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The Daily Texan Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

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Wednesday, January 16, 2013

TRY OUT Interested in contributing to The Daily Texan? Stop by the HSM, underneath the Cronkite Plaza, to pick up an application today.

INSIDE 4 OPINION

A review of a few main issues to be debated this spring at the Capitol.

dailytexanonline.com

Psychology professor talks about keeping resoultions.

Indecisive Mike Davis will make impact as senior next season.

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 8

SPORTS PAGE 6

UNIVERSITY

LEGACY

Student veterans difficult to track

Mathematics professor dies of heart attack

By Jordan Rudner

veterans there are. “We have a ballpark figure, but no precise number,” Marc Hamlin, vice president of UT’s Student Veteran Association, said. “The Office of the Registrar only sees people who are pulling veteran benefits, which includes dependents and spouses, and they don’t classify people as veteran or non-veteran.” Gary Romriell, a veteran

As part of recent efforts to gather better data on higher education experiences of veterans, the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) asked universities to track their graduation rates. But before UT can provide those statistics, the school will need to figure out how many student

who served in Baghdad and now works in the Student Veteran Services (SVS) office, said the SVS knows of roughly 650 student veterans at UT. “But that estimate changes depending on who you’re talking to,” Romriell said. “There are also veterans who are undeclared, who pay for their tuition and don’t necessarily inform us of their presence, and that makes it hard

to get a figure.” While UT doesn’t have complete information about its student veterans, Hamlin said student veterans are often equally uninformed. According to data gathered from the 2010 National Survey of Veterans released by the VA, there is a widespread lack of knowledge among vet-

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WOMEN’S TRACK AND FIELD

5 NEWS

Two UT professors awarded by Obama for their contributions to science.

Under new leadership

6 SPORTS

Imani McGee-Stafford improves, will try to help snap Texas’ six-game losing streak.

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By Christine Ayala Mathematics professor Edward Odell suffered a heart attack and died of resulting complications Jan. 8 at the age of 65. Odell, known to many as Ted, began teaching at UT in 1977. While teaching in the mathematics department he held the John T. Stuart III Centennial Professorship in Mathematics and worked to restructure the undergraduate mathematics curriculum. Odell was scheduled to teach Introduction to Real Analysis this semester. Lecturer Gary Berg, who took over Odell’s class, knew him as a graduate adviser, instructor and co-worker. He said Odell inspired others with his dedication to his work and his colleagues. “Ted had a passion for solving math problems,” Berg said. “Even after being loaded with administrative duties, he continued to find time to do significant research. Research at his level requires large blocks of uninterrupted time in which to concentrate on the problem

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LIFE & ARTS

The Daily Texan lists the top ten albums to look out for in 2013.

TODAY Japan Karate

Japan Karate is the Austin branch of the Japan Karate Association and teaches Shotokan Karate to members of the University community. No prior experience is necessary. Japan Karate will meet inside Gregory Gym (GRE), North Aerobics Room from 6:45-8:30 p.m.

Longhorn Salsa open house

Free beginner salsa lessons from 7-8 p.m. followed by social dancing to a mix of salsa, bachata and merengue. This event will be held in the Texas Union Building (UNB), Quadrangle Room 3.304.

Bridging Disciplines Program

Learn about BDP undergraduate interdisciplinary certificate opportunities at an information session with BDP advisers. Event will be held rom 3-4 p.m. at Flawn Academic Center (FAC) 4.

Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff Rose Brimmer, interim women’s track and field head coach, looks on during a practice Tuesday. Brimmer was an assistant for eight years under Bev Kearney, who resigned after an investigation into an “intimate” relationship between her and a student-athlete in 2002.

CAMPUS

1947-2013

CAMPUS

UT alumnus donates classic organ to Butler By Christine Ayala A new organ, donated by UT alumnus Robert Sherrill, is filling Jessen Auditorium with music and is being introduced to the Organ Studio Program. The Aeolian-Skinner Opus 1393 organ was built in 1963 and previously housed in a church in Houston. It was installed in Jessen Auditorium over the fall and after its completion on Dec. 14, a dedication concert was played. The organ contains more than 10,000 different pieces. The organ was donated by

Sherrill, in honor of his late wife, Mary Elizabeth Sherril. Douglas Dempster, Dean of the College of Fine Arts, said the new instrument will allow the organ program to expand. The program serves nine Organ Studio students and allows non-majors to use the organs for lessons. “The program was handicapped by having only one significant organ available to students in Bates Recital Hall,” Dempster said. “The addition to Jessen Auditorium of this refurbished Aeolian-Skinner is an

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Today in history

Chelsea Purgahn | Daily Texan Staff Freshman math and pre-med double major Alicia Sego relaxes in her San Jacinto dorm room with roomate Christina Nguyen between classes Tuesday afternoon. San Jacinto Residence Hall will be offering a limited number of full year contracts in the 2013-2014 school year.

Dorm offers full-year contracts By Tatiana Marceleno

In 1920

First assembly of League of Nations in Paris. This organization was founded as the result of the Paris Peace Conference that ended the World War I. It was also the first international organization whose principal mission was to maintain world peace.

Edward Odell

See full story on page 6

Photo courtesy of Marilyn McCray

The Division of Housing and Food Service (DHFS) is offering full-year contracts to incoming and returning students looking for the full on-campus living experience during the 2013-2014 school year. The contracts are for a limited number of rooms in the San Jacinto Residence Hall. Previously, students could only sign dorm contracts through the fall and spring semesters. DHFS decided to offer the new type of contract

because of students who need a place to live during winter and summer breaks, when most other residential dorms are closed, said Laurie Mackey, director of administrative services for DHFS. “People who don’t live here and can’t afford to go back home, or who have a job in Austin and have to work over the summer or for winter break” will likely benefit from the contract plan the most, Mackey said. She said DHFS will be monitoring applications and available space to find out how many contracts

can be offered. “It’s going to depend on the interest and how much space we have, and we won’t know that until probably after May 1,” Mackey said. Students will benefit from the new contract plan if they plan to stay in the Austin area for the full year. Piano performance freshman Yanni Chan said she had no other choice but to stay with a friend in Houston during the winter break. With plane tickets too expensive to fly

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News

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Wednesday, January 16, 2013

FRAMES | FEAtuREd photo

The Daily Texan Volume 113, Issue 84

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Susannah Jacob (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Trey Scott (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu Classified Advertising: (512) 471-5244 classifieds@dailytexanonline.com

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

Becca Gamache | Daily Texan Staff Junior Amy Wong and sophomore Colton Janysek skate while tabling for Texas Downhill outside of Gregory Gym on Tuesday afternoon.

CORRECTION: Because of reporting errors, an article on page one of yesterday’s Daily Texan regarding parking meters in West Campus contained several mistakes regarding funding from meters, Student Government’s response to the project, the condition of 23rd Street and information about construction of bike lanes. Funds from this project will not go toward constructing bike lanes from 25th to 29th streets and have been used for bike lanes on 19th to 24th streets and will be used for new projects, such as widening sidewalks. Fifty-one percent of the funds from the meters will go toward paying for projects. Student Government submitted a letter of approval to the city of Austin on a pilot of this project. The city has made improvements on 23rd Street, and it is in good shape.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2012 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER High

Low

61

32 This is not how you skybox.

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continues from page 1 erans about the various federal and state benefits they are afforded. Roughly 40 percent of veterans reported they knew little to nothing about veterans benefits. Additionally, 36 percent of veterans who had not taken advantage of VA education benefits said it was because they were not aware of them. “It’s not a very good system,� Hamlin said. Romriell, who served one tour in Baghdad before being medically discharged, said the lack of transparency in the VA’s bureaucratic system makes the search for benefits complicated. “The department isn’t known for customer service, and they receive funding based on how much they can save, rather than how many veterans they can help,� Romriell said. “A lot of us are wandering in the dark.� Veterans are typically eligible for a variety of education benefits, including those resulting from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, which Congress passed in 2008. The bill pays This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25

Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susannah Jacob Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drew Finke, Pete Stroud, Edgar Walters Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trey Scott Associate Managing Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kristine Reyna, Matt Stottlemyre Digital Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayley Fick News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shabab Siddiqui Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elyana Barrera, Bobby Blanchard, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Allie Kolechta, Mustafa Saifuddin, Sarah White Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala, Hannah Jane DeCiutiis, Joshua Fechter, Jordan Rudner Enterprise Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrew Messamore, Megan Strickland, Alexa Ura Wire Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands, Kristine Reyna Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jay Egger, Andrew Huygen, Sara Reinsch Editorial Copy Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nile Miller Creative Director. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Natasha Smith Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pu Ying Huang, Omar Longoria, Jack Mitts, Stefanie Schultz Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Zachary Strain Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pu Ying Huang, Marisa Vasquez Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maggie Arrellaga, Elisabeth Dillon, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pearce Murphy, Chelsea Purgahn, Shelby Tauber Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorge Corona Associate Multimedia Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andrea Macias-Jimenez Senior Videographers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Demi Adejuyigbe, Shila Farahani, Lawrence Peart, Alec Wyman Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kelsey McKinney Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aleksander Chan, Sarah-Grace Sweeney Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Alexandra Hart, Shane Arthur Miller, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Smothers, Alex Williams, Laura Wright Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christian Corona Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Garrett Callahan, Nick Cremona, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Beth Purdy, Rachel Thompson, Matt Warden Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephanie Vanicek Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tyler Reinhart Associate Web Editor, Social Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Sanchez Associate Web Editors, Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Omar Longoria Senior Web Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Helen Fernandez, Hannah Peacock Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Albert Cheng Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

