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INSIDE 5 NEWS

Venture Expo provides opportunity for UT students to showcase entrepeneurship.

NEWS

APD arrests man suspected in multiple groping incidents.

dailytexanonline.com

Longhorn alumni share secrets to healthy living

Texas tips off its season against Fresno State

NEWS PAGE 6

SPORTS PAGE 7

CITY

Businesses may seek bag ban exemption By Joshua Fechter

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Friday, November 9, 2012

The Austin City Council unanimously approved amendments to a city ordinance passed earlier this year banning businesses’ use of plastic bags at the council’s regular meeting

Thursday. In March the council approved an ordinance prohibiting businesses from providing nonreusable plastic and paper bags to customers effective March 1, 2013. The amendments approved Thursday provide guidelines for the imple-

mentation of the city’s ban, including a three-year period for businesses to apply for exemption if they demonstrate that they cannot immediately meet the standards set by the ordinance. Businesses may also seek exemption if they wish to use bags composed of an

alternative material not mentioned in the ordinance but still meet the city’s standards of reusability. Bob Gedert, director of the Austin Resource Recovery Department, the city’s solid waste management department, said the department will determine

BUSINESS

7 SPORTS

Longhorns volleyball set sights on record, 15th straight victory.

Student CEOs on par

LIFE & ARTS

Singer Levi Weaver to perform Local Live at UT, reminisces on his success.

TODAY Prove it

Learn how to construct and defend a strong thesis statement with the Undergraduate Writing Center from 3 to 4 p.m. at the FAC.

Texas men’s basketball hosts the Fresno State Bulldogs in its first game of the season. The game begins at 7 p.m. Admission is between $7 - $40.

Eddie Vedder

Musician Eddie Vedder performs live with guest Glen Hansard at Bass Concert Hall from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Admission is $78.50 per person.

Today in history In 1967

On Nov. 9, 1967, NASA launched unmanned Apollo 4 test spacecraft atop the first Saturn V rocket from Cape Kennedy, Fla.

Quote to note “When he calls me soft, I lose it. I play stronger. I play better. I don’t know, it’s just something about that word. I just don’t like being called soft. I hate that word.” — Sheldon McClellan Sophomore guard SPORTS PAGE 7

BAGS continues on page 2 CAMPUS

Columnists,

experts credit 2012 outcome to red rhetoric By Miles Hutson

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Fresno State

exemptions on a case-bycase basis. He said businesses granted temporary exemption from the ordinance must renew their exemption on an annual basis within the three-year period, although he does not

Sophomores launch golf hat business, focus on shifting sales to retail markets By Bobby Blanchard Logan Brown and Bradley Roofner are fellow sophomores, fraternity brothers, roommates, close friends and the two founding CEOs of a student entrepreneurship company that makes accessorized hats for golfers. Brown, a computer science sophomore, and Roofner, business honors sophomore, officially registered

their company, HatTee, in February and have since been selling golf hats that can hold tees on the side. The goal of the hat is to rid the inconvenience of carrying golf tees in pockets, where they can scratch cell phones. Roofner, who golfs on a consistent basis, said he used to leave his tees behind before making HatTee. In September, HatTee

HATS continues on page 2

CITY

Council delays decision to regulate East Riverside By Joshua Fechter The Austin City Council voted to postpone the implementation of a new regulating plan for development in the East Riverside Corridor at its regular meeting Thursday. Citing the late hour and council members’ multiple concerns with the East Riverside Corridor Regulating Plan, Mayor Lee Leffingwell suggested at 11:35 p.m. the council postpone taking action on the plan until the Dec. 6 meeting. Among the council’s concerns is a provision in the plan that prohibits the construction of new businesses that use drive-thrus. Leffingwell said the provision would discourage economic development along the East Riverside Corridor. He said businesses such as pharmacies, fast food restaurants and dry cleaning services would not seek to reside along the East Riverside Corridor and would take

their business elsewhere. “It’s an economic development killer to put this [plan] in the corridor,” Leffingwell said. Erica Leak, a planner in the Austin Planning and Development Review Department, said businesses would not be able to construct buildings with drive-thrus because it would encourage automobile usage, which the regulating plan seeks to discourage. “Having new drive-thrus takes away from a pedestrian environment,” Leak said. Leak said the regulating plan requires developers to construct buildings closer to sidewalks, which she said would encourage pedestrians to frequent businesses occupying those buildings. She said because drive-thrus tend to occupy a large amount of space on a property, pedestrians would be discouraged from frequenting businesses with drive-thrus. Leak said the plan ensures

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Pu Ying Huang | Daily Texan Staff Sophomores Logan Brown and Bradley Roofner are the founding CEOs of HatTee, a company that produces golf hats that hold tees on the side.

Republicans lost because they went too far to the right, disenfranchising Hispanics, youth voters, women and moderates, according to LBJ panelists in Bass Lecture Hall on Thursday. Wayne Slater, a columnist for the Dallas Morning news; Sherri Greenberg, director of the Center for Politics and Governance; Victoria Defrancesco Soto, a fellow for the Center; and Evan Smith, CEO and editor-in-chief of the Texas Tribune, broadly agreed that if the Republican party did not endorse a platform more moderate than the platform this year, the 2012 election would mark the beginning of a longterm decline. “You know your party is in trouble when someone says, ‘What about the rape guy?’ and you say ‘Which one?’” Slater said in reference to women’s votes for Obama, which CNN national exit polls put at 55 percent. DeFrancesco Soto said she saw an opportunity for Republicans to win over women, but they would have to give up some of their views on institutions such as Planned Parenthood. “They fiscally are

PANEL continues on page 6

CAMPUS Students are hoping to finish the tool shed at the UT Micro Farm during the farm’s second workday this weekend from 9:30 a.m. to noon on Saturday.

Zachary Strain Daily Texan Staff

Student project grows local food By Bobby Blanchard UT’s Micro Farm is off to a not-so-micro start. The project is aimed at growing food locally on campus for UT’s dining halls, an on-campus farm stand and a nearby food shelter. It is funded by the Green Fee committee, a group that funds environmental service-related projects on campus. Located at 2204 Leona St., the project held its first work day last weekend, and it will have its second

work day Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to noon. Daniella Lewis, architecture senior and Micro Farm lead coordinator, said the work day had a big student turnout last weekend, when they started focusing on the infrastructure of the farm. “This weekend we hope to finish our tool shed,” Lewis said. “It will make the site a home.” Lewis said discussion about the project’s future is part of the work day. “We have a plan, but that plan is changing every week depending on differ-

ent people’s inputs,” Lewis said. “We want as many different people to voice their opinion as possible.” She said some of the different plants the Micro Farm will grow include jalapenos, tomatoes, herbs and squash, among others. “It’s really exciting to get everything started,” Lewis said. “There is ample student interest that is really energizing. Students are coming out, getting engaged and pushing their opinions and ideas. They

FARM continues on page 5


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News

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Friday, November 9, 2012

BAGS

FRAMES | FEAtuREd photo

The Daily Texan Volume 113, Issue 63

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CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Susannah Jacob (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Aleksander Chan (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office: (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@gmail.com Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com Life & Arts Office: (512) 232-2209 dailytexan@gmail.com

Taylor Barron | Daily Texan Staff Members of La Luz Del Mundo church on East 3rd street sing during a service Thursday evening.

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COPYRIGHT Copyright 2012 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

HATS continues from page 1 launched its website, and in the past month, the company has moved away from pushing individual sales and is now focusing on larger sales. The hats are still available for online individual sales, but Brown said the focus of HatTee was moving to retail. It was over dinner at the UT Club in the Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium in October 2011 that the idea of HatTee started. Roofner mentioned the idea for hats with tees, and Brown was instantly interested. “We didn’t know quite what we would do with it at that point,” Brown said. “But I thought [Roofner] was a genius, and he also had this cool idea for a hat, so I thought I better

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snatch him up quick.” After dinner they shook hands and agreed to start a business together. In the following semester, Brown and Roofner went in for a meeting with John Butler, director of the Herb Kelleher Center for Entrepreneurship. Brown said that was a big moment for their business, because Butler gave them advice and inspiration. Butler set up phone conferences for Brown and Roofner. They spoke to Carl Paul, former CEO and founder of Golfsmith and Joe Beck, agent of two-time Masters Golf champion Ben Crenshaw. Butler said they had entrepreneurship originality that would make them successful. Roofner said the encouragement from that

meeting helped push them forward. “There is no greater feeling than when someone attaches value to our idea,” Roofner said. “When someone buys a hat and we get to have a conversation with someone and they say they like this ... it is unmatched.” The two met in fall 2011 as freshmen when they were pledging for fraternity Beta Upsilon Chi. Since then Brown and Roofner have become close friends and moved together into a West Campus apartment this fall. They said while running a company and going to school can be difficult, it is manageable. Brown said he takes on the strategic planning

and vision for the company, and Roofner said he focuses on the financial backing of the company. “We live together now and we sleep in the same room and do just about everything together,” Brown said. “We mesh just about as good as we possibly can get. I’m the loud and boisterous one, and [Roofner] is there to keep me in check.” Brown said living together has its advantages while running a company. “We can talk about things from midnight to 4 a.m. if we need to, and it does happen sometimes,” Brown said. “We have pillow talk, but it’s not about girls but the finances of the company, which is equally exciting stuff.”

