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INSIDE

Faculty Council passes legislation opposing campus carry similar to a bill it passed in the last two legislative sessions. PAGE 6

SPORTS Texas diver Will Chandler battles through Crohn’s disease, an ailment that kept him out of the pool all of last season, but not this year. PAGE 7 The Longhorns have yet to win a road game, but get what could be their best chance at picking one up against TCU. PAGE 7

dailytexanonline.com

Sherwood Forest Faire still going strong in fourth year.

NEWS Barbara Jordan Week kicks off with discussion featuring her former students. PAGE 6

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Texas looks to maintain pitching prowess vs. UTA SPORTS PAGE 7

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 12

UNIVERSITY

CITY

Lawmakers defend Powers

Local church joins group advocating gay rights

By Joshua Fechter At a time of strain between President William Powers Jr. and members of the UT System Board of Regents, Texas lawmakers defended Powers’ record and heaped praise upon him at a ceremony on the floor of the Texas Senate on Monday.

State Sen. Kevin Eltife, RTyler, filed a Senate resolution honoring Powers, joining two more resolutions filed in the House by state Rep. Dan Branch, R-Dallas and chairman of the House Higher Education Committee. All three passed. Eltife, a UT alumnus, said “I see a man [in Powers] who shares the love for

the University that so many of the current students and former students have for this great institution. I see a man who always puts the University first, someone who stands up for what he believes even if it may not be politically popular.” The resolutions came after regents intensely questioned Powers during their

Feb. 13 meeting. The majority of the questions came primarily from three regents: Alex Cranberg, Wallace Hall and Brenda Pejovich, each appointed by Gov. Rick Perry in 2011, which marked the beginning of a more public opposition to Powers by the regents.

POWERS continues on page 2

FRAMES | FEAtuREd photo

Texas hit .348 in its season-opening series and will look to stay hot against UTArlington. PAGE 8

LIFE&ARTS Austin Java transforms into a comedy club every Wednesday night. PAGE 12 Tunesday takes a look at STRFKR’s latest album, Miracle Mile, as well as other new releases. PAGE 12

VIEWPOINT The Daily Texan, a 113-year-old campus institution, faces life-ordeath financial troubles. The newspaper’s student staff and the Texan’s readers and supporters must step up and take the newspaper’s destiny into their own hands. PAGE 4

TODAY Office Space Swap out unwanted office suplies from 9 a.m. to noon and pick up ones you may need from 1:30 to 4 p.m. at this special recycling event in the Anna Hiss Gym (AHG) 135. Elder justice Marie-Therese Connolly presents an address titled “How Change Happens: The Fight for Elder Justice in the U.S.” with a reception following, from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in the School of Law (CCJ), Eidman Courtroom 2.306. Money Talks! Money Talks! presents Beto Pallares, cofounder of a seed and earlystage venture fund, for a talk from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Food and drinks will follow the program in the AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center (ATT) 201.

Sam Ortega | Daily Texan Staff Various dancers of mixed abilities rehearse at Anna Hiss Gym on Monday evening. The performers are working on a dance piece choreographed and written by dance and theatre major Lucy Kerr, that incorporates people with and without dance abilities.

By Hannah Jane DeCiutiis While several state senators continue to advocate for LGTBQ rights in the Texas Legislature, similar support for religious equality has become more apparent in Christian churches nationwide. In an overwhelming majority, congregation members of the First United Methodist Church, or FUMC, voted to join the Reconciling Ministries Network. The network, founded in 1982, advocates for the rights of gay individuals to serve in United Methodist ministry and be married in the church. The vote took place Feb. 10, making the church, which is located on Lavaca Street, one of more than 500 United Methodist communities to advocate for religious gay rights, according to the Reconciling Ministries Network website. FUMC senior pastor Rev. John Wright said the vote required more than 75 percent of the congregation voting in favor to join the network, rather than a simple majority. He said the actual vote surpassed the requirement by far. “For six months we have been in an intense process of discussion and discernment trying to make sure that everyone had an opportunity to be exposed to the issue and to voice their opinions,” Wright

CHURCH continues on page 2

UNIVERSITY

CAMPUS

New disclosure policies bring privacy concerns

Gun bill elicits mixed views

By Jordan Rudner On the heels of two controversies involving conflicts of interest in research in the past year, UT has amended its financial conflict of interest and objectivity in research policy. Juan Sanchez, vice president for research, spoke at length about changes in UT’s policy at a Faculty Council meeting Monday. Sanchez said the changes were not the result of any action taken by UT but instead were instituted by the UT System. “The change in policy was prompted by changes in regulations by the Public Health Services, which include the National Institutes of Health, and by the guidelines issued by the UT System,” Sanchez said. “No one at UT-Austin had a say in this new policy, but I would imagine the justification used on the federal level was used by our regents, to protect the proper use of university and federal resources.” In July, a study on gay parenting by sociology professor

Juan Sanchez Vice President for research

Mark Regnerus garnered controversy after critics pointed out that the study was funded by The Witherspoon Institute and The Bradley Foundation, two conservative groups. In December, the director of UT’s Energy Institute, Raymond Orbach, resigned and geology professor Chip Groat retired after it was discovered that Groat published a study that found no link between hyrdaulic fracturing and water contamination, but did not disclose he sat on the board of directors of a drilling company. The new conflict of interest

PRIVACY continues on page 5

By Klarissa Fitzpatrick

Students debating on whether concealed weapons would create a safer environment at UT revealed the deep discord over the benefits of concealed handguns on campus. Law professor Sanford Levinson and Sherri Greenberg, director of the Center for Politics Governance, moderated the “Gun Control, Mental Health, and the Law” forum Monday, where students discussed the impossibility of finding an effective solution to the issues surrounding gun control laws. The introduction of a bill in the Texas Legislature to allow concealed handguns on campus has almost made “guns on campus” a loaded term, Danny Zeng, the vice president of College Republicans, said. “I don’t think we’re really introducing anything new here,” Zeng said. “Guns are, in a way, already on campus. If you’re a licensed CHL holder, you’re allowed to carry your gun on public streets like Dean Keeton and 21st Street.” Only 5 percent of CHL

Austin McKinney | Daily Texan Staff A student participates in the gun forum open discussion at the Student Activity Center on Monday evening.

carriers fall in the 18- to 25-year-old category, Zeng said, making an influx of guns on campus unlikely. Educating students on mental health services available may provide better protection than allowing concealed handguns on campus, undeclared freshman Rishi Singh said. “I can understand the logic of wanting a CHL but I can’t understand why a student would need a handgun,” Singh said. “While I’m in a classroom, safety shouldn’t be a main priority, safety should be left up to the University. So it shouldn’t be up to a

student to protect themselves or to protect the lives of other people in the classroom.” Gun owners’ constitutional rights are not threatened by any proposed gun control law, Levinson said. “None of [the gun control bills] raise constitutional issues,” Levinson said. “All raise interesting issues of policy on which reasonable people can disagree.” While no legislation will eliminate gun crime, it is important to focus on legislation that can make a difference, Greenberg, a former member

GUN continues on page 6

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News

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Tuesday, February 19, 2013

FRAMES | FEAtuREd photo Volume 113, Issue 107

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Susannah Jacob (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Trey Scott (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@ dailytexanonline.com

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

Charlie Pearce | Daily Texan Staff A UT student finds a quiet place to study in the Life Science Library on Monday afternoon.

POWERS

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2012 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

continues from page 1

Speaking on the Senate floor, Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst said he believed regents are undermining Power’s authority at the University. “I believe in reform and I know Bill Powers believes in reform,” Dewhurst said. “That’s why I’m particularly troubled when I see UT regents go around this man. I see them trying to micromanage the system.” The Feb. 13 meeting was not the first time Powers

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and the regents butted heads. Last year, the regents rejected Powers’ request for a 2.6 percent in-state undergraduate tuition increase and chose to freeze tuition. Afterward, Powers sent an email to faculty, staff and students expressing disappointment with the regents’ decision. Shortly after, rumors originating from a blog post by Paul Burka, senior executive editor for Texas Monthly, stated that board chairman Gene Powell directed UT System Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa to fire Powers. Cigarroa denied the allegations. In a joint statement

Monday, Powell and Cigarroa said they were grateful to Texas legislators for recognizing Powers’ leadership at the University. “We are glad to partner with President Powers in building and protecting a university of the first class for the state of Texas,” Powell and Cigarroa said in the joint statement. On Monday, several senators gave testimony recognizing Powers’ leadership and achievements during his tenure. State Sen. Kirk Watson, D-Austin, said a recent ranking naming UT the 25th

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Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susannah Jacob Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drew Finke, Pete Stroud, Edgar Walters Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trey Scott Associate Managing Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kristine Reyna, Matt Stottlemyre Digital Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayley Fick News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 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Christian Corona Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Garrett Callahan, Nick Cremona, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Beth Purdy, Rachel Thompson, Matt Warden Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephanie Vanicek Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 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Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mark Carrion, Klarrisa Fitzpatrick, Matthew Hart, Miles Hutson Multimedia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Austin McKinney, Sam Ortega, Charlie Pearce Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Leffler, Wes Maulsby, Peter Sblendorio, Rachel Wenzlaff Life&Arts Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kelly Eisenberg, Jourden Sander Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alyssa Kang, Louis San Miguel Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Birkenstock, Jori Epstein, Lauren Lowe, Lexyee Smith Editorial Cartoonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lauren Moore Comic Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cody Bubenik, Ploy Buraparate, Darien Chen, Dannielle LaMonte . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Forrest Lybrand, Amanda Nguyen, Aaron Rodriguez, Samuel Vanicek

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The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 4711865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

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greatest university in the world could be attributed to Powers’ administration. “That is a direct result of leadership from Bill Powers,” Watson said. State Sen. Rodney Ellis, D-Houston, said despite many senators’ reverential tone when making their remarks, the ceremony did not constitute a “eulogy.” “We’re singing accolades to you today,” Ellis said, “but it’s only because we respect you, we love you, we want you to keep doing the great job you’re doing for my university, the University of Texas.”

