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The Daily Texan Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

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INSIDE

Monday, October 22, 2012

dailytexanonline.com

Haunted house depicts end-ofworld horror.

Texas bounces back against Baylor in classic Big 12 style.

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10

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SPORTS PAGE 6

OPINiON

The debates stink but they don’t have to. UT professor Jeremi Suri explains.

SYSTEM

Endowment’s value rises to $13.5 billion By Alexa Ura

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Huston-Tillotson and UT students discuss society’s racial biases.

6 SPORTS

Texas’ defense didn’t show up Saturday, but made plays when they mattered.

The value of the Permanent University Fund, a state endowment that funds a portion of the University’s budget, increased by $194 million since last year despite receiving lower returns on investments compared to similar educational endowment funds. The Permanent University Fund is now valued at $13.5 billion as of Aug. 31, according to a report released by the

University of Texas Investment Management Company earlier this month. The Permanent University Fund underperformed compared to other university educational endowments valued at more than $1 billion in 2011, obtaining 12.9 percent less than the average return rate, according to data compiled by the National Association of College and University Business Officers. The association reported the average return rate was 20.1 percent in 2011.

Following a request for comment, a UTIMCO spokesperson said all of the company’s employees were travelling. The UT System created UTIMCO in 1996 as a nonprofit corporation that oversees investments for the UT System and the Texas A&M System. UTIMCO invests sale profits from semiannual land lease sales of 2.1 million acres that make up the Permanent University Fund. The land is

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Francisco Cigarroa

Paul Foster

UT Chancellor

UT Regent

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CITY

WEST CAMPUS

Swastikas concern off-campus dormitory residents

10 LIFE & ARTS

UT artists portray the violence along US-Mexican border.

By Jordan Rudner

TODAY Hip hop, mass media and racial storytelling The Senior Fellows Honors Program of The College of Communication hosts a talk by Tricia Rose, a professor of Africana Studies at Brown University in BMC 5.208 from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.

Bevonomics 302B

Attend a session on how to make smart invests toward the things you want in life from 4 to 5 p.m. in BUR 224.

College of Fine Arts resume review In preparation for the Arts Internship and Networking Fair, the Fine Arts Career Services will be reviewing resumes in DFA 1.101 (the Co-Op Student Lounge) from 12 to 1 p.m. and 5 to 6 p.m.

Today in history In 1836

Sam Houston was inaugurated as the first president of the Republic of Texas.

Quote to note “This is the offense we wanted. It’s who we want to be — very balanced. It’s who we were the first two games.” — Mack Brown, head coach SPORTS, PAGE 6

Maria Arrellaga | Daily Texan Staff Three men gather at the starting point for the Austin Thong Jog Saturday morning. The event was in commemoration to Leslie Cochran, and proceeds went to support services for Austin’s homeless.

Run and bare it

Downtown Thong Jog in icon’s honor supplies homeless with food, clothing By Tiffany Hinman Thong-clad Austin joggers filled the streets of downtown Austin Saturday in efforts to raise proceeds for the homeless and in memory of the Austin icon Leslie Cochran, a homeless man who died in March. More than 150 people registered for the one mile and

5k routes to raise proceeds for Mobile Loaves & Fishes, a social outreach ministry that provides supportive items such as food and clothing to the homeless. Cochran, who arrived in Austin in 1996, usually wore a thong while advocating for peace and against police brutality against the homeless. Many considered him the face of Austin’s

ELECTION 2012

Leaders urge students to vote early, prepare By Christine Ayala

Early voting begins Monday, allowing registered voters to cast their ballots at their convenience throughout the county at any polling location, including the Flawn Academic Center at UT. The FAC will be open for early voting from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. until Nov. 2. During the last three days of early voting, two locations at Highland Mall and Lamar Plaza Shopping Center will be open until 9 p.m. and will have more ballot boxes than other locations. Students will need to show some form of identification, including driver’s licenses, or their voter registration card to vote. A full list of acceptable documents is available on the Travis County Clerk’s website. Michael Winn, Travis County Elections Director,

said voters should check if and where they are registered. Winn said there can be confusion about where students need to cast their ballot. Those registered outside of Travis County can request a mail-in ballot as long as the application is recieved (not postmarked) by Oct. 30. Applications are provided by Travis County online but must be addressed to the student’s home County Clerk’s office. “If you do vote early you can check that there are no problems, and if there are, you still have time to go vote,” Winn said. “It gives you a couple of days if you need to go to your home jurisdiction and vote there, or apply for a ballot by mail.” Danny Zeng, goverment and finance senior and College Republicans

