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The Daily Texan Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

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Friday, January 25, 2013

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INSIDE NEWS Former UT football player Erxleben arrested for his role in Ponzi scheme. He has previously served a federal sentence for securities fraud. PAGE 5

WORLD &NATION European countries advise their citizens to leave Benghazi because of unspecified “threat.” PAGE 6

SPORTS The first Big 12 win of the season could be in store for the Longhorns on Saturday against Texas Tech. PAGE 7 Karen Aston’s group is reeling after a 38-point loss. Can the women’s hoops team save face this weekend against KSU? PAGE 7 After setting a school record in the pole vault, Kaitlin Petrillose hopes to make her next meet just as memorable. PAGE 8

LIFE&ARTS Out with the new, in with the old: Vinyl sales begin to overtake CD sales. PAGE 11 Houston band Fingers Crossed will bring its punk act to Local Live this Sunday. PAGE 11

VIEWPOINT Bev Kearney’s resignation tells us UT’s policy guiding studentemployee relationships demands clarification. As it stands, the policy creates an incentive to keep consensual relationships clandestine. PAGE 4

PODCAST Join Daily Texan reporters for the Daily Texan Podcast, where we talk about funding for UT's medical school, a new possible engineering building and tweeting in class. The podcast goes live on KVRX's internet stream at 3 p.m. You can listen later here: bit.ly/TexanPodcast

TODAY

The University is about a month away from becoming a fully tobacco-free campus, city groups are pushing to expand Austin’s smoking ban and a bill to make many public spaces smoke-free across the state has reappeared at the Texas Legislature. Meanwhile, UT continues to benefit from its endowment’s investments in tobacco companies — smoke-free campus or not.

See pages 2 and 3 for the full story.

Spring Student Organization Fair Attend the Spring Student Organization Fair to learn more about campus groups. The Fair is from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the SAC ballroom. Becky Pettit The Population Research Center presents Becky Pettit, who will give a talk titled “Invisible Men: Mass Incarceration and the Myth of Black Progress” from noon to 1 p.m. in CLA 1.302B.

Deadline to Apply Noon Wednesday January 30th 2013

Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees

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smoking section

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Friday, January 25, 2013

PUTTING OUT LIGHTS

Volume 113, Issue 90

CITY

83RD LEGISLATURE

State senator pushes again for statewide smoking ban

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Susannah Jacob (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com

By Joshua Fechter

Managing Editor: Trey Scott (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office: (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@ gmail.com Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office: (512) 232-2209 dtlifeandarts@gmail.com

Maria Arrellaga | Daily Texan Staff Jessica Ryan, marketing Manager of 29th Street Ballroom, smokes while working on the patio outside Spiderhouse Cafe on 29th and Fruth streets Thursday afternoon.

Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu

City considers expanding smoking ban

Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@ dailytexanonline.com

By Hannah Jane DeCiutiis

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2012 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER High

73

Low

60 Four person quintet with two people.

The public areas where smokers can enjoy lighting up may dwindle further as public health advocates fight to clear the air of the dangerous risks of secondhand smoke to Austinites. The city placed a permanent ban on smoking in city parks in December 2011. Smoke-Free Austin advocacy group, a community group made up of Austin citizens, recently proposed a policy that would further limit smoking throughout the city. The proposal would extend the city’s ban to patios, balconies and other outdoor spaces. While there is no proposed bill yet, the group is gathering signatures for a policy endorsement statement and is expecting the Travis County Medical Association to back the policy as well, said Jennifer Conroy, founder of SmokeFree Austin advocacy group. Conroy said the policy, if passed by the City Council, would benefit the vast majority of Austin’s population.

“We’re accommodating a very small number of people, and that association has harmful risks for people who are exposed to it,” Conroy said. “There are very few occasions when the law would allow us to be exposed to any other classA carcinogen. Why would we be allowed to be exposed to this and so frequently?” Conroy said the ultimate goal is to completely eliminate public smoking areas in the city. “Our effort is to try to prevent people from being exposed to smoke in public spaces,” she said. “We started with smoke-free parks, and it was a logical extension to work on smoke-free patios, which makes sense because people are in much closer proximity to one another on patios.” Nicholas Velez, a government and social work sophomore, said attempting to further limit smoking areas is unjust to the smoking population. “As a smoker, I don’t really believe it’s fair,” Delize said. “You have a right to do with your body as you want.

I understand increased taxation to really compensate for increased medical costs that the government might pay later on in life, but straight out banning it isn’t fair.” Dr. Philip Huang, medical director for the Austin Health & Human Services Department, said collected data consistently supports making public outdoor areas smoke-free. “For us at the health department, we just look at data and information,” Huang said. “We also look at the data on the percentage of current smokers, and in Austin and Travis County it’s maybe 15 percent. So you have around 85 percent nonsmokers, which is just a growing majority of people who are really bothered by breathing in secondhand smoke.” Huang said the city park smoking ban passed in 2011 caused several previous opponents of the ban to change their minds because it became easier to quit. “We have done some surveys of the smokers in Travis County,” Huang said. “Seventy percent of them want to quit,

and 59 percent have quit in the last year. A lot of people end up liking [these changes].” Matt Haviland, public health senior and health and wellness policy adviser for UT Student Government, said banning more public smoking areas could have further positive effects on the health of current smokers. “Personally, I think it’s going to help some people get over their addiction,” Haviland said. “Whether they’re for or against it, I think it’s important for people to voice their opinions on public health issues and let City Council know how they feel.” Nick Rutland, bartender at The Local Pub & Patio located on the Drag, said banning smoking in bars is counterintuitive to the reasons people go to bars in the first place. “Open air is open air, and a bar is also a bar,” Rutland said. “This is where people go where there are vices galore. They are inherently not healthy environments — people are drinking. I think if you want to smoke, a bar patio is the perfect place to do it.”

The Texas Legislature will once again consider implementing a statewide smoking ban despite failed attempts in previous sessions. The bill, authored by state Sen. Rodney Ellis, DHouston, would ban smoking in bars, restaurants, arenas, shopping malls, theaters, businesses and other public places. Alfred McAlister, professor of health promotion and behavioral sciences at the School of Public Health, said smokers who already want to quit smoking will be encouraged to do so by the ban. Sixty-nine percent of smokers want to quit smoking completely, according to a 2011 study conducted by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Any kind of bans or limitations on where people can smoke add to the motivation that smokers already have to quit,” McAlister said. About 70 percent of Texas voters supported a statewide ban on smoking in indoor workplaces, restaurants and bars, according to a 2011 poll conducted by Baselice and Associates and released by Smoke-Free Texas, a group that advocates for bans on indoor smoking. McAlister said he believes lobbying by the tobacco industry is responsible for this legislation’s past defeats. The Altria Group, the parent company of tobacco companies Philip Morris USA, John Middleton and the U.S. Smokeless Tobacco Company, spent between $630,000 and $1,145,000 on lobbying Texas legislators during 2011, according to The Texas Tribune. “The bill would have easily passed if not for strong

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SYSTEM This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25 Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susannah Jacob Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drew Finke, Pete Stroud, Edgar Walters Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trey Scott Associate Managing Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kristine Reyna, Matt Stottlemyre Digital Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayley Fick News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shabab Siddiqui Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elyana Barrera, Bobby Blanchard, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Allie Kolechta, Mustafa Saifuddin, Sarah White Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala, Hannah Jane DeCiutiis, Joshua Fechter, Jordan Rudner Enterprise Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrew Messamore, Megan Strickland, Alexa Ura Wire Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands, Kristine Reyna Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jay Egger, Andrew Huygen, Sara Reinsch Editorial Copy Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nile Miller Creative Director. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Natasha Smith Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pu Ying Huang, Omar Longoria, Jack Mitts, Stefanie Schultz Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Zachary Strain Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pu Ying Huang, Marisa Vasquez Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maggie Arrellaga, Elisabeth Dillon, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pearce Murphy, Chelsea Purgahn, Shelby Tauber Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorge Corona Associate Multimedia Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrea Macias-Jimenez Senior Videographers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Demi Adejuyigbe, Shila Farahani, Lawrence Peart, Alec Wyman Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kelsey McKinney Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aleksander Chan, Sarah-Grace Sweeney Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Alexandra Hart, Shane Arthur Miller, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Smothers, Alex Williams, Laura Wright Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christian Corona Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Garrett Callahan, Nick Cremona, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Beth Purdy, Rachel Thompson, Matt Warden Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephanie Vanicek Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tyler Reinhart Associate Web Editor, Social Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Sanchez Associate Web Editors, Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Omar Longoria Senior Web Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Helen Fernandez, Hannah Peacock Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Albert Cheng Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