Issue Staff

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blake Carter, Minh Dang, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Victor Hernandez-Jayme, Tatiana MarceleĂąo Multimedia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Becca Gamache Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jori Epstein, Michael Marks Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Olivia Arena, Milla Impola, Elizabeth Williams Editorial Cartoonist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lauren Moore Comic Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ploy Buraparate, Holly Hansel, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anne Katrine Haris, Rory Harman, Dae Hyun Jin

Business and Advertising

(512) 471-1865 | advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Business Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lori Hamilton Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcast & Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Event Coordinator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindsey Hollingsworth Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Morgan Haenchen Student Assistant Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ted Moreland Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hunter Chitwood, Zach Congdon, Jake Dworkis, Ivan Meza, Rohan Needel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Trevor Nelson, Diego Palmas, Paola Reyes, Ted Sniderman, Stephanie Vajda Student Lead Generators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gabby Garza, Jennifer Howton Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nick Cremona Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jacqui Bontke, Sara Gonzales, Bailey Sullivan Special Editions/Production Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Abby Johnston Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Hublein

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

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veteran tuitions directly to institutions for up to 36 months, while providing a monthly allowance for housing and books. For Texas veterans, the Hazlewood Act provides up to 150 hours of tuition exemption at in-state public schools. Another impediment to tracking statistics about veteran students is that they face different challenges than non-veterans. Hamlin, who graduated from high school in 2004, said many of the students he works with support themselves financially and have different priorities than many students who come to UT straight from high school. “Veterans are typically older than most of their classmates, and we’ve already had a lot of life experience,� Hamlin said. “We’re taking a break from supporting ourselves to go to school.� Romriell said the SVS is working to develop programs, including a mentoring initiative and a faculty sensitivity training campaign, to help student veterans find support at UT. “We’re nontraditional students,� Romriell said. “There are different challenges that we have to confront.�

continues from page 1 at hand.� Odell’s research focused on Banach spaces, which are vector spaces used in functional analysis. Emeritus professor Haskell Rosenthal knew Odell for more than 40 years as Odell’s professor and colleague and published three research papers with him. Rosenthal said Odell felt a responsibility to improve the University and the field. “If you look at his papers almost all of them are collaborative efforts,� he said. “He just gave so generously of himself to this University and was such an outstanding mathematician. He had so many jobs on different committees that were so time-consuming, but he was such a great man.� Rosenthal said Odell was very active in the mathematics community and organized several national mathematicians’ conferences in the past. Rosenthal said he stayed healthy despite his

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continues from page 1 back to Macau, China, she said it would have been easier if she could have stayed on campus. “It would be a lot better because I know people who can’t get back home and they would have to spend $35 per night,� Chan said. “If the dorms were open, we wouldn’t have to worry about money or finding places to stay.�

According to DHFS, there is an option to select a full-year contract in the 2013 housing application, but because of the limited number of rooms, not all students with this preference will be offered a fullyear contract. Mackey said that students who are not offered contracts will be offered the nine-month contract and can pay separately to live on campus in the summer if they wish. Students who receive full-year housing contracts

busy schedule. “This really comes as a shock,� Rosenthal said. “He seemed to take really good care of himself and exercise. It’s just an incredible loss.� Mathematics department chair Alan Reid said Odell was dedicated to improving UT through not only his research but also by helping to develop programs to improve readiness of incoming freshmen for calculus classes. “His death leaves a huge void in the department and he will be sorely missed by his colleagues,� Reid said. “He was a highly regarded mathematician, and was one of the leading researchers in the area of Banach spaces. He was a central figure in the department’s ongoing efforts to improve its instructional program and the experience of both student and instructor in the classroom.� Odell leaves behind his wife Gail and daughters Holly and Amy. The University will be hosting a memorial service open to the public Saturday in the Main Building at 3:30 p.m.

will move in at the same time as everyone else in August but can stay in their rooms during holidays and breaks through the fall and spring semesters. Public relations freshman Madelynne Rodriguez recently reapplied to live in the San Jacinto Residence Hall and is hoping to receive a full-year contract. “I feel like it makes more sense because it’s a full year,� Rodriguez said. “I feel like its overall easier and it’ll definitely take stress out of people’s lives.�

A Student’s Right To Privacy The information below is considered directory information. Under federal law, directory information can be made available to the public. You may restrict access to this information by visiting http://registrar.utexas.edu/restrictmyinfo. Please be aware that if you would like to restrict information from appearing in the printed directory, you must make your changes at this web page by the twelfth class day of the fall semester. If you request that ALL your directory information be restricted NO information about you will be given to anyone, including your family members, except as required by law. Any restriction you make will remain in effect until you revoke it. ‡QDPH ‡ORFDODQGSHUPDQHQW addresses ‡SKRQHQXPEHU ‡HPDLODGGUHVV ‡public user name (UT EID) ‡SODFHRIELUWK ‡GDWHVRIDWWHQGDQFH ‡HQUROOPHQWVWDWXV

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ORGAN continues from page 1

important enrichment of the growing program.� Dempster said organ professors Gerre and Judith Hancock had pushed for a second instrument for several years. Gerre passed away Jan. 21, 2012 before the project was completed and was honored at the dedication concert. “The program has grown because of the dedication and reputation of professors Gerre and Judith over the last five years,� Dempster said. “They are internationally recognized for their performance and teaching.� Charles Ludwick, organ teaching assistant, said playing on different instruments will better prepare students because organists must be able to adapt to different organs. “I look forward to teaching my students on the Jessen organ,� Ludwick said. “A big part of learning our instrument is being able to play on different instruments. It’s important as a professional to be able to translate what you learn on one organ to another organ and make adjustments.� Organ master student Stephan Griffin said the Jessen organ will have the better allow organ students to work with other musicians and expand their skill set. “This opens up opportunities for collaboration,� Griffin said. “The organ we have in Bates is positioned on a balcony, there’s an issue if you want to collaborate with two or three other players. The organ in Jessen, you’re right there onstage and you can make eye contact with other people, making it a lot easier.� Griffin said while programs at other universities are downsizing, this addition shows UT’s commitment to the organ program. “It’s a great addition to the program,� Griffin said. “It’s an American classic organ from a time gone by. You don’t get to play many of them anymore, so it’s amazing UT has installed one. It will attract people because you don’t have many institutions that offer an Aeolian-Skinner as a teaching and performing instrument anymore.�


W&N 3

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

NEWS BRIEFLY Train crash kills 19, injures more than 100 BADRASHEEN, Egypt — Packed in a rickety train speeding through the night, the poorly fed, pale-looking Egyptian conscripts were coming from some of Egypt’s most dirt-poor villages to serve in one of the most miserable, lowly jobs of the security forces — as grunts in an anti-riot force usually deployed against protesters. At a station just outside of Cairo before dawn Tuesday, the train’s last car jumped the track, slammed into a parked train, and then was dragged for several kilometers. The car was torn to pieces, young recruits were sent flying along the tracks, and others were mangled. In the end, 19 recruits mostly in their early 20s were killed and more than 100 were injured, some with arms or legs torn off. The accident was the latest example of Egypt’s decrepit infrastructure turning lethal for the country’s poorest — and a reminder that the revolution two years ago has brought no relief in the lives of a population where poverty is worsening.

Gunman wounds man, self in St. Louis school ST. LOUIS — A part-time student strode into the office of a longtime administrator at a downtown St. Louis business school Tuesday and shot the man in the chest, creating panic in the school before turning the gun on himself, police said. Both men were in surgery Tuesday afternoon at Saint Louis University Hospital. Police Chief Sam Dotson said he was optimistic both would survive, but a hospital spokesman declined to discuss their conditions. Police did not identify either man, but Dotson said the administrator was a longtime employee in his late 40s. He said the suspect had been attending Stevens Institute of Business & Arts off and on for four years and had no history of threats or violence.

South African mine to close, cut jobs JOHANNESBURG — The world’s largest platinum producer said Tuesday it will close some operations, sell one mine in South Africa and cut 14,000 jobs, just months after mining strikes turned violent, killing dozens of people. Anglo American Platinum said a nearly yearlong review found that four mine shafts needed to be closed and one mine sold because of unprofitable operations. The mining industry is a huge part of the economy in South Africa, which is the world’s largest producer of platinum, gold and chromium.

