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The Daily Texan Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

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Monday, February 18, 2013

INSIDE NEWS The Blanton Musem of Art celebrates its 50th year of providing UT and Austin with art. PAGE 5 Seismos, student startup hopes to improve efficiency of enhanced oil recovery. PAGE 5

SPORTS Dillon Peters tosses seven solid innings as Texas takes the rubber match against Sacramento State, 6-3. PAGE 6 Chassidy Fussell scores a game-high 27 points while her team was unable to pull past Texas Tech. PAGE 6

dailytexanonline.com

Indoor skydiving business takes flight in Austin.

Texas’ road woes continue as KU blows out Horns.

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10

SPORTS PAGE 6

STATE

Boosting research to restore funding By Joshua Fechter Restoring state funding cuts to UT may best be done through funding research projects at the University, President William Powers Jr. told Texas lawmakers Friday. Powers told a subcommittee of the House

Appropriations Committee that increasing funds to the Texas Competitive Knowledge Fund, a state fund that supports university research projects, would benefit the University more than increasing state general revenue funds allocated to UT. Powers said it is more difficult to fund research because

it does not always produce an immediate payoff, but research is important for the development of Texas’ economy. “The research part is terribly important for the longrange health of the state,” Powers said. Established in 2007, the Texas Competitive Knowledge Fund provides state sup-

port for university research projects at UT, UT-Dallas, Texas Tech University, Texas A&M University and the University of Houston. Universities must spend $50 million toward research over a three-year period to become eligible for the fund, and they receive $1 from the state for every $10 they

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Decreased funding to affect many universities By Barak Bullock

LIFE&ARTS Disabled music professor Gerhardt Zimmermann conducts music while inspiring students. PAGE 10

COLUMN

TOM MELECKI

TODAY Office supply swap and recycling Drop off unwanted office supplies and get some coffee and snacks from 9 a.m. to noon at SJH multipurpose room. Then return from 1:30 to 4 p.m. to shop. Drop off special recycling for ink and toner, batteries, books and more all day. UT French Club conversation hour All speaking levels are welcome to join the UT Undergraduate French Club upstairs at Cafe Medici for an hour of French conversation from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Teach English abroad Attend this information session to learn about opportunities to teach English abroad from ESL faculty at 5 to 6 p.m. in MEZ 2.122.

Dan Resler | Daily Texan Staff Mechanical Engineering Professor Joe Beaman holds up one of the products of his 3-D printer on Thursday afternoon. Beaman has co-developed the 3-D printer since 1985.

3-D printing debate

Concern surrounding laser sintering increases with gun control disputes By Hannah Jane DeCiutiis Between gun control debates and President Barack Obama’s State of the Union Address, 3-D printing has become a topic of interest in mainstream conversation,

but UT students may find the concept hits closer to campus than they think. When mechanical engineering professor Joe Beaman was asked how much time he spends in UT’s Laboratory for Freeform Fabrication, he laughed.

CAMPUS

For a video about 3-D print manufacturing, visit bit.ly/dt_3d “Not as much as I used to,” Beaman said. In 1985, Beaman began codeveloping the concept of solid freeform fabrication, which is what many people are coming to know as 3-D printing. After its inception, the manufacturing technique received

decreasing amounts of media attention until Defense Distributed, a group founded by UT law student Cody Wilson, began publicizing their plans to create mainstream software designs for printable gun

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Looming cuts to the federal budget, also known as sequestration, could endanger research funding at UT and other universities across the nation. Sequestration would cut federal spending by 8 to 10 percent across the board, which could take out $60 billion federal research over the next four years. The cuts were originally meant to take place last January as a part of the collective tax increases and spending cuts that made up the “fiscal cliff,” but were delayed until March 1. According to UT professor Alan Lambowitz, director of the Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Congress’ failure to prevent the sequester could be a substantial blow the available funds of federal agencies which awarded more than $154 million to UT researchers in 2011. “An immediate effect is that many National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation research grants that have already been reviewed and received high priority scores will no longer be funded,” Lambowitz said. Additionally, Lambowitz

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CITY

Students stand 12 hours Race raises funds for research to support Miracle Kids By Alexandra Dubinsky

By Jeremy Thomas More than 100 volunteers — including superheroes such as Batman, Superman and Wonder Woman — raised about $36,000 Saturday at Gregory Gymnasium for the annual Texas THON. In its 11th year, the Texas THON is a philanthropic event produced by UT students where volunteers raise money by pledging to stand —

without sitting — for 12 consecutive hours for children in need. All proceeds go toward the Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Austin. The organization conducts fund-raising throughout the year, which culminates in a day filled with live entertainment, free food, games and dancing. Texas THON is one of many similar events held at universities across the nation

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Today in history President’s Day Originally celebrated on Feb. 22, George Washington’s birthday, it was moved to the third Monday of February in 1971. We now celebrate all past U.S. presidents on this day.

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Taylor Thom hits two grand slams in Saturday’s win over Houston, making her only the fourth player in NCAA history to accomplish that feat. PAGE 7

As a student, you are uniquely positioned to study pending decisions on financial aid and make your preferences known. You have a living, breathing understanding of these matters. PAGE 4

raise independently. The Legislature, which meets every two years, allocates its funds in two-year periods, or bienniums. In the 2010-11 biennium, the fund had a pot of $126.2 million, which was reduced to $93.5 million the following

Austin McKinney | Daily Texan Staff Dell Miracle Kid Marley removes the hospital bracelets worn by Texas THON volunteers during the closing ceremony Saturday.

Runners congregated Sunday morning to sweat, struggle and raise money for cancer research after a 26.2 mile adventure through the streets of Austin. For 21 years, the annual Livestrong Austin Marathon and Half Marathon race has combined running and charity to raise funds for cancer research. According to the foundation, fundraising efforts resulted in a total of $266,406. Sponsored by 26 Miles for 26 Charities, more than 1,000 volunteers from various organizations managed aid stations throughout the course. About 26,000 runners participated in the event, according to foundation officials. About 10,000 ran the half marathon, about 3,700 ran the full marathon and about 12,000 ran a 5K. The full marathon started at Congress Avenue and 16th Street, and the 26.2— mile course runs past Lady Bird Johnson Lake, the Allandale and Hyde Park

Maria Arrellaga | Daily Texan Staff Volunteers pass out water to runners participating in the 21st annual Livestrong Austin Marathon and Half Marathon on Sunday.

neighborhoods, Congress Avenue, the University’s campus and the State Capitol complex. It ends at Congress Avenue and 10th street. Omar Martinez won this year’s race after finishing with a time of 2:35:09. This year’s female marathon winner was Mariko Neveu with a time of 2:55:04. The half marathon male winner was Lee Troop with a time of 1:06:46. Melissa Johnson-White completed the half marathon with a time of 1:15:25. Anjelica Barrientos, president of the Running Club

Why run a marathon when you can watch a marathon? PAGE 10 at UT, said she estimated around 10 members were running the full marathon and around fifteen ran the half marathon. Management senior Thomas Kehoe said he felt motivated after volunteering for five hours. Kehoe helped redistribute participants’ belongings at the end of the race.

