laura Wright (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor Kristine Reyna (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com

OPINION The credit for the media attention recently directed at Texas is not just due to Sen. Wendy Davis. / PAGE 4 The Supreme Court’s recent unanimous decision on gene patents betrays the court’s lack of scientific knowledge. / PAGE 4

News Office (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Retail Advertising (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu

SPORTS Volleyball traveled all across Europe competing against national teams in preparation to defend its national title. / PAGE 8 Sophomore C.J Hinojosa represents baseball as a member of Team USA this summer. / PAGE 8

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The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

Rooster Teeth Expo nerds out with “Halo” series updates and video game previews. / PAGE 10 “Despicable Me 2” delivers expected character humor, but could it do more? / PAGE 10

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COPYRIGHT Copyright 2013 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER Low High

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UTPD announces it can track the movements of students, faculty and staff by reviewing data collected by UT IDs swiped on campus. / PAGE 5

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She followed a cop and she likes horses?

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COVER PHOTO ERIKA RICH / Daily Texan Staff

Alfonso Delgado practices skateboarding tricks on Thursday afternoon at the Austin BMX & Skate Park in downtown Austin.

NEWS

This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25 Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Wright Associate Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kristine Reyna Digital Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayley Fick Print News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jody Serrano Online News Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard Print Associate News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Messamore Online Associate News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Alberto Long, Colton Pence, Rabeea Tahir Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amy Lach, Lan Le, Sara Reinsch Creative Director. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Natasha Smith Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hirrah Barlas, Jenny Messer, Jack Mitts Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marisa Vasquez Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Zachary Strain Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorge Corona, Guillermo Hernandez Martinez, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Emily Ng, Lawrence Peart, Erika Rich Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorge Corona Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elyana Barrera Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sarah-Grace Sweeney, Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sara Beth Purdy Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christian Corona, Brittany Lamas Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Omar Longoria Social Media Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katie Paschall Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Michael Brick

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Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Wynne Davis Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cody Bubenik, Ploy Buraparate, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hannah Hadidi, David Hook, Aaron Rodriguez Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diego Contreras Life&Arts Writers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Huygen Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Will Crites-Krumm, Luis San Miguel

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NEWS

MONDAY, JULY 8, 2013

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WORLD

Arabic students evacuated from Egypt By Wynne Davis @wynneellyn

College students participating in the Arabic Flagship program in Alexandria, Egypt, have been relocated to Meknes, Morocco, for the remainder of their year abroad because of ongoing political turmoil in Egypt. Eighteen students studying in Egypt as part of a foreign exchange program, including six from UT, were evacuated on Friday. The move is a safety measure because of widespread protests and civic unrest after the Egyptian military announced they had ousted President Mohamed Morsi, the country’s first democratically elected president, from power last Wednesday. Other students in the program come from the University of Oklahoma, University of Michigan, Michigan State University and the University of Maryland. The decision to relocate was made by the American Councils for International Education and the directors of the five university programs. Program directors began using Morocco as an alternative location in 2012 to prevent students from losing the opportunity to continue their studies in the event of unrest. “In 2011, Flagship students, evacuated from Egypt and Syria, were brought directly back to the United States, preventing them from continuing their Arabicimmersive experience,” said Christian Glakas, a senior program coordinator for the UT Department of Middle Eastern studies. “As a result, the directors of the five programs began discussing

KHALIL HAMRA / Associated Press

Opponents of Egypt’s ousted President Mohamed Morsi rally in Tahrir Square in Cairo on July 7. Egypt’s new leadership wrangled over the naming of a prime minister, as both the Muslim Brotherhood and their opponents called for new mass rallies Sunday, renewing fears of another round of street violence over the military’s ousting of Islamist Morsi.

contingency plans for continuing the program in the event of a future evacuation.” Students were informed of the relocation Tuesday morning before their classes. English senior Adam Amrani, a student in the program, said he was disappointed by the move. “The Flagship program runs a summer-long program in Meknes, so there is an established program in the city,” Amrani said. “One

of the major differences that we can expect is the language difference. The Moroccan dialect is vastly different from the Egyptian dialect.” Amrani said he felt safe in Egypt. He said students were prohibited from leaving their dorms and participating in the protests but were still able to witness the events taking place around them. “It’s very exciting, inspiring and very confusing all at once,” Amrani said.