World & Nation 3

New York takes lead on gun control By Michael Virtanen Associated Press

ALBANY, N.Y. — Jumping out ahead of Washington, New York state enacted the nation’s toughest gun restrictions Tuesday and the first since the Connecticut school massacre, including an expanded assault-weapon ban and background checks for buying ammunition. Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed the measure into law less than an hour after it won final passage in the Legislature, with supporters hailing it as a model for the nation and gunrights activists condemning it as a knee-jerk piece of legislation that won’t make anyone safer and is too extreme to win support in the rest of the country. “Common sense can win,” Cuomo said. “You can overpower the extremists with intelligence and with reason and with common sense.” Owners of an estimated 1 million previously legal semiautomatic rifles, such as the Bushmaster model used to kill 20 children and six adults in Newtown, Conn., a month ago, will be allowed to keep their weapons but will have a year to register them with police. The sale

Mike Groll | Associated Press New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders applaud after Cuomo signed New York’s Secure Ammunition and Firearms Enforcement Act into law during a ceremony in the Red Room at the Capitol on Tuesday in Albany, N.Y. Jumping out ahead of Washington, New York enacted the nation’s toughest gun restrictions Tuesday and the first since the Connecticut school shooting.

of any more such weapons is prohibited. In addition to outlawing a broader array of military-style weapons, the measure restricts ammunition magazines to seven rounds, down from

the current 10, creates a more comprehensive database of people barred from owning guns and makes New York the first state to require background checks to buy bullets. The system will also help flag

customers who buy large amounts of ammo. In another provision, therapists, doctors and other mental health professionals will be required to tell state authorities if a patient threatens to use a gun

illegally. The patient’s weapon could then be taken away. In a statement, the National Rifle Association said: “These gun control schemes have failed in the past and will have no impact on public safety and crime.”

World Trade Center adds spire for height By Verena Dobnik Associated Press

NEW YORK — Workers at the rising One World Trade Center on Tuesday installed the first piece of the spire that will make the 104-floor skyscraper the tallest in the Western Hemisphere. Dozens of construction workers were on hand as two giant cranes on the roof slowly lowered the massive, round piece of steel into its socket — the base of the 800-ton, 408-foot spire that will also serve as a worldclass broadcast antenna. “Its function is incredibly important to the region,” said Anthony Hayes, spokesman for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns the 16-acre trade center site. “We’re bringing broadcast back down to lower Manhattan on top of the World Trade Center.” With a beacon at its peak to ward off aircraft, the spire will provide public transmission services for television and radio broadcast channels that were

destroyed on Sept. 11, 2001, along with the twin towers. The nearly 70-ton piece floated into Manhattan last month on a barge. It’s the heaviest of 18 parts that will top the 1,776-foot skyscraper symbolizing America’s freedom Overlooking the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, the high-rise is scheduled to open for business in 2014. Major tenants include the magazine publisher Conde Nast, the government’s General Services Administration and Vantone Holdings China Center, which will provide business space for high-profile international companies. The new tower is at the northwest corner of the site, which is well on its way to reconstruction, with the 72-story 4 World Trade Center and other buildings also going up. The tower’s crowning spire is a joint venture between the ADF Group Inc. engineering firm in Terrebonne, Quebec, and New York-based DCM Erectors Inc., the prime steel contractor for the tower.

In this photo released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, Syrians stand in rubble of the damaged university building caused by an explosion in Aleppo, Syria, Tuesday. Two explosions struck the main university, causing an unknown number of casualties. Photo courtesy of SANA

Syrians killed by blasts at university By Ben Hubbard Associated Press

BEIRUT — Twin blasts ripped through a university campus in Syria’s largest city on Tuesday as students were taking exams, setting cars alight, blowing the walls off dormitory rooms and killing more than 80 people, according to anti-regime activists and a government official. The opposition and the government blamed each other for the explosions inside Aleppo University, which marked a major

Man arrested for theft of father’s dead body DETROIT — Detroit police say a man arrested in the theft of his father’s corpse had hoped the body would return to life. Lt. Harold Rochon tells The Detroit News that the son is “very religious” and was “hoping his father would be resurrected.” The 48-year-old man is in custody after police found the body of Clarence Bright in the son’s home Tuesday. Rochon tells the newspaper that the son bought a freezer to store the body. Bright’s funeral was Saturday but the burial was delayed. The body was reported stolen Monday. Bright’s son and another man were arrested Tuesday while inside a van with an empty casket. Police say the body is being returned to the family for burial. —Compiled from Associated Press reports

Kristine Reyna, Wire Editor

escalation in the struggle for control of the hotly contested commercial hub. Activists said forces loyal to President Bashar Assad launched two airstrikes on the area, while Syrian state media said a “terrorist group” — the government’s shorthand for rebels — hit it with two rockets. Either way, the explosions shattered the relative calm of the sprawling, treelined campus, signaling the creep of Syria’s civil war into areas that were previously spared the violence that has killed more than 60,000 people and reduced entire

neighborhoods to rubble. Aleppo has been the focus of a violent struggle for control since rebel forces, mostly from rural areas north of the city, pushed in and began clashing with government troops last summer. The university is in the city’s northwest, a sector still controlled by the government. Both activists and the Assad regime said those killed in Tuesday’s blasts were mostly students taking their mid-year exams and civilians who sought refuge in the university dorms after fleeing violence elsewhere.

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NOON WEDNESDAY JANUARY 30th 2013 APPLICATIONS DROP OFF: Mark Lennihan | Associated Press The first piece of the spire for One World Trade Center is guided by an ironworker, lower right, as it is lowered by construction cranes into position on the roof of the tower Tuesday in New York. When the spire is completed the building will top out at 1,776 feet, making it the tallest building in North America.

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4A Opinion

Opinion 4

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Editor-in-Chief Susannah Jacob

VIEWPOINT

At the Lege, higher ed and beyond

On Tuesday Jan. 8, the Texas Legislature, which meets every other year, reopened for business. Expect a contentious session, filled with triumph and frustration for onlookers on all sides. We’ll be there to offer our perspective on the issues that affect UT-Austin, but not exclusively. Many UT students have been and will continue to reside in Texas beyond our college years, and what the Legislature does today will affect our adult lives. Here’s a primer on the major issues and debates to watch out for in the months ahead. The Budget The day before the session opened, State Comptroller Susan Combs announced that the state will have a $101.4 billion budget to work with this session, with $8.8 billion left over from last year’s budget and $11.8 billion in the “Rainy Day Fund,” which is money the Legislature sets aside for use when it come up short of estimates. That’s more money than anybody expected, but don’t count on it funding the many state projects, most of which suffered budget cuts last year, that are desperately vying for the money (such as state parks, health care, infrastructure and environmental protection). Gov. Rick Perry and other Republican leaders are not in a generous mood. “There are interest groups in the state who view Monday’s revenue estimate as ringing the dinner bell,” Perry scoffed in a speech to the Texas Senate on the Legislature’s opening day. Higher Education As in previous sessions and centuries, the Texas Legislature will probably make the same tired calls for efficiency, four-year graduation rates and outcomes-based funding for Texas public universities. The chairman of the Texas House of Representatives Committee on Higher Education, Rep. Dan Branch (R-Dallas), who recently expressed skepticism

at the Republican rank-and-file’s eagerly promised tax cuts, has indicated that those are his priorities for this session. We’d prefer the Legislature to instead re-regulate college tuition levels. Ten years ago, the Legislature voted to allow universities to set their own tuition levels so they could continue slashing governmental higher education funding and force students’ families to make up the difference. That vote is the main culprit behind the skyrocketing cost of a college degree in Texas; since then, tuition levels have doubled at UT, and the income bracket of those who can afford to attend school here has become disproportionately exclusive. If they keep cutting UT’s funding, we will keep paying the difference. Another issue that will have far-reaching consequences is the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision on Fisher v. UT, which will be announced at some point this spring. A lot could happen: If plaintiff Abigail Fisher prevails and UT’s raceconscious admissions policy is struck down, high school GPA could become the only criterion by which students are admitted. Ironically, according to admissions statistics in recent years, the group that would be hurt the most by such an outcome would be affluent, mostly white kids from competitive suburban high schools whom the holistic process favors. If UT wins, the rule guaranteeing admission to the top 8 percent of a high school’s graduating class could itself come under fire. Texas Senate Higher Education Committee Chairman Sen. Kel Seliger (R-Panhandle and Permian Basin) has told The Daily Texan that he doesn’t like the government dictating the admissions of a majority of an incoming class. Whatever the Court decides, it’ll be a big deal. There are other issues as well. Ever since Perry signed in-state tuition for undocumented students into law 10 years ago, it’s faced a great deal of criticism from the right. Unusually, Perry takes a moderate position on this issue,

so even if legislators attempt to repeal that policy this session they’ll have to get it past him. Public Education The enormous, $5.4 billion public education funding cut made last session is taking its toll. Public schools face outof-control class sizes, fees for extracurricular activities and school buses, while their teachers have zero job security. In spite of those cost-cutting measures, which mean retrograde education quality, the schools can’t cover payroll. In desperation, two-thirds of Texas’ school districts have sued the state for the money they need. Those lawsuits are ongoing, and regardless of which way the courts rule, the outcome will have major consequences for Texas children enrolled in public school now and in future years.

Water Be fearful. The 2012 incarnation of the State Water Plan, which is released every five years by the Texas Water Development Board, recommends spending $53 billion on improved water management strategies to avoid drastic consequences which could develop several decades down the road. Texas’ population is skyrocketing, especially in already overtaxed areas like the Valley, and according to the TWDB we’ll be dry as a bone by 2060 if nothing is done now. Rep. Lyle Larson (RSan Antonio) is currently leading efforts to pass a $1 billion allocation from the Rainy Day Fund, but that measure is not guaranteed. The new surplus may change the political climate, and leaders and lobbyists on both sides of the aisle have said that better water strategies are a priority. For most of today’s college students’ lives, state leaders have ignored the TWDB’s water management funding recommendations. If they continue that pattern the water supply will stop meeting demand in our lifetimes and likely our young adulthoods.