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Monday, February 18, 2013

THON

to raise money for Children’s Miracle Network hospitals. In her Batman costume, executive chairwoman for Texas THON Caitlyn Leal said she felt the event was a success for the Dell Miracle Kids. “The energy was so high,” Leal said. “Our exec team had a lot of obstacles this year so the amount we raised in the matter of weeks is amazing. It was such a success. I couldn’t have asked for anything better.” The theme of this year’s event was “Super Heroes Stand 2013,” where volunteers and Miracle Kids dressed up as their favorite superhero. “Every year we do a new theme,” Stephanie Morgan, Plan II senior and catering and sponsorship chairwoman, said “and this year we really wanted it to relate to what Texas Thon actually is doing. We wanted to be superheroes for the kids at Dell Children’s Medical Center because they’re an inspiration to us so we want to be an inspiration to them.” Texas THON invites Miracle Children to speak about their experiences at the event. Math junior Lisa Huynh said hearing those stories serves as an inspiration to her to “stand” for them. “Personally it is really touching to hear all of the families come speak,” Huynh said. “I used to have a little brother that had to go to the Children’s Hospital so it’s near and dear to my heart. One of the great things about Dell is they don’t turn away kids so that’s what makes it rewarding for us to do this.” Marley, a Miracle Kid, was one of the children that spoke

at Saturday’s event. At the age of five, Marley was hit by a vehicle that affected her ability to walk. During the aftermath and her recovery, she stayed at Dell Children’s Medical Center. “It’s a very scary place to be when you’re a young child,” she said. “It’s frightening so you guys, what you’re doing, you’re raising money obviously, and you’re helping make everything safer and it feels safer. You make it so much easier for kids like me.” Marley and all of those who participated in the Texas THON wore hospital bracelets with the name of different Miracle Kids on each bracelet. At the end of closing ceremony, the volunteers gathered in a circle to have their bracelets cut off their wrists to symbolize when a Miracle Child can leave the hospital. Marley walked, on her own, around the circle to cut over a hundred bracelets off the wrists of UT students and other volunteers. “That was the first time in my life I’ve ever cried of happiness,” she said. “That shows how awesome you guys are. Thank you so much.”

The material for models created by selective sintering is initially in powder form, which is layered from bottom to top and fused together by the laser. Beaman said approximately 80 percent of commercial parts created by this method are made of nylon. It took two years to make the technique functional, he said. “[Carl] had a Commodore 64 [computer], and we had found an XY table to spread this powder out, and we had found a laser that someone was using for some other purpose, so we just tried it and sort of were able to make a box in a box,” Beaman said. “Now how else would you make a box that’s inside a box? It didn’t look very box-like,

but it was close enough.” While the technology has taken off commercially, the idea that the public could start printing weapon components has little merit, Beaman said, because of the high costs and more intricate processes it takes to manufacture usable parts. He said the differences between 3-D printing and true additive manufacturing lie in both the accuracy and strength of the materials and the design. “Think of [3-D printing] as low-accuracy and low-strength,” Beaman said. “It’s not going to make parts. Additive manufacturing is having all the strong parts and all the accurate parts. This is the hard part, and this is when it gets expensive. And

that’s what you would have to do to make any kind of weapon, for example, which we’re not really interested in doing anyway.” While debates about gun control and the question of protecting intellectual property continue to circulate around the idea of freeform fabrication, Beaman said it is no different from when other technologies have been introduced into the mainstream. “It’s an interesting conversation and an extremely important policy question,” Beaman said. “I’m not saying there are no problems, because there are definitely problems. But it can bring up a lot of opportunities too. A lot of people really did not like the light bulb.”

ScienceWorksForU.S., an outreach project focused on demonstrating “the tremendous impact that federally funded university-based scientific research has on the nation and on the lives of all Americans,” according to the joint organizations. In addition to halting promising research, researchers also argue the sequester would harm the nation by arresting the opportunities for students to engage in research. “These cuts are not just a retreat from our nation’s cutting-edge research programs — they would directly

impact opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to prepare for careers as the high tech innovators our nation needs to prosper,” said Laurie Leshin, a former NASA scientist and dean of the School of Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in a statement. “Such a cut would have a very negative impact on UT’s research activities” Juan Sanchez, UT’s vice president for research, said. “There will be less opportunities for both graduate and undergraduate students to participate in funded research projects. With regard to science and

technology, it is obvious that U.S. competitiveness will suffer at a time when other nations, especially in the Pacific, are aggressively increasing their R&D investments.” In addition to slowing down research, opportunities for university students would also be adversely affected, according to William Shute, vice chancellor for federal relations at the UT System. “Unfortunately it will impact UT through the Pell Grant program, work-study and some financial aid ... The programs would not be available to a significant number of students,” he said.

Volume 113, Issue 106

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Susannah Jacob (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Trey Scott (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com

Austin McKinney | Daily Texan Staff UT President William Powers Jr. appeals before a representative sub-committee at the John Reagan building early Friday morning.

News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com

FUNDS

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The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

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biennium. The House’s current budget proposal increases the fund to $100.2 million for the upcoming biennium. Of the total fund, UT received $55.1 million in 2010-11 and $36.8 million in 2012-13. The House’s proposal would allocate $38.3 million for the 201415 biennium. Powers addressed how the University is dealing with the decline of state general revenue funds. The House’s initial proposal would allocate $478.8 million to the University over the next two years. The proposal is $14 million less than the amount the University received during 2012 and 2013 and $93 million less than what the University received during 2010

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COPYRIGHT

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Copyright 2012 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

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components in 2012. Congress has since taken up the idea of banning the process on varying levels, from simply printing gun components to commercially printing products at all. Since its development, the process has gained popularity in a wide variety of industries including aerospace, consumer goods and biomedical engineering, all the while reducing costs and manpower for creating product parts. Beaman worked on developing selective laser sintering three decades ago with his student at

This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25 Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susannah Jacob Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drew Finke, Pete Stroud, Edgar Walters Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trey Scott Associate Managing Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kristine Reyna, Matt Stottlemyre Digital Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayley Fick News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shabab Siddiqui Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elyana Barrera, Allie Kolechta, Mustafa Saifuddin, Sarah White Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala, Hannah Jane DeCiutiis, Joshua Fechter, Jordan Rudner Enterprise Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrew Messamore, Megan Strickland, Alexa Ura Wire Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands, Kristine Reyna Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon, Jay Egger, Andrew Huygen, Sara Reinsch Editorial Copy Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nile Miller Creative Director. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Natasha Smith Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pu Ying Huang, Omar Longoria, Jack Mitts, Stefanie Schultz Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Zachary Strain Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pu Ying Huang, Marisa Vasquez Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Maggie Arrellaga, Jorge Corona, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pearce Murphy, Chelsea Purgahn, Shelby Tauber Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorge Corona Associate Multimedia Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrea Macias-Jimenez Senior Videographers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Demi Adejuyigbe, Shila Farahani, Lawrence Peart, Alec Wyman Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kelsey McKinney Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aleksander Chan, Sarah-Grace Sweeney Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alexandra Hart, Shane Arthur Miller, Hannah Smothers, Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christian Corona Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Garrett Callahan, Nick Cremona, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Beth Purdy, Rachel Thompson, Matt Warden Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephanie Vanicek Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tyler Reinhart Associate Web Editor, Social Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Sanchez Associate Web Editors, Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Omar Longoria Senior Web Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Helen Fernandez, Hannah Peacock Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Breanna Williams Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

Issue Staff

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barak Bullock, Alexandra Dubinsky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Klarissa Fitzpatrick, Albert Lory, Jeremy Thomas, Amanda Voeller Multimedia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Shweta Gulati, Guillermo Hernandez Martinez, Austin McKinney, Marshall Nolen Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Evan Berkowitz, Peter Sblendorio Life&Arts Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Juhie Modi Columnist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amil Malik Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kyle Cavazos, Ashley Cunningham Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alexandra Frankel, Reeana Keenen, Sarah Talaat Comic Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Desiree Avila, Kaz Frankiewicz, Hannah Hadidi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nohemy Herrera, Isabella Palacios, Justin Perez, Lindsay Rojas, Lydia Thron

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(512) 471-1865 | advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Business Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lori Hamilton Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcast & Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Event Coordinator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindsey Hollingsworth Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Morgan Haenchen Student Assistant Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ted Moreland Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hunter Chitwood, Zach Congdon, Jake Dworkis, Ivan Meza, Rohan Needel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Trevor Nelson, Diego Palmas, Paola Reyes, Ted Sniderman, Stephanie Vajda Student Lead Generators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gabby Garza, Jennifer Howton Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nick Cremona Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jacqui Bontke, Sara Gonzales, Bailey Sullivan Special Editions/Production Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Abby Johnston Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Hublein