Issue Staff

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Carrion, Tatiana Marceleño, Veronica Porras Multimedia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Lara Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Evan Berkowitz, Melinda Billingsley, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Caraveo, Nitya Duran, Jori Epstein, Rachel Wenzlaff Life&Arts Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elizabeth Williams Page Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diana Nadir, Allyson Szatny Copy Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mark Carrion Comic Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Desireé Avila, Anik Bhattacharya, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kaz Frankiewicz, David Hook, Lindsay Rojas, Lydia Thron Web Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amyna Dosani

Business and Advertising

(512) 471-1865 | advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Business Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lori Hamilton Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcast & Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Event Coordinator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindsey Hollingsworth Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Morgan Haenchen Student Assistant Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ted Moreland Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hunter Chitwood, Zach Congdon, Jake Dworkis, Ivan Meza, Rohan Needel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Trevor Nelson, Diego Palmas, Paola Reyes, Ted Sniderman, Stephanie Vajda Student Lead Generators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gabby Garza, Jennifer Howton Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nick Cremona Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jacqui Bontke, Sara Gonzales, Bailey Sullivan Special Editions/Production Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Abby Johnston Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Hublein

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 4711865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

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1/25/13

Texan Ad Deadlines

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Endowment invested in tobacco companies By Jordan Rudner Although UT’s on-campus smoking ban will be fully implemented in March, a portion of the University’s endowment is invested in more than a dozen tobacco companies. The University of Texas Investment Management Company, or UTIMCO, is a nonprofit corporation created by the UT System to oversee UT and Texas A&M systems’ investments. UTIMCO holds equity and debt securities in several companies including British American Tobacco, Imperial Tobacco Group and Philip Morris. The company holds more than 250,000 security shares in tobacco equity securities, which combined hold a value of more than $9.5 million. UTIMCO CEO Bruce Zimmerman said the company, which ultimately follows the investment policies set by the UT System Board

of Regents, does not take anything other than economics into account when making investment decisions. “The investment policies explicitly state that UTIMCO will not take into account political or social considerations in making investments,” Zimmerman said. “We only take into account the economic factors surrounding the decision.” Zimmerman said that UTIMCO’s goal is simply to focus on profits. “Our job is to generate returns so that we can provide more resources to all the institutions in the UT System, so that students and professors can get their educations and do their jobs,” Zimmerman said. “They’re free to pursue any social or academic cause they want to pursue.” In 2011, Student Government and the Graduate Student Assembly both passed resolutions recommending a policy change written by a group called Longhorns

for Investing Responsibly. The proposal recommended that UTIMCO “[consider] investments in line with its values.” Zimmerman said such a change is unlikely, especially because there are an unlimited number of political causes that might appeal to a person’s set of values at any given time. “There have always been, there continue to be, and there always will be a long list of social and political considerations that people care about,” Zimmerman said. “If we were to take those considerations into account, there would be a cost to that, and we would generate less resources for the University System.” William Charlton, senior lecturer and associate director of UT’s Center for Private Equity Finance, said when sales for a product remain consistent regardless of economic circumstance, the demand is considered inelastic. Tobacco is one

such product. “In an inelastic demand case, when price on a product goes up, quantity doesn’t change, or at least changes much less than the increase in price,” Charlton said. “People will pay large amounts of dollars to continue to smoke.” Charlton cited anti-smoking laws in New York, which apply a tax of more than $5 to every pack of cigarettes sold, as an example. “Even with the $5 tax, there is still substantial demand for the product,” he said. Given the inelastic demand for tobacco products, Charlton said it makes sense that some would consider tobacco products an ideal candidate for investment. “Even in a negative economic growth environment, people will still be willing to buy cigarettes,” Charlton said. “Even in difficult economic times, you will still have substantial demand, and that’s what makes for an attractive investment.”

stats on smoking 2.7 PERCENT of UT students self-reported as daily smokers, according to University Health Services’ survey

70 PERCENT of Texas voters supported a statewide ban on smoking in indoor workplaces, restaurants and bars, according to a 2011 poll conducted by Baselice and Associates

70 TEXAS CITIES have enacted some form of smoking ban in public places 33 TEXAS CITIES completely banned smoking in bars, restaurants and workplaces

15 PERCENT of Austin residents smoke, according to Dr. Philip Huang, medical director for the Austin Health & Human Services Department


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Friday, January 25, 2013

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CAMPUS

Campus to phase out temporary smoking areas By Christine Ayala The University will remove temporary smoking locations in March to become a fully tobacco-free campus but will continue to enforce the policy without fining violators. Starting March 1, smoking tobacco will no longer be allowed at the 15 temporary locations, including two at the Pickle Research Center. University spokeswoman Adrienne Howarth-Moore said the tobacco-free policy applies to UT property and areas under the University’s control, excluding neighboring streets. She said the University will monitor areas on campus where tobacco use is reported. “Although there is not currently a fines structure in place, if someone repeatedly is advised to not use tobacco products and they continue to use those products, that is a violation of campus policy,” Howarth-Moore said. “It will be treated like any other violation of policy.” Current violations of campus policy are dealt with by various organizations. For example, students who breach University policy must deal with it through Student Judicial Services at the Dean of Students. In February 2012, the Cancer Prevention Research

BILL

continues from page 2 industry lobbying against it,” McAlister said. Currently, 24 states enforce statewide smoking bans including Arizona, California, Colorado, New York and Massachusetts, according to Americans for

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Institute of Texas, or CPRIT, required the University to make all facilities tobacco-free by March of that year to continue to recieve research funding. The University allowed select temporary smoking areas on its facilities for one year, as well as allowing smoking for academic research. According to the University Health Services’ college health assessment survey, 2.7 percent of UT students reported smoking at least one cigarrette every day of the month. The American Cancer Association reports that 19 percent of the United States adult population smokes. Psychology junior Ticiane Silva said she smokes about 10 cigarettes a day, often near Littlefield Patio Cafe, and is not planning on quitting because of the campus-wide ban. She said students who regularly meet there will likely just walk to neighboring streets to smoke between class. “Last semester this area was pretty famous. We call it ‘The Lounge,’” Silva said. “We’ll just go to Dean Keaton now.” University Health Services offers a mobile app and informative classes to help smokers who want to quit make the transition easier. Resources to help individuals minimize tobacco use increased through the semester. “Although they’re offering

those classes to help you quit smoking, it’s not that I want to quit and can’t,” Silva said. “I don’t want to quit. I like it.” Marketing senior Alejandra Garcia said she’s glad the temporary location near the Red McCombs School of Business will be smokefree because it impacts

everyone passing by, not just those smoking. “I hate passing by there,” Garcia said. “If they were somewhere else I wouldn’t even be concerned about it, but because it’s so close to where I go basically all day it does bother me. I don’t think that I should have to be suc-

cumb to secondhand smoke when I don’t even smoke.” Howarth-Moore said although CPRIT’s requirement allowed the University to implement the policy quickly, UT had been concerned with minimizing tobacco use, including making the Darrell K

Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium smoke-free. “Because of the CPRIT requirement, what could’ve taken three to five years to accomplish, we had to accomplish it in months,” she said. “Looking at the future, we’re going to be a healthier institution.”

Nonsmokers’ Rights, an anti-smoking lobbying organization. According to the organization, 70 cities in Texas have enacted some form of smoking ban in public places. Of those, 33 have completely banned smoking in bars, restaurants and workplaces, including the state’s four largest cities: Houston, San Antonio, Dallas and Austin.

Wendy Saari, Texas Restaurant Association spokeswoman, said the association believes applying a statewide smoking ban is the only equitable method of implementing restrictions on smoking within restaurants and bars because there is no uniform standard for implementing a ban. “Each local smoking ban ordinance can be slightly

different, so if you are a restaurant operating in multiple cities, it is challenging to modify your operations and facilities to meet differing local ordinances,” Saari said. “Additionally, if you are in a city or municipality with a smoking ban but the city three miles up the highway does not have a smoking ban, you can be at a competitive disadvantage.”

In 2007, Ellis sponsored a smoking ban bill in the House of Representatives. The bill was referred to the House Business and Industry Committee and the House Health and Human Services Committee, was amended and came up for a vote 13 times before it passed the House. However, it was not brought up for a vote in the Senate. In 2009, another smoking

ban bill co-sponsored by four representatives in the House did not come up for a vote. A bill co-sponsored by five representatives in 2011 received the same treatment. Ellis filed a bill in the Senate in 2009 proposing the implementation of a statewide smoking ban but the bill did not come up for a vote. Ellis tried again in 2011 and achieved the same results.

Shelby Tauber | Daily Texan Staff Biology senior Muhammad Alsaedi smokes a cigarette at the Littlefield temporary smoking area Thursday evening. Starting March 1, smoking tobacco will no longer be allowed at the 15 temporary locations to make the University fully tobacco-free.