Keep your eyes on the Capitol

GALLERY

Kayla Oliver Guest Columnist

Lauren Moore | Daily Texan Cartoonist

Want to write for the Texan? Your Name Here Guest Columnist

The Daily Texan Editorial Board is currently accepting applications for columnists and cartoonists through Thursday, Jan 31. We’re looking for talented writers and artists to provide as much diversity of opinion as possible. Anyone and everyone is encouraged to apply. Writing for the Texan is a great way to get your voice heard. Our columnists’ and reporters’ work is often syndicated nationwide, and every issue of the Texan is a historical document archived at the Center for American History. A copy of the Texan runs across UT

President William Powers’ desk each day, and the opinions on this page have great potential to affect University policy. It’s no rare occurrence for Texan staff members to receive feedback from local or state officials or to be contacted by a reader whose life was changed by an article. In such instances, the power of writing for the Texan becomes real, motivating our staffers to provide the best public service possible. If interested, please come to the Texan office at 25th and Whitis to complete an application form and sign up for an interview time. If you have any additional questions, please contact Susannah Jacob at (512) 471-5084 or editor@dailytexanonline.com.

Submit a firing line The best voices, the people’s voices. That is the why of the Firing Line. The true measure of any newspaper is its critics, and we want hard-hitting ones. Nothing is taboo except falsehood and libel. The editor will never change a letter’s meaning, but she reserves the right to shorten it so that others may also be heard. Letters should be under 150 words if possible. Don’t be afraid to tell us what you think, and send your letters to firingline@dailytexanonline.com

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

The 83rd Texas Legislature convened at noon last Tuesday under a cold, rainy sky. A delegation of secessionists gathered near the entrance to the North Lobby to protest for Texas’ independence, while lobbyists balanced umbrellas and cell phones as they rushed to make the rounds of congressional offices. Harried caterers and interns struggled with bags and boxed lunches, occasionally slipping on the slick granite of the Capitol Complex. Inside the big pink dome, the scene was all pomp, circumstance and pantsuits as legislators took the oath of office in the Texas Senate and House of Representatives. Visitors were received in congressional offices with proper decorum throughout the afternoon. To outsiders, the disconnect between the Capitol’s interior and exterior resembles the public’s relationship to Texas lawmakers. While well-dressed politicians endlessly debate issues and bills in their warm, dry offices, the rest of us remain out in the elements, trying to lead our everyday lives under the rules and regulations set down by the lawmaking aristocracy. I’ve only worked as a staffer in the House for a few weeks, but I can attest that the public’s feeling of alienation, though understandable, is misguided. When they’re not in session, state legislators live and work in the communities they represent, buying groceries and dropping their kids off at school alongside the constituents on whom they count for reelection. These lawmakers are infinitely more accessible and receptive than their counterparts in Washington. And that’s a very good thing, because the bills they pass have a direct impact on the lives of everyday Texans, including UT students. Here are just five of the many reasons why college students, a notoriously apathetic and disengaged demographic, should pay attention to the Texas Legislature and stay apprised of the issues it considers. You vote. Say what you will about the impotency of the individual in national elections — when you cast a ballot for state representative or senator, your vote counts. An impassioned voter with Internet access can significantly affect the outcome of a race by starting a chain email or tweeting something clever. But with power comes responsibility. Before you vote, develop informed stances on key issues and familiarize yourself with the candidates’ records. And once your ballot is cast, take advantage of your state legislators’ accessibility by calling or writing with your concerns. You won’t be ignored. You have relationships. Well, maybe you’re going through a dry spell, but let’s assume

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it.

it won’t last forever. Whether you like it or not, the state has a high degree of discretion in regulating your private life. From abortion to marriage equality to contraceptive coverage in insurance plans, battles over social issues are sure to reappear this session. The status quo is unlikely to change with a large Republican majority in both houses, but when lawmakers are fighting over issues as personal as whom you can marry and why, it’s worth paying attention to. You attend a public university. Over the past few decades, state funding for UT and other public universities has decreased dramatically, shifting the financial burden onto students and their families. Last session saw dramatic cuts in education funding, and, even with an unexpected budget surplus, state leaders haven’t committed to re-funding public schools and universities. You can take action not only at the polls but also by joining UT’s student lobbying group, Invest In Texas, or other advocacy organizations that work to make students’ voices heard. Of additional interest to UT this session is the Supreme Court’s decision in the affirmative action case Fisher v. UT, expected to come down this spring. If the Court rules unfavorably for UT, the Legislature will be responsible for formulating a race-neutral admissions system that could dramatically alter the way the University admits prospective students. You won’t attend a public university forever. After graduation, you’ll likely start your career in the Lone Star State. With its low cost of living and business-friendly tax environment, Texas is a great place for young professionals to get their careers off the ground, but regulations considered in the Legislature can have a serious effect on our economic future. Your personal political philosophy may determine what side you’re on in taxation and spending debates, but once you graduate you won’t be able to afford to ignore them. You enjoy free entertainment. The Texas Legislature — especially the House of Representatives — has a well-earned reputation for being colorful and quirky. Keep up with the news coverage and you won’t be disappointed. On the opening day of session, for example, I learned from The Dallas Morning News that Gov. Perry’s son presented his father’s former presidential rival Rick Santorum (whose sudden appearance at the Capitol remains unexplained) with an A&M sweater vest. This only a year after the young Griffin Perry mocked Santorum’s ubiquitous sweater vests on Twitter. Whether his peace offering is an omen for a greater sense of reconciliation and goodwill in the 83rd Legislature remains to be seen. Oliver is press secretary for Rep. Richard Raymond (D-Laredo) and an English and sociology sophomore from New Braunfels.

EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@DTeditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


NEWS 5

News

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

5 SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

CAMPUS

UT professor’s findings advance virus research By Victor Hernandez

Maria Arrellaga | Daily Texan Staff Parking Services Supervisor John Garrett stands in front of solar panels on the Manor Garage roof Tuesday afternoon. The panels were installed in 2011 as part of a study by the Webber Energy Group, a UT mechanical engineering team researching the output of three different types of panels under the same conditions.

UT elects to not expand solar energy usage By Minh Dang While Austin Energy announced that it gave out more solar energy rebates to residents in 2012 than any other year, UT officials said they plan to maintain the campus’ solar panels but don’t plan to build any more. Since 2004, Austin Energy provides solar photovoltaic rebates to residents who install panels and meet other requirements. Austin Energy spokesman Carlos Cordova said the company is looking to help customers ease into this

alternative energy source. “We want to help spur the solar energy desire in the world but to also bring the costs down,” Cordova said. “Our rebate is the lowest ever, $2 per kilowatt hour, but the desire for solar energy in Austin is at its highest ever, which has helped us achieve the high number of rebates.” Saying he hopes to provide a clean energy future for students, Jim Walker, the University’s director of sustainability, oversaw the installation of solar paneling on the main campus and at the J.J. Pickle Research Campus in

North Austin. The J.J. Pickle Research Campus has been heralded as having the largest solar power system in Austin, consisting of two solar arrays. One is on top of a newly built carport structure and the other covers more than an acre as a larger ground-mounted system south of the Microelectronics Research Center building. By harnessing the sun’s energy, UT obtains more than 400,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity per year, according to UT Facilities Services. However, Walker said representatives of the

University have no plans to install any more solar paneling. He said the current energy program, started in 1930, is both efficient and cost-effective. Outside of solar energy, Walker said one type of fuel has powered all 400 acres of the University over the last 50 years. “Our [main] energy source is a monofuel burning, natural gas producing plant that produces energy that is cheaper and much more efficient than solar energy,” Walker said. “Because solar energy is still quite expensive, making the campus go solar is a harder argument to make.”

NATION

UT professors awarded National Medal of Science By Blake Carter Two UT professors will be recognized by the White House for their contributions to science. President Barack Obama named Allen Bard, chemistry professor and director of the Center for Electrochemistry, and engineering professor John Goodenough recipients of the 2012 National Medal of Science. The government-bestowed honor is administered by the National Science Foundation and recognizes U.S. scientists, engineers and inventors. Bard and Goodenough will join 10 other scientists in a ceremony later this year. Mayra Montrose, a science policy analyst at the Office of Integrative Activities of the National Science Foundation, said the foundation’s committee receives nominations from many sources, spends two months reviewing and picks the best candidates.

“They were nominated because they are the cream of the crop in their fields,” Montrose said. “Both Dr. Bard and Dr. Goodenough were deemed excellent and meritorious of this award. Both have made a huge impact not only in the fields of science and technology, but also within the nation’s economy.” Goodenough came to the University in 1986. He earned a doctorate in physics in 1952 from the University of Chicago and spent 24 years at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Lincoln Laboratory as a research scientist and group leader. He also served as a professor at Oxford University in 1976. Goodenough’s research looked into various energy materials, including lithium-ion batteries. His developments with the battery allowed for the advancement of wireless technologies. “The relationship between chance and grace is a

photographers & videographers! daily texan multimedia is hosting try outs until THE 31st of january. Swing by the HSM basement to grab an application and to sign up for tryout days.