“Watching the presidential speeches and the Egyptian army’s official statement live with Egyptian students has been great.” Strife was reported in cities throughout the country, but Amrani said the protests he witnessed were peaceful. The program will continue next year, even though it is yet to be seen where students will be able to travel as political climates change, Glakas said.

“It is difficult to predict how current events may affect the Arabic Overseas Flagship program in the future,” Glakas said. “The Arabic Flagship Program at UT-Austin will continue to work with all of its partners to ensure that our students have a safe and beneficial immersive experience while studying abroad.” Students can participate in the program if they receive an advanced score on a

government language exam, study Arabic intensively for three years and participate in other program activities. Egypt will need change before students in the program can return to the country, said Dr. Mahmoud Al-Batal, director of the Arabic Flagship Program. Al-Batal said the situation in Egypt reflects the failure of the Muslim Brotherhood,

EGYPT page 5


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LAURA WRIGHT, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, @DTeditorial MONDAY, JULY 8, 2013

HORNS UP, HORNS DOWN

VIEWPOINT

To make lawmakers listen, speak up On October 15, 1971, this newspaper ran an article headlined “Fems to Rally for Abortion, March Ends at Capitol.” Two years before the Supreme Court would vote in a 7-2 decision to uphold a woman’s right to receive an abortion before the point of viability, this article reported that a group of UT students known as the Women’s Abortion Action Committee

The credit for the media attention should go not to Davis, but to the citizens who took it upon themselves to converge on the Capitol in protest.

planned to march from campus to the Capitol to “ask that all abortion and contraception laws be repealed.” According to the article, the organization, then only six weeks old, had already received endorsements from activist Gloria Steinem and then-student body president Bob Binder. Mary Ann Lunn, the secretary of WAAC, told The Daily Texan that the group expected the Supreme Court to hear the case we now know as Roe v. Wade in November of that year, and that the group planned to send a “busload” of their members from Texas to Washington to protest federal abortion laws. In the past two weeks, students have once again marched to the Capitol, joining thousands of protesters standing for or against abortion-limiting legislation filed by Republican legislators. The bills have attracted national attention, due in

part to the filibuster staged by state Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, which killed one of the bills in question on the Senate floor (and in turn prompted Gov. Rick Perry to call a second special session in which to pass a version of the killed bill). But the credit for the media attention should go not to Davis, but to the citizens who took it upon themselves to converge on the Capitol in protest. The students who participated in these demonstrations, both in support of and against the bills, have done the important job of reminding legislators that laws on paper affect people in real life, just as the students of WAAC did more than 40 years ago. Whatever the outcome of the current debate, students should remember that the only way to make legislators (and the media) listen is to give them something to listen to, no matter the issue at hand.

Horns Up: The governor has all but said that he won’t place the issue of tuition revenue bonds on the second special session call. But that didn’t stop state Sen. Kel Seliger, R-Amarillo, from filing a bill authorizing their issuance. We admire that sort of perseverance, even if the governor doesn’t. Horns Down: National media outlets’ coverage of the abortion debate raging in Texas has focused too much on the personal battles between state Sen. Wendy Davis and Gov. Rick Perry and too little on the actual substance of the bills. Horns Up: This Monday, the Austin City Council’s revised Density Bonus Program, which removes a loophole for developers, goes into effect, promoting the development of more affordable housing in downtown Austin. Horns Down: On Tuesday night, state Rep. Byron Cook, R-Corsicana, chairman of the House State Affairs Committee, allowed just 100 people, out of more than 3,000 who signed up, to testify on House Bill 2 when he ended the testimony at midnight. Couldn’t he at least have made it to 2 a.m.?