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CHURCH continues from page 1

said. “We’re not giving blanket approval to every form of sexual expression, but we’re saying when two people are of faithful love and exclusive love for each other, the church should be able to encourage that love.” Although several congregation members chose to leave the church because of the decision to join the network, Wright said FUMC has always welcomed the LGTBQ community with open arms. “For a long time we’ve had a policy in our own local church of welcoming all persons regardless of sexual orientation,” Wright said. “We say that every Sunday. We’re not prepared to break church law, but we have taken an official position as a congregation that we want to work officially toward trying to change that law to the extent that we have the power to do that.” Religious studies junior Cole Kirby, who said he works at a United Methodist church not affiliated with the network, said he believes practicing gay individuals should not be serving in ministry in the same way alcoholics or other “habitual sinners” should not. “I think the gospel of Jesus Christ commands that we welcome people of all walks of life into the church, and homosexuals are not excluded from that,” Kirby said. “I do, however, believe that scripture is clear that God ordained sexual behavior as to be between a married man and woman. It’s the same as walking in heterosexual promiscuity.” While gay persons should not be ordained or married by church ministry, they should still be welcomed by the church, Kirby said. “I don’t think that sexual sin is something that is specific to homosexuals,” Kirby said. “They should not be leading the church, but should be loved and cared for by the church in the hopes that they might one day repent.” Ryan Hernandez, advertising senior and public relations assistant for the Texas Wesley United Methodist Campus Ministry, said the way modern culture has changed has made it evident that gay individuals should be allowed to serve in ministry. “I’m definitely in favor of the church joining the network,” Hernandez said. “[Homosexuals] should be allowed in the church and should be allowed to minister. A year ago I probably wouldn’t have felt that way. It’s just the way society has moved and culture has shifted, and I believe [it] too should be accepted.”


W&N 3

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

NEWS BRIEFLY Myanmar nationals rescued by navy COLOMBO, Sri Lanka — Sri Lanka’s navy says it has rescued 32 Myanmar nationals whose wooden vessel began sinking while making a perilous journey to Australia. A navy statement says the rescue was made about 250 nautical miles off the island’s eastern coast on Saturday. Those rescued are being treated for acute dehydration. The group comprising 31 adult males and a boy had been at sea without food for 21 days when the navy rescued them after being informed by a local fishing boat. Survivors have told local newspapers that there were 130 passengers at the beginning of the journey and 98 died on the way and their bodies were dumped to sea. They said they were planning to go to Australia after their attempt to enter Malaysia failed.

United Arab Emirates purchases U.S. drones ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates — A defense official in the United Arab Emirates says the Gulf nation has signed $1.4 billion in military contracts that include purchases of U.S.-made drones. The drone deal, worth nearly $200 million, suggests Gulf Arab states are looking to boost surveillance capabilities to match claims by rival Iran of growing drone technology. The UAE says the Predator drones, built by General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, will not be outfitted for weapons capabilities, but used for reconnaissance. UAE military spokesman Maj. Gen. Obaid al-Ketbi also said the deals include 750 U.S.made mine-resistant vehicles. The contracts were announced Monday at a defense show in Abu Dhabi.

World & Nation 3

EU launches mission training in Mali By Don Melvin Associated Press

BRUSSELS — Less than a year after Mali’s military was heavily criticized for seizing power in a coup, it will now start receiving advice from European experts on how to maintain control of its vast territory. On Monday, the European Union officially launched a training mission to the African nation. Its goal is to make the disparaged Malian army good enough to patrol the whole country, including its huge northern region, where French and African troops are fighting to unseat Islamist rebels who used the coup’s chaos to grab control there. The mission will “support stability in Mali and the Sahel, both now and in the future. Respect for human rights and the protection of civilians will be an important part of the training program,” said EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton. Critics have accused the new Malian military government of being undemocratic and abusive. Still, the European Union ministers felt they had no choice but to offer support and oversight because of fears that — if left alone — northern Mali could turn into a new Afghanistan, with Islamist groups given free rein to hatch deadly plots carried out around the world.

Pascal Guyot | Associated Press A Malian soldier handles ammunitions aboard a vehicle as he enters Bourem, northern Mali on Sunday. Mali’s military detained eight Arab men last week in Timbuktu, raising fears of further reprisals against the region’s Arab minority whose members are accused of having supported the al-Qaida-linked groups which overran northern Mali last year.

The 27-nation bloc was so eager to help that it sent the first 70 advisers to Mali 10 days ago so they could hit the ground running when the decision was made. More EU military experts will begin arriving in Bamako next month and the training will begin in April. The decision by the bloc’s 27 foreign ministers who were meeting in Brussels authorizes the deployment of

about 500 people to Mali for 15 months at an estimated cost of $16.4 million. About 20 EU countries will participate in the mission, which officials say will not be involved in any combat. Some of those groups have imposed a harsh version of Islamic law, executing violators and performing punitive amputations on thieves. International officials, A woman leaves a shop with a broken window in Chelyabinsk, Russia on Monday as part of the local damage after a meteorite exploded over the region on Friday.

EU urges North Korea to end nuclear testing BRUSSELS — EU finance ministers, condemning the Feb. 12 nuclear test by North Korea, have imposed trade and economic sanctions on the Asian nation. A statement by the 27 European Union finance ministers, who met Monday in Brussels, said they condemn the test “in the strongest terms” and demand that North Korea abstain from further tests. The statement also urged North Korea to sign the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty without delay. Monday’s action brings the number of North Koreans subject to a travel ban and an asset freeze to 26, and the number of sanctioned companies to 33. The ministers also banned the export of components for ballistic missiles, such as certain types of aluminum, and prohibited trade in new public bonds from North Korea.

Dad in custody battle protests on crane PARIS — A French father demanding visiting rights with his son climbed down Monday from his protest perch atop a crane, but said it will be a long time before divorced dads are seen as credible single parents and get the same rights in France as mothers. Serge Charnay halted his four-day protest on the crane in the western city of Nantes after Justice Minister Christiane Taubira met with SOS Papa, an activist group for divorced fathers. “It’s a start ... There’s lots of work to do,” he told TV cameras after reaching the ground. “These little ladies still think we can’t change the diapers of a kid and take care of him ... This must stop.” —Compiled from Associated Press reports

Kristine Reyna, Wire Editor

Boris Kaulin Associated Press

Russian scientists recover small fragments of meteor By Vladimir Isachenkov Associated Press

MOSCOW — Scientists have found more than 50 tiny fragments of a meteor that exploded over Russia’s Ural Mountains, and preliminary tests are turning up information about its contents. However, local residents seem more interested in the black market value of the fragments. As they search for their own pieces of the meteor, sales offers already are filling the Internet, and police are warning all purchasers to prepare for possible fraud.

The meteor — which injured nearly 1,500 people and caused widespread property damage in Chelyabinsk city on Friday — was the largest recorded space rock to hit Earth in more than a century. Health officials said 46 of the injured remain hospitalized. Viktor Grokhovsky, who led the expedition from Urals Federal University, said Monday that 53 fragments of the meteor have been plucked from the ice-covered Chebarkul Lake. He said they are less than a centimeter in size, about 10 percent iron and belong to the chondrite

type, the most common variation of meteorites found on Earth. Friday’s meteor left a six-meter-wide hole in the ice covering the lake. Divers inspecting it have found nothing at the bottom, but Grokhovsky said a fragment as large as 5060 centimeters could eventually be found there. Meanwhile, workers in the city remained busy replacing acres of windows shattered by a powerful shockwave caused by the meteor’s strike, which NASA said released 500 kilotons of energy, the power equivalent to more than 30 Hiroshima bombs.