In a scientific breakthrough, Ian Molineux, professor of molecular genetics and microbiology, observed viruses crawl across the surface of bacteria, scouting the membrane to infect the cell at its weak spot. The observations, published this week in Science Express, provide new information that could fill current gaps in viral research. “For 10 years, I have been drawing straight lines — in cartoon fashion — of how proteins go from the head through the [cell] wall,” Molineux said. “Now we can see it, and seeing is believing.” Molineux said two details of the publication are surprising. Contrary to previous hypotheses, the bacteriophage — a specific type of virus that infects bacteria in order to replicate itself — contains five or six leg-like fibers that extend from the viral head. These fibers unfurl upon approaching bacteria, allowing the virus to scout the surface like a lunar lander. Additionally, the paper presents new evidence to suggest that the virus uses the inner membrane of the host cell for the initial energy needed to deploy proteins and DNA inside the cell. Using cryo-electron tomography, the researchers observed the mechanics by which T7 bacteriophages unfold fibers and infect genetically modified E. coli bacteria that are about a quarter of their regular size. Molineux co-authored the article with Bo Hu, William Margolin and Jun Liu, from the UT Health Science Center at Houston. “It’s an amazing thing, when you see something you only hoped for, and there it is.” Liu said. Liu and Molineux met at a conference in Galveston where

‘‘

For 10 years, I have been drawing straight lines — in cartoon fashion — of how proteins go from the head through the [cell] wall. Now we can see it and seeing is believing. — Ian Molineux, Professor of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology

the two talked about the details of a previous article that Liu had published with Margolin about a P1 bacteriophage. “We were building on a lot of assumptions, hoping that the same model would apply to my research with the T7,” Molineux said. “We try to work on [these] assumptions, a house of cards you could say. Well, now this house has mortar and bricks.” According to the published article, some aspects of the findings may be limited to the T7 bacteriophage. “We don’t know how common it is for the bacteriophage to walk on the cell since they hadn’t been seen doing it until now,” Margolin said. “Normally they are very difficult to see: when you use a light microscope, the image is not clear, and when you use a transmission electron microscope, it is clear but full with chemicals. The cryo-electron tomography ends up being the middle point we were looking for.” The team’s animation, uploaded to YouTube earlier in the week, depicts the T7 walking.

NATION

Muslim teen promises ‘dark day’ for U.S. at trial By Nigel Duara Associated Press

John Goodenough

Allen Bard

Engineering professor

Chemistry professor

mystery,” Goodenough said. “You have to listen to your inner voice and find your calling. The only way to find meaning in life is through service, but you have to know what to serve.” Bard will receive the award for contributions to electrochemistry. He joined UT 55 years ago after completing his doctorate at Harvard and developed the technique for scanning electrochemical microscopy, which is used to visualize chemical reactions. Brent Iverson, chairman of the Department of Chemistry and

Biochemistry, said Bard has made a huge impact on the University. “[Bard] is an excellent teacher who has trained multiple generations through UT-Austin and through his co-authored textbook. That’s impact,” Iverson said. “He focuses on things that have never been understood before, and when he sees that opportunity, he takes that new knowledge and does something important and practical, and that’s really rare and extraordinary. I think that is why he is being recognized by the president.”

PORTLAND, Ore. — An Oregon terrorism suspect dressed in a red headdress and white robes and reciting a speech pledging a “dark day” for the United States gave jurors their clearest glimpse yet at the supposed radicalization of a Somali-American teenager. Prosecutors are trying to prove Mohamed Mohamud, 21, already was prepared for violent jihad by the time the FBI launched a sting operation targeting him. His defense team has said he was a braggart and a loudmouth, but no terrorist, before undercover government agents filled his head with fantasies of radical Islamic superstardom. Either way, Mohamud was

filmed in September 2010 making what he hoped would air as his final words to his parents, sister and the West before he planned to detonate a bomb in Portland later that year and flee the country. “Living (in the U.S.) is a sin,” he cautioned other Muslims. Addressing the West, he said, “As long as you threaten our security, your people will not remain safe.” The video was shot at the behest of two undercover FBI agents posing as jihadis. It was shown at the end of testimony Tuesday in Mohamud’s trial in Oregon federal court on terrorism charges. Mohamud is accused of attempting to detonate a bomb at a Christmas tree lighting in Portland in November 2010. The bomb was a fake, supplied by the undercover agents.


6 SPTS

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6

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

STARTS HERE

Christian Corona, Sports Editor

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Shaking freshman jitters

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By Matt Warden Six feet, seven inches is tall, especially for women’s basketball. Imani McGee-Stafford is proving that she can do more than just stand tall in the paint this season. After 15 games, the freshman has led the team in rebounding five times and continues to get better. “Her performance is showing that she is trying to improve,” head coach Karen Aston said. “She is starting to really think about the things that we are asking her to get better at and she’s starting to apply them, even if it’s just little things like footwork or how to run the offense.” Like most first-year players, McGee-Stafford’s adjustment to the college level of play has been gradual. But Big 12 competition has forced her to learn on the fly. “The biggest change has been the physicality of the game,” McGee-Stafford said. “But I think it’s made me a much better rebounder.” Jitters or not, when her name was called to make her first start against powerhouse Tennessee, she rose to the occasion. “Having [senior post] Cokie [Reed] out for this game, Imani was forced step into her shoes and start,” forward Nneka Enemkpali said. “She empowered that role.” Due to “exercise-induced

ROCKETS

HORNETS

76ERS

PACERS

BOBCATS

TRAIL BLAZERS

Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan file photo Freshman center Imani McGee-Stafford, Texas’ leading rebounder, has made her mark while learning the ropes of college basketball.

hypertension,” Reed has decided to retire from college basketball, along with guard Chelsea Bass. Rebounding has been the staple for the Longhorns all season long, thanks in part to McGee-Stafford, who appears poised to do big things the rest of the way. “I’m definitely getting more comfortable,” McGeeStafford said. “I’m learning

MEN’S BASKETBALL

as I go to play hard, even if it’s wrong, just play hard through it and correct it as I go along. I’m just learning what I’m doing.” She’s become comfortable with each contest, averaging 10.2 points and 9.7 rebounds per game this year. But even with the adjustments, McGee-Stafford sees a lot to fix. “I think my offense has been a big problem, especially

my poise on offense,” McGee-Stafford said. “At this point I’d rate my play a five or a six [out of 10]. And I think that’s pretty high actually.” Texas is currently on a sixgame losing streak and sits at 0-4 in Big 12 play, although McGee-Stafford has played well in all four contests. “[For the] losses in Big 12 play we’ve been in the game,” McGee-Stafford said.

Texas Tech @ Texas TOP TWEET Date: Tonight Time: 7 p.m. On air: LHN “They’ve done nothing to deter us from winning, it’s just

January is the time of college basketball season when teams begin to jockey for a position within their conference and hopefully add the finishing touches to their NCAA tournament resumes. The best-case scenario would be for a team to have at least a couple marquee wins, and no losses that would be deemed harmful to the team’s tournament chances. Unfortunately for Texas, it has a little more to show

NCAA continues on page 7

FOOTBALL

Davis decides to stay, Moore leaves for draft By Rachel Thompson The end of an autumn football season brings a flurry of career prospects for NCAA players as they grapple with the decision to remain in school or pursue an NFL career. Wide receiver Mike Davis’ indecisiveness could best be summarized with The Clash’s “Should I stay or should I go?” lyric. In the span of one week, reports circled through

the news and social media, claiming the Dallas native was staying, then he was going, then he was unsure and finally, that he was staying. Davis shined this year with the most receiving yards, receptions, receiving touchdowns and yards per catch on the team. He played in all 12 games and started 10 of them. Those numbers left Davis wondering if it was time to pack his bags and head for the NFL, where some experts

DAVIS continues on page 7

Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan file photo Wide receiver Mike Davis posted high numbers this season and has decided to return to Texas for his senior year.

“Hawked up again for no reason...long hair don’t care”

SPORTS BRIEFLY

WOMEN’S TRACK AND FIELD

of the latter, which will no doubt hinder the Longhorns’ chances of making the 68team soiree come March. The Longhorns’ struggles started in Hawaii in just the third game of the season in a shocking 86-73 loss to Division II Chaminade, by far the worst loss by a Rick Barnescoached Texas team. One early season loss usually doesn’t weigh so heavily, but it was the kind of loss that will weigh on the minds of the NCAA Selection Committee when they

Fozzy Whittaker @FozzyWhit

MCGEE continues on page 7

Toughness needed for team progress By Nick Cremona

NUGGETS

Reed, Bass to retire from basketball

Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff Interim women’s track and field head coach Rose Brimmer comes to the new position with a versatile resume and an optimistic attitude. The team will compete in Houston this weekend.