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and 2011. Powers said UT responded to past funding decreases from the state by cutting $46 million annually from the University’s core budget. “We found some areas that really were worth cutting, but we cut into some bone, too,” Powers said. “But, we did it in a very thoughtful way.” The state bases the University’s funding on the total number of credit hours students enroll in, which is called formula funding. Powers said formula funding cannot make up for past budget cuts because enrollment is not growing enough to produce a significant increase. In fall 2012, the University enrolled 52,186

students, a slight increase from the 51,112 enrolled in fall 2011 and 51,195 enrolled in fall 2010. Powers said UT is the last in its peer group, which includes University of California-Berkeley and University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, in terms of state support. He said increasing research funding at UT would help the University to stay competitive with its peer group. “It’s going to take some funding, we are very efficient, but it’s going to take some funding to let us compete for those great scientists, great teachers and great graduate students so we are bringing the talent here to Texas,” Powers said.

the time, mechanical engineering alumnus Carl Deckard, to whom the patent for selective sintering is accredited. Laser sintering is based on two concepts: the ability of a laser to carry information and the ability to arrange 3-D pixels in any form. The 3-D pixels are called voxels, which is short for volume pixels. “What a laser does is it has energy, which everyone thinks about, but it actually has information because you can point it, and so that’s really what made this technology possible,” Beaman said. “What we wanted to have is a process where you can literally just spit down voxels, or little material elements, and build it up.”

CUTS

continues from page 1 said the funding of existing research projects would also be cut. Now, groups such as the Association of American Universities, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities and the Science Coalition are urging Congress to stop the sequester. The groups argue that cuts to research would set the nation back in innovation and advancement. The three organizations have collaborated to create

continues from page 1

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RACE

continues from page 1 “It makes you want to run seeing how much joy running gives to all 20,000 participants,” said Kehoe, who is hoping to participate in next year’s event. “You talk to people who just ran their first or their 20th. Either way, they seemed hooked.” Communication studies senior Lucia Mueller, former member of the NCAA Women’s Rowing team, said she wanted to run the full marathon because she was itching for another challenge in her athletic life. Mueller finished her first marathon with a time of 4:15:26. “The fact is that I wanted a taste of the anguish, sweat and struggle of the full 26.2,” Mueller said. “Isn’t that sick? There’s something in competitive blood that is truly disturbing. You want to push your body to its absolute limit ... and then some.”


W&N 3

Monday, February 18, 2013

World & Nation 3

Kristine Reyna, Wire Editor

White House has backup drafted for immigration

NEWS BRIEFLY Seven foreigners kidnapped in Nigeria BAUCHI, Nigeria — Gunmen attacked a camp for a construction company in rural northern Nigeria, killing a guard and kidnapping seven foreign workers in the biggest kidnapping yet in a region under attack by Islamic extremists. The attack Saturday night happened in Jama’are. There, the gunmen first attacked a local prison, burning two police trucks. The gunmen then targeted a workers’ camp for Lebanese construction company Setraco. The gunmen shot dead a guard at the camp before kidnapping the foreign workers. One British citizen, one Greek, one Italian, three Lebanese and one Filipino were kidnapped.

Russia quickly repairs damage from meteor MOSCOW — More than half of the acres of windows smashed in the city by an exploding meteor’s shock wave have been replaced. Friday’s explosion, estimated to be equivalent to several atomic bombs, shattered glass in more than 4,000 buildings in Chelyabinsk and the surrounding region, leaving residents vulnerable in temperatures well below freezing. About 1,200 people were injured, mostly by broken glass, with 40 still hospitalized Sunday. The Chelyabinsk city administration said in a Sunday statement that nearly 60 percent of the city’s broken windows had been replaced. — Compiled from Associated Press reports

By Philip Elliott Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Republicans and Democrats alike on Sunday predicted President Barack Obama would fail if he pushed forward with his own effort to overhaul the nation’s immigration system and urged the administration to hold off while lawmakers work on a bipartisan measure. Republican Sen. John McCain predicted the administration’s efforts would come up short if the White House went forward with a proposal to put the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants in the U.S. on a long pathway to citizenship. Democratic Sen. Chuck Schumer, who met with Obama on Wednesday at the White House to discuss progress, urged his allies in the administration to give a bipartisan group of eight lawmakers the time to hammer out a deal on their own. Obama’s newly appointed top aide, chief of staff Denis McDonough, said the White House would only send its plan to Congress if the lawmakers stumble in their efforts and cast its efforts as a backup plan. The administration’s proposal would create a visa for those in the country illegally and allow them to become legal permanent residents within eight years. The proposal also requires businesses to know the immigration status of their workers and adds more funding for border security.

Mohammad Hannon | Associated Press A Libyan military helicopter maneuvers over Tahrir Square as Libyan security forces wave and flash the victory sign during the celebration of the second anniversary of the Libyan revolution in Benghazi, Libya on Sunday. Libya’s interim President Mohammed el-Megarif called for unity in the North African nation on Sunday.

Libya celebrates uprising, unity By Maggie Michael Associated Press

BENGHAZI, Libya — Libya’s leader called on Sunday for unity in the North African nation as it celebrates the second anniversary of the uprising that toppled longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi but plunged the country into lawlessness and economic woes. Addressing thousands of flag-waving Libyans in Benghazi, the eastern Libyan city that was the birthplace of the anti-Gadhafi uprising, Mohammed el-Megarif urged his countrymen to “join ranks and resolve our differences to build our nation.”

He also promised to fight poverty and “marginalization,” and to give Libyans extra cash to mark the occasion. He did not say how much money he meant, or how it would be distributed. Libya has been roiled by instability and violence since the ouster of the Gadhafi regime in late 2011. Benghazi has been among the worst-hit parts of the country, falling prey to armed militiamen and Muslim militants. El-Megarif alluded to the rise of radical Islam in the energy-rich nation, vowing that he would not allow Libya to become “an incubator of terrorism and violence.” In what appeared to be an attempt to assuage the

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militants, the Libyan leader promised that the nation’s next constitution would explicitly declare Islam as the country’s religion and that Islamic law, or Shariah, would be the main source of legislation. He also vowed to push for laws that would “isolate” remnants of the old Gadhafi regime, another bid to appease militants who claim that members of the ousted regime remained in charge of many government departments as well as the security forces. Sunday’s celebration was held amid tight security precautions. Army vehicles blocked roads leading to the site and snipers deployed on nearby rooftops.

In Tripoli, tens of thousands thronged the main square in celebration. Security was deployed but the mood was relaxed, as people used fireworks, sent balloons in the sky and sprayed each other with perfume and incense. Overhead, jets circled in formation. Salma Bashir, a housewife in her forties, brought her two daughters to the square to celebrate. “I never thought I would see this many people out celebrating. Not even in Gadhafi’s days could they organize such a huge celebration,” she said, as loudspeakers blasted patriotic songs. “This is an expression of our sense of ease. Security has exceeded our expectations.”

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4A Opinion

Opinion 4

Monday, February 18, 2013

Editor-in-Chief Susannah Jacob

The future of financial aid at UT is in your hands Tom Melecki

KEY FEDERAL AND STATE FINANCIAL AID REDUCTIONS AT UT AUSTIN

Guest Columnist

“No qualified student should be prevented from attending the University for financial reasons,” declared UT’s Commission of 125, a group of prominent citizens who convened nearly a decade ago to determine how the University can best serve the state. UT-Austin administrators take this statement seriously. The University is working hard to hold down student costs. If you are an in-state undergraduate, your tuition increased at less than half the national average last year. Using the University’s flat-rate tuition plan, you are allowed to take 15 or more credit hours for the price of 12. Additionally, the University spends $100 million a year on merit-based scholarships and need-based grants, and David Laude, senior vice provost for enrollment and graduation management, recently announced $5 million in new pilot programs to encourage and support four-year graduation by forgiving student loans, expanding scholarships and creating more on-campus work opportunities. Nevertheless, the cost of attending the University keeps rising. Why? Most UT students come from elsewhere in Texas. They must leave their homes to live in Austin, which is the state’s most expensive city to rent in. And while tuition may be frozen for two years, research indicates that student living costs will average about $15,600 next academic year — up 24 percent from just five years ago — which means students pay more while government financial aid programs deliver less. Data in the Office of Student Financial Services show that, in the last two years, federal and state cutbacks in five key financial aid programs have cost UT students almost $20 million a year. The Legislature cut the state’s TEXAS Grants, upon which the neediest students depend, by $7 million. Lawmakers also cut funding for Texas B-On-Time Loans even though 59 percent of these loans made to previous UT students have been forgiven because the students graduated in four years with GPAs of 3.0 or better. Additionally, Congress eliminated the federal summer Pell Grants that some students used to speed time to their degrees by taking year-round classes. It also eliminated two other programs through which almost 4,400 students supplemented their Pell Grants.