4A Opinion

Opinion 4

Friday, January 25, 2013

Editor-in-Chief Susannah Jacob

We Asked: Guns on campus? THE QUESTION

A bill filed by State Sen. Brian Birdwell (R-Granbury) on Jan. 17 would allow concealed handgun license holders to carry firearms on campus. We asked UT students if they would feel safer if such a bill were passed. For more responses, visit bit.ly/dt_guns Branden Chaisorn Computer science senior from Elkhorn, Wisconsin For me personally, it’d make me feel less safe, just in the sense that I think the law would be too general by letting everybody carry a concealed weapon. Personally, I would prefer something where certain people could carry concealed weapons on campus, just because any random guy could walk up on the street with a gun, in that case, and have no repercussions for that action. DT: What types of people did you have in mind? Well, I mean, obviously, police. I don’t know, I feel that there would have to be more legislation for the background of people that have guns, and maybe creating different classes of where you can have your gun. That way, personally, you’re not taking away any [Second] Amendment rights. ••• Jesus Gonzalez, Computer science senior from Pachuca, Mexico Less safe. I actually know cases where innocent people died because of shoot-outs, like lost bullets. So suppose that the guns are used to protect someone else — that would cause a shoot-out. If there’s a shoot-out, there’s a risk that I will get shot by mistake. So that actually makes me feel less secure. ••• Chris Thomas Asian studies and journalism senior from Ossining, NY In my personal opinion, I feel like it would make me safer that law-abiding people who have passed their examinations and who have been legally licensed to operate firearms —

to own and carry their firearms by the government — are allowed to do so everywhere, including college campuses. It would definitely make us safer, because, in the wake of all these school shootings that have happened, especially the ones in Houston, Virginia Tech, all those — they’ve all happened in places that were gun-free zones at the time. So I feel like if somebody’s going to come in and start shooting people, they’re not going to respect whether guns are allowed there or not. So I’d rather the opportunity for people who are trained to use their weapons to be allowed to have that protection in case of such an emergency, and have it on hand so that they’re able to exercise that right. ••• Kandice Najjar, Chemistry junior from Amioun, Lebanon Oh, no, I would not feel safer. Because, for example, someone turns out to be — sorry to say — a little bit crazy, like in just one split second, he gets angry, he could shoot someone. I would not agree with that. It could kill many people for no reason. ••• Diana Mendoza Communication sciences and disorders junior from Alice I would actually feel less safe, just because if everybody’s going to be holding a weapon on them, who knows what type of motive they actually have for holding that. So, it could be bad, it could be good — nobody knows — but I’d rather not take that risk. •••

VIEWPOINT

Kearney gone, clarity needed

It’s no exaggeration to call Bev Kearney, former UT women’s track coach, the most winning coach in UT Athletics history. Kearney is the first African-American to serve as a head coach at UT and the first African-American to win an NCAA national team championship in Division 1 track and field. She coached 12 Olympians, and in her three decades at UT, she won seven NCAA championships. In October 2012, Kearney admitted to having “an intimate consensual relationship” with a student-athlete in 2002, a violation of UT policy, which “strongly discourages consensual relationships between ... teachers and students.” She resigned Jan. 5, right as the University was preparing to begin her termination process. UT was right to investigate Kearney and acted appropriately and consistently with its own policy. But beyond that, its own hazy and conflicted interpretation of the rules guiding employee-student relationships suggests that the policy needs to be sharpened and clarified. As it stands, the policy creates an incentive to keep consensual relationships clandestine, an explicit violation of policy. The University’s Handbook of Operating Procedures states, “The University strongly discourages consensual relationships between supervisors and subordinates, teachers and students and advisors and students. Should such a relationship develop, the teacher, supervisor or advisor has the obligation to disclose its existence to an immediate supervisor.” Significantly, the handbook does not state that relationships between supervisors and subordinates are necessarily impermissible. Implemented in 2001, the same policy holds that failure to report such a relationship or “cooperate in efforts to eliminate the conflict of interest or appearance of impropriety” is “subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination.” Patti Ohlendorf, UT’s vice president for legal affairs, cited a different rationale for Kearney’s prospective discipline in a statement to the Austin American-Statesman. “In the case of a head coach and a studentathlete on his or her team, the University’s position is that that cannot be condoned in any event,” Ohlendorf told the newspaper. “‘It can’t happen’ is what the University’s position is on that.” But UT’s policy governing consensual relationships among faculty, staff and students as described in the Handbook of Operating Procedures makes no such blanket repudiation. Derek A. Howard, Kearney’s attorney, told The Daily Texan that the University doesn’t cite Kearney’s “failure to report the relationship as the reason for firing her.” Instead, Howard

said, “It’s because she had the relationship, period.” What aspect of the relationship between a coach and a studentathlete makes such a relationship impermissible? (Ohlendorf was unavailable for comment to the Texan by press time.) Perhaps the answer is the high visibility of such relationships or that a coach’s duty to her athletes is inherently of a more physical nature than, for example, an instructor’s to her students. But coach-athlete romantic pairs do exist. Two of the Final Four head coaches in the 2012 NCAA women’s volleyball championship, both men, were married to women who had played for them in college. One of them, Jim Moore of Oregon, was a former coach at UT. If coaches can face termination for entering into relationships they disclose, regardless of the stated policy, then other University employees in supervisory roles may have reason to fear similar repercussions. The way UT handled the Kearney incident may encourage employees to keep quiet about consensual relationships. Howard claims Kearney violated the rule unknowingly. Technically, Kearney should have been exposed to the consensual relationships policy when she completed her mandatory compliance training modules, which all University employees complete when they are hired and every two years subsequently. The training requires employees answer questions after viewing a series of computer presentations. Only two slides in those sessions are devoted to the University’s policy on consensual relationships. We believe such a minimal focus on the policy leaves UT employees unaware and uninformed about the gravity and extent of the policy. Critics may claim that Kearney should have simply intuited that engaging in a relationship with one of her athletes was improper — Kearney has described it herself as an “error” and a lapse in judgment. But other student-supervisor relationships covered by the policy are less obvious. What about the case of the teaching assistant in your class who has no impact on your grade? Or the resident assistant on the dorm floor below yours who is also your classmate? If it is the University’s official policy to “strongly discourage” a behavior, it should do so more directly. The resignation of Kearney, one of UT’s most successful and celebrated coaches, demonstrates the consequences that result when employees are unaware of the University’s policies.

GALLERY

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article or cartoonist. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE | E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline.com. Letters should be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability. The Texan does not run all submissions.

Sarah Luckey, Classical archaeology, ancient history, and English junior from Dallas Probably less safe. It’s somewhat disconcerting to know that anybody can be carrying a firearm on campus. They’d have to be licensed, I’m sure, but the licensing process is not nearly as rigorous as I would like it to be, at the same time. I feel like, if you should be able to bring a firearm on campus, you should probably have to go through a psych evaluation of some sort. ••• Gracie Jaimes, Nutrition junior from Austin Definitely less safe. I mean, I know the whole issue with guns has been a big thing, especially in Texas, but I’ve just never believed in owning firearms. I’m just one of those people who just doesn’t believe in them. So, definitely I would feel less safe. I mean, there was just that recent shooting in that community college in Houston, right? There’s no reason to bring them on campus, so I don’t see the point in carrying one around. ••• Michael Malcer, American studies senior from Wuerzburg, Germany Less safe. Well, I guess, it’s really because I come from a country where weapons aren’t that common. And, well, looking at the statistics, more guns lead to more gun violence, so I don’t think that giving people guns will make it any safer for the rest of us. So, yeah, I’m generally pretty much against guns. I think only policemen, military and maybe licensed hunters should carry them.