Student-run entertainment = student-run fun

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Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susannah Jacob Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drew Finke, Pete Stroud, Edgar Walters Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Aleksander Chan Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trey Scott Digital Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayley Fick News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matt Stottlemyre Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Boze, Samantha Katsounas, Allie Koletcha Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bobby Blanchard, Joshua Fechter, Lazaro Hernandez, David Maly, Alexa Ura Enterprise Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Audrey White Enterprise Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Messamore, Megan Strickland Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kristine Reyna Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands, Amyna Dosani, Sherry Hu, Luis San Miguel Editorial Copy Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nile Miller Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nicole Collins Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pu Ying Huang, Omar Longoria, Jack Mitts Special Projects Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Natasha Smith Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lawrence Peart Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon, Andrew Torrey Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pu Ying Huang, Zachary Strain, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fanny Trang, Marisa Vasquez Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorge Corona Associate Multimedia Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrea Macias Senior Videographers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oluwademilade Adejuyigbe, Thomas Allison, Shila Farahani, Lawrence Peart Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kelsey McKinney Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorge Corona, Sarah-Grace Sweeney Senior Life&Arts Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Helen Fernandez, Hannah Smothers, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ricky Stein, Alex Williams, Laura Wright Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christian Corona Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lauren Giudice, Chris Hummer, Sara Beth Purdy, Rachel Thompson, Wes Maulsby Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ao Meng Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riki Tsuji Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ghayde Ghraowi Associate Web Editor, Social Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Sanchez Associate Web Editors, Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Helen Fernandez, Omar Longoria Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Albert Cheng Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

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Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor Barron, Aaron Berecka, Ben Chestnut Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala, Taylor Hampton, Tiffany Hinman, Miles Hutson Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nitya Duran, Jori Epstein, Michael Marks, Rachel Wenzlaff Page Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jaime Cheng Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rachel Kaser, Sarah Smith, Amy Yu Comic Artists. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anik Battacharya, Cody Bubonik, Holly Hansel, David Hook, Dae Hyng Jin, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .John Massingill, Lindsay Rojas, Colin Zelinski

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(512) 471-1865 | advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Interim Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Business Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lori Hamilton Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amy Ramirez Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcast & Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Morgan Haenchen Student Assistant Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ted Moreland Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunter Chitwood, Zach Congdon, Draike Delagarza, Jake Dworkis, Ivan Meza, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rohan Needel, Trevor Nelson, Diego Palmas, Paola Reyes, Ted Sniderman Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nick Cremona Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jacqui Bontke, Sara Gonzales, Bailey Sullivan Special Editions/Production Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Abby Johnston Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Daniel Hublein

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The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

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Texan Ad Deadlines

11/9/12

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think the department will grant many renewals. “We don’t expect to grant many exemptions,” Gedert said. He said businesses must apply for exemption by Jan. 1, 2013. If a business is granted annual exemption from the ordinance during the three-year period, they must adopt the standards set by the ordinance once the period expires. Gedert said implementing the ordinance will cost the city about $850,000 between December 2012 and December 2013. Brad Parsons, a local environmental activist, said he believes the guidelines dilute the intent of the ordinance, which is to abolish the use of unrecyclable bags, by allowing the continued usage of plastic bags. Parsons said he does not support the three-year period during which businesses can apply for exemption. He said he would prefer giving businesses one year to seek exemption from the ordinance. “What’s the point of having this ban if you do not apply pressure for businesses and citizens to follow the ban?” Parsons said. Effective March 1, 2013, businesses must instead provide customers with reusable carryout bags. Article 7 of the city code defines a reusable carryout bag as a bag constructed of cloth or another washable fabric, recyclable plastic with a minimum thickness of four millimeters or recyclable paper. Paper bags must contain 40 percent recycled content beginning March 1, 2013, and contain a minimum of 80 percent recycled content by March 1, 2015. The ordinance does not apply to laundry, newspaper and waste bags; bags provided by pharmacies and veterinarians that contain prescription drugs and other medical necessities; bags provided by restaurants to carry prepared food; bags used by nonprofit organizations to distribute food, groceries and clothing, among other items; and noncheckout bags that carry produce, nuts and other f ood products. If businesses fail to follow the ordinance, they will be subject to a fine between $100 and $2,000.

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existing establishments with drive-thrus would be able to keep their drive-thrus or remodel their buildings to eliminate the drive-thru. Leffingwell also raised concerns that the plan would limit the number of lanes on East Riverside Drive. “There’s no way I’m going to support that initiative to reduce the number of lanes on Riverside Drive,” Leffingwell said. Leak said a study conducted by the city’s transportation department found Riverside Drive would be reduced to two lanes running in each direction if the proposed urban rail project is constructed in the corridor. She said the reduction in lanes planned for the corridor’s anticipated prioritization of urban rail usage over automobile usage is not related to the regulating plan. The second phase of the urban rail project proposed by the city would extend into the East Riverside Corridor, providing a route from downtown to South Pleasant Valley Road along East Riverside Drive.

Congrats to Sigmas for a Successful S.A.F.E. Week


Friday, November 9, 2012

World & Nation 3

Amyna Dosani, Wire Editor

NEWS BRIEFLY

Waves crash into a seawall and buildings along the coast in Hull, Mass., Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012. A nor’easter blustered into New York, New Jersey and western Massachusetts on Wednesday with rain and wet snow, plunging homes in New York and New Jersey right back into darkness in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.

Syrian leaders to vote on united opposition DOHA, Qatar — Syrian opposition leaders say they have made progress toward forging a broadbased, 60-member leadership group sought by the international community. Riad Seif, the proposal’s author, said the main opposition bloc, the Syrian National Council, deferred a decision until after a final round of internal elections Friday. The leadership group is to serve as a conduit for foreign support for those trying to oust President Bashar Assad. Seif says the SNC will make a final decision Friday afternoon.

Pope to christen first personal Twitter link VATICAN CITY — He already has a billion followers. Now Pope Benedict XVI will join the Twitter-sphere with a personal account. Vatican spokesman the Rev. Federico Lombardi made the announcement Thursday, saying details about Benedict’s handle and other information will come when the Vatican officially launches the account, perhaps before the end of the year. The 85-year-old Benedict sent his first tweet from a Vatican account last year when he launched the Vatican’s news information portal, aimed at the world’s 1.1 billion Catholics. The new Twitter account will be his own, though it’s doubtful Benedict himself will wrestle down his encyclicals, apostolic exhortations and other papal pronouncements into 140-character bites. — Compiled from Associated Press reports

Steven Senne Associated Press

Second storm hits battered East Coast By Frank Eltman & Colleen Long Associated Press

NEW YORK — A nor’easter blustered into New York and New Jersey on Wednesday with rain and wet snow, plunging homes right back into darkness, stopping commuter trains again and inflicting another round of misery on thousands of people still reeling from Superstorm Sandy’s blow more than a week ago. Under ordinary circumstances, a storm of this sort wouldn’t be a big deal, but large swaths of the landscape were still an open wound, with the electrical system highly fragile and many of

Judge issues injunction for Planned Parenthood By Chris Tomlinson Associated Press

Texas District Judge Steve Yelenosky issued an injunction that will keep Planned Parenthood in the Women’s Health Program pending resolution of the organization’s lawsuit claiming a rule banning it violates state law. The organization had asked Yelenosky to extend a temporary order issued two weeks ago that stopped Texas from defunding clinics and doctors that have ties to groups that provide abortions. A new rule, which took effect this month, would effectively deny critical funding to Planned Parenthood clinics that provide preventive health care and contraception services to 110,000 poor women, even though they do not provide abortions and are financially separate institutions. Unless overturned on appeal, the injunction will remain in effect until a trial can decide Planned Parenthood’s lawsuit. Yelenosky decided Thursday that Planned Parenthood has a reasonable chance to win its lawsuit and that allowing the rule to go into effect would cause irreparable harm to the organization. Lauren Bean, spokeswoman for the Texas attorney general’s office, said the state would immediately appeal Yelenosky’s decision. Planned Parenthood attorneys recently lost a federal lawsuit that hinged on a doctor’s right to freedom of speech and association. The argument before Yelenosky on Thursday hinged on whether the so-called “affiliate rule” could result in the loss of federal funding for health care. Steve McKetta, arguing

for Planned Parenthood, explained that a section of Texas law clearly states that any rule that violates federal law, and therefore endangers federal matching funds, is automatically inoperable. He said lawmakers have made it clear that the state Department of Health and Human Services should do everything possible to gain federal matching funds for health programs. The federal Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services sent a letter to state officials Wednesday that said the affiliate rule violates federal law, and therefore the center was cutting off $36 million a year for the Women’s Health Program on Dec. 31. McKetta said that since the affiliate rule led to the end of federal funding, it should not be enforced. Republican Gov. Rick Perry has known since March that federal officials would cut off funding and ordered state officials to develop a new program that depended solely on state funding. That program was due to launch Nov. 1, but Perry and Health and Human Services Commissioner Kyle Janek said they would continue to accept federal funding for as long as possible. However, Perry did say that he would cut off funding to Planned Parenthood immediately, and Planned Parenthood won a temporary order the next day to retain funding. Janek and Perry have both said they will cut the Women’s Health Program if a court decided the affiliate rule is illegal and the state must fund Planned Parenthood clinics that do not provide abortions. Perry said state lawmakers made it clear that they don’t want any state funds to reach groups such as Planned Parenthood under any circumstances.