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homeless community. Austin city officials estimate that more than 2,300 homeless people lived in the city in 2011. The Thong Jog was a joint effort to commemorate Cochran by Dean Baldwin, owner of the personal training company Austin F.I.T., and Sara Henry, owner of the event planning company Oh, Henry Events. Baldwin said he worked with Henry to create a fun event to honor Cochran’s positive impact on Austin residents. “Everybody really enjoyed

him in Austin,” Baldwin said. “Everybody sees him in a positive way. He influenced corporate people, college students, anybody visiting from out of town and specifically me and Sara to do this. It is important to keep his memory alive.” Cochran ran for Austin mayor three times, most recently in 2003. In 2009, Cochran was attacked and suffered a head injury. It is believed he died because of complications from

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Austin police received a report Saturday that swastikas had been carved into the doors of two suites in the University Towers private dorm complex located at West 24th and Rio Grande streets. Three Jewish students live in one of the suites. Students from the two suites said the swastikas, which each measured about a foot in diameter, were carved into their doors around midnight Friday. No arrest has been made in regard to the carvings and police say the investigation is ongoing. Undeclared freshman Andrew Kleiman, resident of one of the vandalized suites, said this was not the first anti-semitic incident he has seen while living at Towers. He said roughly a month ago, a brief verbal altercation occurred between members of his suite and members of the suite across the hall. Kleiman said he heard them use anti-Semitic

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UNIVERSITY Laura Bush, Julius Glickman, Charles Matthews, Adm. William McRaven, Melinda Perin and Hector Ruiz are recognized as distinguished alumni by the Texas Exes.

Courtesey of Mark Rutkowski

Distinguished alumni awarded By David Maly Six of UT’s most distinguished alumni, including former first lady Laura Bush and Adm. William McRaven, traveled to campus Friday to be honored for their accomplishments. For more than 50 years, Texas Exes, the University’s

alumni organization, has annually honored as many as six UT alumni who have distinguished themselves professionally and through service to UT with a Distinguished Alumnus Award. This year, the organization recognized Laura Bush, former first lady and 1973 alumna; Julius Glickman, philanthropist, attorney and 1962 alumnus;

Charles Matthews, former vice president and general counsel of Exxon Mobil Corporation and 1967 alumnus; Adm. William McRaven, commander of NATO Special Operations Command, leader of the military operation that resulted in the death of Osama bin Laden and

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News

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Monday, October 22, 2012

FRAMES | FEAtuREd photo

The Daily Texan Volume 113, Issue 49

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CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Susannah Jacob (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Aleksander Chan (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office: (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@gmail.com Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com

Maria Arrellaga | Daily Texan Staff A man relaxes in the sun outside of his trailer at Pecan Grove RV Park on Barton Springs road Sunday afternoon.

Life & Arts Office: (512) 232-2209 dailytexan@gmail.com

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The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2012 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER High

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She came out of the womb frowning.

leased for surface use and oil and gas production. The Available University Fund, which usually makes up about 8 percent of UT’s $2.3 billion operating budget, is funded through returns on investments. The University received $176 million through the Available University Fund for the 2012-2013 operating budget. Kevin Hegarty, UT vice president and chief financial officer, said he was initially skeptical of UTIMCO’s work but said the company keeps up with the work of prestigious private school investors despite a smaller endowment. “Yale and Harvard see skyrocketing returns, and you could find similar entities or institutions that achieve greater returns than UTIMCO,” he said. “It also means they are taking greater risks, but we may be more

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1977 UT alumnus; Melinda Perrin, former chair of the Hermann Hospital Board of Trustees and 1969 UT alumna; and Hector de Jesus This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25

Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susannah Jacob Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drew Finke, Kayla Oliver, Pete Stroud Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Aleksander Chan Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trey Scott Digital Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayley Fick News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matt Stottlemyre Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Boze, Samantha Katsounas, Allie Koletcha, Jody Serrano Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bobby Blanchard, Joshua Fechter, Lazaro Hernandez, David Maly, Alexa Ura Enterprise Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Audrey White Enterprise Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Messamore, Megan Strickland Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kristine Reyna Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands, Amyna Dosani, Sherry Hu, Luis San Miguel Editorial Copy Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nile Miller Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nicole Collins Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pu Ying Huang, Omar Longoria, Jack Mitts Special Projects Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Natasha Smith Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lawrence Peart Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon, Andrew Torrey Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nathan Goldsmith, Pu Ying Huang, Zachary Strain, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fanny Trang, Marisa Vasquez Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorge Corona Associate Multimedia Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrea Macias Senior Videographers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oluwademilade Adejuyigbe, Thomas Allison, Shila Farahani, Lawrence Peart Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kelsey McKinney Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorge Corona, Sarah-Grace Sweeney Senior Life&Arts Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Helen Fernandez, Hannah Smothers, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ricky Stein, Alex Williams, Laura Wright Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christian Corona Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lauren Giudice, Chris Hummer, Sara Beth Purdy, Rachel Thompson, Wes Maulsby Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ao Meng Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riki Tsuji Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ghayde Ghraowi Associate Web Editor, Social Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Sanchez Associate Web Editors, Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Helen Fernandez, Omar Longoria Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Albert Cheng Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

conservative than some of the private schools.” Harvard’s endowment is worth more than $30 billion and has historically generated annualized returns of 12.5 percent in the last 20 years, according to the New York Times. The Permanent University Fund generated annualized returns of 8.2 percent during the last 10 years. The UT System receives two-thirds of returns on investment and the A&M System receives one-third. The University is then awarded 45 percent of the UT System’s portion as recurring funding that is applied to operating costs, salaries and student scholarships. The UT regents also award one-time payouts from the fund to all System universities for special initiatives. Hegarty said UTIMCO benefits from a legal structure the UT regents oversee. UT System regent Paul Foster serves as chair of UTIMCO’s board of directors and Ruiz, CEO of Bull Ventures, an education advocate who has served on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board and 1970 UT alumnus. All six members were in attendance at the ceremony, along with some of UT’s most prominent figures and former Distinguished Alumnus Award winners. UT President William Powers Jr. kicked off the ceremony by welcoming each award winner and talking about their impressive accomplishments. “We’re just happy that we can say we knew them back when, and we are even more happy that we still know them today,” Powers said.

A Look at University Funding utimco investments

AUGUST 2012

$27.8 BILLION Total UTIMCO investment value $13.5 BILLION Permanent Univerity Fund investment value $176 MILLION Allocated to UT-Austin in 2012 from the Available University Fund (comes from PUF investments) Source: UTIMCO and UT Budget Office

chancellor Francisco Cigarroa serves as vice chairman for policy. “The regents themselves set a targeted return rate, and we rely on the regents and UTIMCO to be as successful as they can,” he said. “[Foster and Cigarroa] really oversee, along with the other board members, UTIMCO operations and ensure they provide a connection back to the full board of regents.” UTIMCO also invests billions of dollars internationally in both developed countries and countries with emerging economies. Sandy Leeds, finance lecturer and president of the MBA Investment Fund, Each recipient gave a speech after accepting their orange blazer, a symbol of the award given to each of its recipients. Bush talked about her time at UT in 1972, while working on her masters degree in information sciences. She said Austin was an impressive and welcoming place, even back then. “I felt right at home, even though I was not really hippie material,” she said. “Case in point, I was a librarian who named her cat Dewey after the Dewey Decimal System.” Perrin and Glickman chose to use part of their speeches to comment on the current debate over funding going on at UT. Glickman said when he came to UT in the 1950s

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(512) 471-1865 | advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Interim Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Business Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lori Hamilton Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amy Ramirez Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcast & Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Morgan Haenchen Student Assistant Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ted Moreland Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matthew Chang, Zach Congdon, Draike Delagarza, Jake Dworkis, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ivan Meza, Trevor Nelson, Diego Palmas, Paola Reyes, Ted Sniderman Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nick Cremona Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jacqui Bontke, Sara Gonzales, Bailey Sullivan Special Editions/Production Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Abby Johnston Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Hublein

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The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

Texan Ad Deadlines

10/22/12

UT gave him, and the way he was able to go on and experience great success, despite his low GPA. “The school taught me that failure was only a temporary condition,” McRaven said, citing his poor performance in UT classes. McRaven gave some advice to UT professors with struggling students in their classes, students in the same situation he was in during the 1970s. “For those professors out there who come across a struggling student, I would ask you to give them a break and never forget that great institutions like the University of Texas can take a common student and give them the tools they need to have uncommon success,” McRaven said.