COLUMN

Supreme Court should have studied the science of DNA decision By Ross McBee Guest Columnist

In the most recent term of the Supreme Court, which ended June 26, decisions were made on gay rights, voting rights and affirmative action. But lost in that list of big-ticket cases was a case that may very well be a landmark decision in a coming era of biotechnology. That case, Assoc. for Molecular Pathology et al. v. USPTO and Myriad Genetics, Inc. et al., centered on the debate over whether human genes were patent eligible and will have lasting effects on biological science research across the nation. In 1995 and 1996, Myriad Genetics filed for, and was later granted, a number of patents on two human breast cancer awareness genes, known as BRCA1 and BRCA2. The DNA sequences of these genes can

be used to help predict breast cancer. Prior to the June 13 ruling, Myriad, as the owner of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 patents, held exclusive rights to any commercial process, including medical tests, which used these genes – allowing Myriad to charge artificially inflated rates for its breast cancer screens, sometimes at prices pushing $3,000. On June 13, in a rare unanimous decision, the court struck down some of those patents, ruling that human DNA, as a naturally occurring form of matter, is not patentable. The decision was heralded by many, including Francis Collins, head of the National Institutes of Health, as “a victory for all those eagerly awaiting more individualized, gene-based approaches to medical care.” But while the court’s decision in the case represents a step forward,

it is not the giant leap many in the scientific community hoped for. Because while the court ruled DNA is not eligible for patent, it ruled that another form of DNA, known as cDNA, is patentable. What difference does the “c” make? DNA in a cell is filled with sequences that get removed in the process of “translating” it into the proteins that make up an organism. cDNA is simply DNA without those “intervening sequences.” In its opinion, the Court reasoned that cDNA “is distinct from the DNA from which it was derived” because it has been so edited, and is therefore “not a ‘product of nature’ and is patent eligible.” But cDNA is very much a product of nature. Retroviruses like HIV make cDNA as a part of their life cycle, as do bits of self-replicating DNA called “retrotransposons.” In

fact, a 2011 paper by Sanchez et al suggests that not only is cDNA a naturally occurring substance, but that BRCA1 cDNA, the cDNA of the gene patented by Myriad, is itself present in nature in certain individuals. But the court in its opinion dismissed the presence of naturally occurring cDNA and did not address the 2011 study. In doing so, the justices seem to be ignoring their own reasoning in the decision. All the information in the BRCA1/2 cDNA was already present in an organism’s DNA. And by the court’s own admission, the reason DNA isn’t patentable is precisely because its information content is naturally occurring – a contradiction tantamount to stating that one could take a published book, remove some of the chapters, and then publish it again under a different au-

thor’s name simply because the text had been edited. When a Supreme Court justice feels it necessary to reinforce that he was “unable to affirm [some aspects of the biology] by my own knowledge or even own belief,” as Justice Scalia did in this case, we should take note. Undoubtedly, the confusing nature of this Supreme Court ruling is the result of a difficult task undertaken in good faith by the justices. Biology and genetics are phenomenally complicated subjects, and only growing more so. But correspondingly, they are phenomenally powerful, phenomenally deep and phenomenal sources of innovation for the betterment of mankind. We as citizens need to ask if “in good faith” alone is still enough. McBee is a Plan II and biology senior from Austin.


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NEWS

MONDAY, JULY 8, 2013

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UNIVERSITY

UTPD can track students, staff through ID swipes on campus By Alberto Long @albertolong

While revelations on the federal government’s surveillance of U.S. citizens’ phone records and emails continue to become public, UT has also disclosed its own forms of on-campus data collection using UT IDs. Whenever students, staff and faculty swipe their UT IDs to enter a building on campus, the University of Texas Police Department can find out where they have been, without a warrant. Information gathered through card swipes is stored in a data log immediately accessible to UTPD for 30 days and then removed, UTPD spokeswoman Rhonda

EGYPT

continues from page 3 the former president’s political party, to build a national consensus and improve the quality of life in Egypt.