2010-2011

TYPE OF AID

2012-2013

Recipients

Amount

Recipients

Amount

Federal Academic Competitiveness Grants

3,229

$2,375,333

0

$0

Federal SMART Grants

1,131

$2,934,547

0

$0

Federal Summer Pell Grants

2,967

$4,095,016

0

$0

881

$5,396,065

385

$2,675,135

5,126

$32,757,267

5,269

$25,295,000

State B-On-Time Loans State TEXAS Grants

Moreover, UT’s Federal Work-Study allocations have declined 25 percent in the last five years, eliminating more than 400 undergraduate jobs, most of which were on-campus. The University’s Texas College Work-Study allotment has also decreased, and federal financial aid soon may be subject to more reductions. Federal Work-Study could be downsized further if Washington implements spending cuts on March 1 to avoid the fiscal cliff. Pell Grants, on which more than 11,000 UT students rely, also face an uncertain future because next year’s federal budget is still not set. Under a law already on the books, the 3.4 percent interest rate on federal loans which more than 14,000 UT students receive will rise to 6.8 percent next year. Next biennium’s preliminary state budget includes flat funding for Texas College Work-Study, Top 10 Percent Scholarships, and TEXAS Grants as the Legislature struggles with demands on a state treasury stretched thin. Still, the University and some state and national leaders hope to see increases in financial aid. UT President William Powers Jr. recently spoke of the need for more TEXAS Grants in his testimony to state lawmakers about the state budget. Legislative appropriations committees are looking into increased funding that could provide $5,000 TEXAS Grants to as many as 90 percent of the new students who are eligible for them, up from the current level of 30 percent. The Texas Senate’s Higher Education Committee favors consistent B-onTime funding and expanding Texas College Work-Study. The state’s Higher Education Coordinating Board would amend

GALLERY

state law so public universities may keep the tuition they must now send the state to help fund B-On-Time — ensuring that more than $6.5 million a year for B-on-Time stays at UT. At the federal level, there is a growing consensus about the importance of keeping higher education affordable, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation recently funded studies that recommend increasing Pell Grants and reducing student loan interest rates. Financial aid decisions by federal and state policymakers affect your UT experience. If you are one of the University’s 25,000 undergraduate financial aid recipients, they affect the affordability of your UT education. If you do not rely on financial aid, they affect the students with whom you live and attend class. As a student, you are uniquely positioned to study pending decisions on financial aid and make your preferences known. You have a living, breathing understanding of these matters. Research skills you honed in courses and on term papers can help you inform yourself about the issues. You attend classes a few blocks north of the state capitol, so you can observe funding and policy decisions in person. You have access to student-oriented media, including The Daily Texan, so you can monitor what public officials say and do. Whether you agree that qualified students shouldn’t be prevented from attending UT for financial reasons or whether you support or oppose additional financial aid, pay attention and participate. Your present, and your future, are at stake. Melecki is the director of Student Financial Services.

Don’t mandate volunteering Amil Malik Daily Texan Columnist

What to Watch February 18 - 22 At the beginning of every week, we provide a list of opinion-worthy events to expect during the coming week. “Good Hair,” a docu-comedy featuring comedian Chris Rock that explores societal notions of beauty as they apply to African-American women’s hair, will be screened Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. in the Calhoun Hall auditorium (CAL 100). The film investigates how the beauty industry influences women’s understanding of “good hair” and how this understanding affects the African-American community at large. The film will be preceded by a brief introduction from Jackie Smith, an American Studies Ph.D. student. The Environmental Science Institute presents Robert Bullard, known as “the father of the environmental justice movement,” who will discuss the disparate effects that climate change and other environmental health threats have on historically disadvantaged communities. The lecture will take place Friday, Feb. 22, at 7 p.m. in the SAC auditorium. The Gender and Sexuality Center will host an informal talk Thursday, Feb. 21 to discuss the intersection of LGBTQ identities with religion and spirituality. Snacks will be provided. The GSC is located in the Student Activities Center, room SAC 2.112.

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article or cartoonist. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline.com. Letters should be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability. The Texan does not run all submissions.

The Texas Legislature is an idiosyncratic establishment from which impractical bills often arise. Consider House Bill 22. HB 22 proposes “the establishment of a public service requirement for undergraduate students, known as Service to Texas, at public institutions of higher education.” Any student enrolled in an undergraduate program that requires at least 60 hours would have to do 20 hours of community service to graduate. This service would have to be approved by an office in the University that coordinates and monitors the service program and provides students with a list of approved organizations in which they may serve. While the bill sounds good in theory, it’s unrealistic considering the state’s education finances. Requiring an office to coordinate community service hours for 50,000 or more students at UT alone would put a huge economic burden on the University. But, instead of discussing the impracticality of the suggestion, I’d like to focus on the principle of mandating community service. Does mandatory community service benefit the community, or does it take away from the point of volunteerism? Isn’t the purpose of volunteering to take part in something freely? And, more broadly, what exactly is community service? As for benefitting the community, there results are inconclusive as to whether mandatory service programs increase the likelihood of graduates continuing service involvement on their own. According to a study in the American Education Research Journal, both mandatory and voluntary community service in high school were strong predictors of adult volunteering. But other studies indicate that the results are inconclusive, especially at a college level. An article in the January 2000 issue of School Administrator, a monthly magazine published by American Association of School Administrators, concludes that mandatory community service programs can go both ways; such programs’ success depends on the quality with which they are implemented. There are plenty of organizations

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Does mandatory community service benefit the community, or does it take away from the point of volunteerism? on UT campus that distinguish themselves through their members’ community involvement. Activities such organizations sponsor include hands-on volunteering in homeless shelters, food pantries, women’s shelters, retirement homes and children’s museums. Other volunteer efforts by campus organizations involve less personal investment on members’ parts — for example, when campus organizations run blood drives, student involvement is generally limited to soliciting blood donations. Is it fair to ask, as HB 22 would, school administrators to decide if such contributions to service projects all weigh equally? Perhaps what we already have at UT is the best solution. Students who want to engage in community service can do so, without having to worry whether their actions will be approved by the Legislature or any bureaucracy it would establish with HB 22. And, since I may not see standing outside a blood donation truck as the best use of my time, I can do instead what I am passionate about — tutoring at-risk kids, running clothing donation drives, helping the homeless — without having someone else judge whether what I am doing benefits constitutes “public service.” The value of volunteering arises from its intention. If you intend to work to make a difference and help someone, then most things can be considered “service.” But if you make volunteering obligatory, something students are forced to do, its impact — both personal and otherwise — could be diminished. And though school boards and authorities can mandate an action, no one can mandate an intention. Malik is a Plan II and business honors program freshman from Austin.

