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Friday, May 3, 2013

INSIDE

SPORTS Longhorns head to Stillwater for battle with Oklahoma State, sitting at the top of the conference. PAGE 7 Texas men’s golf team looks to defend its national title next month after winning its first Big 12 championship since 2004 last month. PAGE 7

Longhorns still searching for first Big 12 win.

COMICS PAGE 10

NEWS Outgoing Daily Texan staffers reflect on their time at the organization and lend advice to the next generation.

dailytexanonline.com

SPORTS PAGE 7

83RD LEGISLATURE

House to hear campus gun bill By Joshua Fechter Concealed handgun license holders could carry on university campuses if the Texas Legislature approves a bill going before the House of Representatives on Saturday. The bill, authored by State

Rep. Allen Fletcher, R-Cypress, would authorize university administrators to establish rules prohibiting concealed handguns in buildings located on campus only after consulting faculty, staff and students. Fletcher said the bill would “decriminalize” possessing concealed handguns on

campus. He said license holders would have to meet the age requirement — 21 and over — and will have completed background checks and training. “It won’t be a bunch of 19-year-old freshmen running around at frat parties with guns,” Fletcher said. “They will be over 21.”

Similar legislation has stalled in the Senate. State Sen. John Whitmire, D-Houston, who chairs the Senate Criminal Justice Committee, has said he would not bring the Senate companion to the bill up for a hearing in the committee.

TURTLES continues on page 2

UTS continues on page 2

CAMPUS

These late-night events will help procrastinate any finals studying. PAGE 12 ‘Iron Man 3’ maintains the momentum of the series but has too many villains. PAGE 12

-30- COLUMN

SUSANNAH JACOB

NEWS UT will remember students, faculty and staff who have died this year. TAMU’s Kyle Field will be larger than UT’s Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium this coming football season.

dailytexanonline.com

MULTIMEDIA We close our Moontower interview with Bill Burr. Give it a watch: bit.ly/dtvid

What is today’s reason to party?

Chelsea Purgahn | Daily Texan Staff Curtis Drosche, a Facilities Services mechanical maintenance technician, checks the Turtle Pond on Thursday. Drosche hopes that communication will improve between Facilities Services and the College of Natural Sciences so improvements can be made to the pond.

Turtle Pond thrives Despite uncertain management, UT’s Turtle Pond proves hospitable waters By Christine Ayala Chicken nuggets and fries are a common lunch on campus, even for the hundreds of turtles swimming in the Turtle Pond’s murky water. Directly north of the Main

Building, the pond crawls with more than 200 turtles of at least four different species. Most are red-eared sliders native to the area. Curtis Drosche, a Facilities Services mechanical maintenance technician, oversees the pond’s water levels and

keeps the habitat clear of trash and debris. Drosche said the pond essentially sustains itself. No office on campus takes care of the individual turtles or provides food, although people tend to feed the turtles their lunch leftovers. Drosche said two of the inhabitants are alligator turtles that have been known to catch unaware birds. He said the other

By Jordan Rudner

turtles have similar appetites to the students on campus. “They’ll eat anything,” Drosche said. “People feed them a lot of scraps when they pass by after lunch. They don’t like lettuce though, they’re spoiled, they like what the kids eat.” Drosche said throughout the 11 years he has taken care of the pond, a lack of

GUNS continues on page 2

LIFE&ARTS

ONLINE

UT faculty question disclosure proposals Faculty members are rallying against a new UT System disclosure policy that may diminish the University’s ability to recruit and retain professors, according to current Faculty Council members. The Faculty Council will meet Monday to vote on a resolution objecting to UT System-wide Policy 180, also known as the “Conflict of Interest, Conflicts of Commitment and Outside Activities” policy. The policy would enact a litany of disclosure requirements for all University employees, including forcing faculty members to disclose any gifts they or their family members receive costing more than $250, among other requirements. Though the policy was originally meant to be implemented Wednesday, UT System Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa announced in April that implementation would be delayed until Sept. 1. The announcement came two days after a Faculty Council meeting during which faculty members expressed objections to the policy for more than an hour. “The chancellor heard from some of the faculty members and some of the presidents, who expressed concerns,” said Dan Sharphorn, associate vice chancellor and deputy general counsel for the System. “He decided to take another look at some of the elements of the policy to see if there’s a need for revision.” One engineering professor, who requested to

Graduating sports writers reflect on positive memories from their time at the Texan. PAGE 8

The Daily Texan is not independent from the University of Texas, but it should be. PAGE 4

SYSTEM

CAMPUS

UT professor studies own brain for a year By Amanda Voeller

Many people weigh themselves and track what they eat, but neurobiology professor Russell Poldrack studies himself in an in-depth way no one has done before in his quest to learn how a healthy brain functions daily. His study consists of a weekly blood sample and two MRI scans per week paired with mood questionnaires, according to Poldrack. Poldrack said SEE COMICS he also completes daily surBH_SpillyTweet_Frontpg_May3_4C.pdf 4/29/2013 10:48:47 AM such PAGE 10 veys 1measuring aspects

as sleep quality, diet and what happened that day. Poldrack said he began data collection in September 2012 and plans to publish his results in the fall. Poldrack said he tracks the fluctuations of his psoriasis and has found that on days he recorded it being worse, the genes related to psoriasis are expressed more. “Even though this is really preliminary, it starts to show us the kinds of stuff that we might be able to find,”

BRAIN continues on page 2

Shelby Tauber | Daily Texan Staff Neurobiology professor Russell Poldrack has a MRI Tuesday morning in the basement of the Norman Hackerman Building. Poldrack receives two MRIs weekly and has completed 56 thus far.

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CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Susannah Jacob (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Trey Scott (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com

Gabriella Belzer | Daily Texan Staff The Roustabouts Dance Company rehearses “All That Jazz” at Hogg Memorial Auditorium.

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BRAIN

Poldrack said. “The question is if we had enough data could we relate this back to brain function, too.” There is no research on how brains change over a period of weeks and months, and because some disorders, including depression, fluctuate over this period, people with these disorders could get scanned regularly to measure which treatments work, Poldrack said. Poldrack stopped getting MRI scans in March because the noise from the scans worsened his tinnitus. He said he plans to resume scanning this week, although he will decrease the number

GUNS

continues from page 1 Whitmire said Thursday if the House passes Fletcher’s bill, it could come to his committee for an “unnecessary” hearing or be referred to another committee. “Whichever committee gets it and looks at it, it’s going to be dead because there are not 21 votes [for the bill] on the Senate floor,” Whitmire said. A bill that passed out of the Senate Tuesday would allow license holders to

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and duration of his scans, because Poldrack will stop measuring some things, such as brain structure, that probably won’t change. One of Poldrack’s colleagues, Tom Schonberg, said that his research receives some criticism. “[His colleagues] try to plant the seeds of doubt and criticism all the time because when it’s out there scientifically, when he reaches the stage of trying to publish this, he’ll get criticism from all directions,” Schonberg said. Poldrack said although it will be challenging to find people willing to participate, he wants to do the study on a large set of people. Not only is this data the first of its kind, but it also has some very unique uses. For example, Austin artist Laurie

Frick, who creates work based off measurements and selftracking data, said she will use the results of Poldrack’s study to create pattern-based art. “I’m sort of having this idea that maybe you could really come up with a more holistic portrait and think about what that data adds up to,” Frick said. Poldrack said he may not have the funds to analyze a year’s worth of blood samples, which show how gene levels relate to what is happening in the body, because it costs $700 to analyze a week’s worth of blood. “If we could find the money … then we could go back and do it,” Poldrack said. “It would be a really unique data set. I don’t know of any other data sets of a person who collected blood at the same time every week for such a long period of time.”

keep concealed handguns in their vehicles while on campus. Whitmire voted for the bill and said it was a reasonable compromise. The bill’s author, state Sen. Glenn Hegar, R-Katy, said he does not see his bill as a substitute to campus carry because the two proposals address two separate ways to carry firearms. He said instances such as the Jan. 22 shooting at Lone Star College-North Harris do not reflect the behavior of lawabiding concealed handgun license holders. In that instance, the gunman injured three people, including himself, after arguing with a student. “A piece of paper that has a law on it that’s trying to prevent law-abiding citizens from having their firearm in their car doesn’t stop that deranged individual,” Hegar said. “So we have to separate criminals, people that have intent to do harm and law-abiding citizens.” State Sen. Jose Rodriguez, D-El Paso, voted against Hegar’s proposal and said he would vote against similar legislation if it came from the House. “All it does is promote proliferation of guns on public spaces, and I don’t think they have any business in learning

institutions, whether it’s in elementary schools, high schools or universities,” Rodriguez said. UT and UT System officials have repeatedly stated their opposition to legislation allowing handguns on campuses. UT President William Powers Jr. has signaled his opposition to the legislation throughout this session. UT spokesman Gary Susswein said Thursday that Powers’ stance has not changed. “President Powers’ position on this issue has been clear,” Susswein said. “He does not believe guns on campus are a good idea.” In a March 12 letter, UT System Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa told Gov. Rick Perry he does not believe the presence of concealed handguns on campus would create a safer environment. State Sen. Brian Birdwell, RGranbury, authored the Senate version of campus carry rejected by Whitmire. Birdwell said the presence of handguns does not mean an increase in crime or violent incidences. “If that were the case, then we would have the shootings at the grocery stores, the Starbucks, all the places where you can lawfully carry your CHL,” Birdwell said. “To make that assumption is ludicrous.”