Regional crime discussed in Haiti P O RT- AU - P R I N C E , Haiti — U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder discussed regional crime with Caribbean leaders on Monday during a summit in Haiti. Holder talked with the leaders of mostly Englishspeaking Caribbean countries about crime problems, efforts to curb weapons and drug trafficking and a need to alert countries in the region about imminent deportations at the conference of the Caribbean Community, known as Caricom, held at a hotel in the Haitian capital. Hundreds of thousands of people from Haiti, Jamaica, Mexico and other

nations have been deported to homelands they barely know since the U.S. Congress mandated in 1996 that every non-citizen sentenced to a year or more in prison be booted from the country upon release. “With regard to deportees, I think what we need to do is make sure that we give as much notice as we possibly can before people are to be released and deported from the United States,” Holder told reporters. “As we increase the more general capacity, law enforcement capacity, security capacity of the nations of Caricom, they will be in

a much better position to deal with these deportees from the United States.” Holder also met privately with Haiti’s President Michel Martelly, who assumed the chair of the Caricom group in January and will hold the title for six months. It’s the first time Haiti has hosted a Caricom conference. The gathering ends Tuesday afternoon. Holder flew Monday afternoon to Thomas, Virgin Islands, where he is to meet with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of the U.S. Virgin Islands. —Associated Press

including those in the EU, have turned to the enemy of those militants — Mali’s military government in Bamako, a former pariah. That military’s record over the past year has drawn little praise. It ostensibly handed power back to civilians, but then in December it arrested the prime minister, who announced his resignation on state television at 4 a.m., hours after soldiers had

stormed his house. Human Rights Watch’s senior researcher for West Africa, Corinne Dufka, said those events fit the pattern of abuse by Malian soldiers since the coup in March 2012. The goal now, EU officials say, is create an army not only capable of holding the retaken territory but willing to respect international law and civilian control.

Coast guard investigation of ship to take six months By Kate Brumback Associated Press

ATLANTA — A leak in a fuel oil return line caused the engine-room fire that disabled a Carnival cruise ship at sea, leaving 4,200 people without power or working toilets for five days, a Coast Guard official said Monday. Cmdr. Teresa Hatfield addressed the finding in a conference call with reporters and estimated that the investigation of the disabled ship, the Carnival Triumph, would take six months. Hatfield said the Bahamas — where the ship is registered, or flagged — is leading the investigation, with the Coast Guard and National Transportation Safety Board representing U.S. interests in the probe. The vessel was in international waters at the time of the incident. She said investigators have been with the ship since it arrived Thursday in Mobile. Since then, she said, interviews have been conducted with passengers and crew and forensic analysis has been performed on the ship. She said the crew responded appropriately to the fire. “They did a very good job,” Hatfield said. In an email after Monday’s conference call, Coast Guard spokesman Carlos Diaz described the oil return line that leaked as stretching from the ship’s No. 6 engine

to the fuel tank. A Carnival Cruise Lines spokesman said in an email Monday that the company agrees with the Coast Guard’s findings about the fire source. Andrew Coggins, a former Navy commander who was a chief engineer and is now a professor at Pace University in New York and an expert on the cruise industry, said the fire could potentially have been serious. “The problem is the oil’s under pressure,” he said. “What happens in the case of a fuel oil leak, where you have a fire like that, is it leaks in such a way that it sprays out in a mist. In the engine room you have many hot surfaces, so once the mist hits a hot surface it will flash into flame.” If the crew hadn’t reacted quickly and the fire suppression system hadn’t worked properly, he said, “the fire from the engine room would have eventually burned through to other parts of the ship.” Engine room fires that can’t be suppressed generally result in the loss of the entire ship, he said. The Triumph left Galveston, Texas, on Feb. 7 for a four-day trip to Mexico. The fire paralyzed the ship early Feb. 10, leaving it adrift in the Gulf of Mexico until tugboats towed it to Mobile. Passengers described harsh conditions on board: overflowing toilets, long lines for food, foul odors and tent cities for sleeping on deck.

Dave Martin | Associated Press The cruise ship Carnival Triumph is towed into Mobile Bay, Ala. on Thursday. A leak in a fuel oil return line caused the engineroom fire that disabled the ship at sea, leaving 4,200 people without power for five days, a Coast Guard official said Monday.


4A Opinion

Opinion 4

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

VIEWPOINT

Editor-in-Chief Susannah Jacob

The point of no return The Daily Texan faces serious financial challenges that cannot be solved with short-sighted decisions.

Keep The Daily Texan daily The Daily Texan, a 113-year-old campus institution, faces life-or-death financial troubles. The newspaper’s student staff and the Texan’s readers and supporters must step up and take the newspaper’s destiny into their own hands. In recent years, the recession and a webtriggered collapse of the traditional newspaper model have sent the Texan’s print advertising revenues into free fall. As recently as 2007, the Texan sold more than $2.1 million in advertisements each year. Last year, the Texan sold less than $1.3 million worth of ads, and this year is forecasted to be even worse. Those figures and forecast come from Texas Student Media, an auxiliary enterprise of the University, which manages the Texan’s business operations. In recent years, TSM reduced the Texan’s summer edition from a daily newspaper to a weekly tabloid. It is possible the TSM Board of Operating Trustees will decide at its March 1 meeting to further curtail the Texan’s print schedule. TSM Director Jalah Goette and others have declined to give specifics, but she said a print reduction will be considered. We understand the need to reverse the newspaper’s downward financial spiral, but we believe that reducing the number of days the Texan is printed when print advertising has made up more than 95 percent of the Texan’s annual advertising sales will not accomplish that goal. Furthermore, we argue that there are dozens of enterprising steps to be taken before TSM is forced to reduce the printing schedule. The Texan is, after all, a free newspaper filled with content produced entirely by unpaid and underpaid students. We supply news to a captive, largely young audience and are associated with one of the biggest college campuses in the country. We publish in a growing city that is militant about its love for publicly-funded journalism and all things local. Those advantages should help ensure the Texan’s financial solvency in an era when newspapers straddle the print-digital divide. We know the Texan must change to meet the changing habits of its readers, and our vision for this newspaper’s next year and next decade includes not only a print product but also a wholesale revolution to the way we engage our peers and community. If it will succeed, that revolution must come from UT students. We imagine the Texan as much larger, more visible, inclusive and prominent in students’ lives than it is now. In the coming days we will share more of our ideas and will ask our readers, particularly UT students, to share theirs. The Texan, after all, belongs to the students. For years, TSM’s approaches to the Texan’s declining revenues — selling the newspaper’s printing press, laying off professional staff, reducing some student staff ’s pay to zero and printing only one day a week in

the summer — have failed to address the Texan’s underlying problem: the decline of print advertising. It is a problem with which all newspapers contend, but we believe the Texan is equipped to fight until our website, which has long needed an overhaul, can bring in significant income. For now, the daily printed newspaper remains the primary means for the Texan to reach the student population it serves. Our website averages a mere 7,000 clicks per day, 60 percent of which are from outside Austin. By comparison, the print newspaper has a daily circulation of 12,000 newspapers that land in 160 news boxes and on the doorsteps of 200 businesses and restaurants each weekday. Other college newspapers that have cut their circulation such as The Red and Black at the University of Georgia have not found themselves liberated by shedding their daily print product and transforming into a weekly newspaper. According to The Red and Black Editor-in-Chief Nicholas Fouriezos, print pick-up rates have declined dramatically and web traffic has suffered, too. “Take the paper out of their minds every day, and it’s no longer a part of their daily habit,” he said, adding, “People can ignore a print product just as much as they can ignore and online product. Online readership is not a given.” For more than 100 years, the Texan has hoisted UT students’ opinions and voices. During those years, Texan editors, defending those students’ voices, have been threatened with expulsion, impeachment, imprisonment and worse. The Texan’s influence has seen UT through the last century’s fights against sexism, segregation and McCarthyera censorship. Today, the need for student voices to help shape the present and the future is arguably greater than ever. Fractures between the UT System Board of Regents and University administration threaten to diminish this institution and dramatically alter the educational experience offered here. Already this year, the Texan exposed questionable financial practices and a CEO’s bloated salary at the University Coop; disclosed UT assistant football coach Major Applewhite’s inappropriate relationship with a student; sent a reporter to the U.S. Supreme Court to cover the race discrimination claims filed by a white plaintiff against UT; and editorialized against a flawed study about fracking, which in part led to the retirement of the study’s lead author and the resignation of the UT Energy Institute’s director. The printed future of this newspaper should not be dispensed with so quickly and the opportunity to set the Texan on a different course should not be sacrificed along with it. We need our readers, our professors and our predecessors to rally for our cause, which is theirs, too.

Lauren Moore | Daily Texan Cartoonist

Some big ideas Editor’s note: Below find preliminary suggestions collected from The Daily Texan staff and readers to boost the Texan’s relevance and revenue. We encourage you to submit your own ideas before March 1 to editor@dailytexanonline.com and tweet them to @thedailytexan. With permission, we will publish ideas we receive.