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NEWS 5

News

Monday, February 18, 2013

5

CAMPUS

CAMPUS

Blanton 50th party is a ‘Go-Go’

Student startup hopes to improve oil recovery

By Alberto Long The Blanton Museum of Art raised funds and glasses on Saturday to commemorate its 50-year anniversary. The Blanton celebrated its biannual gala as the official University art museum. The evening’s festive events concluded with the first ever gala after-party dubbed “Gold a GoGo” held inside the museum. Ticket holders were treated to a live performance by The Bluebonnets, which featured special appearances by Charlie Sexton and Kathy Valentine, a former member of Go Go’s. More than 570 guests were in attendance from Texas and around the country, said Samantha Youngblood, manager of public relations and marketing for the Blanton. “We have a gala every two years, but this is our first ever gala after-party,” Youngblood said. “The gala is a large fundraising event for us because we are a nonprofit.” The Blanton also opened its new exhibit, Through the Eyes of Texas: Masterworks from Alumni Collections, for advanced viewing. The exhibition features nearly 200 works, works from the private collections of UT alumni across the United States, which include

By Alberto Long

Shweta Gulati | Daily Texan Staff The Bluebonnets perform at the Blanton Museum of Art’s 50th anniversary party. Guests toasted to the Blanton’s Big 50 gala during “Gold a Go-Go,” an after-party with art, live music and dance.

works by Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso. “It’s everything from Mayan artifacts to your super contemporary works like Kehinde Wiley,” Youngblood said. “It’s a very large undertaking and I think it illustrates the Blanton’s connection to the University.” Martha Bradshaw, manager of visitor and volunteer services at the Blanton, said the evening was a success for the museum, a testament to its last 50 years and an

exciting look toward its future. “Its a commemoration of the past and the launch of the next 50 years,” Bradshaw said. “It’s been a great moment, a definite success. Many of our guests tonight have never been here.” Mechanical engineering sophomore Christopher Tran volunteered to work at the event to support the museum as part of the Blanton Student Guild. “Even if you’re not really interested in art, it’s a great place

to come relax in between classes or after a test,” Tran said. Events commemorating the museum’s 50th anniversary are ongoing. This week is UT preview week at the museum. Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to view the Masterworks collection before it opens to the public Sunday. On Apr. 27, festivities will come to a head with a 12-hour birthday party and arts festival called Blanton Fifty Fest. It will be free and open to the public.

STATE

NASFAA addresses financial aid policy By Jeremy Thomas National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA) offered several policy considerations in a report released Wednesday that received mixed reviews from the UT community. The report does not make recommendations, but rather puts forward broad policy considerations to generate discussion on key policy issues facing students. One policy in the report considered federal government use of a “Student Loan Eligibility Index,” which would introduce minimal financial requirements that students must meet before receiving federal loans. Director of the Office of Student Financial Aid Tom Melecki said the policy has the potential to benefit and harm the students depending on how it is applied and designed. “We might actually close the door to college opportunity to some students who could still benefit because of the way they scored on their SAT/ACT test or GPA made them fall into some category where we’re making assumptions about them that we shouldn’t make because we don’t really know them that well,” Melecki said. “It could also protect students from taking out loans they should not take on. It depends on how it gets applied and designed.” If students did not qualify under the “Student Loan Eligibility Index,” they would still be able to receive Pell Grants and other institutional aid, according to the report. Studio art junior Sian Paulin said she thinks the proposed system would be unfair even with the possibility of Pell

Grant eligibility. “Pell grants don’t cover everything,” Paulin said. “Even if they do get Pell grants but they still have more expenses to cover and have no other money to pay for it, you need loan money. If your GPA isn’t high enough then they have to pay out of their own pocket or take out a loan from a private bank with higher interest rates.” Another policy consideration suggested student loan repayments through Income-Based Repayment plans for all borrowers. Melecki said the plan would tie the amount paid to the borrower’s income, where the amount due in a year would depend on income earned that year. “The Income-Based Repayment makes a lot of sense to me [especially for] those early years when you’re getting out of school,” said Melecki. “When you

can’t afford to pay a lot, it’ll suppress your payments. In addition you could opt out of the income based repayment if you wanted to pay off the loan quicker or endured a financial hardship.” Journalism junior Rebecca Salazar said evaluating the repayment plan is a tough issue. “I feel like on paper it sounds fair because if you make more you can pay more,” she said, “but then I don’t want to punish the people that make more to pay more.” The report also considered an option for students to be told in advance whether they are Pell eligible and guarantee an award amount as early as students’ freshman year in high school. Other policies in the report included Pell Grant incentives based on credit hours for those who already qualified for the grant and the idea to allow

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financial aid offices to limit the amount some students may borrow. “I think everything in here is worth exploring and thinking about,” said Melecki. “That does not mean that I think we should adopt everything in here. They make some really good points.”

Seismos, a student-led startup company, aims to boost the efficiency of enhanced oil recovery by combining the power of carbon dioxide and sound waves to release oil trapped underground. The company was started by electrical engineering senior Omar Hernandez and Panos Adamopoulos, Stevan Slusher and Devin Bedwell, graduate students enrolled in the Master of Science in Technology Commercialization Program at UT. The program focuses on identifying of new technologies and assessing their market potential. “Seismos began as part of the program we’re in,” Bedwell, the team leader, said. “The first semester one of our assignments was to find four different technologies, then do market assessments on them. This is one of the ones we found.” Seismos recently won first prize at the Texas Venture Labs Investment Competition, taking home $135,000 toward the its development. The company also received backing from the Austin Technology Incubator, a branch of the University’s IC2 Institute, which promotes economic development in Central Texas through entrepreneurial wealth and job creation, and a teaching laboratory in applied entrepreneurship for University students. “The ATI is your oncampus resource for starting a [technology-based] company,” said Kyle Cox, director of IT/Wireless and Development Portfolios for the incubator. “We go through a rigorous due

diligence progress in working with a potential startup. We assess their viability and opportunity in the market and try to work to see if we can help add value to the company. ” Cox said Seismos was a perfect fit for the incubator, citing the company’s potential for profit and innovation within a $4 trillion industry. “What their technology can impact as far as enhanced oil recovery is tremendous,” Cox said, “Seismos has a massive opportunity. They have a few things left to figure out and we hope to be able to provide them the resources to do so, whether it be access to our mentors and advisers, venture capitalists that will help them get going, or access to potential customers.” Adamopolous said the team plans to continue developing the company after graduation. “The future looks bright as long as you can deliver what you promise,” Adamopolous said. “We can’t say that we’re finished. We have a long way to go, but we’re on the right track.” The Seismos team is currently preparing to compete in the business plan competition circuit, with initial stops at Rice, University of California-Berkeley and Tulane University. “We’re going to those competitions to meet more investors and get more feedback on the business plan,” Bedwell said, “Hopefully we’ll win some feed money to continue the project. We’re in the early stages right now, but I think [Seismos] is something that would work, so we’re working to develop it after we graduate.”


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By Nick Cremona LAWRENCE, Kan. — Texas will have to wait another year to steal a win at Allen Fieldhouse after getting pummeled 73-47 by Kansas on Saturday night. The Longhorns made only two of their 21 threepoint attempts and committed 16 turnovers in a game that could have ended up a lot worse for Texas. The loss drops the Longhorns to six games behind the Jayhawks (21-4, 9-3) in the Big 12 standings and to an overall record of 11-14 on the year. The Longhorns have lost all six of their Big 12 road games. “Guys get away mentally from what we want to get done,” head coach Rick Barnes said. “That’s the thing that bothers me. Kansas is as good as anyone when they make shots.” Texas’ 21.8-percent mark shooting the ball marks the worst shooting percentage in the Barnes era. “You can’t coach making shots,” Barnes said. “All the things we talked about that we wanted to do, we didn’t do.” Myck Kabongo scored a team-high 13 points with nine of those points coming from the free-throw line. Connor Lammert had seven points in the first half but scored just two more points before fouling out with under four minutes left in the game.

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LONGHORNS IN THE NBA Lawrence Peart | Daily Texan Staff Head basketball coach Rick Barnes chats with Kansas head coach Bill Self after their two teams matched up Saturday night. Kansas delivered the Longhorns another road loss as Texas continues to struggle in away games, losing all seven of them this season.