Friday, May 3, 2013

TURTLES

communication between Facilities Services and the College of Natural Sciences regarding responsibility for the pond has blocked improvements to the area. “Nobody really knows who is in charge of it, and nobody seems to want to take responsibility, so we just do what we can to keep the water flowing and keep up the area,” Drosche said. “We’ve wanted to replace a few parts of the piping to make the system run better, but we’re not turtle experts, so we don’t know what might harm them.” Drosche said he has asked about draining the pond to do a thorough inspection of the water system for years, but he has not been able to connect with biology experts to determine the best time of year to remove the turtles or where they could be housed during the process. Several fish live in the pond including bass, catfish and goldfish, according to Drosche. When the pond was introduced in the 1930s, it included just two species of turtles, but now the pond is swimming with several pet turtles and fish that have been dumped there by folks on campus over the years. Integrative biology professor David Hillis said he has volunteered to manage the turtle population since the late 1990s, although he is not responsible for the pond. “We try to keep only native species of turtles in the pond so that they are appropriate for our weather conditions,” Hillis said. Hillis said the turtles breed and lay eggs around the pond and courtship behavior can be observed often. “I get lots of calls from people who are concerned that the small turtles are ‘picking on’ the larger ones,” Hillis said. “It looks like the little turtles are trying to slap the big ones in the face. In fact, the small turtles are males, and the larger ones are females,

UTS

remain anonymous because his leave of absence request is still pending, said the policy is what convinced him to take a leave from the University, and he will see how the policy plays out before deciding to return. “My decision isn’t entirely about UTS 180, but that really pushed me over the edge,” the professor said. “It absolutely encroaches on what people would normally consider time away from work. UT is an excellent school, but this doesn’t make any sense.” English professor Alan Friedman, a former Faculty Council chairman, said many other faculty members also have concerns. “This policy is intrusive,” Friedman said. “It violates academic freedom and privacy rights. There was no

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Nobody really knows who is in charge of it, and nobody seems to want to take responsibility. —Curtis Drosche, Facilities Services mechanical maintenance technician

and the males are displaying their feet to the females, and tickling the females with the male’s long fingernails, which is part of their normal mating behavior.” The turtles commonly lay their eggs around the pond in grassy areas under trees and bushes — even across the street at adjacent buildings. Integrative biology professor David Crews said he specifically studies the reproduction of the red-eared slider. Crews said the temperature of the eggs during incubation determines the turtle’s sex. Drosche said his team maintains the water levels with a recirculation system that takes water from the lower pond up to a bog area with foliage. From there, the water flows back down to the turtles. The pond water uses this recycled water unless levels get too low and water must be added. “We clean out each of the little areas with waterfalls where debris will build with leaves, sticks and trash, and check on it every other day to see how things are running,” Drosche said. “We know other people try too. We come some days, and it has been cleared. There is just no communication between them and us. It would be nice if there was a main group that wanted to take charge.”

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Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Carrion, Jeremy Thomas, Amanda Voeller Multimedia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gabriella Belzer, Shweta Gulati Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jori Epstein, Sebastian Herrera, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sam Jackson, Jacob Martella, Peter Sblendorio Life&Arts Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elizabeth Williams Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drew Finke, Susannah Jacob Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hirrah Barlas, Jenny Messer Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brett Donohoe, Tara Frels, Lan Le Comic Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anik Bhattacharya, Grace Biggs, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nohemy Herrera, Justin Perez, Colin Zelinski Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amyna Dosani

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 4711865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

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argument or rationale offered for why it was needed or what it was intended to accomplish. No study has been done to demonstrate that this will serve any purpose or do any good, and it has not been tried out elsewhere.” Among other provisions, the policy would require full-time faculty and staff to disclose the nature and extent of any outside employment or activity that “may reasonably appear to create a conflict of interest or a conflict of commitment,” even if the outside activities are uncompensated, including activities by immediate family members. “When in doubt in determining whether an activity or interest should be disclosed, the individual should resolve the doubt in favor of disclosure,” the policy states. The policy also requires faculty and staff to obtain approval before engaging in the activities it mentions. Sharphorn said he acknowledged certain faculty members have concerns but did not say whether he thinks they were legitimate. “I understand why certain faculty members are concerned, but I don’t know if I’m willing to say whether those concerns are valid or not,” Sharphorn said. “There are many faculty members who don’t have objection to [UTS 180].” Sharphorn said public research often includes extensive disclosure requirements, though he said he isn’t aware of any universities that have policies similar to the proposed UTS 180. “It’s gotten to be pretty common that public employees involved in public research don’t have a lot of privacy,” Sharphorn said. “This just expands those disclosure policies in a couple of ways.”


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Friday, May 3, 2013

3

Managing editor bids The Daily Texan farewell By Trey Scott I remember the last few days of high school pretty well. Although I didn’t much care for those four years of my life, there was a distinct sadness in leaving, because it was the first time I had ever had to leave anything: home, my friends, my dog, my comfort zone. I did not want to start something new. If only I had known … … I’d make surprisingly good grades, I’d make horrendously bad grades, I’d join the school newspaper, I’d write things that made people think, I’d figure out what I wanted to do with my life, I’d spend hours debating if that was the right decision, I’d get in trouble with my friends, I’d truly figure out why people hated the 11 a.m. kick at the Texas-OU game, I’d make mistakes, I’d learn from them, I’d disappoint myself, I’d do myself proud. I’d hug my parents goodbye and take a 6 a.m. flight to New York City on the biggest adventure of my life, I’d spend a summer in the basement of my girlfriend’s parents’ house in Denver. I’d watch Mike Trout and Bryce Harper in their rookie year, I’d get cussed out by Albert Pujols, I’d hit on 16 in Las Vegas with my best friends, I’d drive 14 hours to Omaha to cover the College World Series. I’d interview Darrell Royal, Kevin Durant, Vince Young and Ricky Williams. I’d be there when Andrew Luck and Robert Griffin III were drafted and shake Lawrence Taylor’s hand on Fifth Avenue. I’d witness the dawn of Linsanity and watch Derek Jeter hit an

Trey Scott started working at The Daily Texan in fall 2010 as a sports staff writer. He has been sports editor, associate managing editor and is now the managing editor. He encourages all of you to keep searching for the perfect lede.

Elisabeth Dillon Daily Texan file photo

inside-out single to right field. I’d play basketball at Rucker Park and ski the Rocky Mountains. I’d catch John Legend at Austin City Limits and then see him three years later in the bathroom of a Manhattan bar and tell him how good he was. I’d walk past my grandfather’s open casket and wonder what the point was, if we’d just end up buried in dirt at the end of it. I’d watch my father give the eulogy and I’d hold my sister’s trembling hand, and then I’d realize that this is actually pretty beautiful. I’d learn what it was like to be broke and I’d see how nice it was to make gobs of money, and then I’d realize I was stupid to spend all of

it on Sixth Street. I’d play 2K late into the night with Eddie and finish second to Kristen every single time in Mario Kart — she’s Yoshi, I’m Koopa Troopa. I’d dance to Jay-Z with Hank, from the nosebleeds, and I’d drive to San Antonio with Kyle and Todd (and technically with Hank, too) for Mama Margie’s at 4 a.m. I’d watch Nick chunk apples into building walls and plop them into hot tubs. I’d drive to San Antonio with Kristen to watch the Spurs play the Heat on a pretty penny, and pull into the parking lot and learn LeBron and D-Wade weren’t playing. I’d watch David Ash thread the needle from the stands in Stillwater, Okla.

I’d broaden my horizons and learn that everything I was taught was not necessarily right. I’d make friends with people from all walks of life. I’d stop judging them the way I did in high school. I’d cover the Texas football, basketball and baseball teams, and learn that press box food was not good for your figure. I’d be pumped up by awards and then humbled by typos and inaccuracies. I’d stand on a bench and defend myself in front of protesters. I’d protest, too, but mostly about the Longhorn Network. I’d gulp down Shiner pitchers purchased by Doug at Hole in the Wall and I’d sneak Christian into bars in Dallas. I’d figure out I

was no good at basketball, but thanks to everybody at Gregory who put up with me, anyway. I’d spend a day with Julius Whittier, the first African-American football player in school history, and we’d go to football practice together. I’d get pizza with Garrett Gilbert, and ask him about his failures as a quarterback (cue the high school version of me, punching a hole through the wall). I’d spend weekends at Disch Falk-Field, listening to Augie Garrido talk about the human spirit. I’d play intramural softball, and stand in the outfield as our former sports editor (requisite Dan Hurwitz shoutout) gave up 22 runs in one

inning. I’d see pitching nearly as bad covering the Colorado Rockies a year later. I’d go to Big 12 Media Days with Nick and Sameer, and we’d ask Robert Griffin III about his chances of winning the Heisman that fall, and then we’d watch him win the Heisman. I’d get a new dog, and a cat. I’d grow up, become independent and assume I knew everything. I’d fall down and have to ask for help. I’d turn 21 and then I’d turn 22 and then oh man, I’m getting old. There was nothing to worry about. It’s been a wonderful ride, even if it did go way too fast. Texas forever. -30-

Cash for books We buy over one million different titles.


4A Opinion

Opinion 4

Friday, May 3, 2013

Editor-in-Chief Susannah Jacob

We Asked: Summer Plans? THE QUESTION: What is the first thing you will do to mark the start of summer? It’ll be either get hard to work on job applications or ignore them entirely, so more likely I’m going to ignore them entirely. That’s probably what’s going to happen. —Mallory Johnson Advertising senior from Dallas Just go home. —Rodolfo Jimenez Economics junior from Plano Have ACL surgery. I injured it playing basketball, just pickup, playing here. —Philip Gobble Kinesiology and sports management freshman from Alba

Probably register for summer classes. —Arantxa Hernandez Undeclared freshman from McAllen

I feel like. It’s in Minnesota. —Yoli Bartholome Psychology and French senior from Houston

Probably spend a day just sleeping in. —Lin Truong Psychology junior from Austin

I’ll be taking some online classes through Richland, and then still looking for an internship. We’ll figure that out. And I’ll be in Austin. —Carson Tucker Advertising junior from Dallas

Go to summer school. I’m just taking calculus. —Cliff Archibald Business management sophomore from Katy It’s actually a very momentous start. It’s my family reunion we have every three years, and I’m graduating. Sixth year senior. So it’s going to be an awesome summer release,

GALLERY

First thing? I don’t know. Probably just hang out with my friends. I might go home for about a week or two and then come back for June. —Jenny Lee Biology sophomore from Katy

An independent Daily Texan Susannah Jacob Editor-in-chief

Lauren Moore | Daily Texan Cartoonist Susannah Jacob, Editor-in-Chief, and Drew Finke, Associate Editor are departing seniors.