Sandy’s victims still mucking out their homes and cars and shivering in the deepening cold. Exactly as authorities feared, the nor’easter brought down tree limbs and electrical wires, and utilities in New York and New Jersey reported that nearly 60,000 customers who lost power because of Sandy lost it all over again as a result of the nor’easter. Mark L. Fendrick, of Staten Island, tweeted Wednesday night: “My son had just got his power back 2 days ago now along comes this nor’easter and it’s out again.” John Miksad, senior vice president of electric operations at Consolidated Edison, the chief utility in New

York City, said, “I know everyone’s patience is wearing thin.” As the nor’easter closed in, thousands of people in low-lying neighborhoods staggered by the superstorm just over a week ago were urged to clear out. Authorities warned that rain and 60 mph gusts in the evening and overnight could topple trees wrenched loose by Sandy and erase some of the hard-won progress made in restoring power to millions of customers. “I am waiting for the locusts and pestilence next,” New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said. “We may take a setback in the next 24 hours.” Ahead of the storm, public works crews in New

Jersey built up dunes to protect the stripped and battered coast, and new evacuations were ordered in a number of communities already emptied by Sandy. New shelters opened. In New York City, police went to low-lying neighborhoods with loudspeakers, urging residents to leave. But Mayor Michael Bloomberg didn’t issue mandatory evacuations, and many people stayed behind, some because they feared looting, others because they figured whatever happens couldn’t be any worse than what they have gone through already. “We’re petrified,” said James Alexander, a resident of the hard-hit Rockaways section of Queens. “It’s like a

sequel to a horror movie.” Forecasters said the nor’easter would bring moderate coastal flooding, with storm surges of about 3 feet possible Wednesday into Thursday — far less than the 8 to 14 feet Sandy hurled at the region. The storm’s winds were expected to be well below Sandy’s, which gusted to 90 mph. By evening, the storm had created a slushy mess in the streets in the metropolitan area. Eight-foot waves crashed on the beaches in New Jersey, which was lashed with a wintry mix of rain, sleet and snow. Sandy killed more than 100 people in 10 states, with most of the victims in New York and New Jersey.

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Opinion 4

Friday, November 9, 2012

Editor-in-Chief Susannah Jacob

Humble history is a part of our past

Shelby Tayber | Daily Texan Staff Austin City Council has decided against designating this campus area home a historic structure, despite the civic and scientific contributions made by one of its previous owners.

By Drew Finke Associate Editor

No matter how long you’ve lived in Austin, you’ve probably heard that the city was a better place just before you arrived. That’s because back then, that bar was still around, and you could still hear that band play at that now long-gone local club, the demolition of which tore down everything that made the city great along with the building. In a city with such a fierce reverence for its own past, anything that provides a link to Austin’s history seems like something worth protecting. But a recent city council decision regarding a historic building on the property of a UT fraternity shows that’s not always the case. During last week’s city council meeting, the council decided to deny historic status for the S. Leroy Brown house, a small structure on the property of a UT fraternity located just a few steps from campus on Hemphill Park Road. This decision allows the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity to move or demolish the house to make way for a new building they plan to construct on the site. While the council’s decision is not out of the ordinary, the building’s proximity to an established historic structure and another upcoming council decision regarding the historic status of a higher-profile building call into question the city’s professed commitment to its always-vanishing and much-ballyhooed past. The Brown house isn’t as exciting or as well-loved as long-lost Austin landmarks like the Armadillo World Headquarters or Liberty Lunch, whose absences you hear people complaining about even now, but the house’s small stature and demure brick facade

nonetheless serve as a link to an Austin that was quieter and more slowly paced than the city we inhabit today. Historic records show that the house’s owner, S. Leroy Brown, was responsible for bringing the first broadcast radio station to Austin — the station that would eventually become KUT — and for inventing a high speed calculator that some suggest was a forerunner to the modern computer. The house’s peculiar Dutch Colonial Revival architecture made it a good candidate for historic designation, according to the city’s Historic Preservation Office, and such a designation would have prevented the building from being demolished or significantly altered. Phi Gamma Delta wanted to demolish the structure in order to move forward with expansion plans, and with few members of the community calling for the home’s preservation, the council’s decision not to designate the home as historic doesn’t come as a surprise. The Brown house and Phi Gamma Delta’s main fraternity house next door are a compelling case study of what kinds of Austin history are and are not deemed worthy of preservation. The fraternity’s Colonial Revival mansion, known as Buen Retiro, was built in 1902 and has been listed on Texas’ register of historic places since 1972. According to the plaque attached to the house, the structure’s historical significance is derived not only from its architectural style, but also from the fact that it was built “by Austin financier Louis Nicholas Goldbeck” and “has been campus residence of men who became statesmen and cultural and business leaders.” Apparently, the council doesn’t consider the accomplishments of Mr. Brown to be of equal historical importance. Next week the council will determine whether or not to confer

In a city that prides itself on being weird and funky, the built history we choose to honor officially shouldn’t just be those buildings that have played to host the city’s elite.

historical designation on Westgate Tower, the conspicuously tall, boxy high-rise on Lavaca Street next to the Capitol. While preservationists claim that the building is an elegant example of the New Formalism style in downtown Austin, others deride the building as an eyesore that blocks views of the Capitol and that doesn’t deserve to be honored with a historical designation. Working in the building’s favor is its illustrious political and social past. In the 1960s the building’s penthouse was home to the Headliners Club, an exclusive playground for the city’s political and business elite, as well as a Presidential Room meant to serve President Johnson during his trips to Texas. Like Buen Retiro, Westgate Tower’s social pedigree is likely as much of a factor in its historical designation as is its architectural significance. But in a city that prides itself on being weird and funky, the built history we choose to honor officially shouldn’t just be those buildings that have played host to the city’s elite. By failing to preserve the less glamorous elements of Austin’s past, we lose out on a more complete understanding of where the city has been and are less able to appreciate the city as it is right now. Finke is an urban studies and architecture senior.

Trouble looms for TRS By Laura Wright Daily Texan Columnist

On the Teacher Retirement System of Texas (TRS) website, a pastel background sets off black and white images of smiling teachers, young and old. But the retirement system — in which UT employees are eligible to enroll automatically on their first day — faces a financial situation that shouldn’t trigger any happy faces. The bottom line is that none of TRS’s main funding sources offer easy answers for the agency’s current budget shortfall. The sixth-largest pension fund in the United States, TRS relies on three main sources of funding to maintain its substantial trust fund: contributions from the state, contributions from members’ salaries and investment returns. The system has $101 billion in assets and serves more than 1.3 million Texans, including 312,680 retirees and 1 million or so active employees. TRS members include employees of Texas public schools, colleges and universities. TRS administers four different benefit programs, including two health benefit programs, a long-term care insurance program and a defined-benefit retirement program. TRS’s defined-benefit retirement plan promises members a monthly benefit upon retirement, no matter how long they live. The size of the monthly benefit is determined by a pre-established formula that takes into account the employee’s earnings history. In the most recent session of the Texas Legislature, lawmakers lowered the state contribution from 6.4 percent to 6 percent, meaning that the state now matches 6 percent of every TRS member’s paycheck in contributions to the TRS funds. (Employers in the system cut 6.4 percent from employees’ before-tax paychecks, making the current employee contribution rate slightly higher than the state contribution rate.) In the past, the state contribution rate has been as high as 8.4 percent, and during the Sep. 12 hearing of the House Committee on Pensions, Investments and Financial Services, TRS Executive Director Brian Guthrie suggested that the state begin to “stair-step” state contribution rates back up to the original 8.4 percent. Why? Because the program as it stands is “not actuarially sound.”

“Not actuarially sound” is a technical (and polite) way of saying that there is not enough money coming in to the system to support what it needs to pay out. Though the pension plan portion of TRS is fairly solid and should be able to pay benefits through the year 2075, funding for the healthcare plans provided by TRS will run out by 2015. So, how do we solve this problem for the million-plus Texas teachers who rely on TRS? According to Brian Guthrie’s testimony, if the state and employee contributions were raised equally, then the blended contribution rate would go up to 7.7 percent, but the state’s contribution would only grow by 1.7 percent at a cost of less than $600 million per year. The alternative: Raise only state contribution rates or only employee rates. But that makes the burden greater — possibly too great — on the state or the employees. What about investment returns, TRS’s third source of funding? The UT Human Resource Services website says that “employee and employer contributions go into a large trust fund that’s managed by knowledgeable professionals.” By “knowledgeable professionals,” they mean TRS’s nine-member Board of Trustees. Five of these members are appointed directly by Governor Perry, and they must have “investment expertise.” At least one, Joe Colonnetta, has donated over $49,000 to the Texans for Rick Perry PAC. The other four are chosen by Governor Perry from a list provided by the State Board of Education and the membership of TRS. In the last fiscal year, TRS made around 7 percent in investment returns. But that’s not enough to drag TRS back to the land of “actuarial soundness.” If TRS succeeds in some of its internal restructuring efforts, like getting 80 percent of its members to switch to a less-expensive Medicare plan, then it won’t need funds from the state for the next biennium. But even then, it would still be in trouble for the biennium after that. So what’s TRS to do? I, like TRS’s Board of Trustees, wish I knew. But one thing is certain: the trustees need to quickly make a plan to see just how much groveling for extra funds they’ll need to do come the 83rd Texas Legislative Session. Wright is a Plan II and biology junior.