After showing some signs of improvement in recent games, freshmen Demarcus Holland and Ioannis Papapetrou combined for just eight points. Fellow freshman Cameron Ridley missed on all five of his free throw attempts and, like Javan Felix, failed to score a single point. The Jayhawks’ starters combined for 61 points, led by Jeff Withey and Travis Releford with 15

Longhorns dominated as road skid continues GAME BREAKDOWN First Half: Connor Lammert scored seven of Texas’ first eight points, all within the first four and a half minutes of the game. Lammert’s layup cut Kansas’ lead to 11-8 at the 15:55 mark but the Jayhawks immediately went on a 17-3 run and had the game sown up by halftime. Texas, who shot just 20 percent from the floor and 36.4 percent from the free throw line, scored 15 points, the fewest in school history in a first half during Big 12 play. Second Half: A 13-point halftime deficit was quickly extended to a 22-point deficit as Kansas led, 41-19, after a layup by Travis Releford with 14:34 to go. Jeff Withey blocked a Jonathan Holmes shot to break former Longhorn Chris Mihm’s Big 12 record for most career blocks. Ben McLemore’s 360-degree dunk in the waning moments of the game put an emphatic exclamation on what may have been the Longhorns’ worst game all season long. —Christian Corona

points each. Withey rounded out a double-double with 11 rebounds and two blocks, the second of which moved him in to sole possession of the Big 12 alltime block record with 265 career rejections. The record was previously held by Texas’ Chris Mihm. “We had an emphasis on trying to get inside more but the outside shots kept coming open and

KANSAS continues on page 7

By the numbers 21.8: The Longhorns’ field goal percentage, making for their worst-ever shooting percentage in Big 12 play. The previous low was set when Texas shot 30 percent from the floor in a 83-60 loss to Colorado on March 1, 2007. 265: Career blocks for Withey, who stuffed Holmes early in the second half to break the record for most career blocks by a Big 12 player, which was previously held by former Longhorn Chris Mihm.

26: Margin of defeat for the Longhorns in Saturday’s loss to Kansas. The 26-point defeat tied last month’s loss to Kansas State for the program’s most lopsided road loss in Big 12 play and was the worst loss by Texas since a 97-66 loss to No. 1 Duke in 2005 — the last time the Longhorns wore all-black uniforms. 7: Consecutive road losses in Big 12 play, a school record. The Longhorns lost to Kansas at Allen Fieldhouse last year as well, 73-63, on March 3. That was the first of seven straight road defeats in conference play, which broke the previous school record of six.

What’s Next Texas gets a good shot at picking up its first road victory of the season when it travels to Fort Worth to face TCU on Tuesday, who the Longhorns trounced, 60-43, earlier this season to pick up their first Big 12 win of the year and break a season-long fivegame losing streak.

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Horns outlast Hornets in debut by the score of 6-3 to clinch the rubber game of its season opening series. Starting pitcher Dillon Peters overcame a shaky first inning and pitched seven efficient innings, allowing just five hits and two runs. After hitting and walking the Hornets’ first two batters to lead off the game, the left-hander

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3: Number of assists Texas had. That is the fewest by the Longhorns in Big 12 play and one more than the fewest they have had in a game of any kind. Texas had two assists in a 2005 NCAA Tournament loss to Nevada and recorded just four assists in a loss to Nebraska in 2001.

Outfielder Mark Payton takes his turn at bat during the Longhorns’ victory Sunday against Sacrament State. Texas won two out of three games against the Hornets, clinching the series with a 6-3 win Sunday.

Everything that plagued the Longhorns in Saturday’s loss seemed to go right for them on Sunday. Texas used a combination of timely hitting and strong starting pitching to defeat the Sacramento State Hornets

them uncomfortable shooting the ball in the second half,” Releford said. Withey had a lot to do with Texas’ alarmingly low field goal percentage, but senior guard Elijah Johnson thinks the Jayhawks can get even more from the seven-footer. “Frustration sets in for other teams when they have to take a detour

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we couldn’t make them,” Lammert said. For much of the game the Jayhawks’ defensive pressure forced the Longhorns into hurried shots inside the lane, turnovers and eventually two shot-clock violations. Kabongo and Felix had several passes into the post tipped, leading to fast break opportunities for the Jayhawks. “We did a good job making

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was able to make adjustments and effectively pitch to contact throughout the afternoon. “You don’t really focus on mechanics out there,” Peters said. “I just came in the dugout and worked on working it down and staying on target.” The Texas lineup had a

DEBUT continues on page 7

Texas’ conference play plagued by another loss By Garrett Callahan Texas fell once again in conference play as it gave up a 69-62 loss to in-state rival Texas Tech in Lubbock over the weekend. The Longhorns have now fallen 12 games behind Baylor who sits atop the Big 12 standings. Led by Chassidy Fussell, the Longhorns were in striking distance of the Red Raiders (19-7, 9-5 Big 12) the whole game but failed to produce a comeback at the end. This loss, which brings the Longhorns to 9-15 on the season and 2-11 in the Big 12, continues the struggles the team has had in Karen Aston’s first season as head coach and increases their losing streak to four.

Texas got out to a quick start against Tech as Imani McGeeStafford and Nneka Enemkpali gave their team a 6-0 lead. Except for a quick segment, the Longhorns maintained that lead until more than midway through the first half when the Red Raiders went ahead with 7:01 to go. Texas was held without points for almost seven minutes during that half. When the second half started the Longhorns were down 36-27. They held their opponent to just one point in the first seven minutes and took the lead with 13:12 to go in the game. That lead only lasted 18 seconds, however, as a three-pointer from Casey Morris returned the lead to her team, where it remained for the rest of the game.

TECH continues on page 7

SPORTS BRIEFLY Two Texas stars acknowledged Tonight, two former Longhorns will be inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame. Former softball pitcher Cat Osterman and former Texas running back and Heisman trophy winner Ricky Williams were both selected to join the prestigious athletes. Osterman was a threetime National Player of the Year and four-time All-American during her four season at Texas. She led her team to three Women’s College World Series trips and even won a gold medal in the 2004 Olympics in Athens. Williams was UT’s star running back from 19951998. He finished his college career 21 NCAA records including, rushing yards, all-purpose yards, rushing TDs, and total TDs. He was selected as the Heisman winner after his senior season in 1998. After college, Williams played 11 years in the NFL. Among others joining Osterman and Williams in the Hall of Fame is New Orleans quarterback Drew Brees, former NBA star Shaquille O’Neal and former Dallas Cowboys running back Walt Garrison among others. —Garrett Callahan


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BASEBALL

Payton, Horns take first series GAME BREAKDOWN

STOCK DOWN

Game 1: Starting pitcher Parker French dominated through seven innings of work. French only gave up three hits and no runs on the night. The Texas bullpen, however, couldn’t get it together in the eighth and gave up five runs in the inning. The Texas offense stayed solid posting a 6-0 lead before the eighth, finishing with 14 hits and six runs. Freshman C.J Hinojosa had three hits of his own and one RBI. The Longhorns won 6-5. Game 2: Starter Nathan Thornhill struggled on the mound throwing for 3.2 innings with six hits and four runs. The Hornets put up a 4-1 lead that the Longhorn offense was not able to overcome. The Longhorns fell 3-5 with nine hits. Game 3: A solid performance across the field. Dillon Peters threw seven innings with only two runs and five hits, though he gave up the first home run of the year, a solo shot over left field. The Texas offense was solid and steady throughout the game. Payton and Hinojosa each had strong at-bats and the Longhorns combined for 11 hits in the 6-3 win.

Corey Knebel: The Longhorns’ closer had a solid 2012 season but failed to impress against Sacramento State. Knebel came in as relief for Toller Boardman in game one but couldn’t clean up as he came out after giving up one run and one hit to just two batters. In game three, Knebel came in as relief again and gave up two hits with one run across two innings, including a solo homer in the ninth.

STOCK UP

—Sara Beth Purdy

What’s Next The Longhorns will face the University of Texas at Arlington for a mid-week game Tuesday at 6 p.m. at UFCU Disch-Falk Field. The Mavericks swept Louisiana Tech at home this past weekend.