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Issue Staff

Monday .............Wednesday, 12 p.m. Thursday.................Monday, 12 p.m. Tuesday.................Thursday, 12 p.m. Friday......................Tuesday, 12 p.m. Word Ads 11 a.m. Wednesday................Friday, 12 p.m. Classified (Last Business Day Prior to Publication)

the state paid for 69 percent of the cost of his education. He said they now pay only an average 13 percent of a UT’s undergraduate’s education cost. Both commented on UT’s need for additional funds in order to keep up its tradition of excellence. “To prevail will require our united, passionate, engaged advocacy,” Perrin said. “Together we can help the University of Texas become the best public university in America.” The crowd roared especially loud when McRaven accepted his award. McRaven organized and executed Operation Neptune Spear in 2011, the military operation that resulted in the death of Osama bin Laden. In his speech, McRaven talked about the tools that

THONGS

Reporter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala, Tiffany Hinman, Miles Hutson, Jordan Rudner Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Maria Arrellaga, Ricky Llamas, Mark Rutkowski Sports Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Evan Berkowitz, Christopher Caraveo, Garrett Callahan, Nitya Duran, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Samantha Jackson, Jacob Martella, Peter Sblendorio, Sarah White Life&Arts Writers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Olivia Arena, Bobby Blanchard, Eli Watson Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard, Meital Boim, Andrew Huygen Comic Artists. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Desiree Avila, Alyssa Creagh, Kaz Frankiewicz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Holly Hansel, Anne KT Haris, Shaun Lane, Lydia Thron Web Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Peacock, Tyler Reinhart

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L.L.C., said UTIMCO’s international investments allow for a diverse portfolio. “In my opinion, it would be negligent of UTIMCO’s management if they did not invest internationally,” he said. “Many foreign countries have greater growth prospects than the U.S. In addition, they offer a way to diversify the risk of your portfolio.” Leeds said it’s appropriate for UTIMCO to take risks and invest in good hedge funds that might otherwise appear uncertain. UTIMCO’s hedge funds investments were valued at $3.7 billion as of their last available investment summary report for 2011.

slurs and imitate the Nazi salute. Kleiman said he has not seen any other antiSemitism at UT. “I’d never experienced or heard of anyone else experiencing this kind of thing,” Kleiman said. “I think this was just a couple of messed-up kids. I don’t know.” Kleiman said the carved swastika had an immediate impact on him. “I’m not an angry kid, and I don’t like to fight, but I was looking for a fight at that moment,” Kleiman said. “I was really upset. You can make fun of me, you can say whatever, but when you bring religion into it, and particularly an image from the Holocaust, then that just isn’t acceptable.” Suite residents carved the vandalized portions of the doors flat that night, and said by midSaturday, their doors had been spray-painted black by other Tower residents. However, the carved slashes are still visible. Tracy Frydberg, head of campus relations on the student executive cabinet at Texas Hillel, a campus center for Jewish life, said Hillel has not yet had a chance to investigate the incident, but will reach out to the local Anti-Defamation League in order to determine an appropriate course of action. “We take things like this very seriously and will do what we think is necessary to make sure something like this doesn’t happen again,” Frydberg said. She said there are roughly 4,000 Jewish students currently enrolled at UT. —Additional reporting by David Maly

Raises money for graduate student professional development awards. Put on by the Graduate Student Assembly Register today at:

www.utgsa5k.com

the injury last year. James Sutton, chemical engineering freshman and race participant, said the race was a way to get involved in the community and work with charity. “It is just people having a good time, with no alterior motives,” Sutton said. “People are just trying to help out and have fun while doing that.” Race coordinator Henry said Cochran represented a sense of adventure for those in Austin whose lives forced them to solely focus on work. She said she and Baldwin hope to make the race an annual event. “He had a good heart, and his ‘screw the man,’ anti-establishment mentality made him loved,” Henry said. “He went against the grain, and many of us that work in cubicles and hate our lives looked up to that.”


W&N 3

Monday, October 22, 2012

World & Nation 3

Electoral proce draws Cuba to p

NEWS BRIEFLY George McGovern dies at age 90 It was a campaign in 1972 dishonored by Watergate in which the South Dakota senator George McGovern dropped Missouri Sen. Thomas F. Eagleton as the vice presidential nominee from the ticket after Eagleton had undergone electroshock therapy for depression. It was called “possibly the most single damaging faux pas ever made by a presidential candidate” by the late political writer Theodore H. White. George McGovern, died at 5:15 a.m. Sunday at a Sioux Falls hospice, family spokesman Steve Hildebrand told The Associated Press. McGovern was 90.