Bring back the books Travis Knoll

Guest Columnist

Most of us, me included, have probably bought some of our books from the University Co-op during the rush of the first week of classes. Some may have even purchased UT merchandise, as I have done several times when friends in Argentina or Brazil have asked for souvenirs. This mixture of school spirit and textbook sales has made the Co-op an icon for current, former and future UT students. It benefits from the UT brand even if it receives no direct funding from the University. Enter the Co-op store and gaze at three floors of sheer school spirit: khakis with UT logos that are more expensive than plain khakis, Longhorn regalia and a kids’ section for future Longhorns. School spirit has its place, but the Co-op creates an image problem by not offering any books beyond those textbooks required for classes down in the basement. The Co-op had a separate shelf for faculty publications and University of Texas Press several years ago, but that section has disappeared. Why is that? Why did the Co-op, which is supposed to be at the service of the University, pull the books? When I talked to George Mitchell, the president and CEO of the Co-op, he gave a simple answer: The books were not profitable. In Mitchell’s defense, America has a bookstore problem. This is largely due to the rise of online distribution centers such as Amazon.com, which benefits from the so-called “long tail effect.” This means online distributors do not depend on local markets or storefronts, instead selling a few copies of even the most obscure books to worldwide audiences at a low cost. Barnes & Nobles leased the space the Co-op used to use for trade books, but according to Mitchell, it did not do any better than the Co-op and the location was subsequently closed. In the last year Borders, another national bookstore chain, went out of business. Michael Kiely, director of course materials for the Co-op, made note of this trend, telling me that he used to work at a Colloquium Bookstore in San Marcos that has since closed. The Co-op has not escaped the nationwide trend. According to Mitchell, textbook sales have dropped from $26.7 million to $13.7 million in the last five years. This effect has cut into the Co-op’s normal textbook sales, which used to account for the majority of sales. Now they account for only 40 percent of all sales as opposed to 52 percent for licensed merchandise. But in the case of the Co-op, other oft-cited culprits such as book rentals and e-books in general have not yet cut into Co-op price sales. When I asked Kiely which books sold well outside of regular textbooks, he showed me “DKR: The Royal Scrapbook,” which eulogized the legendary football coach, and told me, “I don’t have the exact numbers, but it sold well during the Christmas season.” Study aids also fare well. Do I blame the Co-op for prioritizing textbooks over trade books? No. But the Co-op should keep in mind that its function is not merely to sell what is profitable, but also to serve the UT community and promote a positive attitude toward education. Merchandising should supplement, not replace, this effort. There are some things that the Co-op is doing to promote educational initiatives. The Mitchell and Granof Awards for students who conduct exemplary research encourage and reward quality academic production from UT students, and the Hamilton Book Award rewards prolific scholars from our University as well. However, the Co-op should go further. If the Co-op has a surplus of faculty publications in its inventory, why not make a separate display or shelf that could highlight certain scholarly work and help sell off some of those extra copies? Why not dedicate a specific section to showcase the quality academic research that receives the aforementioned awards and not just UT’s athletic conquests? As an emblematic institution in the UT community, the Co-op should seek innovative ways to encourage the reading culture on campus while remaining conscious of financial limitations. Without balanced marketing, the Coop risks sending the message that UT stands not for the pursuit of knowledge but only for the football field. Knoll is a Latin American Studies senior from Dallas.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it.

EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@DTeditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


NEWS 5

News

Friday, January 25, 2013

5

UNIVERSITY

STATE

Unemployment rates fell in Texas in 2012 By Mark Carrion

Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff Moshe Rosman presents his lecture, “How Jewish is Jewish History? Jewish Metahistories and the Jewish Historical Experience,” Thursday. Rosman, a Jewish history professor at Bar Ilan University in Israel, spoke about the validity of traditional Jewish history.

Jewish history told in new light

NEWS BRIEFLY Former NFL kicker charged with fraud Former UT All-American and NFL kicker and punter Russell Erxleben, who previously served a federal prison sentence for securities fraud, was arrested Thursday on new charges of running an illegal Ponzi investment scam that netted more than $2 million. According to a federal indictment, the 56-year-old Erxleben scammed investors from 2005 to 2009 with fraudulent deals that promoted dealing in post-World War I German government bonds and a work of art purportedly by French painter Paul Gauguin. According to the indictment, Erxleben used the investments to pay himself and previous investors. Erxleben was indicted on five counts of wire fraud, one count of securities fraud and two counts of money laundering. He faces up to 20 years in prison on each of the wire and securities fraud charges, and up to 10 years on the money laundering charge. U.S. Magistrate Judge Mark Lane ordered Erxleben held in custody until his next court appearance Jan. 28. Erxleben requested a courtappointed attorney but told the court he may also seek to hire private counsel. Erxleben was sentenced in 1999 to seven years in federal prison for an investment scam that robbed investors of $36 million. The latest indictment said Erxleben did not disclose that conviction or the fact he still owed $28 million in restitution, to his later investors. Erxleben still holds the record for the longest field goal in UT history — 67 yards. He was a first-round draft pick by the New Orleans Saints in 1979. – Associated Press

following weeks over different topics in Jewish history. Next Thursday, Rosman will discuss the background behind the construction of a new Jewish history museum in Warsaw, Poland. “Now all of a sudden, there is a new interest in Poland about Jews and the lecture will cover why this museum all of a sudden and why does this happen?” Abzug said. “The lecture will be about a specifically Jewish topic, but the implications are rather broad for most elements of culture.” Rosman will lead a third lecture Feb. 14 on the increasing influence of Jewish women in Europe in the early modern period. He said he thinks the general public will be most interested in this topic. Comparative literature graduate student Rae Wyse

CATEGORICALLY JEWISH, DISTINCTLY POLISH Lecturer: Moshe Rosman Date: Thursday, Jan. 31 Time: 4 - 5:30 p.m. said she attended the lecture to see if Rosman would raise questions that could relate to her research on Jewish history in Latin America. “I work on Jewish studies in Latin America and this question of the history of Jews is very important to me,” Wyse said. After the first lecture, Wyse said she felt the subjects Rosman covered were very interesting. She said she is hoping the next two lectures will add to her research interests. “I think the next two lectures will be relevant and interesting to other people as well,” Wyse said.

$18 STUDENT RUSH TICKETS!

Shooting suspect Hasan wants death penalty out By Angela K. Brown Associated Press

FORT WORTH — The new judge in the Fort Hood shooting rampage case faces a controversial decision next week: whether to spare Maj. Nidal Hasan a possible death sentence and let him plead guilty in the worst mass shooting on a U.S. military installation. Defense attorneys said Hasan wants to plead guilty to 13 counts of premeditated murder, but Army rules prohibit a judge from accepting a guilty plea in a death penalty case. If the death sentence is removed, Hasan’s punishment would be life without parole — which he already faces if convicted of the 32 counts of attempted premeditated murder in the 2009 attack on the Texas Army post. The date for his longdelayed trial has not been set, but pretrial hearings are scheduled Wednesday through Friday so the new military judge, Col. Tara Osborn, can reconsider several defense requests previously rejected by the former judge. That judge was removed after the military’s highest court said he appeared to show bias, a ruling that ended appeals that had delayed the case more than three months. Defense attorneys argue that Hasan should be spared a possible death sentence because his rights have been violated — including by the former judge who ordered that Hasan’s beard be forcibly shaved. Hasan first showed up in court in June with a beard, later saying it was required by his Muslim faith, but facial hair violates Army rules.

Defense attorneys also claim Fort Hood’s commanding general was not impartial when he decided in July 2011 that Hasan would face the death penalty, and had been influenced by high-ranking government officials. Hasan, an Army psychiatrist, has not yet entered a plea. Osborn has full authority to decide on the death penalty issue because she is ruling on legal matters raised by the defense, said Jeff Addicott, director of the Center for Terrorism Law at St. Mary’s University School of Law in San Antonio. “I think the case will go forward as a death penalty case, because it’s dragged on for years, and if ever there was a case fitting of the death penalty, this is it,” said Addicott, who is not involved in the Hasan case, adding that he believed Hasan is “a radical extremist … and he has no remorse.” He said defense attorneys are simply trying to quickly end the case by having their client plead guilty and avoid a death sentence. Witnesses have said that a gunman wearing an Army combat uniform opened fire after shouting “Allahu Akbar!” — or “God is great!” in Arabic — inside a crowded medical building on Nov. 5, 2009, where deploying and returning soldiers received vaccines and other tests. Hasan was also about to deploy to Afghanistan. A Senate report released in 2011 said the FBI missed warning signs about Hasan, alleging he had become an Islamic extremist and a “ticking time bomb” before the rampage at Fort Hood, about 125 miles southwest of Fort Worth.

At The Door, Starting 1-Hour Before Show Time.

Jill Blackwood. Photo: KirkTuck.com

Scholars studying Jewish history are beginning to consider differences between actuality and people’s perceptions of Jewish history and culture, said Moshe Rosman, a professor of Jewish history at Bar Ilan University in Israel during a talk Thursday afternoon. The Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies sponsored a lecture by Rosman, titled “How Jewish is Jewish History? Jewish Metahistories and the Jewish Historical Experience.” The lecture featured Rosman’s views on the validities of traditional Jewish history and the metahistories which he describes as “the big story that historians tell.” “As far as Jewish history is concerned, it has been construed as the quest for

a secular Jewish culture, as the process of Jews returning to history and establishing a state, as the triumph over persecution, and many other metahistories,” Rosman said. Robert Abzug, director of the Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies, said he thought it would be a great idea for people to be exposed to Rosman’s work in Jewish history. “He speaks clearly of major issues and makes them comprehensible even if you’re not Jewish or a historian, and in ways that are quite applicable to history in general,” Abzug said. During his lecture, Rosman said the percentage of students studying Jewish studies at Israel’s Tel Aviv University has decreased from 30 percent to 3 percent since the 1970s. Rosman will give two additional lectures in the

Regional Premiere

Live, Now On Stage, 4 Weeks Only! By Moisés Kaufman • Directed by Dave Steakley Starring TV and film star Beth Broderick (Sabrina the Teenage Witch) and internationally renowned pianist Anton Nel (U.T. Professor of Piano and Chamber Music) Beethoven’s Diabelli Variations come life in this inspirational Broadway play of passion, ferocious tenacity and moments of beauty that transform our lives.