THE DAILY TEXAN ON YOUR SCREEN

THE DAILY TEXAN IN YOUR HAND

THE DAILY TEXAN’S BOTTOM LINE

• Redesign and relaunch The Daily Texan website using WordPress. This will make our site more nimble, flexible and usable to more editors and staff members at the Texan. Wordpress has a built-in developers’ community to help, so we no longer will be reliant on an in-house expert.

• Redesign the newspaper so it reflects fewer strictures of traditional newspaper layout and presents the most compelling image and headline visible from the box. This includes changing our traditional notion of what belongs on the front page. As part of the staffwide redesign effort, we will aim to develop compelling features that draw readers back and allow them to interact with the print product.

• Conduct an in-depth study of The Daily Texan readers to determine who they are and what they’re looking for when they open a paper or browse our website.

• Militantly scrutinize our distribution methods, evaluating the placement of each newspaper box on and off campus to increase efficiency and make it easier to get a paper.

• Develop new print products to engage readers and provide more opportunities for advertising revenue, such as a Back-toCampus guide, a Greek Life guide, a Best-Of guide.

• Hand out the paper at strategic locations such as Jester, Gregory Gymnasium and the West Mall.

• Publish Daily Texan photographs on wall-sized posters which include advertisements, distribute to freshmen looking to decorate spare dorm room walls. Sell artfully-designed graduation posters drawn and customized by The Daily Texan comics department.

• Build and launch a free Daily Texan mobile application. The free Daily Texan app will offer different guides to campus life and dining, access to reader-authored event listings and push Texan news alerts. It will allow mobile readers to engage with the stories they read, posting comments and responding to polls. • Develop event listings where UT students can access and post information about meetings and events happening on and off campus. • Develop a student-to-student classified ads section online, accessible only to UT students. • Create a network of writers from groups all across campus. Host blogs by UT students and professors on The Daily Texan website.

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article or cartoonist. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline.com. Letters should be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability. The Texan does not run all submissions.

• Use the business school as a resource. The Daily Texan’s current problems offer a real-world learning experience not only for us, but also for enterprising business students.

• Host Daily Texan-sponsored debates and events and charge admission. Film these events and post the video footage on our website.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burntorange newsstand where you found it.

EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@DTeditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


NEWS 5

News

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

RADIO

5

CAMPUS

Political scientist explores inequality By Matthew Hart

Charlie Pearce | Daily Texan Staff KVRX and station manager Katy Aus raised $5,000 for the yearly pledge drive but failed to reach their stated goal of $18,000.

KVRX wraps up fundraiser, donated funds fall short of goal By Mark Carrion KVRX, UT’s student-run radio station, concluded its annual pledge drive Monday, falling short of its fundraising goal. As of press time, the station has raised $5,000 in donations. The KVRX Pledge Drive, which lasted from Feb. 4 to Feb. 18, had a stated goal of reaching $18,000. “It’s a period of time dedicated to seeking support from the community and our listeners by asking for donations,” KVRX station manager Katy Aus said. “It’s essentially a fundraiser, and the most important one that we do at the station.” Aus, a history senior, said KVRX DJs go on air during the two weeks of pledge drive in order to promote the fundraiser and talk about the importance of college radio. She said the station also campaigns through social media to

keep students up to date on KVRX news. “Last year’s pledge drive was fairly successful — we raised over $15,000 with generous support from KVRX alumni,” Aus said. Public Relations sophomore Evelyn Gaucin served as the pledge drive director this year for KVRX. “We got more support from businesses than from pledges,” Gaucin said. She said the amount of money garnered from business contributions was the highest it has ever been. Aus said even though the station did not make as much as last year’s funds, she supports the work that the student DJs performed in promoting the pledge drive this year. This year’s pledge drive concluded with a benefit concert, which took place last Friday at Emo’s East. Aus said the concert featured local bands such as Salesman, Hundred

Visions, The Mole People and Love Inks, the latter two of which featured former KVRX DJs. The money from the concert went directly to KVRX. “[The money] goes into the reserve portion of our budget, which essentially means that it is there when we need it should anything go wrong with our transmitter or if we are in need of minor equipment,” Aus said. “But it is extremely vital for the security of KVRX.” For Gaucin, the KVRX Pledge Drive enables her to continue pursuing her passion in radio. “I think it’s really rewarding,” Gaucin said. “KVRX really is unique. There is no other radio station like this in Austin.” Gaucin said the student DJs work for no pay, and that some arrive at the office as early as 3 a.m. in order to host talk shows. “We’re here because we love it,” Gaucin said.

It’s red carpet time!

The 2013

Temple University political scientist Joseph M. Schwartz’s academic focus explores the rise in inequality as a result of neo-capitalism and the overlooking of an individual’s ability to perform his or her way out of material poverty. Schwartz’s talk Monday revolved around his exploration of a fragmented society due to ever-evolving pluralism. He said he became obsessed with the question of how we build some sort of interest and common view of social justice among a world that is much more plural, global and diverse. “How do we create democratic politics that affirms and cherishes diversity, culture and plurality?” Schwartz said. “And can you have meaningful democratic difference if it is institutionalized under radical terrain of social inequality?” Schwartz compared his research to transgressing the norms of being a good university student by

PRIVACY

reading only what is intellectually interesting and skipping over material that is dull. As radicals of political theory have focused on questioning the nature of the self and how performative resistance of the self takes place in society, Schwartz said neocapitalism has generated a record rise in inequality. “You can’t perform your way out of being unemployed, and many people, under the Marxist analysis, face problems with labor under capitalism that makes most people task executors and not task definers,” Schwartz said. Adding to this notion, Schwartz said many of LGTBQ activists do resist a lot of heterosexual norms in our society. But even there, there are limits to resistance based on material power including violence. He said Matthew Shephard really couldn’t perform his way out of the homophobia of Wyoming in which he was targeted and murdered for his sexual orientation. Sociology student Elizabeth Cozzolino said the post-

structural turn in political theory has focused away from the larger trends in equality. “While concern for group difference is crucial, this must exist within a larger framework or shared commitment to equal rights of all human beings,” Cozzolino said. “Political theorists must not retreat from analyzing the material inequalities that shape access to opportunities from members of various groups, whether they be opportunities for resources, for rights or even opportunities for microresistance. This entails a recognition and analysis of how the social equality norm has been eroded by neo-liberalism.” Schwartz said he thinks there has been a lot of attention paid to the nature of knowledge and the nature of subjectivity. While some believe one can get a vision of what is a just society from a capacity to reason and communicate, others say power is an open contestation. “Democracy may not win,” Schwartz said. “It is an open struggle.”

continues from page 1

policy differs from its predecessor in two main ways. Potential conflicts of interest will be determined by an independent official, as opposed to faculty members themselves. Additionally, the new policy has an extended scope, applying to all research irrespective of funding source, while the old regulations applied only to externally funded research. Several faculty members expressed hesitation about privacy issues at the meeting. In a question submitted in advance of Sanchez’ presentation, government professor Daron Shaw stated his deep concerns about the implications of the personal financial disclosure

required by the new policy. “This is the most egregious, chilling policy UT has adopted since I’ve been here,” Shaw wrote. Jody Jensen, kinesiology and psychology professor, also expressed concern about the nature of the financial disclosure forms. Jensen said the fear was that the indepth personal finances of UT faculty members would be publicly available via open records requests. “There is a growing culture of what we do being searchable and open to the scrutiny of those with good intentions and those without,” Jensen said. “It seems fair to me that people with conflicts of

interest should disclose, but it doesn’t seem appropriate that all faculty should have these kinds of records — seeing that this should be available to all who want to snoop.” Sanchez said it was important to clarify that UT faculty financial disclosures would not be accessible via an online database. “Where is the mandate that this information be publicly searchable?” Sanchez said. “There is no such mandate, and there is no such publicly accessible database. The database will be kept as a university record, and in most cases, only open records requests will make the information public.”

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6 NEWS

News

6 CAMPUS

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

CAMPUS

Speaker discusses loss, poetry By Mark Carrion

Sam Ortega | Daily Texan Staff Civil engineering student Saif Al-Shmaisani participates in Chubby Bunny, one of the events of UT’s Engineers Week.