DEBUT

continues from page 6 much improved day in the series finale, recording 11 hits and knocking Hornets starter Zach Morgan out of the game after just three innings. The Longhorns scored at least once in each of the first four innings Sunday, and head coach Augie Garrido believed that this was important in allowing Peters to settle in to the game. “Any time a pitcher sits on the bench and watches the offense score runs, he feels a lot more confident and he doesn’t feel like if he gives up one run then he’s going to lose the game,” Garrido said. “When they go out there thinking

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they can’t give up a run is when they overpitch, walk guys and get out of rhythm.” Right fielder Mark Payton continued his hot hitting with a pair of hits, including an RBI single in the first inning to give Texas its first run. The junior, who had seven hits in 12 at bats over the weekend, also added a triple to leadoff the third inning and scored on an RBI groundout by third baseman Madison Carter. The Longhorns scored two runs in the second inning on a pair of bunts by Weston Hall and Taylor Stell with runners on third base. Stell went 2-3 on the day with a stolen base and would add another RBI on a sacrifice fly in the fourth inning. Texas closer Corey Knebel picked up his first

save of the season after pitching the eighth and ninth innings for the Longhorns. The right-hander, who failed to record an out in Friday’s game, allowed one run on a solo home run and struck out two batters. The Longhorns took the first game of the series 6-5 behind seven shutout innings from Parker French. Sacramento State won Saturday’s contest 5-3, as Texas struggled to find offensive consistency and saw starting pitcher Nathan Thornhill last just 3.2 innings. Texas’ next game comes Tuesday when they host UT Arlington at UFCU DischFalk Field at 6 p.m. The Mavericks swept Louisiana Tech in their season opening series over the weekend.

continues from page 6

Fussell led her team with a game-high 27 points but was unable to claim the victory even with McGee-Stafford recording her tenth double-

double of the season with 11 points and 10 rebounds. The Longhorns noted 24 turnovers, nine of which were steals, which turned into 26

points for the Red Raiders. This was costly for Texas as it shot 51.1 percent from the floor but had to spend most of its time on defense.

SOFTBALL | EVAN BERKOWITZ No. 6 Texas improved to 11-0 for the third time in program history this weekend with five wins at the Hilton Houston Plaza Invitational. Led by junior Taylor Thom’s hot bat, the Longhorns powered by DePaul, Illinois twice and Houston once. Thom hit two grand slams Saturday against Houston (7-3) and followed that up with a two-homer performance Sunday against DePaul (4-6) to highlight the potent Texas offense this weekend. Thom became only the fourth player in NCAA history to hit two grand slams in a game. “I had been struggling lately so I was just trying to get good swings on the ball and pick good pitches,” Thom said. “Tonight I was seeing it well, and the ball just went.” But Thom wasn’t the only Longhorn crushing the ball this weekend as the Longhorns hit .357 and slugged .612. Karina Scott, Taylor

KANSAS

Hoagland, Kim Bruins and Holly Kern all went deep this weekend. “We got to swing the bat a lot,” head coach Connie Clark said. “It’s something about getting the repetitions. We got some hitters that have really been working through some things in the last week, and we saw some vast improvements in some of the things they were keying on. And that’s exciting. It’s good to see the hard work paying off.” The Longhorns collected four shutouts and four run-rule wins this weekend as they outscored opponents 52-5. The Longhorns have now outscored their opponents 90-7 this year, as they continue to run through the competition. Kern, Blaire Luna and Bruins all threw shutouts. On Friday, the Longhorns beat DePaul, 13-0, and Illinois, 3-0. The first

game of the weekend saw Texas steal eight bases, tying a team-record. On Saturday, the Longhorns began the day with a thrilling 12-2 victory over Illinois (4-5). After trailing 2-0 after five innings, the Longhorns put up a 12 spot — the school record for runs in a single inning — en route to yet another shutout. The next game against Houston went a lot smoother in a 15-0 victory. Sunday’s 9-0 win over DePaul capped off the festivities. The Longhorns are now tied with the 2010 squad for the second-best record to start the season. The 2003 team won 16 straight to begin its year. The Longhorns return home Wednesday looking to improve to 12-0 when they take on Houston Baptist at Red and Charline McCombs field at 4:30 p.m.

continues from page 6

around Jeff,” Johnson said. “We know how to use Jeff but right now we’re not doing it.” Kansas scored 38 points in the paint, thanks in large part to Withey’s presence around the rim and Releford’s 4-of-5 night shooting from behind the three-point line. Freshman Ben McLemore picked Kabongo’s pocket late in the second half, taking the ball the length of the court and

finishing with a 360-degree dunk that sent the home crowd in to all-out chaos. A freshman on the other end of the talent spectrum from McLemore, walk-on Tyler Self, scored a basket with just under a minute to play which caused Allen Fieldhouse to roar even louder. Tyler, son of head coach Bill Self, was fouled on the play but would go on to miss the ensuing free

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throw attempt. “That was a hard shot, but if he wouldn’t have gotten fouled it probably wouldn’t have had any chance to go in,” Self said. “I will probably hear at home how he needs to probably start getting more playing time.” Texas will get another shot at its first road conference win when it takes on TCU in Fort Worth on Tuesday.

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sports

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Monday, February 18, 2013

LOST IN THE PHOG You cannot escape the noise inside Allen Fieldhouse, named in honor of former Kansas head coach Dr. Forrest C. “Phog” Allen. It is deafening. Everywhere you turn someone is screaming. When players are introduced the rafters shake and the walls shudder under the weight of endless sound. Every basket is cheered like it’s the game winner; every steal like it’s the game clincher; every block like it’s the record breaker—every dunk like it was a 10 out of 10. And it doesn’t help that Kansas can play basketball, too.

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1. Kansas fans, some adorned with masks of U.S. Presidents, scream at Texas players during pre-game warm-ups.

4. Head coach Rick Barnes looks to the stands after calling a timeout. Barring a miraculous NCAA Tournament run, the Longhorns will miss the NCAA Tournament for the first time under Barnes.

2. Forward Connor Lammert lofts a shot over Kansas center Jeff Withey in the first half. With two blocks in the game, Withey broke the Big 12 record for career blocks, with 265.

5. Point guard Myck Kabongo had a team-high 13 points (on 10 shots) in his second game back from suspension. Texas shot 21.8 percent, the worst percentage in school history for a Big 12 game.

3. Point guard Javan Felix looks for an opening under the basket. Felix played nine minutes without attempting a field goal and ended the game with one steal.

6. The sports page for The University Daily Kansan ran the headline “Kabongo is back” for its Friday issue. While the opposing team’s players are being introduced, fans pretend to read the paper and afterward tear it into shreds to throw into the air.


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Monday, February 18, 2013

Life & Arts 10

Kelsey McKinney, Life & Arts Editor

CAMPUS

Professor orchestrates inspiration By Juhie Modi If professor Gerhardt Zimmermann had a choice, he would play second base for the Cincinnati Reds. Polio knocked the wind out of that. But then again, until his first rehearsal after making second trumpet for Bowling Green State University as a freshman, he had never heard a full live orchestra. “When I heard the strings, a light bulb went off,” Zimmermann said. “That changed my life, to hear all of the additional orchestral colors was just not the same. It was like going from a 24 crayon box to a 64 crayon box. All those other colors. That’s when I decided I wanted to be a conductor: an orchestral conductor.” Because he contracted polio when he was seven years old, Zimmermann wears two leg braces, but he doesn’t let that get in the way of his work. Like most conductors, he sits during rehearsals and stands during concerts, but Zimmermann said the most difficult part of being a conductor with a disability is getting over the prejudice. “The problem is that people will look at a person with disabilities and they decide what they can do or not,” Zimmermann said. “Nobody decides that for me. I decide that.” Roger Myers, professor of viola and chairman of strings division at UT, said that Zimmermann has a tested knowledge from a career of conducting symphony orchestras. “He teaches through his

conducting itself so as you watch it, you’re also watching someone who conveys his authority through the end of his baton,” Myers said. “It’s completely demonstrative without using words. When he uses words, he has a sense of immense knowledge behind what he says and he can tell students what he wants quickly and he doesn’t need to talk to get his point across.” Meredith Riley, who completed her bachelor’s degree at UT and is now pursuing an artist degree in violin performance, referenced a speech that famous violinist David Kim once gave about how even the best performer needs to be a good person to be successful. “I think that speaks volumes about a lot of musicians, but for ‘Z’ especially because I’m sure that there were good candidates that came up for the job, and despite polio, despite whatever, despite age, the [reality was] that ‘Z’ got the job,” Riley said. In her five years studying under Zimmermann, Riley said that she has never thought of him as disabled. “And that’s probably because he’s such a good conductor,” Riley said. “I know ‘Z’ used to want to be a baseball player when he was a kid, so I guess, in a weird way, him getting polio as a kid was a really great thing for the music world rather than him becoming a baseball player. You want to be an all-star but instead you’re a rock star.” Zimmermann is one of