Weldon said. Although the National Security Agency has been the subject of criticism for its surveillance, local officials say such monitoring is not uncommon and does not break the law. UT officials say its information on UT IDs is only accessed on a limited basis for specific purposes. “Access control records are turned over to UTPD if they are needed to investigate criminal activity in specific areas,” Weldon said. “The security system card access records are never used for employee management or student time and attendance purposes.” UT IDs are required for access to “controlled areas,” such as student living areas in Some disagree with Al-Batal and have demanded Morsi be reinstated. “Millions of people felt that a change was needed and the army has responded to this sentiment among

Jester Dormitory and Kinsolving Dormitory, as well as research laboratories on campus. All new buildings opened in the last five years, including the Belo Center for New Media and the Liberal Arts Building, have been installed with card access points. Weldon could not provide a number of times the data has been accessed, but said UTPD has asked for these records on “numerous” occasions. UTPD also advises Information Technology Services, the department that distributes IDs and manages technology on campus, on where to install new card access points. The Austin Police Department uses a similar technique with city millions of Egyptians,” AlBatal said. “What Egypt needs now is to build stability through wide political representation in the government, including the Muslim Brotherhood.”

NASSER SHIYOUKHI / Associated Press

Supporters of Egypt’s ousted President Mohamed Morsi wave Egyptian flags and posters with his pictures during a rally near Cairo University in Giza, Egypt on July 7. The Arabic words on the posters read, “No alternative to legitimacy.”

employees at controlled municipal buildings, said Samantha Park, spokeswoman for the city of Austin. Park said city employee access card data could be obtained by APD without a warrant, but that a formal process requiring approval of building managers was necessary for access. Park said most inquiries from APD on card data are related to criminal investigations. “If APD makes a request, Building Services tries to work with them as best as possible,” Park said. “If there is ever a question about the request, the best course of action is determined internally between Building Services, APD and management.”

Recent events have all made us stop and think about what the rules should be. That’s a question we should all ask. —Robert Chesney, Associate dean, School of Law

UTPD’s access to the proximity access data does not require a warrant because of current legal precedent, said Robert Chesney, associate dean of the school of law. “It may be the case that not a lot [of] students know this is going on, but we’re talking about the information that’s being gathered because you were using UT-issued IDs to access UT property with permission from UT,” Chesney said. Chesney said he thought it

was a practical measure to use the information for administrative purposes and crime prevention because of the high value of technology and goods stored on campus facilities. “Recent events have all made us stop and think about what the rules should be,” Chesney said. “That’s a question we should all ask. But I don’t think it’s constitutionally required, or that there’s anything illegal or untoward about UT handling information in this way.”


LOCAL LEISURE 6

MONDAY, JULY 8, 2013

NEWS

Above: Beat the heat by gathering friends to plan water activties such as the water gun fight that took place on Sixth Street on July 6. LOUIS SAN MIGUEL / Daily Texan Staff Right: David Rosales, right, plays pickup basketball with others at Shipe Park on Wednesday. WILL CRITES-KRUMM / Daily Texan Staff

Customers shop for food at the D sfcfarmersmarket.org to learn ab


MONDAY, JULY 8, 2013

7

Left: Moviegoers sit back and relax to the sights and sounds of the film “Grease” at Deep Eddy Pool on Saturday. The film kicked off Deep Eddy Movie Nights, a weekly series of outdoor movie screenings. Go to austintexas.gov for the Deep Eddy Movie Nights schedule. LOUIS SAN MIGUEL / Daily Texan Staff Below: Local band Buds plays during a Fourth of July celebratory house show in West Campus. Check out more summer shows at showlistaustin.com. GUILLERMO HERNANDEZ MARTINEZ / Daily Texan Staff

WILL KRITES-CRUMM / Daily Texan Staff

A swimmer relaxes under one of Hamilton Pool’s waterfalls Saturday. Call (512) 264-2740 for Hamilton Pool public information, which schedules operating hours on a day-to-day basis.