Engineers connect during E-Week By Klarissa Fitzpatrick The UT engineering community is forming ties this week through a series of events and competitions, collectively called Engineers Week, which occurs annually. The Student Engineering Council hosts E-Week, a national event, which at UT consists of multiple competitions held by various engineering societies. The council is an umbrella organization which represents the engineering societies within the Senate of College Councils. Events hosted Monday included foosball games, a marshmallow toss and a game of musical chairs. Individual societies, such as the Engineering Chamber Orchestra, finance their event or make sure it’s low-cost, EChO member Melanie Kong said. EChO hosted a musical chairs competition Monday afternoon that drew a noisy crowd in the mechanical

engineering building. “For us, this was very low cost,” Kong said. “We just had to make sure we had the room reserved.” Council member Albert Chen, who attended Engineering Chamber Orchestra’s musical chairs event, said that while he knew many of the people at the event, he still values E-Week. “I am a part of SEC, so I do know a lot of the people here, but I did also see people that I haven’t seen in a long time,” Chen said. “With biomedical engineering, we spend a lot of time with people in the same major. But E-Week is just a good time. We set aside some time to see people we haven’t seen in a long time.” While E-Week is held annually, this year the council focused on publicizing the event through different avenues to increase participation, E-Week co-chair Baha Eren said. “We realize that a lot of engineers don’t like to get

involved in community stuff,” Eren said. “We publicized through more social media, such as Facebook, Twitter. Actually, it’s proven to be pretty successful so far.” Attendance at the EWeek kick-off increased to approximately 150 students, up from 60 students last year. The council and a corporate sponsor — this year, it’s BASF — pay for the larger events of EWeek, such as the banquet and the Dr. Ramshorn Competition, a co-ed pageant, according to Farzad Yousefi, the council’s vice president of finance. For Eric Lucha, pageant contestant and electrical engineering senior, E-Week and the pageant are chances to prove himself, even if the pageant is a “silly” event. “More than anything though, this pageant is a way of separating the best looking from the good looking,” Lucha said. “Some might say that’s shallow. I say I don’t know what that means.”

When renowned cultural anthropologist Renato Rosaldo’s wife died, he turned to writing to overcome her death and in the process developed a new style of ethnographic writing known as antropoeseìa. The Department of Anthropology hosted a talk from Rosaldo on Monday as part of its 2012-2013 Seminar Series. Rosaldo, who is a professor of anthropology at New York University, said antropoesía seeks to explain the physical characteristics and expressions of people by focusing on small details. Poetry, he said, was the way he could express the entirety of his experiences surrounding his wife’s death. “I tried to recover details: smells, feelings, objects, words,” he said. “I found that my memory and my field journal supplemented each other.” Renato and Shelly Rosaldo were conducting anthropological fieldwork in the Philippines in 1981 when Shelly lost her footing on a cliff and fell 65 feet, killing her on impact. For Renato, the experience was one of severe trauma and grief.

The tragic experience would later lead to Rosaldo’s creation of antropoesía. At a poetry conference in Brooklyn, Rosaldo said he had a verbal outpouring of the feelings and events of the day his wife died, and that his colleagues encouraged him to write about the subject as a way for him to deal with his grief. Though the writing process was one that Rosaldo said he felt apprehensive toward at first, he gradually began to recall details of the event, and the more he remembered the more he felt compelled to write out of necessity. During his writing, the coupling of free poetic verse along with the detailed descriptions of his fieldwork in the Philippines would give rise to antropoesía. Rosaldo gradually built up a body of writings in free verse, and together the collections of poems form the content of his forthcoming collection, “The Day of Shelly’s Death.” “Poetry has proven compelling for me because it allows me to dwell in powerful experiences and perceptions,” Rosaldo said. Rosaldo also said the collection, which he intends to be a manifesto on

Poetry has proven compelling for me because it allows me to dwell in powerful experiences and perceptions. — Renato Rosaldo, Anthropology professor, NYU

antropoesía, helped him explore the experience of his wife’s death. “Allowing myself to be in those emotions was enormously freeing,” Rosaldo said. Julie Conquest, a graduate student in anthropology who attended Rosaldo’s talk, said she is interested in using poetry within ethnography. Conquest said ethnography is a method of qualitative analysis that gives a representation of a culture through interviews and field studies, and that poetry can be a way to frame ethnography. “Poetry comes the closest to conjuring a particular place, time and feeling,” she said. Anthropologist Renato Rosaldo explains how his writing method of antropoesía relates ethnography with poetry in the Student Activity Center on Monday afternoon.

Austin McKinney Daily Texan Staff

UNIVERSITY

CAMPUS

Faculty Council reaffirms ban of guns on campus Former students honor educator and politician By Hannah Jane DeCiutiis

With the idea of allowing concealed weapons on campus making its rounds again in the Texas Legislature, the University’s Faculty Council affirmed its stance for the third time against allowing firearms on University grounds. The Faculty Council met Monday to discuss various campus issues, one of which included a resolution to reaffirm the ban of firearms on campus. With the exception of one abstaining member, all present members voted in favor of the resolution without discussion. Similar resolutions were passed in February 2009 and March 2011. Martha Hilley, music professor and council chairwoman, said the decision to once again affirm the faculty’s stance was simply to remind legislators that faculty views concerning weapons on campus have not changed. “The squeaky wheel gets the oil,” Hilley said. “There are two bills that have been

For the third time, the Faculty Council voted against allowing firearms on campus during a meeting Monday afternoon. The council passed similar resolutions in February 2009 and March 2011.

Charlie Pearce Daily Texan Staff

filed, and we’re very worried. Not speaking as the chair but speaking for myself, I don’t want to be scared when I come to work. That’s just it, plain and simple. This is just to reaffirm.” President William Powers Jr., who has previously expressed public opposition to concealed carry laws on campus, said continuing to affirm the idea of keeping guns out of the University is something that is protective of all students, not just faculty.

“My view is clear,” Powers said. “My view is aggregate safety. Friday night comes once a week. Mixing alcohol and youth and firearms is not conducive to overall safety. On campus, I think our employees agree with that, and that’s not a new point for me.” Michael Morton, president of the Senate of College Councils and a voting student member of the Faculty Council, said the fact that the overwhelming majority

of council members were strong in their opposition of concealed weapons on campus should say something to Texas legislators. “They recognize it as a safety issue,” Morton said. “They don’t want to be afraid to come to work, and they would be if it were allowed. Whenever faculty can voice their opinion and take a stance on something, that’s a good thing. But it says a lot and I hope legislators take the vote seriously.”

By Matthew Hart Individuals who remember Barbara Jordan recall her commitment to bringing to light the differing conditions for Americans throughout her lifetime. The Policy Organization for Women hosted the first of several events for Barbara Jordan Week on Monday at Sid Richardson Hall. The event featured Deann Friedholm, director of Consumer Union’s health reform campaign, and Max Sherman, former member of the Texas Senate. Jordan became the first black congresswoman elected in the Deep South and the first black woman to win a seat in the Texas Legislature. She also served as a faculty member at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs. Friedholm said seeing Jordan speak at the Watergate hearing in 1974 left a profound impact. “When she walked out onto that stage, the ovation lasted four or five minutes,” Friedholm said. “I had just not seen adulation like that. She had much to be proud of and was not afraid to show it.” Sherman said Jordan explained to the country why it really was a constitutional

GUN

continues from page 1 of the Texas Legislature, said. Greenberg also said the biggest debates concern magazine size, and the fact guns can be purchased at gun shows without a background check. “If you can even prohibit a few people — who may not be of sound mind — from getting these guns and committing atrocities, then you have helped,” Greenberg said.

crisis, and it was the moment that made her a national figure. “She could play it big and she could play it small,” Sherman said. “She was criticized by many African-American groups because she did play with the guys and made it known that she seemed to have been forgotten by our founding fathers in the writing of the constitution.” Friedholm said she met Jordan in the hallway of the LBJ School and was asked to be her teaching assistant by the dean. “She was extremely serious about teaching,” Friedholm said. “Knowing how important of a person she was and how famous she was, I think people might have been surprised at how worried she was about being a good teacher.” Jordan is the first AfricanAmerican to be buried in the Texas State Cemetery. Sherman said her tombstone today says the word “teacher.” “When she was very close to passing away, she asked me two favors,” Sherman said. “One was to make sure that they didn’t cancel her liberal ethics class after she was gone and the second was to bury her on the highest hill in the Texas State Cemetery next to Stephen F. Austin — and I made darn sure it happened.” Greenberg said the issue of doctor/patient confidentiality complicates regulation regarding individuals who have mental health issues. Greenberg said many of the recent mass shootings occurred after signals of the shooter’s ill health were noted but not acted upon. “From a public policy standpoint, I think that we need to do more in the United States,” Greenberg said. “Get people the health care they need when it comes to mental health.”