Brimmer brings experience, determination to succeed By Jori Epstein When women’s athletics director Chris Plonsky told Rose Brimmer she would become interim head coach upon Beverly Kearney’s resignation, Brimmer first contacted her husband. “Really?” he said. Leo Brimmer wasn’t fazed. Brimmer’s daughter, Bria, set the South Carolina State University record for most single-season assists when playing on its volleyball team, and her son, Brodney, has experience playing defensive back at OU and in the NFL for the Cleveland Browns and New York Jets. And Rose? Her sports career has leaped far beyond her college hurdle experience: from volleyball and track and field captain at the former Texas A&I University in Kingsville to coaching in the high school arena and at Texas. Rose Brimmer began work at Westbury High School in Houston in 1986. Teaching and coaching athletes to the national level, Brimmer’s athletic oversight included track and field, cross country, basketball

and volleyball. But when the Longhorn staff wanted an addition, Brimmer seized the opportunity. “I came here as a sprints and hurdles coach but I became a field events coach because I did jumps and sprints in college,” Brimmer said. “I hadn’t done throws but I acquired it when I got here.” Joining the UT staff in the 2004-05 season, Brimmer mentored then-sophomore Michelle Carter as she broke the school shot put record. Since then, she has guided the high jumps of All-American Victoria Lucas and NCAA champion Destinee Hooker; the long jumps of 4-time NCAA champion Marshevet Hooker, Destinee’s older sister, and NCAA champion Alexandria Anderson; and the pole vault of Ashley Laughlin. Lucas and the Hooker sisters went on to compete in the Olympics. “Because I’ve coached everything now for quite some time, I think I know a little bit about everything,” Brimmer said. “I can go from event to event and actually know what I’m talking about.” Before Brimmer’s ninth season this year, Kearney

...I’ve learned to set higher goals from Coach Kearney— she never gives up. — Rose Brimmer, Interim head coach of women’s track and field

resigned as head coach of the women’s track and field program. UT head coach since 1993, the highly decorated Kearney admitted to an intimate consensual relationship with a student-athlete in her program beginning in 2002. Although the reported relationship ended about eight years ago, the University “determined it was no longer appropriate for Coach Kearney to serve as head coach or to work directly with our student-athletes,” according to a statement released by Patti Ohlendorf, vice president for legal affairs. Brimmer finds Kearney influenced her coaching

COACH continues on page 7

Women’s basketball players Cokie Reed and Chelsea Bass announced their decisions to retire from basketball Tuesday evening. Reed averaged 9.5 points per game and started in seven games this season, after missing the 2010-11 season due to a foot injury, she played in 73 career games. “Due to exercise-induced hypertension, I have been advised by the UT medical staff that it is in my best interest to retire from the game of basketball,” Reed said. Bass scored 11 points against Texas A&M-Corpus Christi Nov. 30 and played in 57 career games, including five starts. “After careful consideration and extensive insight from the UT medical staff and various doctors, I have accepted their recommendation that it is best for me to retire from basketball at this time,” Bass said. “I have had a wonderful three years with the Texas women’s basketball team, but the time has come for me to focus solely on academics and my future without basketball.” – Rachel Thompson

LONGHORNS IN THE NBA Royal Ivey - 3 points

DJ Augustin - 6 points - 2 rebounds

Lamarcus Aldridge - 28 points - 8 rebounds


SPTS/CLASS 7

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Wednesday, January 16, 2013

COACH

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continues from page 6 style tremendously. “I came in here winning so I always knew how to win but I’ve learned to set higher goals from Coach Kearney — she never gives up,” Brimmer said. “I never have [either] but I learned from working with her that it was OK to be that way.” Brimmer now oversees the long sprinters, throwers and the jumpers while assistant coach Stephen Sisson guides distance runners. To fill the vacancy of a third coaching position, longtime volunteer assistant coach Michelle Freeman assumed the role of interim assistant coach, a UT spokeswoman confirmed to The Daily Texan on Tuesday. With three Olympics under her belt, a 1997 World Indoor Championship in 60-meter hurdles and four school records at Florida, Freeman moved from team strength coach last season to short sprints. The juggled staff hasn’t changed its goal: to gain confidence and a national championship, Brimmer said. But it has altered its strategy. “We’re putting more people in more events,” Brimmer said. “A lot of times we’d specialize and just have them do one event to try and get a max. But [now] if they’re good at two, we’re putting them in two and hoping they’re scoring in both.” Brimmer remains optimistic, believing the team boasts stronger quarter-milers this season and sophomore sprinters “a year older, a year wiser, a year better.” With her increased leadership and a squad brimming with talent, Brimmer coaches as she always has: by teaching. “Compared to most collegiate coaches, I was a teacher for twenty years,” Brimmer said. “I’m a teacher first and a coach second.” The women’s track and field team competes this weekend at the UH Leonard Hilton Invite.

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Lawrence Peart | Daily Texan file photo Sophomore guard Julien Lewis attempts to block the ball in a nail-bitingly close 65-63 loss to UCLA on Dec. 8.

NCAA

continues from page 6 construct the NCAA tournament field in two months. Texas isn’t dead in the water just yet, but losses to a mediocre USC squad and a shaky West Virginia team aren’t doing it any favors in terms of resume building. The Longhorns held a 13-point lead over the Mountaineers before falling in overtime and missed a chance for a quality victory when they blew an eight-point lead with less than three minutes left against UCLA last month. Texas must make a run in Big 12 play and fast. Three straight losses to open conference play are telling for a young team that is still figuring out how to win close games. “It gets down to toughness,” Barnes said after the loss to the Mountaineers. “They made

winning plays at the end. I’ve always said, ‘You get the lead with your defense, and the offense has to keep it.’ We are counting on our perimeter guys to score, and they didn’t do that at the end of the game.” It’s hard to discount the Longhorns’ effort in their 8567 win over a then-ranked North Carolina team, but Texas has not been able to duplicate that performance. With 15 games remaining in the regular season, the Longhorns will need to win a majority of those, and perhaps even a couple more in the Big 12 Tournament for good measure in order to make a case for selection into the NCAA tournament. If Texas were to get snubbed by the Selection Committee and instead go to the NIT when March rolls around, it would be the first time since 1998 the Longhorns failed to make an appearance in the Big Dance.

projected him to be a thirdround draft pick. What followed was a spree of social media-induced confusion. Davis tweeted that he would remain at Texas, but then it was rumored he would enter the draft. ESPN’s Joe Schad then announced that Davis was unsure about his decision to end his collegiate career, but Davis again changed course and declared his intent to stay after discussing it with coaches and family. “I need to see the big picture and see what I can be at Texas and in the Big 12,” he said. “I want to maximize my stats and go to the BCS.” For a team that often struggled to perform offensively, Davis’ return is a sigh of relief. He was often quarterback David Ash’s go-to guy, and

MCGEE

continues from page 6 been us not executing.” McGee-Stafford and the Longhorns will try to snap that six-game losing streak when they host Texas Tech on Wednesday. “Rebounding is key and I need to finish whatever touches I get in the paint,” McGee-

7 his quickness allowed him to dart past opponents on the field. Davis would have been a weighty loss for the Longhorns, forcing younger receivers Jaxon Shipley, Kendall Sanders, Marcus Johnson and Cayleb Jones to step up. While Shipley started nine times in his sophomore season, Sanders, Johnson and Jones saw relatively little playing time. Thus, Davis’ departure would have left a gaping hole and the need for increasingly fervent recruiting for wide receivers. Just after Davis’ announcement, defensive tackle Brandon Moore declared he would enter the draft. The decision surprised many who weren’t used to hearing Moore’s name dropped in play-by-plays. But Moore, who played one year at Texas after two at East Mississippi Community College and one at Alabama, posted solid stats. He played in 11 games and started four, ranking fourth

on the team in tackles for loss and tied for third in quarterback pressures. While his exit from the team comes after the worst defensive season in school history, the depth of Moore’s position means his departure is less concerning than that of someone like Davis. All the others in the team’s five-man rotation are set to return. But it does mean younger players will be dealt more responsibility in filling Moore’s place, particularly true freshman Malcolm Brown. For Davis, the decision to stay came down to BCS hopes and Biletnikoff Award aspirations. For Moore, the decision to go simply came down to the pursuit of a dream. “I really appreciate the opportunity I had to play for the Longhorns, but my lifelong dream has been to play in the NFL and to have a chance to support my family,” Moore said.

Stafford said. “I’m not fond of losing and we all share that mentality. As long as I control the boards then we control the tempo of the game.” The Big 12 is one of the toughest conferences in college basketball and, although rivalries can be exciting and daunting for newcomers, winning is the main concern. “At this point I’m just looking forward to a win,”

McGee-Stafford said. “It doesn’t really matter to me who we play.” With a tall stature and a game beginning to grow just as tall, McGee-Stafford is a player to keep an eye on as the Longhorns move forward. “The sky is the limit for her,” Enemkpali said. “She’s 6-foot-7 and I just want her to buy into it, and once she taps into it, we are going to be an even better team with her.”