ERIKA RICH / Daily Texan Staff or Associated Press

Downtown Farmers’ Markets on Saturday morning. Visit bout farmers’ markets in Austin.

ERIKA RICH / Daily Texan Staff

Patrons of Casey’s New Orleans Snowballs cool down with some flavored snow cones on a summer afternoon.

Summer spots around town


8

8

SARA BETH PURDY, SPORTS EDITOR, @texansports MONDAY, JULY 8, 2013

VOLLEYBALL

European summer Horns bounce overseas in preparation to defend national title

By Diego Contreras @texansports

In preparation for its title defense, the defending national champion Longhorns volleyball team is not taking any time off this summer. The Longhorns embarked on a trip to Europe that spanned two weeks and four countries this summer. The trip, which the NCAA permits once every four years, gave the Longhorns the opportunity to play against the top competition in Europe. “When you’re a college athlete, you don’t have the

opportunity to study abroad,” coach Jerritt Elliott said. “Almost all of our players end up going and playing professional in Europe ‘cause it’s the No. 2 sport and very big.” The beginning of the trip was spent in Milan. After the team spent time sightseeing, it quickly got back to competition and spent its days in Milan competing against the Italian Senior National Team. “It was a challenge for us that eventually helped us realize that they were going to test us and cause some

EUROPE page 9

ELISABETH DILLON / Daily Texan file photo

Bailey Webster and Sha’Dare McNeal hoist the Big 12 Championship trophy last fall.

BASEBALL

Hinojosa represents Texas on Team USA By Brittany Lamas @brittany_lamas

After playing in seven games with the USA Baseball Collegiate National team, sophomore shortstop C.J Hinojosa has been placed on the final roster and will compete in international play this month. This is not Hinojosa’s first time playing for USA Baseball, as he held spots on the 14U and 16U national teams before coming to Texas. Hinojosa is the 20th Longhorn to make the team and the first Longhorn player since Jordan Danks, Hoby Milner,

Corey Knebel and Erich Weiss were on the squad in 2011. In his few games before being finalized on the roster, Hinojosa made an impact. In his seventh game, he hit a double to drive in three runs for USA to win 5-2 and keep its perfect record. “As a young studentathlete who has played for several teams in the USA Baseball organization, C.J has been comfortable playing at the highest amateur levels,” Texas baseball head coach Augie Garrido said when Hinojosa was picked to attend training

HINOJOSA page 9

SIDELINE MLB

vs. Orioles Monday, 6:05 p.m. Tuesday, 6:05 p.m. Wednesday, 6:05 p.m. Thursday, 6:05 p.m.

vs. Cardinals Tuesday, 7:15 p.m. Wednesday, 7:15 p.m.


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SPORTS

MONDAY, JULY 8, 2013

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SHELBY TAUBER / Daily Texan file photo Sophomore shortstop C.J Hinojosa has been selected to play for the USA Baseball Collegiate National team. He finished the season with a .309 batting average, second on the team, with 29 RBIs.

HINOJOSA

continues from page 8 camp in June. Hinojosa played every game at shortstop for the Longhorn baseball team this season and was named to the 2013 Big 12 All-Freshman Team. He finished the regular season with a .309 batting average, second on the team, and recorded 10 doubles,

EUROPE

continues from page 8 adversity,” sophomore outside hitter Haley Eckerman blogged during the trip. “I think it was a great experience learning how to accept the adversity and compete against a great team.” The next leg of the trip took the team to Maribor, Slovenia. Texas beat the Slovenian National Team 3-1 and spent the rest of the two days in Slovenia sightseeing and getting to know the National Team players. After their stay in Maribor, the Longhorns packed up and headed to Split, Croatia. The first full day in

two triples, two home runs, 29 RBIs and 11 errors. “As his game went on throughout this season, he continued to improve,” Garrido said. “He made tremendous defensive strides as a middle infielder, especially with his accuracy. He has proven to be one of the top collegiate all-around shortstops in the nation.”