Seeing behind the curtain Drew Finke Associate Editor

Editor’s note: A 30 column is a chance for departing permanent staff to say farewell and reflect on their time spent in The Daily Texan’s basement office. The term comes from the old typesetting mark (-30-) to denote the end of a line. I didn’t become a part of the Daily Texan until the spring semester of my penultimate year in college, but the paper has been a part of my life since my first semester on campus. Clippings of articles and cartoons I liked, once pinned to the wall of my freshman dorm room and now sitting in a box in my parents’ attic, are a testament to who I was and what interested me six years ago. Important and not-so-important events along the way — the election and re-election of our nation’s first African-American president, along with that day it actually snowed in Austin — are commemorated in whole issues of the Texan, wedged into a bookshelf or piled in my closet. I continue to hold on to these mementos because the Daily Texan captures these occasions, and the memories that accompany them, in a way that no other publication does: from a student’s point of view. When I shuffle back through these keepsake editions of the Texan years from now, I’ll be doing so not just to see what sorts of things were happening during my time at UT, but also to remember how students were thinking about those things. Before starting as a columnist at the Texan, I was part of the Senate of College Councils, and whenever the Texan made mention of the work that me and other members in Senate were doing, we couldn’t help but to feel proud as we cut out the article and taped it to the office door. If the Daily Texan considered Senate’s work important enough to write about, we must have been doing something right, or so my thinking went. No other newspaper could confer that sort of validation, because no other newspaper endeavors to connect directly with the 50,000 students who populate our campus.

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article or cartoonist. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Writing as a columnist showed me that the Texan’s reach extends far beyond the 40 Acres. Seeing your column Tweeted about by someone you’ve never met or getting an email from a stranger who especially disliked your argument imbues the act of publishing your opinion with the same particular type of addictive terror you get from activities far more likely to result in physical harm. I still feel anxious every morning I know a column I authored will be waiting in the Texan’s orange newspaper boxes. And it wasn’t until I joined the editorial board that I fully understood the scale and complexity of the operation it takes to get a fresh edition of the paper into those boxes each morning. I’m not a communication major — I’ve never even taken a journalism class — and the first time I walked downstairs to the Texan’s basement office was memorably intimidating. For all I knew about what it takes to put out a paper, its daily appearance in the news box outside my apartment could have been the result of some incredible magic. Since then, I’ve learned more, though not nearly all, about what it takes to produce an award-winning daily paper. As I walk up those stairs for the last time, the awe I feel toward the students who make the Texan happen every day will be no less diminished for having seen behind the curtain. I relish the nights of argument, deliberation and delirious laughter shared with Susannah, Pete and Edgar on the editorial board. After a year of Nike shorts, regents, Supreme Court trials, jumping into lakes and columns kearned to -50 just to fit it all in, we have emerged from the rabbit hole relatively unscathed — though I’m not sure that would be the case without the benefit of Nile’s preternatural patience. Thank you, Susannah, for giving me the opportunity to be a part of the Texan, and thank you to all the columnists who frustrated, intrigued and ultimately enlightened me. Reading your columns consistently reminded me just how important it is to share all the things you’re passionate about -30Finke is an architecture and urban studies senior from The Woodlands.

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline.com. Letters should be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability. The Texan does not run all submissions.

Editor’s note: A 30 column is a chance for departing permanent staff to say farewell and reflect on their time spent in The Daily Texan’s basement office. The term comes from the old typesetting mark (-30-) to denote the end of a line. The Daily Texan should be independent from the University of Texas at Austin. Today, it is not. In February, facing severely diminished advertising revenues and a budget shortfall, the Texas Student Media Board of Trustees considered a plan to curtail The Daily Texan’s five-day-per-week print schedule and weekly paper in the summer. In an industry short on optimism, there was a bright spot. Daily Texan alumni rallied to support the careful charting of a course forward for the Texan. In doing so, they gave hope that this institution’s success in fatter times may have produced a human legacy that will help it reconfigure in leaner, more uncertain ones. Hundreds of alumni spoke up. Many attended a March Texas Student Media Board meeting, not out of nostalgia, but out of a sharp awareness of what the Texan has accomplished in the past and present, and most importantly what it is capable of accomplishing in the future. Based on the calculation that print advertising remains 95 percent of the Texan’s revenue, we argued successfully, alongside the alumni, against the proposed curtailment. Yet, the financial realities and structural forces that caused Texas Student Media to entertain a print-schedule cut in the first place persist. In the face of an eroding reserve fund, student journalists equipped with fighting words cannot alone will a healthy future for newspapers, the Texan included. Protest accomplished — we now need a plan. Decades of battles over the students’ right to free speech resulted in an arrangement that puts total control over words and pictures in the hands of the student staff in the basement. Yet responsibility for the day-to-day management of the Texan’s finances, distribution methods (in print and online) and advertising rests effectively in the hands of the administration. Students must lead the efforts to revise the conceptual architecture of this news organization—that is the educational experience the Texan has to offer. The current structure of Texas Student Media, by virtue of the fixed division between the student-controlled content and administration-controlled business affairs, resists that change. This is no easy task, and at a college daily where staff turnover is eye-popping, professional advice is paramount. But the students in the basement must have executive control over the development of that model if it will succeed. In the aftermath of the March board meeting, which made very public the mismanagement that some of us have known about for a long time, the students in the basement began to devise a plan. Quickly, we grasped there exists no single solution to the challenges of engagement with screen-consumed readers and financial backing news organizations face. The Web department in particular proposed highly specific changes to the newsroom and delivery of the Texan online that aim to “make this whole newspaper a web department.” I queried writers, editors, photographers and videographers — all college students — they submitted ideas about how to make the newspaper consequential to their roommates, how to siphon from the ocean of ideas floating on this campus, how to greatly enlarge our contributor base by exploiting the fact that undergraduates are earnest, searching for groups to belong to and stories to believe in, and are byline-hungry. But when at the TSM board’s most recent meeting a member raised the idea of formally soliciting a plan for the Texan from the student staff the UT administration’s representative loudly objected to the proposal on the basis that she believed the plan would be impractical. Total independence alone in no way guarantees the Texan’s solvency, but it may be a means to executing one when the current structure stands in the way. What must happen at The Daily Texan in the next year, five years and decade is an experiment with no promise of success. The Texan must change not only to address a broken revenue model, but to use the Internet to grow into a bigger role in UT students’ daily lives, students who are screen-consumed and whose news consumption happens in a trickle throughout the day rather than over one meal with the paper. In this sense, the unlimited, free space of the Internet is not a burden but an opportunity to become something bigger and more present in students’ lives. Walk into The Daily Texan’s basement offices and you will find not just journalism students but a comprehensive representation of the many courses of study UT offers. Not all college papers are like this. The Texan has long been a bastion for those interested in thinking big, who graduate and pursue non-journalism careers but champion the independent-mindedness they formed during their years at the newspaper. We must defend this tradition. Austin has become a journalism town in some measure because Texan graduates longed for their basement days and created professional organizations in the hopes of recreating them. Former Texan staffers fill the pages (online and print) of the Austin Chronicle, Texas Monthly, The Texas Observer, the AustinAmerican Statesman and The Texas Tribune. In 1971, during a heated political battle between the UT regents and the Texas Student Publications board about the Texan charter which ultimately vested the control of the Texan’s finances in the hands of the administration, Daily Texan giant Walter Cronkite said, “It would be a disaster if, in the heat of present-day politics, an institution that has been eminently successful for 50 years, is allowed to die. Once undone, things like that are hard to piece back together.” -30Jacob is a history senior from Dallas.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burntorange newsstand where you found it.

EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@DTeditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


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Friday, May 3, 2013

5

News reporter says final goodbye By Mustafa Saifuddin This semester, our news team was constantly connected by text. I imagine my phone buzzing late at night some 10 years from now with a barrage of group texts. Something entirely random will trigger a memory — maybe someone will light a candle and recall a fancy pitch meeting amid stacks of old newspapers, or perhaps one of us will be folding laundry and remember a clothes dryer catching fire in West Campus. I hope it will be from Shabab, telling us what he’s finished on the most recent best day of his life, or maybe it will be from Jordan making a jelly bean run on her way to meet Sarah at the Supreme Court. Maybe Bobby will perk up and fix his bow tie after the buzz wakes him from the quick nap he takes after publishing his 9 millionth story. Elyana will be reminding us to listen for her broccoli pun on the next episode of “SNL,” or maybe Hannah Jane DeCiutiis will have finally booked that interview with Bill Gates. Maybe it will be a stray text

Scribbles by Matthew Stottlemyre | Daily Texan Staff Matt started in fall 2010 as a general reporter. He has served as a senior reporter, news editor and leaves as enterprise editor and associate managing editor. This illustration was completed in Matt’s famous orange pen, with which he sends his love to everyone he spent time with at The Texan. -30-

Mustafa Saifuddin joined The Daily Texan in Fall 2009 as a page designer. He has served as a senior designer, Double Coverage design editor and associate news editor.

Zachary Strain Daily Texan Staff

from Allie highlighting her feelings at the moment, or perhaps it will be Christine assuring us she has escaped the menaces of gnarly staircases, gluten and undipped chips. Maybe it will be an alert from Albert as he emerges from the archive room of another prestigious newspaper, or maybe Fechter will just be telling us to shut up in that loving way of his. Whatever the message says, I hope it comes. In my four-year on-again, off-again relationship with The Daily Texan, I’ve said farewell to the basement multiple times, but this

time, I won’t have the option of drifting back. I fell in love with the dedication and meticulousness of the staff on my first night of design when Thu handed me edits covered in red ink — proving she cared enough to pore over my work, circle every misaligned stroke and catch every dangling orphan. The next semester, after a frazzled and late first night as a senior designer, I was nearly too embarrassed to return to work. That was only until Olivia reassured a flustered freshman to let his mistakes be swept away by the current of the next day’s paper.