SPTS 7

Sports 7

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Christian Corona, Sports Editor

MEN’S SWIMMING & DIVING

Chandler battles Crohn’s

SIDELINE NCAAB WEST VIRGINIA

By Rachel Wenzlaff After his dominating performances against TCU and Arizona, redshirt sophomore Will Chandler gained recognition from the Big 12 as the Men’s Diver of the Week last Wednesday. Despite it being the third time Chandler has received the award, this time holds a special significance: it was his first Big 12 Men’s Diver of the Week honor since coming back from Crohn’s disease. Chandler was diagnosed with Crohn’s, a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract, at age 12. However, it wasn’t until his sophomore year in college, in the middle of his development as a serious diver, that the disease became severe enough to require surgery. “I had six feet of my large intestine removed,” Chandler recalled. “I lost like 20 pounds in the hospital, and that’s really important, because if you’re a little twig on the diving board, the board isn’t going to go anywhere when you jump on it.” But diving coach Matt Scoggin wasn’t concerned with Chandler’s weight loss affecting his diving abilities. He was solely concerned with how it would affect his health. “Sports took a back seat,” Scoggin said. “I was only

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Courtesy of Texas Athletics Redshirt sophmore Will Chandler was named Big 12 Diver of the Week last Wednesday, his first honor since returning from a bout with Crohn’s Disease. Even with a possibility of the disease returning, Chandler continues to remain poised in and out of the pool.

concerned with Will progressing to complete health and managing the disease.” Chandler’s diving may have been pushed to the back burner, but the diving team stepped up to support Chandler during his 24-day stay at the hospital. “I saw a teammate in the hospital every day I was there,” Chandler said. “Matt came to the hospital three to five times. He

brought me diving videos to watch so I could still stay in the mindset. That was really my strength.” The struggle didn’t end when Chandler was released from the hospital. He had been out of the pool for about four months and lost a significant amount of muscle. “It definitely plays a role in the back of your mind,” Chandler said. “When I do come back, am I going to

be able to be as good or as strong as I was before?” However, there is one haunting factor standing between Chandler and a successful career: the potential that Crohn’s disease will return. Crohn’s is characterized by spontaneous flare-ups that could knock Chandler back to the beginning stages of the recovery process. Chandler acknowledges

this possibility, but is hopeful the surgery, his medicine and diet will be enough to keep him healthy. “There is definitely a chance it can come back,” Chandler said. “But before, I was really stubborn about it. Whenever I felt sick, I didn’t tell anybody, and that’s what made me so sick. Now I talk to my

DIVER continues on page 8

MEN’S BASKETBALL

With Kabongo back, Horns still in slump By Wes Maulsby Daily Texan Columnist

Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff Freshman Connor Lammert attempts a shot in Texas’ 73-47 loss to Kansas. Lammert will carry an increased role into the game with TCU, averaging 11.5 points per game in his last two.

Longhorns face Horned Frogs in search of first road victory By Christian Corona The last Longhorn team that didn’t reach the NCAA Tournament couldn’t win on the road either. In 1998, Texas’ second year in the Big 12, it lost six straight road games en route to going 14-17, the program’s only losing season in the past two decades. Head coach Tom Penders was replaced the following year by Rick Barnes, who took the Longhorns to the Big Dance the next 14 seasons. Barnes is now leading

the worst Texas team since Penders’ last year on the 40 Acres. The Longhorns are 11-14 and have won just three games in conference play, one of them coming in a 60-43 victory over TCU earlier this month. Texas, which has dropped each of their six road games against Big 12 opponents this year, face those same Horned Frogs on Tuesday. A loss against TCU would mark the Longhorns’ eighth straight road loss in Big 12 play dating back to last season, which would

The hopes that Myck Kabongo would revive this team with a strong finish to end the conference slate on a high note are lost. The only thing left for Texas to do in the wake of the loss to Kansas is to pick up the pieces of its program and figure out where it all went wrong and how it can become competitive again. In other words, there aren’t many positives that can be taken away after Saturday night. Kansas completely shut down Texas with its defense and its offense was good enough for a 26-point win over Texas. “You give a team

like Kansas breathing room and they can be loose and free, they make shots,” head coach Rick Barnes said after the loss Saturday. “I think we have to give them credit with their defense, but we had a lot of looks that we would have liked to make, but you have to make them.” At first it seemed like Texas would be able to keep up with Kansas. The interior defense denied Kansas anything in the paint. But as soon as the Jayhawks figured out how to beat it, they were able to roll to 38 points in the paint. Meanwhile, the offense was completely lost for nearly the entire game. The Longhorns only had

SLUMP continues on page 8

Texas @ TCU

Date: Tuesday Time: 7 p.m. On air: Big 12 Network extend the school record set this past Saturday. Kansas crushed Texas, 73-47, at Allen Fieldhouse last weekend, tying the loss with last month’s defeat to Kansas

TCU continues on page 8

Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff Myck Kabongo is averaging 13.0 points and 3.5 assists per game since returning from a 23-game suspension to start the season. If Texas wants to find success he’ll need to find his groove quickly.

Hollingsworth to make first career start against Mavericks After kicking off the season with a series win over the weekend, the Longhorns look to pick up their third victory of the year Tuesday against the UTArlington Mavericks.

Texas (2-1) will send freshman Chad Hollingsworth to the mound for his first career start. The right-hander, who made his collegiate debut as a reliever on Saturday, went 13-2 with a 0.50 ERA and 139 strikeouts in 97.1 innings as a senior at Robinson High School in Waco last season.

Hollingsworth will attempt to match the performances of starters Parker French and Dillon Peters over the weekend. French pitched seven scoreless innings and struck out five players to pick up the win Friday, while Peters allowed just two runs in seven innings during Sunday’s victory.

Former Longhorns make Texas HOF Fomer Texas greats Ricky Williams and Cat Osterman were both inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame on Monday night, accompanying countless great athletes from the state. Other inductees include New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees — who won the 1996 5A State Championship with Austin Westlake — and former San Antonio High School and NBA champion Shaquille O’Neal. As a running back for the Longhorns from 1995-98, Williams finished his career with 21 NCAA records and 46 school records. He rushed for an NCAA record 6,279 rushing yards and 72 touchdowns, and accumulated a record 7,206 allpurpose yards and 75 total touchdowns. Williams’ crowning accomplishment was his selection as the 1998 recipient of the Heisman Trophy, a year in which he claimed a NCAA rushing title for the second consecutive season. Osterman, one of the top pitchers in the history of the UT softball program, was named a three-time National Player of the Year and a four-time All-American during her four seasons as a Longhorn. She is the only individual player in the history of NCAA Softball to be named player of the year three times, a feat that helped her team to the College World Series three times in her career (2003, 2005, 2006). —Matt Warden

BASEBALL

By Peter Sblendorio

SPORTS BRIEFLY

The Texas lineup will also look to continue its strong play, as it recorded at least 10 hits in each of its first three games. Junior Mark Payton has responded well to batting cleanup, as he hit .583 with three

MAVS continues on page 8

UT-Arlington @ Texas

Date: Tuesday Time: 6 p.m. On air: LHN

Lakers owner Jerry Buss dies at age 80 Jerry Buss built a glittering life at the intersection of sports and Hollywood. After growing up in poverty in Wyoming, he earned success in academia, aerospace and real estate before discovering his favorite vocation when he bought the Los Angeles Lakers in 1979. Buss, who shepherded his NBA team from the Showtime dynasty of the 1980s to the current Bryant era, all while becoming one of the most important and successful owners in pro sports, died Monday from cancer. He was 80. —Associated Press


8 SPTS

sports

8

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

MAVS

continues from page 7

Jonathan Garza | Daily Texan Staff Highly touted freshman shortstop C.J Hinojosa started strong in his first series with the Longhorns, batting .545 with two extra-base hits in three games against Sacramento State last weekend.

runs and five RBIs over the weekend. Freshman shortstop C.J Hinojosa also made a nice impression in his Longhorns debut, batting .545 with a pair of RBIs and a run scored. Head coach Augie Garrido was pleased with the Longhorns’ start to the 2013 season. “Well it wasn’t a sweep but it was, I think, good baseball by both teams,” Garrido said. “I think that a lot of good things were done by both teams throughout the weekend. Both teams hit the ball frequently and hard and put pressure on the defenses.” UT-Arlington also had a successful opening weekend, as the Mavericks swept Louisiana Tech. They scored 20 runs in the three games of the series, and five players batted at least .375 against the Bulldogs. Tuesday’s game is scheduled to begin at 6 p.m. at UFCU Disch-Falk Field.

STAT GUY

Texas takes two wins with solid numbers at the plate By David Leffler

Daily Texan Columnist

It may be snowing in New York, but it feels like spring here in Texas. And as any sports fan around will tell you, spring in Austin means only one thing: Longhorn baseball. Returning from its first season without an NCAA berth since 1998, this Texas program has plenty to prove. This is evident in the team’s national ranking. After beginning the season ranked No. 24 in the polls, which was drastically lower than the top 10 ranking they typically begin with, the Longhorns are currently unranked. To turn things around this year, they will do so led by a number of rising players

SLUMP

who have accumulated experience. Like most other Augie Garrido-coached teams before it, the 2013 team is comprised of talented players — in particular, strong pitchers. Led by starting pitchers Nathan Thornhill, Parker French and Dillon Peters, Texas’ defense should be capable of handling the majority of the offenses it will face this year. But when the Longhorns opened the season last weekend at UFCU Disch-Falk Field against the Sacramento State Hornets, it was their offense that looked most impressive. Following an encouraging start, here is an in-depth look at what this year’s club brings to the table: 35: Hits for Texas in its three games against Sacramento State, which trans-

lates to a whopping 11.67 a game. Although it is yet to be seen if the offense can consistently perform at such a high level, new assistant coach Tommy Nicholson has got to be smiling. Nicholson took over aiming to improve Texas’ offense, which struggled down the stretch under former assistant coach Tommy Harmon. 15: Runs scored for the Longhorns last weekend, good for an average of five a game. Last year’s squad, which finished with a 3022 overall record, averaged slightly less than that. 7:  Hits junior outfielder Mark Payton had against the Hornets, giving him a .583 batting average to start the season. Payton could do seemingly no wrong, gathering two extra-

To put it simply, things came easy for Kansas. Texas became easy to defend, while its defense gave up too many open shots to the Jayhawks. At the same time, everything was hard for Texas. It couldn’t handle Kansas’ ball movement on defense and had absolutely no offense. It was an embarrassing game for the Longhorns, and to say they got run out of the arena by Kansas would be an understatement. The loss drops Texas’ road record to a pitiful 0-7 on the road and 1-4 in neutral games. Next is a road game against TCU. It looks winnable on paper, but that is

likely the same thing that Kansas thought before its 62-55 loss to the Horned Frogs on Feb. 6. TCU’s only conference win was against Kansas, but Texas is not much better with three wins in Big 12 play this year. It is clear the Texas program isn’t what is was a few years ago when it was competing for conference championships with the Jayhawks. It may no longer be at Kansas’ level, but it needs to show that it hasn’t dropped down to TCU’s level. Another road loss would lower this horrific season to apocalyptic levels.