The national team began international play on July 5 in Japan with an exhibition match against the Matsuyama Industrial League and then the 39th USA-Japan series July 6. The team will come back to the U.S. for two more exhibition matches before taking on the Cuban national team July 18 in Des Moines, Iowa.

Croatia was spent sightseeing and sailing the Adriatic Sea. After spending nearly two hours on the water, the team headed back to the mainland to compete against the Croatian National Team. Texas lost 3-1. The team competed once more against the Croatian National Team and then headed off to Dubrovnik, Croatia, for the last leg of the trip. Texas faced its final match against the Montenegro National Team and ended the competition with a 3-0 victory. The team spent the next day and the remaining hours doing more sightseeing before heading back to the

United States. “Four new countries, seven competitive matches and seemingly endless cappuccinos and gelatos with teammates, coaches and friends. What a wonderful learning and bonding experience for everyone,” junior setter Hannah Allison said. “I feel blessed to be just 20 years old and to have seen and experienced so much of the world. Our team came back even closer than when we left.” The Longhorn volleyball team will begin its next journey, trying to win a consecutive NCAA championship, at the Chevron Rainbow Wahine Invitational in Hawaii at the end of August.

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ELYANA BARRERA, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR, @DTlifeandarts MONDAY, JULY 8, 2013

VIDEO GAMES

MOVIE REVIEW | ‘DESPICABLE ME’

Sequel delivers humor but lacks creative plot

A contender in the “Halo 4” Global Championship competes in a qualifying round at Rooster Teeth Expo on Friday afternoon. Rooster Teeth hosted game developers, industry talent and Internet celebrities at RTX this previous weekend at the Austin Convention Center.

By Alex Williams @AlexWilliamsdt

ANDREW HUYGEN Daily Texan Staff

Studios unveil products at expo By Andrew Huygen @AndrewHuygen

A horde of nearly 300 people running across a convention floor, nearly knocking others down in the pursuit of an autograph from Jen Taylor, the voice of Cortana from the “Halo” series, was a cinematic sight and just one highlight of RTX this weekend. Rooster Teeth, which is celebrating its 10th anniversary, hosted Rooster Teeth Expo, or RTX, which included informational panels, celebrity appearances, indie game demos and costumed fans. RTX took place at the Austin Convention Center on July 5-7. This is the third iteration of the convention, with its first year having been a “small” gathering of 500 people at a field in Austin.

Gus Sorola, director of RTX and voice actor for the “Red vs. Blue” series, has seen unprecedented attendance growth at the convention. “When we were done last year, we hoped — people thought I was crazy — but I hoped to double the size of the convention, and we successfully did it,” Sorola said. “We are officially twice the size of last year and there have been relatively few hitches.” One major presence at the convention was 343 Industries, or 343i, an offshoot of Microsoft Studios and the developer of “Halo 4.” 343i used the convention as a kickoff for the “Halo 4 Global Championship,” which will take place over the next two months and will award the winner with a prize of $200,000.