While I stared perplexedly at football helmets for Double Coverage, Veronica and Martina inspired some of my best graphics and introduced me to my favorite fonts. Somehow, we were always on the same page. There are so many more people, piñatas, boxes of popcorn tofu, mold spores and sketchy couches I will miss. I wish I could name them all. That being said, I hope the mushiness of this 30 column does not invalidate four years of sass, which is, after all, the cornerstone of this organization. -30-

Whisper sister looks back on collecting data, friends By Megan Strickland I wish I had more time. That sentence sums up how I feel about writing this on my last day in the basement that has, in the past two years, become more of a home to me than the place where I sleep at night. I wish I had more time to hear the incredible stories of people on this campus and try to find the words to tell them. I wish I had more time to sit with Alexa on the green sofa, nerding out over numbers, trying to whisper out fragile stories and find

ways to make people care about them half as much as we did. I wish I had more time with to hear Natasha grumble about how I had too many or too few numbers before she breathed life onto a gray page. I wish I had more time to spend antagonizing over the most effective way to tell stories with the best editors, Audrey and Matt, both of whom have the rare talent to take mammoth projects jumbled together and dissect them into readable content, always while fitting in some sort of grammar lesson or nugget

of wisdom along the way. They’ve encouraged me, reined me in and put up with my pre-print anxiety and believed I could finish stories I honestly thought I couldn’t. I don’t know what I’ll do without them. I wish I had more time with Andrew, who challenges me to think from new angles. I wish I had one more Friday with Shabab and Susannah, waiting for our 5 p.m. weekly fight with the Tower over document requests. I wish I had one more time to feel that giddy, anxious feeling I get every afternoon when Doug’s critique is due

and I find out if my stories flopped, flew or faltered. It’s been my compass. I feel directionless without it. I wish I had more time to spend with the people and working on the stories I’ve come to love during my time at the Texan, but my time for wishing is done, so I’ll make a wish for those of you coming back next year instead. I wish you all the best of stories. -30-

Now is the time.

ATTENTION ALL HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS! T e x a s

S t u d e n t

Marisa Vasquez | Daily Texan Staff Megan Strickland started working at The Daily Texan in fall 2011 as a general reporter. She worked as an enterprise reporter from spring 2012 until spring 2013, covering topics including external foundations, parking, the oil boom and University demographics.

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6

Friday, May 3, 2013

e Senior videographer reflects, prepares to move on By Demi Adejuyigbe

Demi Adejuyigbe started working at The Daily Texan in September 2011 as an issue staffer videographer. He is graduating in May 2013 as a senior videographer.

a single thing on my resume that I’m as proud of as my title of senior videographer at the Texan. When I joined the newspaper, very few people even knew there was a video department, but I’ve been given so many fantastic opportunities through the Texan that people actively ask me how to join for the next semester. As excited as I am to graduate from UT and move to Los Angeles, I wish there was some way for me to pack up all of the Texan in a suitcase and bring it with me — I’d even gladly deal with the inevitable TSA hell storm that would result from me smuggling an entire building of wonderful people onto a plane. -30-

ed an a I remember my very first r. piece for the Texan was a d

retrospective man-on-the-

ble street, where I went out on

the Communication Plaza

andand asked strangers about ws 9/11. It was in September of

2011, on the anniversary of the attacks, and the idea of presenting such a piece in a proper light wasn’t nearly as nerve-racking as the prospect of approaching strangers with a video camera. Twenty months later xed-and I’ve literally jumped at forthe idea, almost eschewing nicanews pieces entirely in favor omeof sitting down with people in-and talking about their ritejobs. If I’m being perfectly e al-honest, I don’t think there’s

Zachary Strain Daily Texan Staff

more opand ss. I ll. ope 30 date h is, e of

To the people who showed me kindness and patience. To those who shared their wisdom and time with me. To The Daily Texan, my second home: Gracias de todo corazón. -30-

check out

ONLINE stories videos photo galleries

dailytexanonline.com Zachary Strain Daily Texan Staff

UT RemembeRs Friday, May 3, 2013

An annual day of remembrance honoring members of The University of Texas at Austin community who died in the previous year.

Gbenga Yomi Afolabi David Blount Anderson Lloyd Anderson Maurice Angly, Jr. Efraim P. Armendariz Lisa Marie Arriaga Edward Carl “Ed” Baldwin, Jr. Stephen Travis Bannerman Gayle H. Barrington Nancy Barron Ernest F. Barth III Nancy Lee Muse Bass Barbara S. Becker Eric Baker Becker III Charles Bell Ola Bell Barbara Bellamy Charlotte Bement Edward W. Bielke III Edward Bloomer Jeffrey Matthew Bock Mary Ellen “Mel” Boggins James Ashton Braband Patricia Bradshaw Joe W. Bratcher, Jr. Jimmy Breazeale Robert W. “Bob” Briggs Joe Alan Brooks Alicia Brothers Charles Brown Horace Browning Hugh William “Bill” Bryant Albert Burditt Norma Y. Butler Christopher Dylan Bynum Daniel Clinton Cameron Frances Geraldine Tinkle “Gerry” Canant Winifred Ellen Carlson Matthew C. Casey Catherine “Chris” Catalfamo Eugene Chapa Letha Christian Cassandra Clark Kermeta J. “Kay” Clayton Peter O. Coltman William W. Cooper Elizabeth Breihan “Beth” Cotner David W. Crittenden Mary S. Crockett Joseph Howard “Joe” Culver, Sr. Karen Burns Dailey Melvin “Dan” Daniels

8:45-9:30 a.m.

Lowering of the Flags Ceremony, Main Mall

2- 3 p.m.

UT Remembers Service, Tower Garden

Dusk to Dawn

The “darkened Tower” lighting configuration will be revealed as the sun sets and be visible through out the night until sunrise on Saturday morning.

Michel A. Dassonville Joseph Clinton de Leon Coleman Beatrice C. DeLeon Paul Leighton Donoho William “Skip” Doppmann Arwin A. Dougal John Dugan Andrew Hugo Edburg Gregoria Escobedo Olivia A. Escobedo Helena Fair Evangeline “Eve” FalconKorems Mary Margaret Farabee Sandra Fletcher Patricia Susan Foster Jonathan Nicholas Frid Albert Gamboa Albert Garcia Delfina O. Garza Carolyn Gillmore Roselle M. Girard Linda L. Glessner Mark Edward Gobble Cruz Gonzales Francisco Gonzales Jessie Gonzales Robert Goodnow Charles Dick “Charlie” Grant, Jr. Suzanne Pearson “Suzy” Grantham Frank Drake Graydon Elias J. Guajardo Delores Gummelt Marilyn J. Hall Yonghan “Tom” Hao E. Glynn Harmon Shafika Harutunian Robert L. “Bob” Helmreich Marie Catherine Riley Gattuso Henery Virginia Hennig Jessica Tsung-Rong Her John H. Hicks Walter A. “Tony” Hightower James L. Hill Randy D. Holmes Sarah Ann Holmes Thomas Hayes “Tom” Horn Louise “Tex” Horvath O. C. Houston Bettelou Huff Charles Andrew Huizar

Fred Earl Ingerson Sherwood William Inkley John Johnsen Charles Jones Michael Fred “Mike” Jones Omer Edward Jordan Walter Paul Kelley Mary Kern Bradford Lanier Killen Yeojoon “Yeo” Kim Ellen Umphres King Albert Kirby Kristin M. “Kay” Knittel Zoltan F. “Kinki” Koi Margaret Konarik Michael Todd “Mike” Korth Dean Kuhles Jeffrey Matthew Kuhnlein George Lenox Bibiana “Bibi” Lopez David Hill Lopez William Jackson “Jack” Lord, Jr. Mary E. MacNamara Alma Faye “Abbie” Madden Constance Mahaffey Richard “Dick” Marshall Joshua David Martin Christine L. Matyear Benjamin McCullough Patsy McDonald Sharon McGraw Mason Phillip McGuire Sarah Ann McKinnon Kyle Lansing McNeely Esther Meckel Jeffrey L. Millar Edward Montoya Milton A. Morse Joe W. Neal Nancy Louise Neff Jane Nethercut Carrie O’Malley Edward W. “Ted” Odell Patricia DeLaRosa Ortega Roger Cook Osborn Mays Thomas OvertonBotello Louise Perdue Elmira Popova Robert P. “Bob” Popovich Catherine Potter Michael Gilles Purgason Joe Walter Reed Bessie Mae Reeves

List of names received through May 1, 2013.

Anastacia Saenz “Ann” Reyes Rodolfo G. Reyes Frederico C. “Freddy” Reyna, Jr. Salina Ann Rios Domingo “Mingo” Rodriguez Darrell K Royal Marianne C. Ruhnke Roxanna Diane Ruiz-Felter Lois Ann Russell Natalie V. Ryazanova Petry Earl “Pete” Sanders, Jr. Edgar W. “Sam” Sanford Gary Scheer Brooke E. Sheldon Melvin P. Sikes John Silber Clinton Lynch Smith Helen Baldwin Bauer Smith Herman Smith Jim E. Smith McDonald Smith Ruth Jon Smith Jo Soto John Paul Stark Carl Steele Hugo Steinfink Kevin “Shelby” Sullivan John F. Sutton, Jr. Sonja Swanson Helen Adele Tackett Ivan Teixeira Regan Terrier Howard L. Terry Nancy M. Terry Ronald Gene Thomas Margaret Ann Dunlap “Peggy” Thompson George B. Thurston Carol Treece Ellen Trout Beulah J. Tucker Tom A. Vestal, Jr. Carlos A. Villanueva Martin B. Villarreal Karel Weinert Russell J. Weintraub Erick Vonn Whitaker, Jr. Waynie Meredith Greer White Timothy Michael WhitfieldPeterson Jo Boatright Whitt David Willard “Dave” Williams, Jr. Billy Burben Wylie

CONGRATS

TEXASNT STUDDEIA ME

TO THE

ADVERTISING GRADUATES of 2013

Lindsey Hollingsworth Event Coordinator

Fredis Benitez

Account Executive

The Texas Student Media Advertising department would like to thank all of our graduates for all of their hard work! Jennifer Howton Lead Generator

We wish you the best with all of your future endeavors!