See it at ZACH’s brand New Topfer Theatre • Riverside & Lamar Executive Producers: Michelle Bourianoff & Juan Zalles • Producers: Kathleen and Harvey Guion

“A potent family drama wrapped inside a fascinating historical mystery!” – Variety

Photo: KirkTuck.com

By Tatiana Marceleno

Records from the Texas Workforce Commission indicate that unemployment rates across Texas have recently fallen to their lowest percentages since 2008, while unemployment rates in Austin slightly increased between November and December 2012. “We report on the unemployment rate each month,” said Mark Lavergne, a spokesman for the Texas Workforce Commission. The commission, a state agency created to develop and promote the workforce, found that the state’s average unemployment rate for the last quarter of 2012 dropped below 7 percent — attributed to the addition of 260,800 jobs across Texas during 2012. The Texas Workforce Commission also monitors local unemployment. According to the commission’s combined report for Austin, Round Rock and San Marcos, even though the region has had a small increase of 0.1 percentage points in unemployment between November and December 2012, the area has fared well. The region’s 5 percent unemployment rate is still lower than Texas’ 6 percent rate and the national average of 7.6 percent. The unemployment rate in Austin may continue to rise for the current quarter. According to Lavergne, it is important to note that the unemployment percentages that the Texas Workforce Commission releases for local areas like Austin are affected by seasonal changes, such as holiday hiring and students taking summer and winter jobs. “It is not uncommon to see a slight uptick in the unemployment for a local area around this time of year,” Lavergne said. “As students head back to school and staffs decrease their sizes after the

holiday season, the unemployment rate will naturally grow.” Despite the recent increase in local unemployment, he said Austin’s economy has been improving. “Over the last year the Austin area has added 34,600 jobs — a 4.3 percent annual growth rate,” Lavergne said. According to the Texas Workforce Commission, the accommodations and food service industries make up the largest number of job gains with 2,400 hires in 2012. However, jobs in government decreased with the loss of some 3,000 positions since the end of 2011. So what does this mean for UT students graduating soon? “I don’t think the general job market was too bad when I graduated,” said Ariel Min, a former UT journalism student who graduated in the spring of 2012. “But I think it was pretty difficult to find an entry-level job in journalism right off the bat in Austin.” Min, who is now interning for a magazine in Dallas, said employment opportunities varied for students with different majors. “A lot of my friends are in engineering or business, so I think it was a lot easier for them to find jobs,” Min said. Lavergne said Austin and Texas are great places to look for a job. “We can never predict the future 100 percent,” Lavergne said. “[But] from 2010 to 2020, our projections indicate that employment across all industries in Texas will grow by about 20 percent.” Min said students should not be afraid to take advantage of unpaid opportunities and that the city’s job market looks promising. “Utilize your faculty and resources well, and be aggressive in trying to get academic internships,” Min said.

512-476-0541 x1

zachtheatre.org


W&N 3

Friday, January 25 , 2013

World & Nation 6

NEWS BRIEFLY

Brits, Germans, Dutch urged to leave Benghazi

Rhode Island House OKs gay marriage bill PROVIDENCE, R.I. — The opponents of gay marriage say it is difficult to predict the bill’s fate. “This has been a long journey,” said House Speaker Gordon Fox, who is gay and supported same-sex legislation when it was first introduced in 1997. “Today ... we stand for equality, we stand for justice.” Thursday’s vote posed the most significant challenge yet for gay marriage in Rhode Island. While the five other New England states already allow gay couples to marry, attempts have fallen flat in this heavily Catholic state. Nine states and the District of Columbia now allow gay and lesbian couples to marry.

Fake Chavez photo forces reprint in Spain MADRID — The leading Spanish newspaper El Pais withdrew and reprinted its Thursday edition after discovering that its front-page exclusive photograph supposedly showing ailing Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez was a fake. The poor-quality image showed the head of a man apparently on a hospital bed with tubes in his mouth. El Pais had received the picture from an agency, Gtres Online, which declined to comment on the situation. The agency also offered the photo to The Associated Press and another Spanish newspaper, which both turned it down. — Compiled from Associated Press reports

Riley Brands, Wire Editor

By Cassandra Vinograd & Paisley Dodds Associated Press

Photo by the Associated Press In this Dec. 12, 2012, file image made from video, North Korea’s Unha-3 rocket lifts off from the Sohae launching station in Tongchang-ri, North Korea.

North Korea continues launches By Hyung-Jin Kim Associated Press

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea’s top governing body warned Thursday that the regime will conduct its third nuclear test in defiance of U.N. punishment, and made clear that its long-range rockets are designed to carry not only satellites but also warheads aimed at striking the United States. The National Defense Commission, headed by the country’s young leader, Kim Jong Un, denounced Tuesday’s U.N. Security Council resolution condemning North Korea’s long-range rocket launch in December as a banned missile activity and expanding sanctions against

the regime. The commission reaffirmed in its declaration that the launch was a peaceful bid to send a satellite into space, but also clearly indicated the country’s rocket launches have a military purpose: to strike and attack the United States. While experts say North Korea doesn’t have the capability to hit the U.S. with its missiles, recent tests and rhetoric indicate the country is feverishly working toward that goal. The commission pledged to keep launching satellites and rockets and to conduct a nuclear test as part of a “new phase” of combat with the United States, which it blames for leading the U.N. bid to punish Pyongyang. “We do not hide that a variety of satellites

and long-range rockets which will be launched by [North Korea] one after another and a nuclear test of higher level which will be carried out by it in the upcoming all-out action, a new phase of the anti-U.S. struggle that has lasted century after century, will target against the U.S., the sworn enemy of the Korean people,” the commission said. It was a rare declaration by the powerful commission once led by late leader Kim Jong Il and now commanded by his son. The statement made clear Kim Jong Un’s commitment to continue developing the country’s nuclear and missile programs in defiance of the Security Council, even at risk of further international isolation.

LONDON — Britain, Germany and the Netherlands urged their citizens to immediately leave the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi on Thursday, warning of an imminent threat against Westerners days after a deadly hostage crisis in neighboring Algeria. European officials told The Associated Press that schools were among the potential targets. The warnings came a day after U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton testified to Congress about the Sept. 11 attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi that killed four Americans, including the U.S. ambassador to Libya. They also came as French troops battled al-Qaidalinked militants in the West

African nation of Mali, and followed the deaths of at least 37 foreign hostages seized by Islamist extremists in Algeria. It was unclear if those two events were linked to the latest concerns about Libya. The foreign ministries of the three European countries issued statements describing the threat as specific and imminent but none would elaborate. The U.S. Embassy in Tripoli, Libya’s capital far to the west of Benghazi, said there was “no specific information pointing to specific, imminent threats against U.S. citizens.” With a population of 1 million, Benghazi is Libya’s second-largest city and where the Libyan uprising against longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi began in February 2011. Gadhafi was eventually toppled and killed after NATO backed the rebel movement, and the Arab country has since struggled with increasing insecurity.

Ibrahim Alaguri | Associated Press In this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012, file photo, a man looks at documents at the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya.


SPTS 7

Sports 7

Friday, January 25, 2013

Christian Corona, Sports Editor

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Hobbled Horns host Tech

SIDELINE NBA KNICKS

By Nick Cremona CELTICS

With five games left on his 23-game suspension, Myck Kabongo’s return is near. Unfortunately, that is about it on the good news front for Texas. Coming off its first loss to Oklahoma in two years, the Longhorns are reeling and there’s not much hope left for a young team that struggles in seemingly every game. “We do a lot of things well, but we don’t win because we don’t consistently do it when the game is on the line,” head coach Rick

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SPORTS BRIEFLY Aldridge named to West All-Star team

TECH continues on page 8 Texas vs. Texas Tech

Date: Saturday, Time: 7 p.m. On air: LHN

Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff Freshman forward Connor Lammert will see significant playing time against Texas Tech in the absence of injured starter Jonathan Holmes. Lammert, whose brother Clark plays for Texas Tech, is averaging 3.4 points per game.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Texas needs consistency to end skid By Garrett Callahan After nine straight losses, Texas sits in the basement of the Big 12 standings. The troubled team comes back home to Austin this weekend as it battles Big

12 foe Kansas State in its eighth conference game of the season. Karen Aston and her Longhorns look to finally bring this losing streak to an end. The Longhorns will get their two leading scorers back, Nneka

Enemkpali and Chassidy Fussell, after they served a one-game suspension during Wednesday’s game against Kansas for violating team rules. They were definitely missed. Texas struggled to do anything right against the