“The big goal there was to create a skill-based tournament that is super accessible to all players with numerous ways to qualify,” said Andy “Bravo” Dudynsky, a member of 343i’s Matchmaking Systems team. “It’s been really exciting checking out the action. You can navigate throughout the booth and watch everyone play and stand beside the players.” 343i also used the panel to unveil the newest downloadable content pack for “Halo 4,” entitled the “Champions Bundle.” The pack will include a remake of the fan-favorite map “The Pit” from “Halo 3,” as well as three new sets of armor and seven new stances for a Spartan character. “We’re fairly happy with the way that ‘Halo 4’ is right now, and we’ll continue to maintain with gentle touches, sort of sustaining that game,” said

Frank O’Connor, director of the Halo franchise. “[Our multiple teams have] helped us to do what the right thing for the game is, which is to sustain it and its community.” “Red vs. Blue,” which many would say is the seminal “machinima,” or video game-based narrative series, is the product that put Rooster Teeth on the map. The cast and production crew for the series premiered the newest episode in front of an audience of fans. The 10-minute clip, which involved characters Caboose and Church and an explosive obstacle course, was met with an uproar of applause. “We so rarely get to see it with an audience,” said Burnie Burns, creator of “Red vs. Blue” and founder of Rooster Teeth. “It’s so fun to see it with an audience, and that’s why we go to conventions.”

The first “Despicable Me” flick was a pleasant enough diversion, but the only thing that necessitated a sequel was the towering box office gross. “Despicable Me 2” is more of the same — a silly, entertaining bit of cotton candy whose predictable plot is salvaged by Steve Carell’s manic, memorable voice acting and a surprisingly adept sense of humor. Picking up where “Despicable Me” left off, the sequel finds the formerly villainous Gru (Carell) happily being a single father to Agnes (Elsie Fisher), Margo (Miranda Cosgrove) and Edith (Dana Gaier). However, an upcoming Mothers’ Day pageant drives home how much the girls could use a woman in their lives, a situation which happily coincides with the arrival of Lucy (Kristen Wiig), an agent for the AntiVillain League, who recruits Gru to help save the world. The film’s first goal is to make its audience laugh, and it certainly succeeds there. While the first “Despicable Me” leaned a bit too heavily on the trio of young girls for its jokes (and heart), the sequel gives everyone a chance to shine. Carell gives a strong, heartfelt vocal performance, and plays wonderfully off the alwayshilarious Wiig. Gru’s endless supply of minions is another reliable source of comedy, fully embodying the film’s adolescent sense of humor with their nonsensical way of speaking and constant titters and giggles. Although the film never fails to elicit chuckles, is that

enough? “Despicable Me 2” is predictable to a fault, coloring firmly inside the lines of what you’d expect from this sort of film, and it doesn’t even try to surprise the audience. The film is structured as something of a mystery, with Gru trying to track down a supervillain, but the film only bothers to pay attention to one suspect, making it pretty clear how things will unfold. Slightly more troubling is the slightly casual racism with which the film approaches its villain, who is little more than a stereotype in a funny mask. “Despicable Me 2” is, just like the first, a flighty and fun trifle that more or less dissipates the minute the credits roll. The film’s saving grace is its strong comedic backbone, and it’s a smart move to give Gru’s minions their own film, a spinoff that’s teased in the closing credits. While the cast is game and very funny, and “Despicable Me 2” is never boring, it’s also never particularly engaging, content to let its plot play out with little creativity or surprise.

DESPICABLE ME 2 Director: Pierre Coffin, Chris Renaud Genre: Comedy Run time: 98 minutes


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Crossword Across   1 Wood for a  chest   6 Holy Land 10 TV’s Dr. ___ 14 Love, Italianstyle 15 “Dies ___”  (Latin hymn) 16 Gossipy Barrett 17 Unseen  purchase 19 Like custard  and meringue 20 Writer Wiesel 21 Long, long time 22 – – – 24 Transparent,  informally 26 “___ Mio” 27 Greet with a  honk 29 Reeves of “The  Matrix” 32 Holy wars 35 Drag behind, as  a trailer 37 Designer Saint  Laurent 38 Made in ___  (garment label)

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Edited by Will Shortz 1

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40 Lighted part of 

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49 Sue Grafton’s 

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57 “The ___ 

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The Daily Texan 2013-07-08  

The July 8, 2013 edition of The Daily Texan