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News

Friday, November 9, 2012

CAMPUS

Workshop clarifies consent By Taylor Hampton

A program aimed at combatting sexual violence ttaught students Thursday ythat getting consent is sexy. s Voices Against Violence nTheatre for Dialogue acted gout real-life scenarios that ydemonstrated the difficulty sof interpreting consent in esexual situations and examined how consent is ne-gotiated. Consent was detfined as getting permission -with a verbal confirmation dof what each sexual partner is comfortable with and -protection they plan to use. d “We can misinterpret sconsent. It’s something -we should be cautious of,” -Plan II freshman Jackson eHaenchen said. - The program uses peer .educators to create awaresness about relationship rviolence, stalking and sex-ual violence. One scene the -troupe performed showed da couple kissing, then a spartner pulling away after n

more contact was initiated. Haenchen said this scene was a good example of the need to consent. “When someone revokes consent, it’s tempting to get frustrated, but because of mutual respect you have to respect their prerogative,” Haechen said. Haenchen attended the event because his fraternity encouraged it, and he said he learned the importance of verbal consent. Lynn Hoare, Theatre for Dialogue specialist with Voices Against Violence, said statistics for sexual assault crimes are hard to gather, because many victims do not come forward. She said national surveys indicate one in five women will be sexually assaulted in their lifetime and 92 percent will know their assaulter. Hoare said alcohol is a factor in 70 percent of assaults. “We have had disclosure in evaluation sheets that people realize they

were sexually assaulted,” Hoare said. The evaluation questionnaire passed around after the program asked the audience to rate the usefulness of the program. Hoare said the majority of the responses rated it as “useful” or “extremely useful.” Sidney Williams, troupe member and theatre and dance graduate student, said the program creates a space for consent dialogue to be discussed. “What if you don’t consent, male or female: how does that impact your college experience or future relationships?” Williams said. He said talking about consent can be awkward but thinks people benefit from hearing different perspectives and ideas about consent and leave with more awareness. “That’s the best way to have sex,” Williams said. “Enthusiastically, with clear consent.”

t eBUSINESS

Venture Expo provides platform for investors, Central Texas startups

, d h t By Miles Hutson f e c Sara Rodell said when she moved to New York, r she had a lot of friends do a lot of favors for her, and she n wanted to pay them back. t “I had all these people , doing kind things for me, f and I didn’t have time to t do what I wanted — buy them a cup of coffee or a t beer,” Rodell said. r Faced with this problem, Rodell said she realized d there should be an applican tion to solve it. After she and Jeffrey Schwartz met s through a mutual friend o in Austin, they started s NOOM, Next One’s On Me. The mobile applica, tion allows people to buy , generic food and treat d vouchers that can be redeemed by their friends at f locations around Austin. The NOOM co-founders were one of 15 Investorl Ready companies that n presented Thursday at the Texas Venture Expo. The expo, hosted by Texas Venture Labs, intended to connect University and Central Texas entrepreneurial

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d d n

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talent with investors and other entrepreneurs. Rodell and Schwartz hope to use investment money to expand their company. Amey Puranik, a chemical engineering graduate student who works with Texas Venture Labs, said the organization helps entrepreneurial students from across disciplines cooperate and create viable companies with startups from Austin and the rest of Central Texas. “On a daily basis, we’re in touch with the entrepreneurs,” Puranik said. “We’re part of the team.” The expo featured industry-specific companies as well. Among them was AdBm Technologies, a company that seeks to use its UT-developed technology for quieting marine operations to make it cheaper and easier to cooperate with regulators. CEO Mark Wochner said it is expensive to quiet undersea construction with current technology. He said the technology is too ineffective to allow more than a narrow window

check out

ONLINE

for drilling before stricter regulations protecting marine migrations kick in. Daniel Appel, an MBA student and director of AdBm Business Development, said the company took form in the University class From Idea to Intellectual Property. There, students pitched their ideas and later met to discuss them. Appel said Texas Venture Labs provided expertise for penetrating the specialized marine oil market that otherwise would have been more difficult to obtain. He also said the Venture Expo provided an opportunity to raise funds that would otherwise take much more groundwork to raise. “This is in front of 30 investors all at once,” Appel said. Robert J. Adams, director of Texas Venture Labs, said he was proud of his program for providing this opportunity to students. “We have 15 great companies,” Adams said. “This is sort of the coming out party for all of them.”

stories videos photo galleries

5

CITY

Suspect arrested for multiple gropings, held in Travis County jail with no bond By David Maly Austin police arrested a man suspected of groping people at multiple locations in the Austin area. Siji Moreno, 21, was arrested Wednesday and charged with assault with injury following an incident at a Target store located at 10107 Research Boulevard on Nov. 1. He is a suspect in multiple groping incidents that have occurred throughout the state. Those include a Sept. 11 incident at an Iron Cactus restaurant located at 606 Trinity St., an Oct. 18 incident at a Target store located at 11220 FM 2222 and an Oct. 20 incident at an H-E-B store located at 2508 E. Riverside Dr. The Austin Police Department is investigating those incidents. He is also a suspect in a groping incident that

Photo courtesy of Austin Police Department A man suspected of groping people at multiple locations, including this Target, was arrested Wednesday.

took place on the 1000 block of Guadalupe Street that is being investigated by the Travis County Sheriff ’s Office and two similar incidents in Bee Caves, Texas. At the time of his arrest, Moreno was on probation for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and man-

slaughter. His probation has been revoked, and he is being held in the Travis County Jail with no bond. Austin Police Department detectives are asking anyone that may be a victim or may have information regarding these incidents to call 512-974-8265.

FARM continues from page 1 want to do more than just help.” Lewis, who previously saw the expansion of the Concho Community Garden this past summer, said she was happy and excited to see another studentdriven project start so soon. “I don’t think there is a more flexible project on campus,” Lewis said. “I have never seen one when students so physically have the ability to make an impact, and we are in our very first few stages.” Robert Mayberry, Division of Housing and Food Service executive chef, said if the Micro Farm

project is successful, it will have an impact on UT’s food system. “Extreme freshness means better taste and nutrition. Veggies grown just a few blocks away will require very little fuel to transport, and this will be a teaching facility,” Mayberry said. The Campus Environmental Center will use the garden to teach gardeners how to grow vegetables. Mayberry said he is excited about the upcoming yield of crops. “I am a huge fan of local and fresh veggies, and the Micro Farm represents the

potential to serve fresh, seasonal, campus-grown produce right here in our dining facilities,” Mayberry said. “I really look forward to cooking up that first batch of veggies from the Micro Farm.” DHFS is working with Lewis and students on the project, and environmental specialist Hunter Mangrum said this was a good step in the right direction for food service. “We are very excited to get out there and get our hands dirty, as well,” Mangrum said. “We’re going to be out there working and sweating, as well.”

T O N I G H T

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News

6 CAMPUS

Friday, November 9, 2012

CAMPUS

Rules do not inhibit business in China By Christine Ayala

Ben Chesnut | Daily Texan Staff The School of Human Ecology presented a panel of UT alumni, including Marisa Duswalt, Beverly Kearney and Garrett Weber-Gale. They discussed the choices and motivation of healthy living.

Choices affect health, alumni say By Tiffany Hinman Successful healthy living is a result of choices and motivation, Longhorn alumni said in a panel Thursday. The School of Human Ecology presented a panel of UT alumni to share personal stories of obstacles, success and choices that lead to healthier lifestyles. The panel consisted of Marissa Duswalt, associate director of policy and events for First Lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move!” initiative; Beverly Kearney, head coach for UT women’s track and field and cross country; and Garrett Weber-Gale, two-time Olympic gold medalist swimmer. Tyrrell Flawn, Advisory Council member for the School of Human Ecology, moderated the panel. Duswalt said her struggle with adolescent obesity inspired her career path as a

dietician. The symptomatic conditions she suffered associated with obesity during college triggered her awareness that one in three children suffer from obesity, Duswalt said. She said making small changes over a long period of time helped create a healthier lifestyle. “Healthy choices on a grand scale seem very, very overwhelming,” Duswalt said. “When pursuing health, the long-term does not happen without the short-term, so every single day, choice by choice, you can decide to do what is better for yourself and those you love.” Weber-Gale said it is necessary to understand why a healthy lifestyle is important in order to be successful. He said being diagnosed with high blood pressure inspired him to make healthier choices so he could pursue his Olympic goal. “Everyone’s motivation

and goals are different, but when you have passion you can continue to pursue that path and the obstacles will not appear that large,” Weber-Gale said. The School of Human Ecology presented the panel as part of its centennial celebration. Meghan Mullaney, public affairs specialist for the School of Human Ecology, said the school will open its doors to the UT community and invite members to participate in the celebration. She said in addition to the panel, the UT Tower will be lit burnt orange Friday evening with “100” on the sides to commemorate the school’s anniversary. Students will walk away with an inspirational message to help others make wise choices in life, Mullaney said. “Living healthy is essential to happy and healthy families, marriages and relationships,” Mullaney said.