Jayhawks as it was served its seventh straight conference loss. At halftime, the Longhorns had a mere 12 points, their lowest first half output in school history. To make matters worse for Texas, it

K-STATE continues on page 8

Texas @ Kansas State

Date: Saturday Time: 1 p.m. On air: LHN

The NBA announced the rosters for the 2013 AllStar teams Thursday night, with former Longhorn LaMarcus Aldridge making the cut. The six-foot-11 forward, who played two seasons at the University of Texas before declaring for the 2006 NBA draft, will be playing in his second career All-Star Game. He joins fellow Longhorn Kevin Durant, who was named as a starter for the Western Conference squad. Aldridge has compiled an impressive first half to this NBA season, averaging 20.7 points and 8.8 rebounds per contest to go along with 1.3 blocks per game. In his sixth season in the league, Aldridge is averaging 18.1 points and 7.6 rebounds per game for his career. — Matt Warden

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8 SPTS

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Friday, January 25, 2013

weekend PREVIEWS MEN’s SWIMMING AND DIving | rachel wenzlaff This Friday at TCU, head coach Eddie Reese will dive into his 35th season at the University of Texas. Reese was selected to coach at numerous Olympic games, so it comes as no surprise that the Longhorns have achieved top-three finishes in 27 of 34 NCAA Championship meets, under his exceptional leadership. Coming off a win against No. 12 Georgia on Jan. 12, No. 7 Texas looks to continue its winning tradition against the Horned Frogs. Senior Michael McBroom, who has gained international recognition, is the nation’s leader in the 1650-meter freestyle and is ranked in

the top three nationally for both the 1000-meter and 500-meter freestyle. McBroom set a positive tone for 2013 by securing a win in all four of his events against Auburn and Georgia. McBroom, along with senior Dax Hill and sophomore Clay Youngquist, are expected to lead the Longhorns against TCU. The Texas men’s swim team boasts an incredibly strong roster this season, featuring three seniors who have won NCAA individual titles during their collegiate careers at Texas. Expectations are high, and only time will tell if the Longhorns can withstand the pressure.

WOMEN’S SWIMMING | EVAN BERKOWITZ Texas @ TCU

Date: Friday Time: 4:30 p.m. Location: Forth Worth

the endurance to be strong during the course of the season.” Nick Naumann and Daniel Whitehead will compete in the singles portion this weekend. Three teams of Chris Camillone/ David Holiner, Sudanwa Sitaram/Daniel Whitehead and Alex Hilliard/Andrew Korinek will compete as doubles teams. The men’s tennis team is off to a 3-0 start this spring with impressive wins over Washington and Tulsa last weekend to round out the Key Biscayne Invitational in Tulsa, Okla. The red-hot Longhorns climbed the national rankings from No. 23 to No. 17. They have begun their season 4-0 or better in each of the past 5 seasons. WE

Senior

ITA KICK-OFF WEEKEND Texas @ South Carolina

Date: Friday Time: 4 p.m. Location: Lexington, Ky.

TECH

transfers Austin Bussing, an All-Big 12 athlete from Kansas, and Kyle Merber who earned All-Ivy League honors at Columbia. The pole-vaulting unit for the Longhorns boasts star athletes, including three-time All-American Maston Wallace, NCAA qualifier Hayden Clark and four-time All-Big 12 honoree Mark Thomas. Texas’ throwing unit consists of three-time first team All-American Hayden Baillio and three-time AllAmerican Ryan Crouser. To open the season, Texas travels to Fayetteville, Ark., to compete in the Razorback Team Invitational on Friday and Saturday, where it will take on Arkansas, which is No. 1 in the preseason rankings.

Date: Friday Time: 4:30 p.m. Location: Forth Worth en’s Swimmer of the Week after finishing ahead of Olympian Micah Lawrence in the 100-yard breaststroke. Junior diver Maren Taylor won her third Diver of the Week award this season.

A week after playing for individual bragging rights, the Longhorns will compete to contribute to the team’s success this weekend. The Longhorns begin dual match play Saturday, hosting Wichita State, No. 34 Utah and Stephen F. Austin as part of the ITA Kick-Off Weekend. Saturday they will face Wichita State in a rematch of last year’s first-round match in the NCAA Championships. They will play Utah or Stephen F. Austin on Sunday depending on who wins. The winning team will advance to the ITA National Team Indoor Championship on Feb. 8-11. Last season as a freshman,

Lina Padegimaite dominated dual match singles play. The Lithuanian posted a 21-5 record en route to being named Big 12 Conference Freshman of the Year. Another Longhorn to keep an eye on in dual match singles play is junior Elizabeth Begley. She tied Padegimaite last season for most wins in dual match singles with a record of 21-2. If all goes to plan, Sunday should pit the No. 11 Longhorns against the No. 34 Utes, who feature three players ranked in singles and a Top 25 doubles team. Play at the PenickAllison Tennis Center begins 10 a.m. Saturday with doubles.

Daniel Whitehead Senior

RAZORBACK TEAM INVITATIONAL

Date: Friday Time: 1:15 p.m. Location: Fayetteville, Ark.

Making the leap to Fayetteville, Ark., for the Razorback Team Invitational this weekend, sophomore Kaitlin Petrillose aims for her third straight pole vault victory. A well-rounded athlete in gymnast-meetstrack-star form, Petrillose holds a school record and reached fifth place in the nation this month. Twentythree teammates will join Petrillose to represent No. 13 Texas. “I have the best training partner in Natasha,” Petrillose said of senior teammate Natasha Masterson, who will compete alongside her this weekend. “We really push each other’s limits and it helps my preparation and competition all the time.” Also looking to push

limits are All-American cross country competitor Marielle Hall, who runs the 3,000-meter, the 60-meter hurdle expert Morgan Snow and 400-meter dash foes Courtney Okolo and Danielle Dowie. Each of the four rank in the top 10 nationally in their respective events. Facing opponents Oklahoma and Oklahoma State, the squad will also battle ranked competitors including No. 5 Arkansas, No. 6 LSU and No. 7 Florida. Friday’s events begin at 6 p.m. and conclude with the high jump at 8 p.m. The tournament resumes at 12:15 p.m. Saturday for the 3,000-meter race and concludes with the 4x400meter relay at 4:45 p.m.

for the Longhorns. “Texas is the youngest team in the country,” Self said. “They are going to be really, really good.” Expectations and results are two entirely different things, and Texas has figured that out the hard way. The result of an inexperienced, sometimes immature, team has made for a bummer of a season. The Longhorns welcome the Texas Tech Red Raiders to the Erwin Center on Saturday evening in what could be their best shot to date at a conference win. The Red Raiders lost their first four games in conference play until they defeated Iowa State 56-51 earlier this week. The Red Raiders’ trip to Austin will reunite Texas forward Connor Lammert and his brother, Clark, a sophomore for Texas Tech. Much like the Longhorns, the Red Raiders have lacked an offense efficient enough to keep them

Sophomore

This will be the Longhorns’ second to last meet before the Big 12 Championships, which begin Feb. 27.

ITA KICK-OFF WEEKEND Texas @ Wichita State

Date: Saturday, Jan. 26 Time: 10 a.m. Location: Austin

Lina Padegemaite Sophomore

Ryan Dohner Junior runner

in close games, and their 9-8 overall record includes just one win against a team with an RPI under 50 (Iowa State). Junior forward Jaye Crockett leads the Red Raiders in scoring and rebounding with an average of 13 points and eight rebounds per game. If Texas can keep the Red Raiders from shooting abnormally well and find a way to rebound without Holmes keeping things together in the lane, it stands a good chance of winning. In its last five games, Texas has made an average of 6.4 free throws and is shooting less than 55 percent from the line. Those are points Texas desperately needs, especially in close games. Texas is 1-6 in games decided by six points or less this season. “Our guards have to understand we have to get to the foul line,” Barnes said. “We have to put the ball inside.”

RAZORBACK TEAM INVITATIONAL

Date: Friday Time: All day Location: Fayetteville, Ark.