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Sports 7

Friday, May 3, 2013

Christian Corona, Sports Editor

BASEBALL

Gunnin’ for a Big 12 spot

By Peter Sblendorio With just two weekend series remaining on their schedule, the Longhorns realize the importance of winning their remaining conference games to earn a spot in the 2013 Phillips 66 Big 12 Baseball Championship. Three losses against Baylor over the weekend dropped Texas to 5-13 in conference play, good for last place in the Big 12 standings. The top eight teams in the nine-team conference qualify for the Big 12 tournament, and the Longhorns sit just one game behind Texas Tech for the final spot. “We’re one game out of the tournament, and that’s what we have to play for,” head coach Augie Garrido said. “We’re one game behind. Whether it’s one game behind in first place or one game behind in last place, you’re still one game behind. I know that our players see that we can play with anybody because they have.“ Because Texas Tech won the season series against the Longhorns, the Red Raiders hold the tiebreaker over Texas in the event that the two teams finish with the same record. The Red Raiders have threegame series against Oklahoma State and Baylor remaining, both of which will be played

Sports Editor

As hard a pill as it will be to swallow, the Longhorns won’t reach the NCAA Tournament for the second year in a row. Despite boasting a Big 12best 2.56 team ERA, Texas is 5-12 in conference play — good for last place in the Big 12. With six of their last eight regular season games against Big

BULLS

MLB WHITE SOX

RANGERS

TOP TWEET Nathan Thornhill @NathanThornhill

Shelby Tauber | Daily Texan Staff Freshman C.J Hinojosa has played well for the struggling Longhorns all season, currently batting .298 which is good enough for third on the team. He has also posted a team-high 25 RBIs with just two series left for the team.

in Lubbock. Texas could improve its chances of making the tournament with a strong showing at home this weekend against Kansas State, who sits in third place in the conference with a 9-6 record. The first game of

the three-game series is scheduled to begin Friday at 6:35 p.m. CT. The final Big 12 series for the Longhorns will take place in Fort Worth against TCU on May 16-18. Texas sits three games behind the

12 foes, the 23-20 Longhorns could finish at or below .500 this year. Their 3.8 runs per game and 3.31 runs per game in Big 12 play are the fewest in the conference. They won’t do it, but it’s time that fans started focusing on next year. Corey Knebel, Erich Weiss and Mark Payton might be gone, but Texas will have the pieces in place to have a solid squad in 2014. There are obvious strides to be made from a hitting standpoint. Texas’

lineup has let its outstanding starting pitching down all year long. “I know it doesn’t look like it but we do practice, we do talk to them, we do have offensive signals,” head coach Augie Garrido said. “I’m really not that confused. I think it’s a matter of them getting their confidence and we’ve been waiting for it. And it hasn’t happened. Only in hindsight will we know if it

FUTURE continues on page 8

SOFTBALL

seventh-place Horned Frogs and would have the opportunity to jump them in the standings if the standings remain the same. TCU plays West Virginia on the road

K-STATE continues on page 8

Kansas State @ Texas

Friday, 6:35 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, 1 p.m.

Shweta Gulati Daily Texan Staff

All signs point to win for Texas Boasting a record of 426, 12-2, No. 6 Texas hits Stillwater this weekend for a battle of the oranges. Burnt or not, the Longhorns have the advantage over the Cowgirls if rankings, winning percentage or conference standings are any indicator. But that was also the case when the Longhorns faced Oklahoma State last season. At 35-6, 9-4, 2012’s No. 5/6 Texas faced a 2216, 5-6 opponent in Oklahoma State. And yet the Longhorns slipped after capturing a 3-2 win Friday, with an embarrassing shutout at home that nearly lost them the series. The Longhorns came through with the rubber match, but head coach Connie Clark was disappointed. “We talked a little about showing more excitement for the game,” Clark

said after last year’s series. “They have aspirations to keep momentum on their sides and to do that, you have to have the action to show that. I just didn’t see that yesterday, so we talked long and hard about the consistency.” As one of just four teams to have both a slugging percentage of .485 or more and an ERA of 1.65 or better, Texas brings that consistency this year. The team is 8-0 on the road and a series sweep would match the program record for single-season road victories. Before this season, the Longhorns never had fewer than three road losses during a campaign. “Everyone says going on the road is really hard, but I think it’s almost more fun,” freshman pinch runner Rachel Scott said. “You don’t have any distractions like you sometimes do at home. It’s all about softball and I like the sense

Texas @ Oklahoma St.

Friday, 7 p.m. Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday, 12 p.m. of team bonding.” Scott uses the traveling experiences to excel on the field. Most recently, she scored in all three matchups against Texas Tech last weekend — bringing her season total to nine runs though she has just six official at-bats. “We just need to take it one pitch, play and game at a time,” Scott said. “We need to focus on what we have left and not get ahead of ourselves.” Texas will close regular season with a final match against Baylor at home May 12. The senior day game is the teams’ third matchup

ORANGE continues on page 8

“Am I the only one who still turns up the volume when ‘Call Me Maybe’ comes on?”

SPORTS BRIEFLY Longhorns sign Martez Walker

Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff Corey Knebel, who was just named to the midseason Golden Spikes Award watch list, has a 2.33 ERA and eight saves for the Longhorns this season. But the MLB may be in his near future.

MEN’S GOLF Kim Bruins has been an integral part of the dominant Texas pitching staff this season, posting a 9-0 record with a 1.65 ERA.

By Jori Epstein

NBA PLAYOFFS NETS

Future all that’s left for the Longhorns By Christian Corona

SIDELINE

Horns want more after clinching a Big 12 title By Jacob Martella Topping a national championship from the year before can be tough, but last week the Longhorns accomplished something the team from last year didn’t: win a Big 12 title. But now the Longhorns are looking to turn that momentum from the conference championship into another NCAA national championship run. “We’ve won our last three tournaments and we’ve got a lot of momentum,” senior Cody Gribble said. “We still have a lot of work to do.” The 2013 version of the Longhorns is different from the team that won the national championship last season. Dylan Frittelli graduated last spring and Jordan Spieth turned pro back in December. Head coach John Fields said the team this season is using that as motivation. “There’s a challenge to them and no matter what we say, they’re going to take that challenge on,” Fields said. Last year’s team ended the regular season with seven wins, compared to four for this year’s team. The Longhorns headed into the NCAA Championship last season as the favorites to win it, but this year are sitting behind Alabama and California. Even with the underdog title, Gribble said he

doesn’t know if that benefits the team. “We know that we can beat them,” Gribble said. “Seven times out of 10, they might have their day, but if we play to our capabilities, we can beat any team out there.” Texas’ Big 12 Championship title last week was the team’s first conference title since 2004, the last of three straight titles for the Longhorns. Despite delays for weather, the Longhorns came out with a four-stroke win and freshman Brandon Stone took home the individual title. Stone said the team title means more to him that the individual title. “At the end of the day, people at Texas remember the team and not the individuals,” Stone said. Gribble, who finished tied for third at five over, said winning the Big 12 tournament was a big goal for him and fellow senior Julio Vegas. “Winning nationals was great, but the Big 12 is something that you can keep and in this region it’s just as big. It’s something we’re never going to forget.” The Longhorns will begin their NCAA run at the Regional Championship May 16-18 at a site to be determined. Gribble said this team still feels like it can get a second national title. “When we get there, we’re going to go down swinging,” Gribble said.

The Longhorns signed Pershing (Detroit) guard Martez Walker to a letter of intent, Texas announced Thursday. Walker, a three-star prospect, according to rivals. com, becomes the fourth player to sign with the Longhorns this year, joining fellow guards Demarcus Croaker, Isaiah Taylor and Kendal Yancy. Walker averaged 20.4 points and seven rebounds per game as a senior last season, earning a spot on the Detroit Free Press Class A All-State First Team. Pershing went 46-4 over the past two seasons, including a 22-0 record in conference play and a 25-1 mark last year, when Walker led the Doughboys to the Michigan Class A state quarterfinals. “Martez is an unorthodox player who has a knack for scoring,” head coach Rick Barnes said. “The thing that gives him a chance to be really good at our level is his competitive nature. Like most young guys, he’ll have to get stronger. When he does, his ability to score the basketball along with his mental toughness and passion to compete will allow him to be very successful.” —Christian Corona

Knebel named to Golden Spikes list On Thursday afternoon, USA Baseball announced the 60-man midseason Golden Spikes Award watch list. Since 1978, USA Baseball has honored the top amateur baseball player in the country with the Golden Spikes Award. Following the first-ever presentation of the Award to Bob Horner of Arizona State, the Golden Spikes Award has been presented each year to the player who exhibits exceptional athletic ability and exemplary sportsmanship. Among the 60 names that appeared on the list was Texas pitcher Corey Knebel. Knebel holds a 3-3 record this season with a 2.33 ERA in 37 innings of work. He also has eight saves as opponents are hitting just .185 against him. —Matt Warden


sports

8 -30-

Friday, May 3, 2013

-30-

Writer cherishes time at Texan By Sara Beth Purdy

Andrea Macias | Daily Texan Staff Sports writer Nick Cremona showcases his trademark personality every chance he gets.