Although American businesses benefit from partnerships with Chinese companies, Chinese regulations make it difficult for partnerships to begin in the first place, panelists said at the Executive Education and Conference Center on Thursday. The McCombs’ Energy Management and Innovation Center hosted the panel “Pensions, China and Shale Gas: CFOs Reveal.” CFOs from Apache Corp., Boeing, BP and Celanise Corp. discussed all three title topics, but their work in China was the focus of the night. Steven Sterin, Celanese Corp. senior vice president and CFO, said the risk of losing intellectual property in China is a reality companies face. He said Celanese, a fuel technologies business that manufactures ethanol, has partnered with Chinese companies for the past 35 years without running into the problem because

of company safeguards. “You can’t protect all of your technology there, although China’s beginning to protect intellectual property,” Sterin said. “I still think we’re a long ways away from having enforcement that’s meaningful. You’ve got to be careful who you partner with in a joint venture.” Niloy Shah, CFO of BP’s Gulf of Mexico region, said its business in China is profitable, although Chinese policies can limit access to international companies. He said one limiting policy requires a Chinese company to hold 51 percent equity in international business ventures, which gives it control of operation and partnership in intellectual property. “They want to get the knowledge from intellectual property, but from a businesssharing standpoint, you basically get full cost recovery,” Shah said. “There’s this misconception that you can’t make money in China, but you do have to bring the technology.”

Shah said BP is watching carefully as its partners in China start deep-water drilling in an effort to avoid any incidents like the 2010 Gulf of Mexico spill. “BP brought in an exploration program, discovered a field and at the point where you recover cost, the assets were turned over to the Chinese,” Shah said. “They are just beginning to do deep-water rigs, and obviously we’re monitoring that closely, because deep-water is not any easy business to be in.” History senior Mansal Denton said it was important the panelists discussed business as well as the politics involved when companies work in China. “It was interesting to hear them say a lot of these big American companies can’t afford not to be in China, but their hands are kind of tied by the intellectual property restrictions and lack of enforcement of intellectual property law,” Denton said.

UNIVERSITY

Texas Student Media board appoints interim director to permanent position By Bobby Blanchard Gage Paine, vice president of Student Affairs, announced Thursday that Jalah Goette will serve as the director of the Texas Student Media board. The Texas Student Media board represents the various University student media outlets, including The Daily Texan, Texas Student Television, KVRX, the Texas Travesty and the Cactus Yearbook. Previously, UT was prepared to go

PANEL

continues from page 1 Republican, but they want a Planned Parenthood,” DeFrancesco Soto said. “They want to be sure Planned Parenthood rights are secured not just for themselves but for their daughters.” DeFrancesco Soto also said voting laws were intended to repress the Democratic vote, but they actually had the opposite effect. “I think it had a mobilizing effect,” she said. “I think young folks, black folks and brown folks said, ‘People are taking our vote away. We don’t really like this.’”

through a national search for a new director, but after a recommendation from the Texas Student Media board, Paine decided to appoint Goette to the position. “While this is not the methodology that we typically use to fill a director-level position, I recognize that Texas Student Media has had considerable leadership transition challenges over the last few years,” Paine said in a memorandum to the board. Goette has served as the

interim director since the spring, when Gary Borders, the former Texas Student Media board director, resigned. Borders said his resignation was forced by Juan Gonzalez, former vice president of Student Affairs, because Borders proposed the selling of KVRX and Texas Student Television. Goette has been with Texas Student Media for six years. Previously, she was the assistant director, where she dealt with Texas Student Media business and advertising.

Panelists said they thought if Romney campaigned on his record as a moderate from Massachusetts, he would have had a chance at the election and that with the Republican party of today, he couldn’t have made it that far. “If he had run as the Mitt Romney who governed Massachusetts, that Mitt Romney might have survived the election,” Smith said. “But he wouldn’t have survived the primary.” Danny Zeng, College Republicans spokesperson, said he disagreed with the premise of the panel that Republicans are extreme. “I think the Romney campaign didn’t define itself very well,” Zeng said. “The Demo-

crats in this election have used a strategy where they talk to each party and tell them the Republicans are extreme.” Zeng said he believed true Republican positions on issues like immigration shouldn’t turn off immigrants, because they support a pathway to citizenship, even though they don’t support amnesty. At the end of the panel, Slater said no matter who takes part in the 2016 election, he wants to see more centered rhetoric. “I think it’s imperative we have a presidential debate where the adults are in the room but not the children,” Slater said.

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Sports 7

Friday, November 9, 2012

Christian Corona, Sports Editor

Horns short-handed

SIDELINE NBA THUNDER

BULLS

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Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff Jaylen Bond embraces Myck Kabongo. Both will miss the season opener against Fresno State. Bond is out with an ankle injury suffered during practice, and Kabongo is sitting while the NCAA continues its investigation into whether he received improper benefits during the offseason.

Kabongo out as NCAA probes, Bond sidelined with hurt ankle By Nick Cremona Texas will be without the services of two of its more explosive players when it faces Fresno State Friday. Point guard Myck Kabongo has been held out of the season opener because of an ongoing NCAA investigation regarding a summer training session with a former teammate,

and Jaylen Bond will sit out due to injury. It might not seem like the ideal situation to be in at the start of the season, but Texas is more than equipped to handle the Bulldogs, even if that means being a bit shorthanded. In years past, this scenario would have drastically altered the Longhorns’ plan of action, but this time around the team is prepared for any sudden

change that may present itself. The Longhorns’ roster is chockfull of wirey playmakers that are ready to return the program to one of the best in the nation. Rick Barnes’ class of six freshmen will all likely see plenty of playing time as the year progresses and have a chance to be one of the most productive freshman classes in the nation. Texas also returns five sophomores from last year’s equally impressive freshman class. Freshman Javan Felix has already made his presence felt at the point and is ready to take

Kabongo’s place in running the Texas offense. He also knows he may be called upon at any time should Kabongo go down or is held out of any more games. “Javan is a very crafty player with a great feel for the game,” Barnes said. “He will tell you that as a coaching staff we’ve been a bit hard on him, but I want him out of his comfort zone.” Felix isn’t the only new face that is primed to break out in his first collegiate game against the Bulldogs. High school teammates at Garland Naaman Forest,

Demarcus Holland and Prince Ibeh will also suit up for the first time and are sure to make their presence felt sooner rather than later. The pair have played on the same team since their sophomore year at Naaman Forest, and after Ibeh was certain he would become a Longhorn, it was only a matter of time before Holland followed and decided to sign with Texas as well. “We had always talked about going to the same school,” Holland said. “It was always the

Lawrence Peart | Daily Texan Staff Rick Barnes wants Sheldon McClellan to take on a more assertive role this season. McClellan averaged 11.4 points per game last year.

Rick Barnes and Sheldon McClellan have what some could call a love-hate relationship. Barnes, the longtime Longhorns head coach, and McClellan, the team’s top returning scorer from last year’s 20-14 squad, don’t get along at practice nearly as well as they do off of the court. “On the court, we’re not friends,” McClellan said. “In practice it’s something different. It’s like Rick knows nobody in practice. He has no love for anybody. Practices are worse than the games.” McClellan averaged 11.3 points per game last year, behind only J’Covan Brown’s Big 12 best of 20.1 points per game. While most coaches usually have trouble getting a few players to shoot less, Barnesvvc convincing McClellan to stop

passing up open jumpers. “He can score. He’s just got to take shots,” Barnes said. “He is a natural scorer. He has a gift for it. He knows how to play without the ball. He just needs to get out of his comfort zone a little bit.” The last time Barnes had this much trouble getting a player to be more aggressive taking shots, the guy got his number retired at the Frank Erwin Center, where Texas begins its season against Fresno State on Friday night. “Kevin Durant, I can’t tell you how many times we told him that he had to shoot it,” Barnes said. “Not that I’m comparing him to Sheldon, but I told Kevin, ‘You need to take this game over. Make me look good.’” Barnes occasionally resorts to making the sophomore guard run what McClellan calls “Jacob Ladders” when he doesn’t take shots that he should. The method seems to be working.

“Last year it used to happen a lot,” McClellan said. “This year I’ve cut it down a little bit. I think it was last practice that he almost made me run for passing up a shot in the post. I’ve just been trying to be aggressive.” Another tactic, more simple than making him run, seems to be just as effective. “He calls me soft. I can’t stand it,” McClellan said. “When he calls me soft, I don’t know, I’m a whole new person. After he calls me soft, I change for the rest of the practice. When he calls me soft, I lose it. I play stronger. I play better. I don’t know, it’s just something about that word. I just don’t like being called soft. I hate that word.” Even if he’s in a slump during a game, McClellan said that he won’t stop looking for and taking his share of shots. That’s

BARNES continues on page 8

VOLLEYBALLL

Longhorns going for record-breaking win By Rachel Thompson Thirteen, a number commonly associated with bad luck and general dread, could be the Longhorns’ lucky break Saturday. Texas will make its way to Lawrence, Kan., to face the second-ranked team in the Big 12. Should the Longhorns win, a new record will be set for best start in Big 12 play since head coach Jerritt Elliott took the reins. 13-0 is the number they’ll seek. “That gym will be so loud,” Elliott said. “We should be able to deal with the nerves a little bit more.