Kaitlin Petrillose Sophomore pole-vaulter

Despite a slow start in Big 12 play, Texas has outrebounded 12 of its 18 opponents. Nneka Enemkpali (left) is averaging a team leading 9.8 rebounds per game. Enemkpali is coming off a one-game suspension for a violation of team rules.

continues from page 7

Barnes said. The Longhorns’ five-game skid in conference play, coupled with leading rebounder Jonathan Holmes’ broken hand, doesn’t bode well for the team’s confidence moving forward. However, leading scorer Sheldon McClellan is coming off a 25-point performance against the Sooners, tying his career high, and Holmes’ absence inside opens up playing time for the Longhorns’ youthful big men. Holmes is expected to miss three to six weeks because of his injury. Freshmen Prince Ibeh, Ioannis Papapetrou and Connor Lammert will log significant minutes and could improve faster than expected during that time. The Longhorns’ second-leading scorer, Julien Lewis, is also expected to take on a larger role while Holmes is gone. Despite their recent struggles, Kansas head coach Bill Self had nothing but praise

Gretchen Jaques

WOMEN’s track and field | jori epstein

men’s track and field | melinda billingsley Although Texas recently lost in its dual meet against Arkansas, on Jan. 9 it was listed as the No. 3 team in the preseason indoor national team rankings by the USTFCCCA. The Longhorns are approaching this season with a strong team, consisting of many All-Americans led by 18th-year coach, Bubba Thornton. Several of the distance runners raced this past fall for the cross-country team, which finished ninth at nationals. Junior runner Ryan Dohner has received all-league honors six times, while senior Patrick McGregor has earned five AllBig 12 honors. The distance runners are gaining even more strength this season with

Texas @ TCU

women’s tennis | chris caraveo Dax Hill

men’s tennis | Nitya duran This weekend the Longhorns travel to Lexington, Ky., to participate in the ITA Kick-Off Weekend event. Texas will play against South Carolina while Kentucky faces off against Michigan State on Friday. A total of 15 ITA KickOff Weekend events will take place this weekend, with the winner of each advancing to the ITA National Men’s Team Indoor Championship in Seattle (Feb. 15-17). “It’s going to be a very challenging week with four good teams,” head coach Michael Center said. “At this point we are still learning about ourselves. We are talking a lot about being consistent physically and emotionally — showing that we have

The No. 7 ranked Longhorns will travel to Fort Worth to take on TCU at 4:30 p.m. Friday. The meeting will be the first-ever Big 12 matchup between the schools. After climbing up to No. 5 after their victory at Stanford, the Longhorns lost two straight matches to Auburn and Georgia this past weekend. On Wednesday, sophomore swimmer Gretchen Jaques won Big 12 wom-

Shelby Tauber Daily Texan Staff

K-STATE

continues from page 7

was outshot and outscored once again in the second half. Kansas State should be just as tough an opponent, currently holding on to fourth place in the Big 12 with a 12-7 record overall. After losing three straight, the Wildcats came back with two straight wins, including a huge upset of No. 12/11 Oklahoma State. Brittany Chambers, 2013 All-American candidate, leads the Wildcats. Against the Cowgirls, Chambers had 26 points in one of her best games of the season. The Longhorns already have an eye out for this guard, who is averaging 19.4 points per game. While Texas has a lot to prepare for against Kansas State, it also has a lot to work on internally, as the

team has been extremely inconsistent all year. In their game against the Jayhawks, the Longhorns led in rebounds but shot only 27.3 percent from the field. Despite a solid first half against Oklahoma, the Sooners came out and took advantage of Longhorn turnovers while taking a small lead into halftime. However, in the second half, they let Oklahoma come out with a 12-5 run and take the game right from under their feet. Texas has been counting on its young players all season to take leadership. The seven underclassmen, conversely, give the roster a large sense of immaturity and inexperience. “The people that are taking ownership are really

young,” head coach Karen Aston said. “It is hard for them. If they had bad attitudes or if they weren’t trying, I would be very frustrated, but I don’t feel that way.” These developing leaders aren’t stepping down, however. With 11 games left in the season, the Longhorns still have time left to restore their winning record. “I think as young players, we measure our success on wins and losses,” sophomore forward Nneka Enemkpali said. “The fact that we had early success in the season and now we are not doing as well, we have to hold each other accountable and uplift each other. That is what I try to do. We just have to move on.”


CLASS/SPTS/L&A 9

Life & Arts

Friday, January 25, 2013

9

MOVIE REVIEW | ‘AMOUR’

‘Amour’ takes stark view on love and aging By Alex Williams It’s no secret that the voting members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences skew toward the elderly, which makes it something of a surprise that they nominated “Amour,” a glaring reminder of human mortality, for five Oscars earlier this month. For viewers of any generation, “Amour” could be considered a horror film, a paralyzing look into the future that could be awaiting any one of us. However, “Amour” is more than deserving of acclaim, as it tells the story of a couple fading into their twilight with brutal honesty. Elderly couple Georges (Jean-Louis Trintignant) and Anne (Emmanuelle Riva) have settled into a happy life after retirement, living in an upscale apartment with occasional visits from former students and their daughter (Isabelle Huppert). Once Anne’s age starts to catch up with her, first with a catatonic episode over breakfast and then with a series of increasingly

debilitating strokes, Georges finds himself acting as her main caretaker. Director Michael Haneke very rarely plays in such blatantly emotional arenas, but his unsentimental approach is perfectly matched to the tragic romance unfurling in the film. Haneke etches his characters and their relationship very carefully, building an unmatchable intimacy between “Amour”’s central couple. Once Anne starts to fall ill, it is clear that Georges’ only response (and the only one that he even considers) is to take care of her, to nurse his wife until the inevitable occurs. Haneke stages the occasional punchy sequence, especially in an opening scene that sets a somber tone for the rest of the film, but for the most part, “Amour” shines for its director’s restraint and strength. The film is mainly a duet between leads Jean-Louis Trintignant and Emmanuelle Riva, and the two give remarkable, heartrending performances. Trintignant stands out as the steadfast Georges, unwavering in his devotion even as his wife

Photo courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics Anne (Oscar nominee Emmanuelle Riva) faces the onset of dementia in Michael Haneke’s “Amour.” Haneke’s film may not sit well with all viewers as the subject of aging and death is tackled head-on.

spirals, and he is especially good at finding the perfect note to milk maximum devastation out of the audience. Riva, the oldest Best Actress nominee ever, has a more challenging role. Watching her become increasingly unrecognizable and ragged hits right in the gut for anyone who has watched a grandparent or loved one deteriorate from old age. Even with the restraints of her character’s

VINYL

Demi Adejuyigbe & Alec Wyman | Daily Texan Staff

New York-based electronic pop band Young Magic returns to Austin in support of their critically acclaimed debut album, Melt. We caught up with the band before their show at the Mohawk Tuesday night to talk about their work, the band’s origins, and the unorthodox production methods they used to record their new album.

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recognize the level of craft on display. Haneke has put together a film that devastates just as aptly as it impresses, and for those that can stomach it, “Amour” is a moving exercise in nobility, tragedy and devotion.

AMOUR Director: Michael Haneke Genre: Drama Runtime: 127 minutes

continues from page 11

to an MP3, vinyl makes people feel closer to the music and musicians.” Waggener is a vinyl enthusiast himself, and said he has had records pressed at A&R Records, a vinyl pressing plant located in Dallas, for his label Heavy Light Records, and has also steered his design clients to have their records pressed at the Dallas plant as well. Stanley Getz II, the sole owner of A&R Records, said the small factory he runs in Dallas has had to

step up its workload to keep up with the surging record sales of the past few years. “When I got the place [in 2008], we were running about one or two days a week, and now we’re running five or six days a week,” Getz said. According to Getz, the manufacturing process for vinyl albums is much more arduous and costly than the manufacturing process for CDs. Record companies are adapting to consumer

demand by including digital download codes inside many new-release vinyl albums, giving consumers the best of both worlds: intimacy and portability. “It’s really nice to see people who, as a generation didn’t grow up with vinyl records, coming to buy them now,” Mason said. “It’s just an intimate kind of format. It’s kind of hard to bond with a file on your computer. I think there’s an emotional element to vinyl albums that you just can’t get on your computer.”

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continues from page 11 manages to keep Julia’s story believable and relatable. There’s a wistful sadness to adult Julia’s drama; to her, it feels like her world is ending when the actual world literally might. Her matterof-factness about the state of things further convinces the reader that humanity’s time on Earth is coming to an inevitable close. Walker’s subtlety in recalling mild everyday moments authenticates Julia’s experiences. Many of the simplest memories and feelings are the ones that turn out to be the most important. However, Walker’s abusive use of foreshadowing becomes an exhaustive nuisance that cuts off many opportunities for surprise. The story would have benefited from cutting phrases like, “We were driving a silver station wagon, although the police report would later describe it as blue,” which was ever so casually sprinkled into a conversation between Julia and her mother. “The Age of Miracles” brings to light that the most terrifying problems of life are the invisible ones. No one could see the slowing or the change in the Earth’s magnetic field, just as cancer and falling out of love are often invisible to us. Walker reminds us that the power of the unseen affects us all.

THE AGE OF MIRACLES What: Author Karen Thompson Walker speaks and signs Where: Book People When: Friday, 7 p.m.