Writer pays tribute to colleagues By Nick Cremona Here’s to everyone who has spent an entire day and most of the night in the remarkably vibrant basement that houses The Daily Texan. To Frank Serpas, who will likely go unnoticed by many, but is the life support keeping things running behind the scenes at Texas Student Media. Frank, you’re awesome. To Trey Scott, who gently pushed me into the field of journalism, even if my only experience was writing snarky notes on Facebook about cats. Natasha Smith, master of all things design and one of the most accommodating people I have had the pleasure to work with, keep doing your thing, girl. Elisabeth Dillon and Lawrence Peart became the cutest, most conscientious couple of photographers to ever grace the Texan with their presence and will go on to flourish in whatever endeavor they choose. To Christian Corona, who can crank out stories with more depth and brute force than anyone I have ever seen, much respect to you, sir. Susannah Jacob, you may have never fully understood my appreciation for you, but I think you have a great head on your shoulders

ORANGE continues from page 7

of the season, after Texas trumped the Bears on both turfs in March. Though the

and I know you will succeed as a thought-provoking journalist sooner rather than later. Laura Wright, you may think I’m a prick who daydreams about yoga pants and sports, and you’re probably right, but I still respect you and think you’re one hell of a journalist. Bobby freaking Blanchard, the man of many bowties and different hues of orange, your mark on the Texan will always be a fanciful and productive one. Keep up the good work, Bobby, and for goodness’ sake, take a nap once in awhile. Pu, I can’t spell your last name, but thanks for always making me laugh. To Jorge Corona, an underrated filmmaker who should have his compass set on Cannes or Sundance, save me a seat! Life and Arts would be nothing without the superb direction of Kelsey McKinney, who happens to employ some of the coolest business cards in the game. Hannah Smothers, I don’t think I’ll ever understand all the angst you harbor toward seemingly everything, but I do enjoy reading your excellent stories whenever I can. Hayley Fick, a woman of few words but many passions, including NASA. That’s inspiring and don’t ever stop doing what you love. There are too many 5-1 home match March 24 went smoothly, Texas struggled in Waco on March 23 through eight scoreless innings against Baylor’s ace Whitney Canion. Finally, Taylor Thom and Kim Bruins connected

people to list individually, but the news team continually produces great content and even if no one is reading your work now, the experience you are gaining now will benefit you in the future. You know this already. That’s why you work for the Texan, right? To the designers, copy editors, comics crew, photo staff and countless others that worked their tails off every day to produce an excellent daily newspaper, know that I love each and every one of you. Doug Warren, I’ve learned a lot from you and I appreciate the time you devoted to help us kids out. My time at the Texan isn’t about what I was able to do, because believe me it wasn’t anything groundbreaking. Rather, I feel that the enriching environment I was in for the past two years and change has shaped me into a more helpful and understanding person who is primed to achieve his goals outside of the classroom and this university. Looking back, I would not have spent any less time in that once gloomy basement because it would have meant missing out on some of the most memorable moments I’ve had as an undergrad. Long live the Texan. -30on bases-loaded plays to aid Luna’s 14 strikeouts in the win. “[Canion] is a great pitcher,” Bruins said after the match. “You have to be really strong mentally and have confidence

About three years ago, a friend challenged me to try out for the Texan. He had seen an ad seeking applicants and pushed me to give it a shot. Not being a journalism major, I dismissed the idea but his challenge quickly turned into a dare. I quickly put together an article about Justin Tucker and one of his many game-winning kicks and a week later I was at my first staff meeting. That first semester, I started out on the swimming and diving beat. It was a fun one to learn on — not too many events to cover and a large range of feature topics. I even got a chance to meet Ryan Lochte and Michael Phelps at the USA Swimming Grand Prix that January! I transitioned to the softball beat the next two springs. It was my first major beat, and I remember feeling proud that I could be trusted with one of the major sports. It was incredible watching them play. They are truly a talented set of athletes. This past fall I finally got

Arnold newmAn Masterclass

in yourself knowing that you can succeed. I was just thinking stay calm, keep your hands up and try to hit something hard somewhere.” Texas opens in Stillwater Friday at 7 p.m.

there we will need everyone from the freshman to the seniors to have our goals in mind.” How much Texas can succeed this weekend will depend heavily on how well its stars perform in favored events like the 400-meter hurdles and sprint relays. Last year, then-sophomore Danielle Dowie won the 400-meter hurdles while the 4X400 and 4x100-meter relay teams finished in 2nd and 4th, respectively. With Texas A&M’s departure of the conference, No. 2 Kansas will be the only real threat standing in the way of Texas and a repeat Big 12 Outdoor Championships title on Sunday.

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21st and Guadalupe Streets Free admission, donations welcome 512-471-8944 www.hrc.utexas.edu/visit

This weekend Texas will travel to Kansas City, Kansas, for the annual Big 12 Championship regatta. Although the spring season has been filled with ambiguity and struggle with injuries, Texas is optimistic heading in to the weekend to defend their Big 12 title. Sara Walton experienced her first Big 12 Championship as a novice last year in Oklahoma when Texas took the win by a single point over the Sooners. Overall Walton has been a huge

never forget. Thank you to Christian and Trey, who coached me through these last two semesters as a permanent staff member and who gave me the opportunity to cover both the baseball team and the national championship volleyball team. I truly learned a lot, and this has been one of my favorite years at the Texan. I also want to thank the other sports editors over the past three years: Nick, Dan, Will and Sameer. Thank you for giving me a chance and helping me to improve! Thank you to Chris, Rachel, Peter, Garrett and Wes for being fabulous co-beat writers! Those games in the press box were some of my favorite times! Looking back on the week I was hired, I am incredibly thankful that I was given this opportunity. I have learned so much and have enhanced my writing ability since I started. Plus, being at the Texan gave me the perfect excuse to spend all of my time watching sports rather than doing my homework! -30-

Andrea Macias | Daily Texan Staff Sara Beth Purdy covered Longhorns men’s swimming and diving (fall 2010), softball (spring 2011 and 2012), women’s soccer (fall 2011), volleyball (fall 2012) and baseball (spring 2013).

WOMEN’S track & field | Sebastian Herrera The home stretch of the outdoor season begins Friday for the No. 10 women’s team as it participates in the Big 12 Outdoor Championships in Waco. After weeks of competing in non-scored events the Longhorns have had more than enough preparation to enter these last phases of the outdoor season. For interim head coach Rose Brimmer, her expectation for the Big 12 Indoor Championships can be summed up in one word: winning. “I expect to win,” Brimmer said. “The upperclassmen have experienced winning a Big 12 title and they know what it takes. But in order to get

a chance to write about volleyball, a team I had been watching from the sidelines for years. As a sports writer, it is easier, and more enjoyable, to write an article about a winning team, and I was given plenty of opportunities to do that. I concluded the season with a trip to Louisville to watch them win the national championship — the highlight of my time at the Texan. My final beat at the Texan was baseball. I remember how excited I was when Christian, my editor, told me that I was going to cover baseball this spring. Baseball is by far my favorite sport and I had been itching for that assignment since I started. Even though the baseball team has not been as successful as desired, it has certainly been a good experience. Texas head coach Augie Garrido is a character in an interview and always made me laugh. I want to thank everyone I came into contact with at the Texan. Even though I didn’t share your major or your class schedule, you incorporated me into a community that I will

contributor to the varsity team this season. Landing herself in Texas’ second boat lead by coxswain Kassie Budzik, Walton holds herself and her boat to the highest of standards. “There is obviously a huge rivalry with OU. After they challenged us at the Longhorn Invitational in March, our momentum dropped dramatically.,” Walton said. “As a team we are all finally showing up for each other in our boats making the fight for our title this weekend an exciting one.”

K-STATE

continues from page 7

on May 10-12 in its final Big 12 series before hosting the Longhorns. Although they are unhappy with their current place in the standings, the Texas players remain motivated and focused on their final games and fight for a spot in the conference tournament. “We’re a great team,” junior pitcher Josh Urban said. “Honestly we could be first in the Big 12 right now but we just have to keep battling. I know luck hasn’t gone our way, so we’ll keep battling and hope things turn out the way

FUTURE continues from page 7

does or doesn’t. We’re running out of time.” But if the Longhorns can take a page out of their playbook from 35 years ago, they’ll be fine. Three years removed from its last national championship, with 12 Southwest Conference titles in the previous 13 years, Texas came into 1978 with high expectations. The Longhorns had won 11 straight games going into their SWC opener against Arkansas. After a pair of one-run losses to the Razorbacks to begin the series, shortstop Ron Gardenhire broke his thumb sliding into second base as Texas was trying to avoid being swept in the series finale. “There’s no way he can play,” the team doctor said. “He’s got a broken thumb and it’s going to require surgery.” “Let me try to finish the game,” Gardenhire told the team doctor. There were two men on when Gardenhire stepped to the plate in the next inning. “Now, look. You can practice swinging and if you can’t swing,

we want it.” After failing to qualify for the NCAA tournament last season for the first time in 14 years, the Longhorns are in danger of missing the tournament again this season. Texas would likely need to win the Big 12 tournament to qualify this season. Despite this, freshman catcher Jeremy Montalbano says his team has no plans of giving up without a fight. “We’re the University of Texas,” Montalbano said. “We have too much pride to throw in the towel.” sacrifice bunt,” head coach Cliff Gustafson told Gardenhire. “I think I can swing,” Gardenhire told Gustafson. “Ok, go ahead and swing,” Gustafson said. “But if hurts you, just bunt.” Gardenhire launched a three-run home run. He went on to double and homer again, racking up a school-record 10 RBIs in the game. It would be his last of the season. Texas, also without starting pitchers Ricky and Kem Wright, went on to go just 12-12 in SWC play, missing out on the conference and NCAA tournaments that year. The Longhorns went on to win 10 consecutive SWC titles after that season, going to the College World Series eight of the next 11 years. Texas isn’t going anywhere this year. If they were, the Longhorns would have scored more than four runs during a three-game sweep at the hands of Baylor last weekend and more than one run in a win over Prairie View A&M on Tuesday. This season won’t be salvaged, but don’t count on Texas missing the postseason three years in a row.


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Friday, May 3, 2013

9

Web designer remembers friends By Amyna Dosani

Charlie Pearce | Daily Texan Staff Ryan Enrique Sanchez started in the Web department as senior Web staff in the summer of 2010. He has risen to the Web editor position, but now is the social media editor.