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8 L&A

Life & Arts

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Wednesday, January 16, 2013

SAD

NATIONAL

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and last-minute as they really were. The third week is spent eating leftover holiday meatballs and baptizing our New Year’s resolutions in cheap champagne. The final week is spent preparing for the inevitable return to freedom, which carries with it the inevitable return to responsibility. Not to mention the poor health and hygiene habits college students are notorious for. According to PubMed Health, ways to manage the symptoms of SAD include sleeping well, eating well and exercising often. These are not measures most college students tend to take during the end of the semester, or ever. Daniel Estrin | Associated Press A restorer at the Israel Museum works on a reassembled display of what curators say was Herod’s tomb in the Israeli museum in Jerusalem, Tuesday. Israel’s national museum is opening the world’s first exhibition on King Herod, displaying what it says are the reconstructed tomb and sarcophagus of one of antiquity’s most towering and despised figures.

King Herod exhibit to open in Israel By Daniel Estrin Associated Press

JERUSALEM — Israel’s national museum said Tuesday it will open what it calls the world’s first exhibition devoted to the architectural legacy of biblical King Herod, the Jewish proxy monarch who ruled Jerusalem and the Holy Land under Roman occupation two millennia ago. The display includes the reconstructed tomb and sarcophagus of one of antiquity’s most notable and despised figures, curators say. Modern-day politics are intruding into this ancient find. Palestinians object to the showing of artifacts found in the West Bank. The Israeli museum insists it will return the finds once the exhibit closes. About 30 tons of artifacts — including hundreds of tiny shattered shards pieced back together — are going on display at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem in a ninemonth exhibition opening Feb. 12. Museum director James Snyder said the exhibit, “Herod the Great,” is the museum’s largest and most expensive archaeological

GOAL

Judean Desert, near the West Bank city of Bethlehem. In 2008, the archaeologist approached the Israel Museum about creating an exhibit that would display artifacts from one of the greatest finds of his career. While surveying the Herodion site with museum staff, Netzer fell to his death. Museum staff pushed forward with planning the exhibit. In 2011, the museum used a crane to remove dozens of half-ton columns and the roof of what Netzer identified as the top floor of Herod’s tomb, which he thought held his sarcophagus. Each stone was affixed with an electronic chip so it could be more easily put back together at the Israel Museum. Three sarcophagi were found at the site, and curators believe one was Herod’s. Although it bears no inscription, it is made of a special reddish stone, found smashed into hundreds of pieces. The Jewish zealots who took over the Herodion after Herod’s death likely smashed the sarcophagus to pieces, destroying the symbol of a man who worked with the empire they were rebelling against, curators said. “It’s not 100 percent. But archaeology is never about

100 percent,” said co-curator Dudi Mevorah. “The circumstantial evidence points to one man.” The sarcophagus will also be on display. Archaeologist Joe Zias, who did not participate in the excavation or the exhibition, said he believes the tomb was likely that of Herod. “It’s a monumental tomb out in the middle of nowhere in a place he built for himself,” Zias said. “It’s as authentic as one could ask for.” The museum exhibit also features a reconstructed throne room from one of Herod’s palaces in Jericho, and a full-sized replica of Herod’s theater viewing room at the Herodion, incorporating detailed fresco wall paintings and other decorative elements that museum staff collected on site. There are still pieces of the puzzle left to assemble. At the museum’s lab Tuesday, workers were still rushing to fit together all the small stucco wall lining pieces found to display in the exhibit. One fresco wall painting, found in tiny fragments, has taken two and a half years to reassemble. The museum’s exhibit is almost entirely made up of finds from the West Bank — a point of contention with the Palestinians.

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Once you get to know yourself, figure out the obstacles that are getting in your way from doing what you want to do. You have to be really realistic about what those obstacles are, because they won’t go away simply because you want to change your behavior. You need to make specific plans to go around those obstacles. If you are planning to exercise, when you’re too tired to

RAPE

project to date. “It’s a name that’s always on everyone’s lips,” Snyder said, “And yet there has never been an exhibit devoted to his material.” Herod was vilified in the New Testament as a bloodthirsty tyrant who massacred Bethlehem’s male children to try to prevent the prophesied birth of Jesus. He is also said to have murdered his wife and sons. Herod was also revered for his ambitious building projects, including his lavish desert palaces and an expansion of the Second Jewish Temple complex in Jerusalem. The Western Wall, today the holiest site where Jews are permitted to pray, was a retaining wall for the compound. Herod’s final grandiose project was to prepare for death. Curators believe Herod constructed an extravagant, 80-foot-high tomb. Israeli archaeologist Ehud Netzer spent 35 years of his career searching for it. In 2007, Netzer drew international attention when he announced he had found what he believed was the tomb at the Herodion, the ruler’s winter palace, located on a cone-like hill that still today juts out prominently in the barren landscape of the

do it, what are you going to do? It’s great to find an exercise buddy, because it’s really easy to say, “I’m not going to exercise.” But it’s harder to blow off your friend. It keeps you on track. It’s crucial to engage other people. Set positive goals rather than negative goals. A positive goal is, “I’m going to eat healthier.” A negative goal is, “I’m going to eat less.” It’s hard to eat less. What does that even

mean? It means you’re not doing something you used to do, and the human mind isn’t designed to learn to do things that are not doing something. Set goals that are lifestyle-changing, processchanging and not outcome-changing. Instead of focusing your goal on an outcome, focus on a process. The process needs to be very specific, like exercising every Monday and Thursday at 4 o’clock.

DT: How do we change our thinking to have a positive mindset? Markman: Find something that will allow you to achieve the goal you want to achieve on a daily basis. Rather than obsessing over food, get into a walking class or a cooking class, become the wizard of making soups and teach yourself a new thing. Your friends will all be impressed and cooking at home is cheaper than going out. As a side effect it’ll turn out that you are eating better.

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tragedy unfolding in India as a geographically isolated occurrence. Gender-based violence and sexual assault occur in our own neighborhood: allegations were brought against two UT football players just before the Valero Alamo Bowl in late December. Although The Daily Texan reported Monday that a statement made by Jordan Hicks’ attorney claimed the investigation had closed and that no charges would be filed, the story highlights that the issue of sexual violence is not just India’s – it’s ours too. In October 2012, UT researchers Carin Perilloux, Judith Easton and David Buss released findings from a study titled “The Misperception of Sexual Interest” on the negative consequences of rape and attempted sexual assault in

13 domains of psychological and social functioning. Perilloux stated in a press release that the “findings document that victims of sexual assault, and even victims of attempted sexual assault, suffer psychological and social costs more far ranging than previously suspected.” Because college campuses are often places where inhibitions disappear and decisions are rendered blurry by alcohol, it is important to discuss rape prevention on a campuswide level. On the UT campus, the group Voices Against Violence empowers students to negotiate sex and consent, and to navigate the world of boundaries and safety. Groups like this help shape the narrative around the issue of rape to recognize that

Victims of sexual assault, and even victims of attempted sexual assault, suffer psychological and social costs more far ranging than previously suspected. — Carrn Perilloux, UT researcher we all play a role through our conversations and actions in preventing the occurrence of sexual violence. Part of the solution is to enable males to become active agents in creating a culture free from sexual violence. Organizations such as Men Can Stop Rape are at the forefront of this movement. Through college programs and awareness campaigns, Men Can Stop Rape calls on men to “redefine masculinity and male strength as part

of preventing men’s violence against women.” Only through our collective efforts can we foster a world in which the bystanders in Steubenville would not have idly witnessed the assaults occur and a world where even one of the perpetrators in the gang rape in New Delhi would have stopped to consider the cruelty and tragic lack of respect for human rights unfolding in front of his eyes.

ALBUMS rock girls that Urban Outfitters tries to recreate in every catalog. The sisters, both former members of Mika Miko, are releasing their debut album Ride Your Heart this year. Their sound is the perfect balance of warm, washed-out guitars and upbeat garage punk drums that will leave listeners yearning to feel the California sun shining on their cheeks. Or to go buy leather jackets.

4. Jim James, Regions of Light and Sound of God | February Jim James is a busy man. In addition to fronting Kentucky rock outfit My Morning Jacket, James has done solo contributions here and there and formed the supergroup Monsters of Folk, an indie wet dream including Conor Oberst and Mike Mogis of Bright Eyes and M. Ward. The track “Know Til Now” is a ‘70s R&B-sounding throwback that is unlike anything heard from James until now. Plus, he has the voice of an angel. It’s true. 5. Vampire Weekend, TBA The stylish New Yorkers who simultaneously created the genre of Ivy League pop and soundtracked many high school experiences are back. This currently unnamed record is the group’s third album, following 2010’s Contra. All that’s been heard from Vampire Weekend up until now is the track “The Unbelievers,” which they performed on Jimmy Kimmel Live last October. Thankfully, the appearance confirmed that Ezra Koenig is indeed just as cute as he used to be, in that dreamy ‘80s rich kid kind of way. 6. Justin Timberlake, The 20/20 Experience | TBA Your boyfriend Justin Timberlake is back, releasing his first album since 2006’s FutureSex/ LoveSounds. The eversmooth, ever-sexy Timberlake has ended his six-year musical hiatus and released the sharp R&B single “Suit & Tie.” While it was fun to watch Timberlake try his hand at acting and sing about putting his thing in a box,

FOR THE DAILY TEXAN IN THE HSM BASEMENT

With all of these factors combined, it is no surprise that SAD is so prevalent among young, college-aged adults. There are several treatments for SAD. One such treatment is light therapy, which involves staring into a lit screen for an extended period of time. Other treatments involve pharmacotherapy and talk therapy, which involves simply speaking to a counselor. If you find yourself feeling more sad than your otherwise cheery peers during the winter months, don’t just chalk it up to a lack of holiday cheer. The winter blues are not a myth — they are a very real and specifically timed manifestation of depression.

continues from page 10 it appears that the world is ready for his return.