We should be able to play at a high level, but obviously we want to go undefeated.” Texas swept No. 23 Kansas earlier this season in Austin, the second two sets concluding at uncomfortably close scores of 25-22 and 26-24. While the latest rankings pin the Longhorns at No. 2, Kansas is sure to provide a challenge in the midst of a sweeping season. Texas currently leads the Big 12 in hitting percentages and blocks and features a roster of talent that has only grown with each game. Outside hitter Haley Eckerman leads the Big 12 in kills and points and is

123 kills away from earning a spot on UT’s singleseason top 10 list for kills. Meanwhile, sophomore middle blocker/outside hitter Khat Bell is first in blocks, and junior outside hitter Bailey Webster ranks third in kills. However, Kansas is not without assets of its own. Junior middle blocker Caroline Jarmoc tops the Big 12 in hitting percentage, while junior setter Erin McNorton is first in assists. Junior libero Brianne Riley currently sits at first in digs. Riley and Jarmoc, along with outside hitters Sara McClinton

and Tiana Dockery, all received Big 12 player of the week honors this season. The 21-5 Jayhawks are also fresh from a win against Kansas State. The match will determine the top team in the Big 12 conference, which Elliott said means a high level of play and a lot at stake. “We want to be tested at a high level and be challenged,” Elliott said. “Kansas will be able to do that, and they’re in a position right now that it is a must-win for them.” Texas will face Kansas on Saturday at 6:30 p.m.

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“I hate that the seats are too small for football players in the classroom.”

HORNS continues on page 8

McClellan more aggressive thanks to Barnes’ tough love By Christian Corona

VIRGINiA TECH

Sophomore Hayley Eckerman Andrew Torrey Daily Texan Staff

Kabongo and Bond out agasint Bulldogs

Sophomore point guard Myck Kabongo will not play in Texas’ season opener against Fresno State on Friday night as the NCAA continues its investigation into allegations that he received improper benefits from an agent earlier this year. Kabongo averaged 9.6 points per game and a team-best 5.2 assists per game as a freshman last year. He has been practicing with the team but did not play in either of the team’s scrimmages against Davidson last month or against Gonzaga last weekend. Sophomore forward Jaylen Bond, the team’s top returning rebounder from last year, will also miss Friday’s season opener with an ankle injury.

— Christian Corona

Hamilton wins Silver Slugger

Louisville Slugger announced Josh Hamilton as one of the 18 winners of the Silver Slugger Award this season. It is his third time to win the award, having taken it home in 2008 and 2010. He became the fifth Ranger to win the award at least three times, joining Julio Franco and Alex Rodriguez with three. Juan Gonzalez won the award five times, and Ivan Rodriguez won it six times. The Silver Slugger Award is voted on by major league coaches and managers. It goes to the players who are the best offensive producers in the league. Hamilton joins the Angels’ Mike Trout and the Twins’ Josh Willingham as the outfield winners from the American League.

— Wes Maulsby


sports

8 CROSS COUNTRY

Friday, November 9, 2012

Sutherland takes on leadership role for Texas By Jori Epstein

While most students sleep soundly stretched out on mattresses, junior Sara Sutherland and the women’s cross country team have their own 6 a.m. stretch-out on a course or at the Richard Mithoff Track before morning drills. Up and ready for daily practice, Sutherland smiles, focused. Blonde hair swinging side to side behind her, she pushes herself to run just a little faster and tighten her calves just a bit more. But a few hours after practice closes, Sutherland returns to student life. Working toward government and Spanish degrees, leading freshman Bible study for sorority Kappa Kappa Gamma and “trying not to eat too many cookies,” her athletic commitment never strays far from her mind. “[My teammates and I] come to practice every single day at 6 a.m. and do all of these things, really trying to prepare and do the best we can as runners and athletes,” Sutherland said. “We want to represent the best that we can and show

HORNS

continues from page 7 goal to play together, and when I finally signed I thought it must have been destiny.” It may take some time to get to know all of the new Longhorns, but they have already grown close as a team after spending time together in the offseason preparing for what is shaping up to be an exciting season. Barnes isn’t letting any of the talk about Kabongo, or anthing else for that matter, get in the way of this team’s goals. “We’ve gone real hard without him at the point,” Barnes said. “From the beginning of

people that Texas distance is a group of girls that really cares about what they’re doing.” Sutherland does just that. She led Texas to a win at the Pac 12 Preview Elite Invitational in September, finishing third in the 5K with a time of 17:12. She again placed top three at Austin’s Grass Routes Grand Prix 5K at 18:43.43, and at the Oct. 13 Pre-Nationals Cross Country Meet, Sutherland finished ninth (20:10.7) in the 6K out of more than 250 competitors. Most recently, Sutherland’s third place (20:19.7) at the Big 12 Cross Country Championships marked the highest Longhorn ranking at the meet since 1998. Ensuring nutrition, hydration and sufficient sleep (although she does admit excessive coffee intake), Sutherland leads a balanced life. But it’s her perspective rather than her actions that put her on top. “The best way I can be prepared is not to think about [competitions] too much,” Sutherland said. “At the end of the day, it’s a race, and I like to think about these things as being fun. I only

get to be a student-athlete for four years of my life. I’m just trying to enjoy the ride, enjoy this time and enjoy being excited about it.” Although many athletes profess the same excitement before matches, Sutherland’s mindset persists even beyond the finish line. “It’s not necessarily pertinent to race the way that everybody else races,” Sutherland said. “Rather, that I’m comfortable and I’m working the way that works for me.” As she runs with her own style, Sutherland inspires teammates to also maximize their physical and psychological strengths as athletes. “Sara can always make a competitive and sometimes stressful environment fun and exciting,” junior Marielle Hall said. “Having someone who is constantly working hard to get better and performing at such a great level motivates me and the whole team to contribute our best efforts in practice and on race day.” Sutherland’s closeness doesn’t just reach her teammates. The girls think the world

of coach Stephen Sisson, as well, and hope to win for him. “It’d be really awesome for Steve to gain that recognition,” Sutherland said. “It sounds kind of ridiculous, because obviously I want to win. But I just think that’d be the coolest thing, because he would be going bananas and I’d be laughing the whole time.” Watching his girls run and understanding that “at the University of Texas, there’s always pressure,” Sisson recognizes how strong his team’s dynamic is.

the summer, we said that we were going to have a system that was flexible and interchangeable enough so that we can play a lot of different ways with this group.” The Bulldogs aren’t your average cupcake and may pose a mild threat to the Longhorns, but any chance at an upset will be greatly altered by the fact that this game is being played in Austin. The series between the two teams is knotted at one win apiece after a pair of home-and-home matchups in the 1990s, with each home team winning. Fresno State went an uninspiring 13-20 last year under first-year head coach Rodney Terry, who also happens to

be a longtime Barnes assistant. Terry was a part of the Texas coaching staff for nine years before heading west to coach the Bulldogs, and after playing in the Big West Conference last season, the Bulldogs will now compete in the Mountain West. The top two scorers from a year ago return for Fresno State, and Terry will no doubt be in search of a win against his former superior, but Texas should have no issue in sending the Bulldogs back to Fresno with a loss. Junior Kevin Olekaibe averaged 17.8 points per game in 2011 and is the biggest threat to score in bunches, while senior guard Jonathan Wills averaged 10.3 points per contest last year.

Besides Olekaibe and Wills, the Bulldogs don’t return any double-digit scorers and could be overwhelmed with the Longhorns’ size inside. Texas may sputter in the opening stages against the Bulldogs, and perhaps the season’s first few games, but with a group of young players eager to prove their worth, this team should have no problem finding its way before the schedule picks up. If Felix is forced to lead the Longhorns for an extended period of time, he’s ready, and the rest of the team is prepared to get off to a strong start. “Coach Barnes has been preaching to all of us to be ready to go at all times,” Felix said.

Sara Sutherland’s work on and off of the track gives her teammates confidence. She said she keeps herself balanced to maximize her effectiveness for her teammates and her coach.

Lawrece Peart Daily Texan file photo

“They’ve created a real sense of teamwork, much stronger than I’ve ever experienced in my time here,” Sisson said. “Our [top two] runners in Marielle Hall and Sara Sutherland, being the physical leaders, position themselves in a great place. We have some front running that will inspire and excite a group of six-seven behind them. Seeing our top two girls in the battle for the championships will motivate them as well.” As this weekend’s NCAA South Central Regional

BARNES continues from page 7

something he had trouble with last year, when he shot 44.8 percent from the field and 31 percent from three-point range, a mark he called horrible. “I did get discouraged by that a lot last year, but as the season got further, I just kept shooting the ball,” McClellan said. “I think this year it’ll be better. I want to make the shot, but I won’t get discouraged if I keep missing.” Most of the six newcomers to the team, like 6-foot-10inch Prince Ibeh and 6-foot9-inch Cameron Ridley, were

Championships near, competitors feel their nerves start to rise. Not Sutherland, though. She’ll stay calm and collected as she pushes herself to the front. “It’s funny when people come out to the race and get nervous or get in their own head, because this is why we’re doing it — because we love to compete and love to be out here,” Sutherland said. “Race day is my favorite day. I love coming out here and running, even if it turns out not the way I want. I’m always happy to be here.”

added to provide size under the basket and alter opponents’ shots. There are skilled marksmen from the outside, such as freshmen guards Demarcus Holland and Javan Felix. But neither of them, along with the rest of the sharpshooters on the squad, may be as good of a shooter as McClellan. “I think every guard on this team can hit the three consistently,” Holland said. “If anybody’s separated themselves, it’s Sheldon McClellan. He’s the best shooter on the team.” McClellan agreed. Now he just needs to take enough shots this season to prove Holland right.