Social media editor reflects on unexpected career at Texan By Ryan Sanchez I often find myself surprised when I keep coming back to the Daily Texan basement, but after two years, I find myself descending the steps for one last night of work. As a bilingual education major with little real interest in writing or reporting, I never thought I would work on a newspaper, but when my roommate told me that the Texan was starting a Web department and needed members, I figured why the hell not. I felt completely out of place, surrounded by people who had worked together for at least a year, and was in a foreign setting, with newspaper jargon being thrown left and right and me not sure what the hell it meant. After the first web editor left, I was quickly given the mantle of responsibility and made my own Web team. Now, two years later

UNS AD IRNE FOR ONL

E! FRE d wor

ad s

only

as the social media editor, I couldn’t feel more at home. I’ve tried to leave before, but I couldn’t pull myself away from this new family I had bonded with, and had to help however I could. Even though I know I will never forget the time and experiences I’ve had here, I know I will miss working at the Texan more than anything. Some things I’ll remember: Working late night and early morning shifts to make sure that the paper’s content went online and spread through the Web and responding to our readers’ comments via our site and Twitter and Facebook pages. Having the immense support from Doug and Jennifer to acclimate me to the fast-paced setting of the newsroom, and amazing managing editors like Veronica and Lena to help out the new blood, and Audrey, Aleks, and Trey to help me iron out any problems.

I barely knew anything about the journalism department here, but you can bet I knew I was working for this paper. And to my Web friends, I’ll never forget hacking the codes, puffing cheese polymers and watching out for those bouillon constrictors and croissantulas in the bathroom. Thank you, Hayley, Ryan, Tyler, Omar and everyone else for making me feel so welcome and supported and, of course, for making me laugh until I couldn’t breathe. Now, can someone please call pest control already? I’ll always be thankful for my time here and look forward to seeing how the paper continues to grow. -30-

Marisa Vasquez | Daily Texan Staff Amyna Dosani is a graduating journalism senior. She started in fall of 2010 as a reporter and copy editor. She has also worked as an associate copy desk chief and recently joined the Web staff.

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Having Hayley and the amazing Web staff to work through the night with, and many bleary-eyed mornings, as well as going through three versions of the website. Working together with the department heads to fix any problems that might have come up. Coming into the office and hearing Jody’s singsong voice, and knowing that there was a very good chance that a plate of her baked goods was not far off. Having Elyana nearby to let me know what was going on in the office and #BowTieBobby to share a laugh with. If I’m completely honest, I still feel a bit out of place writing this column, as if I’ve walked in on someone else’s scene. But even though a newsroom is one of the last places I thought I would find myself, I wouldn’t trade this experience for anything — Except maybe for all the sleep I’ve lost. -30-

What’s that cliche about ups and downs? That’s how I’d describe my time at The Daily Texan. It’s been an incredible three years in this endearing basement, where I worked (very) briefly as a reporter, extensively as a copy editor and associate copy desk chief and recently as a member of the web staff. As a staff, we encountered a lot of learning opportunities, and I think that is exactly what made working here so great. I am so grateful to have worked here and to have contributed to such a dynamic, prestigious publication throughout my college career with some truly amazing people. I always knew, even in high school, that if I attended UT-Austin, I would most definitely work for The Daily Texan. I barely knew anything about the journalism department here, but you can bet I knew I was working for this paper. While I wasn’t a reporter

for long, I found my niche at the copy desk, where I could be the perfectionist grammar nerd that I am. I always looked forward to seeing all the cool hairstyles and makeup looks Elyana would rock that day, and I still don’t know if it was a blessing or a curse that Klarissa generously fed my Snickers Ice Cream bar addiction every week with her leftover Dine-in Dollars. Overall, I don’t think anyone has sass like the copy and design department. No copy cat or kitten can compare to Riley the copy LION. Except the very rad Kristine. Or Bow Tie Bobby. Outside the copy desk I was surrounded by friendly faces, such as the kickass, inspiring personality of Audrey; the ever-singing, ever-reporting, everdeliciously-baking Jody; Bow Tie Bobby, who has worked with almost every department possible at this office; the witty, hilariously cynical mind of Aleks; Omar and his beautiful wardrobe; and the cool and hardworking Pu.

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10 COMICS

Comics

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Friday, May 3, 2013

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Friday, May 3, 2013

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Life & Arts

Friday, May 3, 2013

11

First website returns for Web’s 20th birthday

-30- | MULTIMEDIA

By Stuart Railey

In celebration of the World Wide Web’s 20th anniversary, research laboratory CERN will reinstate the first website. Originally brought online in 1993, CERN’s antiquated website was a public announcement for free access to the lab’s database and permitted users to view documents, projects and programs when connected. Operating under the URL info.cern.ch, CERN’s small project would later evolve into one of the most critical developments in technological history.

Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff

A PLACE TO CALL YOUR OWN — LAWRENCE PEART AND JORGE CORONA I’m not as huge a Daily Texan self-promoter nor a journalism defender as many other people who work at this paper. What I am is a tenacious fan and defender of a place where one can meet like minds and grow in doing what one loves. A place to discover. I’ve made great friends here. I’ve started a journey. When a board cuts wages, the people who depend on those wages cannot spend as much time and effort at their workplace, having to make up for the loss of living expenses. Content will suffer, and therefore readership will suffer. The few who can work as much as they could before will not be able to keep up the work of many. I hope the board realizes this before others are unable to start their journey. I was lucky to come when I did, and I think we may be lucky to leave when we do. My future will forever have an echo of my time here. -30-

EAST

continues from page 12 because there aren’t very many stories that show us different paths for them. They’re usually the girlfriend or the wife or the sister or the sex object, and when they are strong and acting with a lot of agency, it’s usually because the script was written for a man, and then the gender was changed at the last second. DT: When Sarah is preparing to infiltrate The East, or when The East is carrying out one of its “jams,” the members put on nice suits or bleach their hair to slip into the role. Do you ever find yourself doing something similar as an actor? Marling: That’s such a great

IRON

observation! We’re obsessed with presentation and the surface of things. Everybody’s Facebook is literally just about them pitching themselves as they see themselves, and trying on different versions of themselves, and selling it or sharing it. I think the same is true in this story. The members of The East have realized that you shave the beard, you cut the hair, you pop in some pearl earrings, you put on a Rolex and a suit and suddenly you can infiltrate a totally different space from how you feel. They’re very interested in the idea of disguise and playing with the fact that people are so obsessed with the surface of things that they’re willing to overlook the fact that they’re letting a group of eco-terrorists into their home because they present well. It’s true that that’s also

very much the part of an actor’s life. You have to get really comfortable with dissolving your identity and refashioning as a character and doing it a couple of times a year with different people and still holding on to who you are in between those things. It’s not an easy process. DT: The terrorists in the film have an eye-for-aneye philosophy. To what length do you think people should be held accountable for their actions? Marling: That’s a good question, and that’s why we made a movie about it. It’s funny how the film, we feel this way, we don’t know the answers. All we can do is present the questions. It doesn’t matter which side of the political spectrum you’re on, people are frustrated and

continues from page 12

and even the ability to breathe fire. While Marvel’s films have delved into some pretty outlandish concepts, from demigods to alternate dimensions, Black never figures out if he should handle this as science fiction or supernatural fantasy, which results in a sloppilyexecuted threat for Tony Stark to battle. Even if the villains don’t necessarily work in concept, one of “Iron Man 3”’s most pleasant surprises is Kingsley’s performance as the terroristic Mandarin. Kingsley is all bluster and threats in his terroristic dispatches, but when he and Stark come face-to-face, Black’s wry sense of humor comes into play in an unexpected but hugely entertaining fashion. James Badge Dale plays one of Killian’s cronies, and he brings a menacing intensity to some of the film’s

most harrowing sequences. Despite moments of charisma and competence, Pearce is a much less effective antagonist. As his character becomes more brazenly evil, Pearce gets increasingly hammy, and by the time “Iron Man 3” arrives at its rousing fireworks show of a finale, he’s swinging for the fences with his delivery of every line, missing more often than he connects. While “Iron Man 3” handles its multitude of villains better than most films, this may be an instance where Black gets a little too clever for his own good, and it’s hard not to wish he had given Kingsley more to do. Although “Iron Man 3” isn’t Marvel’s best effort, it’s a strong outing and another exciting, hilarious collaboration between Downey Jr. and Black. While the film suffers

Even if the villains don’t necessarily work in concept, one of “Iron Man 3”’s most pleasant surprises is Kingsley’s performance as the terroristic Mandarin. from the same overstuffed syndrome as many other comic-book sequels, it’s the rare comic book film that’s able to explore new territory for its hero in a roundly compelling, well-acted fashion, making for an impressive start to the summer movie season.

angry right now. The question becomes, what do you do? You look at past protest movements. The nonviolence of the freedom riders who got on buses and went from D.C. into the Deep South. That’s really brave. Is that the right way? Or … as some movements have done, [do] they go to structures and say, “What’s happening here is wrong. We have a right to set it on fire”? Is nonviolence correct, or is violence because violence is being used against you correct? We don’t know the answers. We’re not saying, “Corporations are bad and eco-terrorists are good.” We’re saying, “There are bad and good ideas and bad and good people on both sides.” That makes it massively confusing as to what we should do next, but we can’t do anything right until we start talking about it.

Glock family feud Behind Glock GmbH, one of the best-known handgun manufacturers in the world, is an Austrian family embroiled in a legal quagmire. After divorcing his wife of 49 years, Gaston Glock and his new wife, who is in her early 30s, ousted the family from its own business. The three children raised by Gaston and Helga Glock were expected to take control of the company over the next few decades, but this plan fell through. In an attempt to regain some custody of the company’s financial assets, Helga Glock has recruited the help of an Atlanta law firm to regain 15 percent of the family trusts, alimony from the divorce and a division of property between the ex-spouses. Intel announces new redesign for processor chip The next generation of Intel’s impressive Atom processors, compact chipsets that first launched in 2008, will be revealed in a press conference May 6. Atom processors are used in a number of mobile devices and have a surprising amount of processing power despite their penny-sized

dimensions. The new chipsets will feature a quadcore design and increased battery life. Blackberry CEO claims that tablets are doomed Tablet computers have created an extensive amount of buzz in the electronics market over the last few years, threatening to replace mobile platforms like laptops and even cellphones. In spite of success stories including Apple’s iPad and the Microsoft Surface, Blackberry CEO Thorsten Heins expressed skepticism about their continued success. In an interview at the Milken Institute conference on Monday, Heins stated that the tablet industry will fall from power in the next five years. Considering that Blackberry failed to stake a claim in the tablet market with its “PlayBook” device, this statement comes across more as a bitter admission of defeat than anything else. Blackberry has not released any official plans to re-enter the tablet market. Apple sells $17 billion in debt In the absence of Steve Jobs’ galvanizing presence, Apple Corporation Inc. has been on a steady decline in profits over the last year. With a slowdown in sales, company shareholders are itching to gain a cut of Apple’s impressive cash pile, which rests at $145 billion. Hoping to give a boost to declining stock values, CEO Tim Cook announced on April 23 that he would begin selling about $17 billion worth of company debt. These bonds mark not only a financial precedent within the company, but also within the United States. Apple has not sold bonds in more than 15 years and the $17 billion offering marks the largest of its kind in history.