7. Destiny’s Child Love Songs | January Destiny’s Child will never go away. Granted, Love Songs is primarily a compilation of the group’s old songs, with the very special addition of “Nuclear,” the group’s first song together since they broke up in 2005. “Nuclear” has an early ‘90s girl group feeling that makes you yearn for the group’s earlier work. Hopefully the Destiny’s Child reunion at the Super Bowl will reignite the girl group magic and inspire a completely new reunion album.

8. Beach Fossils, Clash the Truth | February Brooklyn foursome Beach Fossils is releasing the follow up to its 2010 self-titled debut. If recently released singles “Shallow” and “Careless” are any indicators, Beach Fossils’ dreamy surf pop is about to make an upbeat return after their gloomier EP What a Pleasure. The band’s grimy and windswept sound is sprinkled with a healthy dose of hazy nostalgia. Never heard of the foursome? Think along the lines of if Vampire Weekend went to public school. 9. Earl Sweatshirt Doris | TBA Doris is the much-anticipated second album from rapper Earl Sweatshirt, who for those who don’t know, is arguably one of the most talented members of the band Odd Future. On the recently released track “Chum,” Earl delivers deeply confessional lyrics with such ease and frankness that it’s hard to believe he is only 18 years old. And with the success of Frank Ocean’s Channel Orange, the music community is wondering if Earl will be as fortunate. NOW HIRING News Reporters, Sports Reporters, Life & Arts Reporters, Opinion Columnists, Web Staff, Photographers, Design Staff, Copy Editors, Multimedia Staff and Comic Artists


COMICS 9

Comics

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

9

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Crossword ACROSS

38

1 Prefix

with distant 5 Ticks off 11 Good deal 14 Be in a pet 15 Meriadoc the Magnificent, for one 16 Gardner of Hollywood 17 Star of 11-/40-Down 19 Ski application 20 “___ Lips Are Sealed” (1981 Go-Go’s hit) 21 Last of a loaf 22 It helps hold glasses 24 Serta rival 26 Director of 11-/40-Down 31 Take on 33 Armand of “Private Benjamin” 34 Niña, Pinta and Santa Maria 37 Surgery souvenir

41 43 44 46

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Pavement caution Gather, with difficulty Last bit LP player “The Hunger Games” participants Adolescents’ support group It might be off the wall Setting of 11-/40-Down Woody Allen title character Louisville’s Muhammad ___ Center Sicilian city Place to play the ponies, for short “The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away” speaker Award for 11-/40-Down “32 Flavors” singer DiFranco Alter, in a way

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE D A S H E R

A R I A N A

S C E U A B L I L O I N E S

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Puzzle by PETER A. COLLINS

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SUDOKUFORYOU

SUD OKU FOR YOU 66

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For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

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10 L&A

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Life & Arts 10

Kelsey McKinney, Life & Arts Editor

Q-AND-A

Are you keeping your resolution? Professor explains why resolutions fall by wayside By Olivia Arena Only two weeks into January, it is likely that many resolutions have already been broken. The beginning of the semester marks a new start for college students, and psychology professor Art Markman, the author of the book “Smart Thinking,” explains why people fail, how to avoid failure and what to do to restart. Daily Texan: The most popular New Year’s resolutions include eating healthy, consuming less alcohol and exercising more. Why do you think these resolutions are so popular? Art Markman: One of the reasons these resolutions are so popular is because we believe everyone else around us is doing them, and so we are influenced by what everybody else is thinking. Eating better, exercising, drinking less are long-term health-related behaviors, where it’s more fun not to do those behaviors than to do them, and so we get into many habits that keep us doing the wrong thing. At some point it becomes difficult to imagine living our lives in a different way. So,we take the landmarks in our lives like birthdays, New Year’s, graduation, and think of them as times to step back and take into account what we can do differently.

Shelby Tauber | Daily Texan Staff Art Markman, UT psychology professor and author of the book “Smart Thinking,” expresses his thoughts on New Year’s resolutions. Markman explains why people fail and how to avoid failure, as well as how to restart.

DT: Why do you think so many people fail at keeping their resolutions? Markman: We don’t take into account how hard it is to change. All of these habits you’ve gotten into are habits that you have built up over a period of years, and a week

before New Year’s you think, “I’m going to do something different.” The big thing is, if you want to succeed at resolutions, you need to start more than a week in advance of planning and remember that a lot of the habits you have are things that you no longer

even think about. All of these things take advanced planning to integrate into your life, and that takes some work. DT: What can people do to make more proactive plans? What stages of planning do we need to focus on?

HEALTH

Winter leaves many feeling SAD

Markman: Several things you need to do. Before you start trying to fix your behavior you have to pay attention to what your behavior actually is. Take a week or two weeks and create a habit diary where you write down what you are actually doing right now and the

situations where you are doing it. Get to know what your current behaviors are because chances are you are unaware of a lot of the situations where you are doing the things you are trying to change.

GOAL continues on page 8

MUSIC

By Hannah Smothers If these are supposed to be the best years of our lives, then why are we all so sad? The return to school for the beginning of the spring semester is a bittersweet journey. The freedom of living independently is regained, but the home cooked meals and a bed that does not double as a couch are lost. Finals are over and obligations are minimal, but there is an entire semester of unknown tortures that lie ahead through the foggy glow of the Christmas lights that should have been taken down weeks ago. To make the inevitable return to education and real responsibility even more of a nuisance, an increasing number of students have reason to be sad. Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD, is a subset of depression that is especially prevalent during the winter months when the days are shorter and the sun is less apparent. According to Mental

Courtesy of Live Music Trajectory Vampire Weekend performs “Unbelievers” on “Jimmy Kimmel Live” on Oct. 31, 2012.

Top album releases to check out in 2013 By Elizabeth Williams

Illustration by John Massingill | Daily Texan Staff

Health America, SAD is thought to be caused by low exposure to sunlight, resulting in an overall, well, sad disposition. Just as a lack of daylight drives certain animals to load up on carbohydrates and sleep for months on end, SAD can cause humans to carbo-load and seek the comfort of their beds more than usual. This is all pretty inconvenient timing for college

students, since the beginning of winter brings about final exam week and winter break as well. Mental Health America indentifies young adults between the ages of 18 and 30, the same age as the majority of college students, as the primary age group for those affected by SAD. The high prevalence among college-aged adults makes sense, because for

a 20-year-old on a budget, the holidays are not as merry as many students hope for them to be. The first week of winter break is often spent in something resembling a mild coma that serves as a post-finals recuperation period. The second week is spent scrambling for holiday gifts that do not appear to be as cheap

SAD continues on page 8

WORLD

Indian rape case opens eyes to sexual violence HUMP

DAY

By Milla Impola

The fatal and tragic gang rape in New Delhi continues to draw worldwide awareness to the role governments, communities and individuals must play to end sexual violence. Whether an

unwelcome sexual gesture, a sexual encounter fueled by alcohol or rape, the issue of sexual violence can no longer be witnessed with indifference and flippancy. “We have to change ourselves. If there are no changes, then these horrible things won’t stop. The public has to wake up now,” the father of the victim in New Delhi told ITV, a British television network.

As the story in India continues to garner international attention and protesters call on the Indian government to take active responsibility to prevent sexual violence, we too should look at our own schools, neighborhoods and communities and how we handle similar issues. Nicholas Kristof, an op-ed columnist for The New York Times, compared the tragic

The year 2013 is turning into a year of musical comebacks. With new music from artists like David Bowie, Destiny’s Child and Justin Timberlake, it will be interesting to see just how much room opens up for newer acts to steal the spotlight.

rape in India to events across the world — such as the football players in Steubenville, Ohio, who were recently accused of repeatedly raping an unconscious girl — saying “gender violence is one of the world’s most common human rights abuses.” When it comes to sexual assault, one cannot view the

RAPE continues on page 8

1. David Bowie The Next Day | March David Bowie is a genrespanning, gender-bending, trend-setting musical god. The Next Day will be his 26th studio album and his first album in ten years. Bowie has been lying low since the release of Reality in 2003 but gifted his fans with the single “Where Are We Now?” Jan. 8. 2. Iceage You’re Nothing | February Iceage is a punk band made up of four devilishly talented Danish youths.

You’re Nothing follows 2011’s New Brigade, which was 24 minutes of thrashing guitars, spastic drums and angry, growling vocals that would leave any listener with headbang hair. The band revealed the track “Coalition” Jan. 7, and if it’s any indication of You’re Nothing’s direction, then expect to be completely destroyed by sheer punk force (it’s a good thing, I promise).

3. Bleached Ride Your Heart | April Bleached, consisting of Los Angeles sisters Jennifer and Jessica Clavin, are the effortlessly cool

ALBUMS continues on page 8

The Daily Texan 2013-01-16  

The Jan. 16, 2013 edition of The Daily Texan

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