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Life & Arts

Friday, November 9, 2012

SMASHED continues from page 11 paper-thin enabler, the soft-voiced devil on Kate’s shoulder. There’s no reason for the audience to invest in their marriage, and the film’s climax jumps to a foregone conclusion without giving us any reason to care about it one way or another. Director James Ponsoldt, who co-wrote “Smashed”’s script with Susan Burke, displays a stronger sense of his story and characters behind the camera. The film’s look is notable, especially for the stark visual contrasts Ponsoldt brings to Kate’s levels of sobriety. When she’s drunk, the camera takes an impressionable lilt, becoming more and more erratic the more Kate imbibes, and her sober scenes are met

9 Charlie (Aaron Paul) and Kate (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) share a rare happy moment in “Smashed.”

Photo courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

with steadiness and a more restrained aesthetic. It is an interesting, creative way to approach Kate’s struggle and a subtle visual signature for Ponsoldt. Although “Smashed” suffers from its slightness, it’s still a well written and directed film that never veers

into sentimentality. There’s no sugar-coating of alcoholism here, and although many of the film’s supporting characters could have used some fleshing out, actors like Offerman, Paul and Octavia Spencer still impress. Even though there’s a lot to like about the film,

there’s so little to it that it’s hard to recommend a pricey theater viewing. However, its scale is so small and its struggles so quiet that it could make for an even more effective experience on video, and it’s certainly worth what little of your time for which it asks.

because it’s common and it’s human,” Grubbs said. “Levi is by far one of the hardest working musicians I’ve ever seen. He puts so much into what he does. Watching him over the course of time and what he’s been through and being able to see him get better and grow as a musician is really inspiring.” As Weaver continues his work, his perspective on his career keeps him grounded and able to connect with fans, something he considers the most important part of what he does. “I’ve done a lot of house shows in the past year, and

I love them,” Weaver said. “You get to meet people and make actual friends rather than talking to someone for five minutes at your merch booth. It’s so much bigger than I ever hoped it would be, having someone come up to me and let me know that they could really relate with the songs about the things I’ve gone through. That’s the greatest part of all this.” Students who wish to be in the audience for the “Local Live” taping of Levi Weaver can pick up wristbands from the business office located on the ground floor of HSM all day Friday.

WEAVER continues from page 12 years ago online when we were both in college,” Grubbs said. “I had recently lost a friend when the A&M bonfire collapsed. That was my first brush with death, and Levi was also going through sort of the same thing, so we connected over that and just struck up a friendship.” The two kept in touch, and after a decade they finally met up in person at a South By Southwest show Weaver was playing at. “I was at the same point in my acting career as he was in his music career, and I felt like I knew exactly what he was going through,” Grubbs

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world so reliant on technology, and the film is shot with deliberate thematic purpose, casting Bond as the shadowy figure keeping the world safe. Mendes and Deakins also stage the hell out of their action sequences, impressing with an opening scene that easily fits among some of the best Bond pre-credits sequences ever and a stunningly beautiful pair of action scenes set in Shanghai that lends the film its most indelible images. In addition to exploring how Bond fits into this world, where hackers are quickly becoming the most useful secret agents, “Skyfall” delves into Bond’s history, two rich themes that give the film an outstanding purpose and resonance. Without spelling too much of the character’s history out, “Skyfall” gives us a sense of where Bond came from and how MI6 shapes its agents. Craig continues to impress as Bond, and the remarkable physicality and suaveness he brings to the role is tempered with an uncharacteristic insecurity as Bond struggles to get on top of his game. Craig seems to know Bond inside and out by now, and “Skyfall” gives him plenty of new notes to play without compromising Craig’s unflappable cool. What can really make a Bond film stand out is a great villain, and once Javier Bardem is introduced into the “Skyfall” equation more than an hour into the film, things really start to get interesting. Bardem won an Oscar in 2008 for playing a terrifying assassin in “No

CLASSIFIEDS THE DAILY TEXAN

Country For Old Men,” but it would be wrong to accuse him of repeating himself here. His villain is much more vibrant, driven by a desire for revenge against MI6, and Bardem is fantastic, instilling the character with a sharp wit, an eye for creating chaos and a surprisingly personal bloodthirstiness. Judi Dench has been playing M, the head of MI6, for seven films now, and “Skyfall” makes her surprisingly instrumental to the plot. More than ever before, Dench is playing not just a secret agent but also the public face of her agency and the guiding force for all of her operatives. The rest of the supporting cast are mostly new characters settling into the archetypes that have defined the Bond franchise, and Ben Whishaw’s charming take on Q, Bond’s gadgets man, stands out. Unfortunately, “Skyfall” lacks a strong Bond girl, but Naomie Harris and Bérénice Marlohe both manage to look stunning and register some chemistry with Craig, although they fail to make a strong impression. Thanks to some legitimately inspired touches from Sam Mendes, “Skyfall” is a highlight of the Bond franchise, an appropriately touching and retrospective look at Bond’s past that also charts a course for his (and the franchise’s) future. Featuring some of the most beautifully staged action scenes in the series’ history, a memorable villain and a strong, wellrounded cast, “Skyfall” is the Bond film at its best.

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said. “It’s like, at these certain milestones in your life, if you’re not doing exactly what you thought you would be doing, does that make you a failure? A lot of people think they’re a failure when they come out of high school or out of college, and that’s not necessarily the case.” Grubbs hopes the film and Weaver’s story will resonate with a broad range of views and challenge attitudes about what it means to be successful. “I think this is a topic that will reach different audiences, no matter what age,

BOND continues from page 12

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Friday, November 9, 2012

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Arrr matey. This scurrvy beast is today’s answerrrrrr. Crop it out, or it’ll be the the fishes for ya!

THOUSANDS OF

5 1 4 9 2 The 7New6York3Times8Syndication Sales Corporation WINES · SPIRITS · FINER FOODS 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018(512) 366-8260 specsonline.com · . Information 1-800-972-3550 3 2 7 3 8 5 For 1 4 ill 9 Call: Ch CHEERS TO SAVINGS!® For Friday, November 09, 2012 8 3 9 4 1 6 5 2 7 2 6 1 7 5 8 4 9 3 No. 1005 7 ACROSS 4 8 6 9 3 2 5 1 Edited by Will Shortz 22 “Weekend 37 What invalid card might 31 Thunderstruck 9 5 1 Update” 4 anchor 2 7readers 6 read8 between Miller 5 Loophole39 Small concession and Macdonald 9 exploiting 7 casino 2 8 6 4 3 5 41 San1 Fernando 23 Symbol of site, say Valley city Lutheranism 42 Oriental vessel 49 London 8 carriages 6 5 3 1 9 7 2 24 Worthless 46 Defensive effort 14 Resembling inheritance? 47 Head honcho 116 “Walk5Away3___” 2 8 6 is pivotal 4 48 Its role 25 Dish7 cover, 9

REASONS TO

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17 Impetus to review 28 safety procedures 30 18 Sliwinska of 31 “Dancing With the Stars” 19 Like many gazebos

Lightheaded? Oriental vessel One of Heinrich Schliemann’s excavations

32 Gets ready for a snap

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DOWN 1 Beau Brummell’s accessory 21 What married 35 Hard to control 2 Radio reply women in India traditionally wear 36 “I remember now” 3 Do one’s part poorly? 4 Confusion ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE 5 ___ Rebellion (1676 Jamestown uprising) 6 Game played since 1935 7 One presenting the earth as flat? 8 Commuter’s expense 9 Stipend paid by a cathedral to a clergyman 10 State tree of New Jersey 11 In no particular order Note: Each of the four black circles represents a MOON in the Down answer 12 Time keeper obscuring a SUN reading across. 13 Eel lookalikes 20 They don’t have class

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49 Surrounding with a glow 50 Sign in a booth 51 Not flowing freely 52 Lashes leave them 53 Press for a hit? 54 Discerned

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possibly

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(1966 #5 hit)

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Puzzle by Patrick Berry

15 Army division 22 They’re in a particular order 24 Longest-living member of the Rat Pack 25 Play, for instance 26 Resident of the largest Spanishspeaking nation

27 Drilling-and-filling job 29 Hits from the 1960s? 32 Sport that requires helmets 33 Bands with bends 35 Hands down 36 Merkel of German politics

38 Ignore the plan 40 How depositions might be recorded 42 Like many toothpastes 43 Live with 44 Burn lightly 45 Urge 47 It’s full of holes

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.


L&A 11

Life & Arts

Friday, November 9, 2012

EVENT PREVIEW

MOVIE REVIEW | ‘SMASHED’ Tami Michalik, Veronique Michalik and Kelly McBride, members of the Animal Lovers of Austin board of directors, prepare for Barkitecture on Saturday. The event will raise money for rescue groups and other animal organizations.