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base hits while knocking in five runs over the three game series. 5:  Strikeouts for sophomore right-hander Parker French, whose season debut was nothing short of spectacular. The Dripping Springs native threw seven scoreless innings and gave up only three hits in the Longhorns’ 6-5 victory on opening night.

DIVER

continues from page 7

five field goals in the first half, with Demarcus Holland getting an open dunk with 37 seconds left in the half. Kansas started off hot hitting its first four threepoint attempts. Eventually the Texas offense devolved to jacking three-pointers in an attempt to finally make one - which it infrequently did - going 2-for-21 from beyond the arc. Texas was hesitant to penetrate the paint while Kansas’ Jeff Withey patrolled around the rim, and the team couldn’t consistently find ways to get him out of position.

TEXAS IN OPENING SERIES VS. SACRAMENTO STATE Game One (W, 6-5) Two (L, 5-3) Three (W, 6-3) Hits 14 9 12 Runs 6 3 6 Batting Average .424 .257 .364 Strikeouts (Batting) 5 5 1 Strikeouts (Pitching) 6 5 3 Errors 2 2 0

Summer Dates 2013 1st term: June 8–June 22 2nd term: June 22–July 13 3rd term: July 13–Aug. 3 4th term: Aug. 3–Aug. 17

We will be interviewing Wednesday, Feb. 20th 10:00 am–2:00 pm University Towers Dorm (801 W. 24th St.)

2:  Seniors on the team, Landon Steinhagen and catcher Patrick Marsh. Although this year’s team is largely comprised of underclassmen, it boasts a number of experienced juniors, such as Erich Weiss, Cohl Walla, Jacob Felts, Corey Knebel and Thornhill. These players should provide this team with some much-needed leadership.

continues from page 7

doctor every five days to make sure that’s not happening again.” Further stalling Chandler’s progress was his still-recovering body. He couldn’t dive back into his normal workout and practice routines. He had to be reintroduced slowly. “When I came back to practice, I didn’t even get in the water for another month,” Chandler said. Scoggin did his best to accommodate Chandler’s condition while still advancing his skills. “Coming back and working with Will, I had

TCU

4:   The total number of extra-base hits for Texas over the weekend, all of which came from Payton and highly touted freshman C.J. Hinojosa. If they can improve upon this number and get more production out of the rest of the lineup, the Longhorns have a chance to light up the scoreboard against opponents.

Total 35 15 .348 11 14 4

to adjust my coaching by listening to his doctor and trainer,” Scoggin said. “Speed was important. We couldn’t throw him back into workouts too quickly. I mean, he was coming back from major surgery.” Chandler, who redshirted last year, has made substantial improvement in his return to diving. Receiving the Big 12 Men’s Diver of the Week award only further displayed his progress. “It’s definitely a very slow progression, but my legs are as big as they’ve ever been,” Chandler said.

Scoggin recognizes Chandler’s abilities and has faith he can achieve NCAA recognition. “One of the great things about Will is he’s always optimistic. He has such high goals and aspirations for himself,” Scoggin said. “He wants to be a great diver, and he has unlimited diving potential.” Despite overcoming substantial struggles to earn the Big 12 award, Chandler still wants more. “Its good for confidence,” he said. “But I want to be honored on the NCAA level.”

continues from page 7

State for its worst road loss in Big 12 play. But, with sophomore point guard Myck Kabongo having two games under his belt since his 23-game suspension, head coach Rick Barnes still thinks his team can turn things around. “With Myck coming back, I think everyone thinks it’s just going to get better and better. And it will,” Barnes said. “I don’t care what you

do, at some point in time, you’ve got to make some shots. If you’re not making outside shots, you’ve got to find a way to get to the foul line. You’ve got to find a way to get some easy baskets.” The Longhorns are shooting just 27.4 percent from the three-point range this year, the seventh-worst mark in the country, and a paltry 24.5 percent from beyond the arc in Big 12 play, the

lowest in the conference. When Texas handed TCU a 60-43 loss in Austin on Feb. 2, it shot 52.3 percent from the floor and knocked down three of nine threepoint tries, while holding the Horned Frogs to 32.7 percent shooting from the floor. That’s the kind of performance the Longhorns will need if they want to pick up their first road victory of the season Tuesday.

TEXAS ON THE ROAD IN BIG 12 (0-6) Opponent Score 3PT% Opponent FG% Baylor (Jan 5) 79-86 (OT) 30.8 35.9 Iowa State (Jan12) 62-82 22.2 43.9 Oklahoma (Jan 21) 67-73 31.6 48.1 Kansas State (Jan 30) 57-83 22.2 47.6 West Virginia (Feb 4) 58-60 25 46.2 Kansas (Feb 16) 47-73 9.5 46.4


CLASS/SPTS/L&A 9

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Tuesday, February 19, 2013

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showing its development as a band and increasing comfort to attempt things other than make a crowd dance. Miracle Mile sees STRFKR build off its ability to craft catchy dance melodies like “Rawnald Gregory Erickson the Second,” and develop them into full-fledged songs, often featuring better-written lyrics and equally catchy bridges. Where some of its previous material was so electronic it verged on banality, STRFKR has concisely revised its often-formulaic synthpop into a more organic version that features distinct live instrumentation while maintaining its characteristic simplicity. By the end of Miracle Mile, STRFKR reasserts its dominance, leaving other electronic contemporaries at a distant second.

BEACH FOSSILS Album: Clash The Truth Label: Captured Tracks Songs To Download: “Careless,” “In Vertigo”

Anyone with ears can detect the recent surge of garage/ surf/indie bands that has destroyed any meaning the word “indie” ever had. New York City’s Beach Fossils was met with praise for its 2010 self-titled debut, but after three years the genre demands something new, and Clash The Truth doesn’t have it. The songs are relatively boring and might signal a stagnant band striving to compete in the saturated arena of “indie rock.”

INC. Album: No World Label: 4AD Songs To Download: “Trust (Hell Below),” “Lifetime,” “The Place” Comprised of brothers Andrew and Daniel Aged from Los Angeles, inc. is a new R&B outfit that deserves to be recognized for its debut album No World. The music is spacious and unhurried, with staples of classic R&B, like snapping snares, sensual pianos and delicately whispered vocals. In all its intricacies and emotions, No World could easily launch inc. from no-namers to the top of modern R&B charts.

INSPECTAH DECK FEATURING 7L & ESOTERIC Album: Czarface Label: Brick Records Songs To Download: “Air ‘Em Out” “Savagely Attack” Wu-Tang Clan’s Inspectah Deck has a reputation that raps for itself, but when paired with Boston hip-hop duo 7L & Esoteric, the result is an extremely satisfying mixture of old school emceeing over 7L’s cutting edge production. True to the traditional Wu-Tang production style, Czarface is packed with movie sound clips and “Savagely Attack” features a particularly ruthless verse from fellow Wu-Tang member Ghostface Killah.

FAIR

Toby Talbot | Associated Press Eighteen different grades of maple syrup are displayed in East Montpelier, Vt. State lawmakers are considering whether to drop Vermont’s traditional maple labeling system in favor of an international one.