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physical state, Riva masterfully communicates the sensation of being betrayed by her own body. It’s no stretch to say “Amour” is not exactly a fun film to watch. In fact, the crushingly honest and recognizable approach to its subject matter may send some running for the hills. However, it is an impeccably directed and acted film, and even when it’s hard to love, it’s impossible not to

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10 COMICS

Comics

10*

Friday, January 25, 2013

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Friday, January 25, 2013

Crossword ACROSS 1 The 500s, in the Dewey Decimal Classification: Abbr. 4 Bars 10 Secretary of war under Theodore Roosevelt 14 Not be underdressed? 16 Polish border river 17 Winner of nine 2011 Tonys 19 Payoffs 20 Figure in a celebrated 2004 breakup 21 Off 22 Stravinsky’s “Le ___ du Printemps” 24 Corrodes 26 Minimally 28 Specialized in fiction, say 29 Title girl in a John Cougar #1 hit

30 Female Arabic name meaning “peace” 32 “___ Fitz,” old comic strip started by Mort Walker 35 Director Thomas H. ___ of the silent era 36 Ring with a face attached? 37 Crossjack, e.g. 38 ___-specific 39 One-___ 40 “Twin Peaks” actor Jack 41 Some hotels, for short 42 Hans Christian ___, pioneer of electromagnetism 44 Everything 48 Program blocker 49 Antique dealer’s transaction 50 Guadeloupe, par exemple 52 Suffix with method 54 American diner favorite

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51 “___ and the Real Girl” (2007 Ryan Gosling film)

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55 Sea goddess who saved Odysseus

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For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

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L&A 11

Friday, January 25, 2013

Life & Arts 11

MUSIC

Kelsey McKinney, Life & Arts Editor

BOOK REVIEW | ‘THE AGE OF MIRACLES’

Book recounts girl’s life in apocalyptic times By Elizabeth Williams

Illustration by John Massingill

Vinyl scratches up more sales By Hannah Smothers When Waterloo Records first opened in 1982, CDs were just coming of age, digital formats were nothing but a futuristic myth and vinyl albums and cassettes reigned supreme when it came to music sales. Now, more than 30 years later, vinyl albums are coming back to reclaim their once coveted position on the totem pole of superior music formats. Former Waterloo employee Don Lamb said in a 2010 interview conducted by Austin archivist John Schooley that in 1985, Waterloo kept their precious few CDs in a glass case at the front of the store, and a single disc could run music buyers up to $25 or $30. The average cost of a vinyl record was a mere $2 as the

oversized and inconvenient discs were slowly disappearing into the realm of the obsolete. But in recent years, the market has flipped. Now it’s vinyl albums selling for $20 to $30 a pop. Currently, the majority of music sales take place through digital formats that allow entire libraries to be carried in the back pocket of a pair of jeans. According to market research company The NPD Group, iTunes has been the biggest music retailer in the United States since 2008 and claimed 29 percent of all music sold in both digital and physical formats in the second quarter of 2012. CDs sit second in the national rankings, but vinyl albums could soon replace them. “CD sales are going down, and vinyl sales are going up,”

said Paul Mason, Waterloo buyer and manager. “CDs still sell more than vinyl albums, but the two could meet in the middle soon.” Mason said vinyl albums made up 27 percent of the store’s total sales in 2012 — an increase from previous years. He said CDs are still the top sellers at 54 percent of the store’s total sales, but that number is slowly declining. Waterloo customer Scott Moher has participated in the return to the age-old physical format of vinyl albums. Moher said he has been collecting records since he was in high school but his collection has really grown in the past few years. “I kinda stopped buying CDs, and I don’t really buy MP3s,” Moher said. “There’s a pretty big jump from an MP3 format. The

quality of the audio is important to me.” According to statistics measured by Nielsen SoundScan, vinyl LP sales in the United States reached 3.6 million units in 2011, a 28.6 percent increase from the 2.8 million units sold in 2010. Tentative data for 2012 shows another increase to about 4.6 million units sold, a further 27.8 percent increase from the surge of 2011. “There’s a growing interest in collecting vinyl, especially amongst those in their 20s and early 30s,” Austin graphic artist Noel Waggener said. “While I’m sure some percentage of new vinyl enthusiasts love it for the sound, I think most long for a more tactile listening experience, which vinyl provides. As opposed

The Earth’s rotation around the sun is slowing measurably with each passing day. The force of gravity is growing heavier and no one has a clue what the cause is. Karen Thompson Walker’s “The Age of Miracles” opens on a seemingly typical Saturday morning that turns into the day everyone realized the Earth as they knew it was changing. In one terrifying announcement, the world’s leading scientists reveal that the Earth’s rotation around the sun is slowing down. Periods of light and darkness grow longer, dramatically skewing the way people choose to live their lives. “The Age of Miracles” recounts the slowing through the narration of a young woman, Julia, as she looks back in time. Julia’s recollection of what it was like to be 11 years old during such extraordinary times is the usual comingof-age story staged against

an impending apocalypse. The typical problems of every young adult novel arise — childhood friends grow distant, crushes turn into love and families fall apart. These issues are played out by the standard teen archetypes, like the mysterious, shaggy-haired crush, the chubby goth friend who finds love online and shaves her head and the protagonist’s frantically-judgmental mother. Even in apocalyptic times, the usual suspects are wreaking havoc on Julia’s confidence and vision of her world. While it follows the stock pattern of most teen novels, “The Age of Miracles” stands apart from the likes of the “Twilight” and “The Hunger Games” series as an astonishing literary debut. The realism with which Walker renders Julia’s story is beautiful, frightening and stunning. In what is arguably a more fantastical set of circumstances — life on Earth is slowly but surely ending — Walker

NOVEL continues on page 9 Author Karen Thompson Walker will have a signing of her New York Times bestselling novel “The Age of Miracles” at Book People on Friday.

Photo courtesy of Ramin Talaie

VINYL continues on page 9

LOCAL LIVE

Fingers Crossed releases first full-length album By Alexandra Hart Fresh out of the studio after recording its first fulllength album, punk/hardcore act Fingers Crossed is anticipating a busy year. The band, originally from Houston, has relocated to Austin since its start in 2008. “We finally put our fulllength out Jan. 1 of this year, kind of with the idea of starting the year out on a good note,” guitarist Zach Chad said. “We had this idea of 2013 being our year. Getting this album out and then just keeping up the momentum all year.” Despite being spread out, with three members living in Austin and one living in Houston, the band has a practice schedule that works for them. “Our drummer lives and works in Houston, which is a challenge sometimes,” bassist Nathan Helton said. Chad agreed, saying flexibility is key. “It takes a lot of jamming with no drums, just playing acoustic in our rooms,” Chad said. “Then, on the day of the shows, we’ll all meet up either here or in Houston, wherever we’re playing, and just rehearse all day. But as far as having a regular practice schedule, it’s kind of rough.” But the band is used to dealing with obstacles. Fingers Crossed has cycled through several different lineups before settling on the members they have now. “Andrew [MacLaren] and

Local punk/ hardcore band Fingers Crossed, including bassist Nathan Helton and guitarist Zach Chad, kicked off a busy year with the release of their first fulllength album on New Year’s Day. Although they formed their roots in Houston, the band has since relocated to Austin.

Pearce Murphy Daily Texan Staff

myself are the two founding members,” Chad said. “We started back in high school, back when we were like, little kids. We started touring with Nate’s other band, Thieves, and that’s how we met. After that first tour, we lost our drummer and eventually our bassist, and that’s where we picked up Nate.” Through the band’s relationship with Thieves, Helton eventually came on as its bassist. “It’s funny, because I had always been basically the

official No. 1 fan of Fingers Crossed,” Helton said. “I was always at the shows. And once I found out they needed a new bassist I pretty much made them let me join the band. Since then I split time between the two bands, but since Thieves is kind of in a lull right now I can spend time working on this.” Fingers Crossed recently returned from tour, which Chad said is the best part of being in the band. “Our last show was in El Paso, rounding out our two-week West Coast tour,”

he said. “I live to tour, I’d do it all the time if I could. I don’t think I’d have the opportunity to see half of the places I’ve seen, like the Hoover Dam, if I wasn’t doing this. It’s a lot of work and yeah, sometimes it’s kind of miserable, but we’re having the time of our lives.” Helton said the band is excited about its upcoming appearance on “Local Live,” its first live performance since releasing its album. “This album is definitely our best yet,” Helton said. “Whereas a lot of our

previous recordings we did in just one or two takes, we put a lot of work into this one. A lot more planning, a lot more cool effects. We’re looking forward to playing the new songs on air. It should be pretty good.”

FINGERS CROSSED Where: William Randolph Hearst Building When: Sunday, line forms at 9 p.m., show starts at 10 p.m. How much: Free

It’s a lot of work and yeah, sometimes it’s kind of miserable, but we’re having the time of our lives. — Zach Chad , guitarist


12 L&A

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The Daily Texan 2013-01-25  

The January 25, 2013 edition of The Daily Texan.