Marshall Nolen | Daily Texan Staff Professor Gerhardt Zimmermann, conductor for the University of Texas student orchestra, continually fights through the physical limitations of contracting polio at age seven.

the main reasons that Riley returned after receiving her undergraduate degree. “If he’s really into something, and it’s an exciting thing, he’ll even start to do a little dance on the podium,” she said. “‘Z’ will usually say, ‘If you can see the whites of my eyes when I look at you, that means play out.’ I don’t think I’ll ever have a conductor like him again, that you can just joke with, that can just joke about himself, and make mistakes and not feel bad

BUSINESS

about it.” Riley recalled one time during a concert when Zimmermann’s arm got stuck in the air while he was conducting. “He just turned around [and] said, ‘I just recently got shots in my arm.’ In this situation, there are 4000 things you can do,” Riley said. “The thing that was amazing to me was that he let everybody know what was going on, midconcert, which was something I had never experienced before. I was amazed with his

knowledge of how to communicate with a crowd.” Zimmermann said that classical musicians need to break down the wall between themselves and their audiences because walking onstage, smiling and simply playing doesn’t work anymore. “You need to sell the humanity of the art itself,” he said. “The more conductors and artists that can do that, the better off classical music is going to be.” Zimmermann said there’s no greater thing in the world to a

musician than a concert that seems to exceed expectations. “The music says so much more to me and for me, so much more than words could ever say,” he said. “[Music] takes me far away from any sense of having a disability whatsoever. You can experience so many different emotions just by listening to music. And to be conducting it in front of an orchestra and all of that sound is coming to you. It’s unbelievable. I don’t need anything, really, but this.”

CITY

iFly offers skydiving for all ages By Alexandra Hart For decades, jumping out of flying aircrafts and diving toward earth has been a necessity for the military and, more recently, an adrenaline sport for civilians. But for those who have a fear of heights, plummeting toward the ground at terminal velocity is out of the question. That’s where the newly opened iFly Austin comes into play. An experiment originally intended for hardcore skydiving enthusiasts, iFly Austin allows participants, regardless of age or experience level, the opportunity to experience a simulated free-fall sensation. They tout that anyone is welcome to “fly,” from ages 3 to 103.” What started as a method to train experienced skydivers eventually became a tourist and family attraction Stuart Wallock, chief marketing officer and UT alumnus, said. “The dream came from a bunch of skydivers,” Wallock said. “Every time you pack a parachute and go up in the plane, you only have about 45 seconds of free fall to do all the formations and movements before you have to pull your parachute. The idea was that we need to build a tunnel that blows the same speed ... That was the dream.” The Austin-based company Antonia Murphy tries out indoor skydiving in the newly opened Austin based company iFly Austin. The company attracts people from all age groups and participants are guided by an experienced instructor.

Shweta Gulati Daily Texan Staff

opened its first location in Orlando in 1997 and has grown to include 19 locations across America and abroad. The newly opened iFly Austin is the company’s most recent addition, opening its doors just over a month ago. “It’s been packed ever since,” Wallock said. “We figured it was finally time to build a location here. Austin is home for us.” Throughout the duration of a beginner flight, about one minute depending on the package purchased, an experienced instructor remains with students in the tunnel. These instructors give signals to students to help them maneuver their bodies correctly to fly in the tunnel. “How you fly all depends on your body type, no two people are going to fly exactly the same,” instructor Javier Serrano said. “We observe how you move in the wind, and help you make adjustments to your body position to help you fly comfortably.” For instructors it’s a fine science, observing flyers and helping them create lift. In a wind tunnel with average speeds of 115 miles per hour for beginners, students may not be focused on maintaining the posture taught in the preceding class. Even slight adjustments in the hands and feet alter the movement of

the flyer, sending them up or down in the tunnel, or veering off toward the glass. But that’s what the instructors are there for: maintaining a sense of safety and stability, pulling wayward flyers back into a comfortable range. It’s physically tiring, too: holding the body a certain way in wind speeds of more than a hundred miles an hour forces the muscles to work against the force of the wind, providing a small workout in the process. Still, iFly says that regardless of age or ability, just about anyone can have a good time. “Our first priority is safety, but definitely a very close second is having fun,” Wallock said. “The best part is being able to see people have a good time. Especially those who think they can’t do it, like older flyers or people with disabilities, seeing them in there having a great time, that’s what makes this really awesome.”

iFLY AUSTIN When: Sunday to

Thursday, 11 a.m. – 11 p.m. Friday to Saturday, 9 a.m. – 11 p.m. Where: 13265 North US 183, Suite A How Much: First time fliers, packages anywhere from $59.95 – $249.95

Illustration by Darien Chen | Daily Texan Staff

Marathoners make mind race By Hannah Smothers Daily Texan Columnist

There is nothing like a horde of fit, motivated marathon runners washing over the city to make a person feel inadequate. Every year, thousands of marathon runners crowd the closed streets of Austin to trot around in shorts that display their muscular legs. They drive around in their vehicles with their 26.2 bumper stickers. They leave their granola crumbs all over the sidewalks, and worst of all, they manage to make all of us commoners, who are not capable of running for four plus hours, feel completely inferior. It is like the marathon is strategically timed to occur right after I’ve all but forgotten my New Year’s Resolution to finally get into shape this year. Just as soon as I’ve rationalized my decision to go ahead and order the pizza or bake the batch of cookies, in comes the army of marathoners to slap my rationale in the face.

What is even the point behind running 26.2 miles anyway? Where is the big thrill behind running for hours on end? Who do we have to blame for this monstrosity? Apparently, the ancient Greeks came up with this one. The story goes that a courier named Phidippides ran from Marathon to Athens to announce the Greek victory over Persia in the Battle of Marathon. The distance between the two cities was 26 miles, and thus was born one of the oldest and most insane forms of athletic competition. Don’t get me wrong — the marathon runners deserve a lot of respect; the marathon is a grueling process. Most pre-race training programs begin months in advance, and a few of those hopeful trainees suffer injuries during the training process and don’t even get to compete in the race. There are also those who do manage to complete the intense training process and head out to the course on race day in their

new running spandex only to hit the infamous runner’s wall midway through the race. Of course there are plenty of people who do actually complete the training and finish the race. To these people, I ask a simple question: Why? Why the months of early Saturday morning runs? Why the evenings spent with your legs in a tub of ice water? Why the hundreds of dollars spent on running shoes and horribly unflattering running clothes? Is all of this really for an oval-shaped sticker you can put on the back of your car, to make the rest of us feel inadequate in your mighty presence? Speaking as someone who has no intention of ever running a marathon, I do not understand the logic behind this madness. I understand that it’s all for a good cause, but can’t I just raise $500 to sit around and watch Netflix all day? When there’s a bumper sticker for 26.2 hours of Netflix watched, I’ll be the first to stick it on the back of my car.

The Daily Texan 2013-02-18  

The February 18, 2013 edition of The Daily Texan