Taylor Barron Daily Texan Staff

Barkitecture raises bucks for pups By Kelly Eisenbarger Months of preparation by the members of nonprofit Animal Lovers of Austin will culminate Saturday in a two-block-wide event, Barkitecture, which will raise money for and awareness of rescue groups and specialty animal organizations. Barkitecture will take place on Second Street from the corners of San Antonio Street to Lavaca Street from noon to 4 p.m. There will be 25 custommade doghouses that will be put up for auction as well as a puppy playground, a “Fashound” show, an entire silent auction made up of local offerings and other activities. While 2 might seem like a display of Austin’s petloving quirkiness to the extreme, it is all put on for the noblest of reasons. Veronique Michalik, the

11

director of Animal Lovers of Austin and owner of Lofty Dog stores, said that this event is helping all of Austin’s shelters become no-kill homes. “Local rescues play a pivotal role in obtaining and maintaining no-kill status. The groups that Barkitecture will benefit work tirelessly to care and foster pets tt may not have a good chance of being adopted in a traditional shelter,” Veronique Michalik said. “This helps greatly to reduce the population in shelters and helps take the dogs out of the danger of being killed for space-related reasons.” Over the last six years, Barkitecture raised funds for critical vet care expenses, spread awareness to local rescue groups and shelters and brought together architecture and philanthropy. In 2011 a total of $20,000 in grant assistance was given to seven animal

Barkitecture Where: Second Street, between San Antonio and Lavaca Streets When: Saturday, Nov. 10, noon to 4 p.m. Website: austinbarkitecture.com welfare groups, including Meals on Wheel and More, an assistance program that provides free spay/ neuter services along with preventative care. Kelly McBride, a member of Animal Lovers of Austin’s board of directors, said funding spay and neuter programs integral to maintaining a low stray and shelter population in Austin. “Having animals [spayed and neutered] plays a huge role in Austin maintaining animal welfare. The funds we raise and grant to many of these organizations are largely used to cover medical expense, and the largest cost for the group is the cost of spay/neuter surgery,”

McBride said. “Many of the animals that these organizations work with have other medical conditions that can be quite costly to cover, and our funds give them a little bit of breathing room by lessening their financial burden and allowing them to continue to take in other animals in need.” Tami Michalik, Lofty Dog store manager and board of directors member, said Saturday’s event will be about fun and pup love. “This event helps a lot of organizations and brings awareness to some serious animal issues, but we want everyone to come out and have a blast,” Tami Michalik said.

‘Smashed’ avoids mush, probes into alcoholism By Alex Williams November is apparently the month of the alcoholism message movie, and between last week’s harrowing “Flight” and Sony Pictures Classics’ unsettling “Smashed,” the topic has been getting a lot of play on the big screen lately. It’s hard not to draw comparisons between the two films, but “Smashed” is an entirely different animal, a much more simplistic but emotional portrayal of a marriage collapsing under the harsh light of sobriety. Alcohol has always been a factor in the relationship between Kate (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) and Charlie (Aaron Paul), and the two are already deep in a mutually propulsive spiral when the film begins. After Kate, a first grade teacher, vomits in front of her class, she begins to realize she may have a problem. With the help of co-worker Dave (Nick Offerman), Kate begins to take steps toward recovery, something that pushes her apart from her husband even as it helps her gain control of her life. Mary Elizabeth Winstead is a consistently unpredictable screen presence, and it’s never certain if she will be the dull, pretty face of “Death Proof ” and “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter” or the interesting performer from “Scott Pilgrim vs. the World.” Fortunately, “Smashed” may be her best showcase yet, a role without any room for vanity or self-awareness, and Winstead throws herself into it admirably. The film essentially asks

Smashed James Ponsoldt Genre: Drama Runtime: 85 min.

her to play two different people, and the animalistic depravity of Kate in the film’s opening is a marked difference from the clarity and focus she has once she starts attending AA meetings. Winstead is powerful and understated here, and she shows off a surprisingly effective dramatic skill set. Unfortunately, “Smashed” spends the majority of its runtime focused almost exclusively on Winstead, and that small scope ends up drastically hurting the film. At only 75 minutes without credits, it’s hard not to feel a bit cheated having plunked down the money for a full ticket only to get about twothirds of a movie. The film’s central tension focuses on Kate and Charlie’s marriage, but we never really get a sense of Charlie as a character. As good as Paul is, Charlie never ascends beyond a

SMASHED continues on page 9


Life & Arts 12

Friday, November 9, 2012

Kelsey McKinney, Life & Arts Editor

MUSIC | LOCAL LIVE

t e d y e l d y

” s d p . t a d l s n , a a

Photo courtesy of Eric May Levi Weaver will play Local Live on Sunday at 11 p.m. Doors open at 9:30 p.m. Weaver toured with Imogen Heap in 2006 but enjoys staying grounded and connected to fans by playing small shows.

Career trajectory focus of film

Singer to perform Local Live at UT, promote documentary on success By Alexandra Hart

The trajectory of Levi Weaver’s career is a hard one to pin. The Nashville-based singer/songwriter’s rise has been one marked by unpredictability — with peaks and valleys ranging from a whirlwind tour with Imogen Heap to nearly calling it quits — ever exacerbated by the constantly changing landscape of the modern music industry.

“I don’t think I’m interesting enough to be the subject of a documentary,” Weaver said. “Shea and Jonathan must have both felt I would be, though, so this film kind of centers around what it means to be successful in the music industry and how we define the term.” Weaver has seen his share of success, no matter the definition. In 2006 the relatively unknown singer “lucked into” playing with Imogen Heap. “While I was living in

England, I saw that Imogen Heap had a MySpace promotion where each of her tour dates she’d have a local band open for her,” Weaver said. “All you had to do was write on the wall saying you were interested, and they’d pick one person at random. They contacted me the day of the show asking if I could be at the venue in two hours, so I told them I would and got over there as fast as I could.” Imogen Heap must have liked what she heard. After the performance, she invited Weaver to play on her subsequent North American tour. “It all happened so

MOVIE REVIEW | ‘SKYFALL’

quickly. I had to pack up and order merch and hope it would be at the venues in time,” Weaver said. “I had no idea how the music industry worked, so after it was all done I thought, ‘I guess now I just sit back and wait for management companies and booking agents and labels or whatever to get in touch.’ After a while, they didn’t, and I realized that wasn’t how it worked.” He began to contemplate the future of his career and considered dropping his ambition of being a professional musician. This was a turning point for Weaver and the change of attitude

‘‘

It’s like, at these certain milestones in your life, if you’re not doing exactly what you thought you would be doing, does that make you a failure?

— Shea Weaver Grubbs, Co-director of ‘String Theory’’

that helped him get back on the track of recording and performing. “It was also a good thing, because it taught me to work harder and embrace the independence,” Weaver said. “I’ve been completely independent ever since then, and it’s been great.” This redefining of suc-

cess helped to inspire the documentary “String Theory,” directed by Shea Weaver Grubbs. The film follows Weaver throughout his six-year career and his attitudes about fame and the music industry. “I met Levi probably 15

WEAVER continues on page 9

POP INDEX BY ALEKSANDER CHAN

HORNS UP

The election is finally over!

Photo courtesy of Sony Pictures The terrifying Silva (Javier Bardem) introduces himself to James Bond (Daniel Craig) in “Skyfall.”

Latest Bond packs in action, thrills Alex Williams Fifty years after the iconic secret agent ordered his first martini, shaken, not stirred, we find the Bond franchise at an impasse. “Casino Royale,” Daniel Craig’s series debut, was one of the best in recent memory, but the sequel, “Quantum of Solace,” was rushed and undercooked. The meltdown of MGM derailed the franchise for a few years, but four years later Bond is back in “Skyfall,” a film that works to define Craig’s legacy as Bond, even as it takes the time to look back at the history of both the franchise and the character. In a rip-roaring opening, James Bond (Daniel Craig)

is accidentally shot and presumed dead by fellow operative Eve (Naomie Harris) as they attempt to reclaim a stolen hard drive containing the secret identities of undercover MI6 agents. In his absence, terrorist Silva (Javier Bardem) attacks MI6, targeting Bond’s mentor M (Judi Dench). Springing back into service after an overseas respite, Bond finds himself shakier, less alert and in the crosshairs of a bloody vendetta against MI6. Director Sam Mendes is best known for domestic dramas “American Beauty” and “Revolutionary Road”, but he’s always been willing to try new things in the process of developing his voice, and his collaboration with cinematographer

Joe Biden filmed a “Parks and Recreation” cameo. Leslie Knope’s dream come true.

This anti-low-level speeding ad is a photo of a car made out of people. Look!

Nate Silver’s vindication.You were right again, Nate.

The possibly misguided idea of a “Boy Meets World” sequel series. “Girl Meets World?”

So, Diane Sawyer seemed kind of drunk election night.

Long voting lines. Two hours of waiting, a lifetime of annoyance.

Those awkward, giant touch screens. Everyone looks like children finger painting.

Skyfall Sam Mendes Genre: Action Runtime: 143 min. Roger Deakins is extremely fruitful. Much of “Skyfall” is concerned with how agents like Bond can function in a

BOND continues on page 9

A seven-foot, 27-pound gummy python exists. It’s 36,720 calories and costs $150.

Voting in Florida. Get it together, guys.

HORNS DOWN

The Daily Texan 2012-11-09  

The November 9, 2012 edition of The Daily Texan.

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