Life & Arts 12

Friday, May 3, 2013

Kelsey McKinney, Life & Arts Editor

Illustration by Amanda Nguyen | Daily Texan Staff

Austin’s Procrastination Station By Elizabeth Williams Finals are almost here, so The Daily Texan wants to help you procrastinate to your fullest potential. What better way to avoid studying than to go out and take advantage of all the quirky entertainment Austin has to offer? Here’s an event calendar that will have you partying all night and feeling miserable for your 9 a.m. final the following morning. MONDAY, MAY 6 What: of Montreal Aftershow: Easy Tiger and Gang Sign When: 11 p.m. Where: Mohawk – Indoor Cost: $5, free for of Montreal ticket holders If you can’t fork out the $18+ to see psychedelic rockers of Montreal, check out the aftershow with tunes provided by Austin’s own Easy Tiger and Gang Sign. It’s sure to be poprock-tacular, and it’ll keep you out till at least 2 a.m. TUESDAY, MAY 7 What: Austin Poetry Slam and Mic Exchange When: 8:30 p.m. and 11 p.m. Where: Spiderhouse Ballroom Cost: $5 Feeling uninspired? Apathetic toward finals and perhaps life in general? Head to Spiderhouse for some inspiration and energy, courtesy of their legendary slam poetry and hip-hop open mic night. WEDNESDAY, MAY 8 What: Spite Club – The Insult Comedy Game Show When: Doors at 9 p.m., show at 10 p.m. Where: Red 7 Cost: Free for 21+, $5 for under 21 Local comedians go headto-head in insult comedy. Come watch some people try to be funny and mean at the same time. Who knows, it could provide you with the much-needed fuel to finally tell

Illustration by Lindsay Rojas | Daily Texan Staff

off that snarky T.A. THURSDAY, MAY 9 What: The Encyclopedia Show: Puberty! When: Doors at 7:30 p.m., show at 8 p.m. Where: North Door Main Stage Cost: $5 Each monthly edition of “The Encyclopedia Show” is a hodgepodge of creative presentations on a theme taken from “an actual encyclopedia.” This month’s theme is that magically cringe-inducing phase known as puberty. If you just can’t get enough of something you went through in middle school, then this is the show for you. FRIDAY, MAY 10 What: Walking Ghost Tour – Ghosts of the Warehouse District When: 8 p.m. Where: Moonshine Patio Bar

and Grill Cost: $20 Take a walking ghost tour around downtown and lose your ability to sleep for the rest of finals. You can totally spend all those waking hours studying and not worrying that a ghost or two followed you home and is now haunting your dorm room closet. What: Super Heroes Costume Party with Super Creeps: David Bowie Tribute Band and DJ Manateemann When: 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Where: Spiderhouse Ballroom Cost: $10, $8 with a costume If ghosts aren’t your thing, don your superhero costume (admit it — everyone has one) and watch a David Bowie tribute band at the Spiderhouse Ballroom. Also, there will be a disc jockey named DJ

Manateemann, and that’s kind of amazing. SATURDAY, MAY 11 What: Rocky Horror Picture Show When: Midnight Where: Alamo Drafthouse Village Cost: $5 Come up to the lab and see what’s on the slab! If you don’t know what that means, then you are an RHPS virgin, and you need to fix that ASAP. Lucky for you, Austin’s Rocky Horror live cast Queerios performs the cult classic every Saturday night at the Village. Get ready for a whole bunch of lineshouting, time-warp-dancing, “Sweet Transvestite”-singing, toilet-paper-throwing fun. What: Animal Party – Second Saturday Silent Disco When: 10 p.m. Where: Spiderhouse Outdoor

Chapel It’s a silent disco dance party, and you get to dress up as your favorite animal. Sounds a heck of lot better than studying, right? FYI, I’ll be the girl dressed like the quokka. SUNDAY, MAY 12 What: The Great Gatsby 3-D When: 10 p.m. and after, various times Where: Alamo Drafthouse Cost: $13 Admit it, you’re mildly interested in seeing what has become of the highly anticipated “Great Gatsby.” But hey, 3-D Leo DiCaprio should be reason enough to check this out. Bonus points if your finals have anything whatsoever to do with “The Great Gatsby.” MONDAY, MAY 13 What: Clubhouse

Where: The New Movement When: 9:30 p.m. Cost: Pay what you can By this point in finals, your brain is most likely fried beyond the point of creating any original thought whatsoever. So instead of staring at the wall, check out the Clubhouse, where you can watch 10 comics try out totally fresh material. It’s nice to see someone else on the spot for a change, huh? TUESDAY, MAY 14 What: Natural Child w/ Birdcloud When: 9 p.m. Where: Red 7 Cost: $10, $12 at the door Wait – it’s Tuesday? And finals are over? Rejoice and be merry! Go forth to Red 7 to party with some dirty Nashville garage rockers. And then get some sleep. Seriously.

Filmmaker shares inspiration, Sequel’s scaled-down plot surprises challenges of eco-terrorism film By Alex Williams

By Alex Williams Writer-actress Brit Marling first came to South By Southwest two years ago with low-key sci-fi films “Another Earth” and “Sound of My Voice.” “The East,” her newest collaboration with “Sound of My Voice” director Zal Batmanglij, was the Closing Night film at this year’s festival. Marling stars as Sarah, a private security contractor asked to infiltrate eco-terrorist group The East. The Daily Texan sat down with Marling at SXSW to talk about her new film. The Daily Texan: What inspired this project? Brit Marling: Four summers ago, before I had started acting and before Zal had started directing, we were just young people trying to make sense of our lives and figure out what we wanted to do. We spent a summer traveling and fell in with different anarchist communities and different collectives and lived on organic farms and learned to train hop and spent time dumpster-diving. We were different people at the end of it, more able to find a kind of freedom in living, and we wanted to try and tell a story about that. We wanted to tell a story about all the intense political and moral ideas behind it, how complicated it all is. But we wanted to put in

Photo courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures Sarah (Brit Marling) and Benji (Alexander Skarsgard) in “The East,” a movie about eco-terrorism.

a really fun, entertaining espionage thriller where that stuff is happening in the background.

THE EAST Director: Zal Batmanglij Genre: Thriller Runtime: 116 minutes

DT: What were some of the distinct experiences you brought from your summer into this film? Marling: The spin-thebottle moment in the movie actually happened. It was really beautiful. It wasn’t spin the bottle the way you’d play in middle school, with everyone trying to figure out how to make out for the first time. It was spin the bottle as a way of connecting with people, and giving voice to what you did or didn’t want, and being physical and affectionate with friends and lovers.

the challenges of writing the character of Sarah for yourself? Marling: Sarah was interesting to me because she’s so unlike me. She’s conservative, and has a really strong sense of her opinion and morality about things, and is not easily swayed by other ideas. She’s a bit of an action hero. She has a toughness to her. I think we have a hard time writing about women. Even women have a hard time writing about women

DT: What are some of

EASTcontinues on page 11

The law of diminishing returns is the bane of Hollywood executives’ existence and often pushes them to stuff sequels to the point of bursting simply because audiences expect the spectacle to get more expansive and grandiose with every film in a franchise. Finding a way to follow up the massively successful “The Avengers” is no easy task for Marvel, and “Iron Man 3” responds by telling a scaled-down, intimate story about a Tony Stark in peril, while still pushing the scope of the franchise to grander heights. After his close call with death in “The Avengers,” Tony Stark is a broken man for the first time, wracked with anxiety. His girlfriend and assistant Pepper (Gwyneth Paltrow) is being courted by mysterious scientist Aldrich Killian (Guy Pearce). Even worse, the Mandarin (Ben Kingsley), a ruthless terrorist with an agenda, is wreaking havoc on the nation. Robert Downey Jr. defines Iron Man, and he’s so comfortable in Tony Stark’s skin at this point that he could effortlessly coast through “Iron Man 3.” In the first two films, Tony Stark was a brash freight train of charisma, barreling through every problem in his path with an offhand barb, a smile, and occasionally his

collection of Iron Man suits. But here, Downey Jr. plays Stark with unusual anxiety and fear. “Iron Man 3” gives Downey Jr. heftier dramatic material than he’s been asked to shoulder thus far, and he turns in a series-best performance, bringing Stark’s arc home with grace, humor and the same unflappable confidence that made him so great for the role in the first place. Shane Black directed Downey Jr. on the criminally underrated “Kiss Kiss Bang Bang,” and it’s a delight to see him working on the massive scope that Marvel can afford. Black is one of the sharpest writers in Hollywood, and “Iron Man 3” has an excellent script that is endlessly witty and clever. By exploring how the presentation of a hero, or villain, can be just as important as his actions, Black incorporates the “Iron Man”

IRON MAN 3

Director: Shane Black Genre: Action Runtime: 130 minutes

iconography in new and surprising ways. Black also stages some grand moments of spectacle, particularly the thrilling destruction of Stark’s mansion. Unfortunately, Black’s directorial voice occasionally chafes against the guiding hand of the Marvel franchise hive mind, especially in his handling of the film’s multiple villains. Aldrich Killian is a scientist who’s been developing a limb regeneration program, and his Extremis project is an ill-defined utility belt for bad guys, giving villains invincibility, super strength

IRON continues on page 11

Photo courtesy of AP Exchange Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) is challenged like never before in “Iron Man 3.”

The Daily Texan 2013-05-03  

The May 3, 2013 edition of The Daily Texan

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