Vermont to clean up syrup grades By Dave Gram Associated Press

MONTPELIER, Vt. — Would fancy grade maple syrup by any other name taste as sweet? Vermont lawmakers are pondering that question as they consider whether to drop the state’s traditional maple labeling system in favor of an international one. The change pits tradition versus a desire to be a bigger player in world markets. Vermont is the No. 1 maple syrup producer in the United States, but its unique labeling standards put it at

JAVA

continues from page 12 themselves, but that doesn’t mean Carson works without stage fright. “Basically you just keep doing stand-up until that instinctual fear of the spotlight wears away and you’re sort of comfortable up there. But it’s still a very heightened, exciting thing

odds with the other big producers, including Canada. The state Senate last week passed and sent to the House a measure to drop fancy, grade A medium amber, dark amber and grade B. (Fancy is the lightest and mildest, while grade B is the darkest and has the strongest maple flavor.) In their place would be several types sharing a grade A label, with descriptive phrases following: golden color and delicate taste; amber color and rich taste; dark color and robust taste; very dark color and strong taste. Sen. Kevin Mullin, RRutland, initially argued against the measure before

reluctantly going along. “We should not be following everyone else in lockstep and ... giving them the ability to try to pretend that syrup made in another state is anywhere near as good as the syrup made in Vermont,” he said. Mullin later said he was mollified by assurances that the changes would be phased in over three years and that producers wouldn’t have to throw out containers already printed with the existing labels. State Agriculture Secretary Chuck Ross said the changes have largely been pushed by the industry, although the agency has conducted a series of public hearings to

address the concerns of the more reluctant producers. Vermont’s syrup production has roughly doubled in the past decade, to the extent that supply vastly exceeds any demand that would come from a state of about 626,000, Ross said. Vermont will maintain its distinct branding by labeling its syrup as coming from the state. Vermont regulations will continue to require boiling sap for longer than is the case elsewhere, producing a slightly denser product, Ross said. But he added that to continue using a separate grading system would lead to consumer confusion.

to do for me,” Carson said. Sophomore Grace Newman sat at one of the tables in the Java Lounge with her books spread around her. Newman said the atmosphere and easy location are what draws her there. The venue is an accessible hangout as well as the home of “Comedy at the Java Lounge,” and Carson said this diverse mixture of activities is what makes Austin Java able to attract a

diverse audience. “We all have this one thing in common: deciding to try and make strangers laugh,” Carson said. “That’s what lends itself to a community, because then we all have this one thing to talk about and it makes it easier to overcome being socially awkward people.” This hidden stage is the home of many comedians that first began their comedic career. Carson said

open mic night is a place for anyone who wants to make people laugh, with or without experience. “New comics just want to do well consistently, and making people laugh is everyone’s goal on a night-tonight basis,” Carson said. “Some people I talk to are pretty frank about considering it just a hobby, but they usually have some other form of creative expression. Everyone wants to be a star.”

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backstoried characters, but most don’t. Most likely the people you hear speaking in Old English would be the fair employees.” When asked if his outfit was his regular apparel, Stermer laughed at the thought. “No, no, the only time I wear this is weekends when I work the fair,” Stermer said. “The few people who wear this stuff in their daily lives are freaks.” There is a hierarchy among

attendees based on how absorbed a person is in fantasy. Stermer himself was born at a Renaissance fair in Largo, Fla., and has worked at fairs since he was a child. Despite being born in and raised at Renaissance fairs, Stermer hasn’t lost the sense of fantasy and play that the fairs represent. The phrase “family reunion” can be found all throughout the fair guide, a veritable book that lists activities, vendors and cast members.

Joey Robichaux, who works in software during the rest of the year, inhabits a shady spot on the fairgrounds where he reads tarot cards for guests. He has attended Sherwood since it began four years ago and has read tarot cards for 20 years. This camaraderie and tradition, he claimed, binds the fantasy community together. “A huge part of a Renaissance fair is the tradition of coming back to the same place where you know you’ll

find the same people over and over again,” Robichaux said. “It’s a tradition for a small, but growing group of people.” Attendees ranged from young families enjoying low entrance fees and tiny rides to techies dressed in leather and velvet and cider-drunk frat boys. Recently retired NASA employees Robert and Jenney Stein said they love the atmosphere of the smaller Sherwood Forest Faire. “The best vendors are here

and the best food. We love ogre toes, which are candied bacon wrapped in sausage wrapped in bacon then fried,” Jenney Stein said. “It might be 1,000 calories, but that’s what makes it tasty.” The couple was dressed in intricately designed costumes that reflected a passionate interest. “I am a airship pilot who lost his airship and she is an adventurer who couldn’t possibly get lost with the

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COMICS 11

Comics

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

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Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Life & Arts 12

NIGHTLIFE

Kelsey McKinney, Life & Arts Editor

ALBUM REVIEW | ‘MIRACLE MILE’

Photo courtesy of the Windish Agency STRFKR’s latest album, Miracle Mile, sees the band successfully incorporate an organic feel to its version of electronic pop.

STRFKR’s latest shines with fresh synth sound By Shane Miller

Illustration by Holly Hansel | Daily Texan Staff

Cozy up to Java Lounge comedy By Jourden Sander In the basement of Austin Java Parkway there lies a mini culture of comedians throwing their best jokes about weed, religion, porn and social norms at their audience. Every Wednesday at 8:00 p.m., the Java Lounge transforms into the Laugh Lounge where the local, everyday folk of Austin come to present their comedic talents at an open mic night Comedian Kat Combs walked in wearing a red jacket and a silver lip ring. She greeted others in the crowd, knowing almost everyone in the room. Combs said many of the comedians that come to the open mic

night often return, resulting in a family atmosphere. “I come here every week and I like that down here it’s a separate room, as if it’s our own space,” Combs said. After Combs greets everyone, she and the other comedians pull out their note-scribbled journals to studiously look over the comedic work they have prepared for the audience. In the show, titled “Comedy at the Java Lounge,” local Austinites come together to create a thriving comedy club that relies on their own efforts to make the night successful. “Most stand-ups have things to say, but there’s a lot of improv too, a lot of performance,” host Duncan Carson said. “I’ve always

wanted to do comedy. I used to be a writer, but this a much more fun thing to do. I love telling jokes.” In the shabby chic basement of the Java Lounge, the locals begin to sign their names on a list that will ensure them a fourand-a-half minute spot to perform their best jokes. One man who signed his name wore a shirt that read “SARCASM: It Beats Killing People,” while another man played a ukulele until names started being called to perform. At 8:00 p.m., Carson got to the stage and began the night by doing his own stand-up. “Stand-up is the most exciting, most fun thing I know how to do. It’s an adrenaline

“COMEDY AT THE JAVA LOUNGE”: OPEN MIC NIGHT Where: Austin Java, 1206 Parkway at 12th and Lamar Boulevard When: Every Wednesday at 8 p.m. Website: austinjava.com rush every time, whether it goes well or badly,” Carson said. “I still get nervous, but after doing it for a while it’s more that I really want everyone to enjoy themselves.” With laughter filling the room, it appeared obvious that the audience enjoyed

JAVA continues on page 10

Portland band Starfucker, or STRFKR, has a reputation for producing electronic dance hits and live shows as provocative as their name. 2011’s Reptilians hooked music critics and, with Miracle Mile, the band seductively reels them in. Beginning with “While I’m Alive,” the album opens as expected — with a catchy and nasally vocal melody and an easygoing synth progression. Then, about two minutes into the song, you realize that STRFKR is not just another happy-go-lucky electropop band, but the innovators of its genre. The descending bridge collapses before rebuilding a funky, easily accessible bass groove. The minimalist guitar work introduced on “While I’m Alive” defines the best parts of the album, which is STRFKR’s ability to craft ridiculously catchy hooks out of only three or four notes. “Isea” is a 50-second vibechiller comprised of a delicate, nylon string acoustic riff. Lead vocalist Joshua

STRFKR Album: Miracle Mile Label: Polyvinyl Songs To Download: “While I’m Alive,” “Say To You” Hodges momentarily breaks from the prevailing themes of hedonism and sings, “We spoke of summer, fall back together/Said it will be better to stay indoors all day,” before the band seamlessly transitions into “YAYAYA,” a reversion to the ubiquitous feel-goodery. The juxtaposition of the hinting of nostalgia in “Isea” and the proceeding nonsensical “YAYAYA” makes Miracle Mile STRFKR’s most lyrically experimental album to date,

ALBUMS continues on page 10

OFFBEAT

Sherwood fair attracts band of merry men By Kelly Eisenberg Traveling to the Sherwood Forest Faire, down Old Highway 20 just east of Austin, feels like a journey into the past. In its fourth year, the local Renaissance fair has become a highlight of Texas’ three fairs. Although it’s small when compared to the Texas Renaissance Festival or Scarborough Renaissance Festival, this fantasy fan destination has its own share of whimsical offerings. The Renaissance fair

moniker doesn’t necessarily encapsulate what the Sherwood Forest Faire is about. An abundance of Johnny Depp-esque pirates as well as Jules Verne’s steampunks litter the fairgrounds, making it clear that historical accuracy is the least of concerns. “This place is far from historically accurate,” said Tali Stermer, a vendor of hand-painted, bird-shaped clay whistles. “It is more of a fantasy fair, if you will. Some people have elaborately

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Festival-goer Dave Pluth enjoys a sausage and a beer Saturday afternoon at the fourth annual Sherwood Forest Faire just east of Austin. Every year, the fair attracts a large variety of people to celebrate and gather around food, music, fantasy and craft.

Maria Arrellaga Daily Texan Staff


2013-02-19