Negligence lawsuit filed against hospital

CHICAGO — The parents of an 8-year-old boy who has had severe brain damage for years have sued a Chicago hospital, alleging that doctors pronounced their son dead, keeping him off his ventilator for hours, even though relatives continued to insist that the boy’s eyes and body were still moving. The lawsuit filed this week by Sheena Lane and Pink Dorsey on behalf of their son, Jaylen Dorsey, accuses Mercy Hospital and Medical Center of negligence and alleges that nearly five hours passed before staff agreed to perform a cardiac ultrasound, which showed Jaylen Dorsey’s heart was beating. The hospital denies the allegations, and said in a written statement that Jaylen arrived at the hospital after suffering full cardiac arrest and doctors treated him for “an extended period of time” before declaring him dead. —Compiled from Associated Press Reports

Kristine Renya,

By Andrea Rodriguez Associated Press

Tom Lynn | Associated Press Police and swat team members respond to a call of a shooting at the Azana Spa in Brookfield, Wis. Sunday.

Suspected shooter found dead By Dinesh Ramde Associated Press

BROOKFIELD, Wis. — A man police suspected of killing three and wounding four by opening fire at a tranquil day spa was found dead Sunday afternoon following a six-hour manhunt that locked down a shopping center, country club and hospital in suburban Milwaukee. Authorities said they believed the shooting was related to a domestic dispute. The man they identified as the suspect, Radcliffe Franklin Haughton, 45, of Brown Deer, had a restraining order against him. Brookfield Police Chief Dan Tushaus said Haughton died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound and was found in the spa. Authorities initially believed Haughton had fled and spent much of Sunday looking for him. The shooting happened about 11 a.m. at the Azana Day

Spa, a two-story, 9,000-squarefoot building across from a major shopping mall in Brookfield, a middle-to-upper class community west of Milwaukee. Hours later, a bomb squad descended on the building, and Tushaus said an improvised explosive device had been found inside. It was not clear whether it remained a threat. The mall, a country club adjacent to the spa, a nearby hospital and other buildings were locked down as police searched for Haughton. Shortly before authorities said Haughton’s body had been found, his father, Radcliffe Haughton, Sr., told The Associated Press and a television station in telephone interviews from Florida that he had last spoken to his son a few days ago, but didn’t have any indication anything was wrong. He said then that he had a message for his son: “Please just turn yourself in or contact me.”

Tushaus said officers initially focused on reaching and helping the victims. The victims’ names were not released by authorities, and the hospital treating them was temporarily locked down. Staff members were being escorted into the building, and critically injured patients were accepted with a police escort. Officers were stationed at all main entrances to the facility. It was the second mass shooting in Wisconsin this year. Wade Michael Page, a 40-year-old Army veteran and white supremacist, killed six people and injured three others before fatally shooting himself Aug. 5 at a Sikh temple south of Milwaukee. The shooting at the mall took place less than a mile from where seven people were killed and four wounded on March 12, 2005, when a gunman opened fire at a Living Church of God service held at a hotel.

HAVANA — There are no flashy television ads or campaign signs spiked into front yards. And candidates definitely don’t tour the island shaking hands and kissing babies. Elections in Cuba lack the hoopla they have in other countries, but authorities here say they give people a voice in government and rebut charges that the country is undemocratic. Critics call them a sham since voters can’t throw out the Communist Party long led by Fidel and Raul Castro. A long, complicated and truly unique electoral process is under way on this communist-run island, with more than 8 million Cubans going to the polls this weekend for municipal elections. The process culminates in February, when national assembly legislators vote on who will occupy the presidency, a post held by Raul Castro since 2008. The latest electoral exercise began in September when Cubans met in common spaces, parks and buildings for neighborhood assemblies to choose the candidates in municipal elections. Those assemblies nominated 32,000 candidates, and each electoral district must have between two and eight names on the ballot. Sheets of paper with terse biographies and photos of the candidates were then taped up to strategically placed walls and windows in each neighborhood for

residents to re about the onl that’s allowed. On Sunday ballots to choo candidates for semblies that cal governme complaints on potholes and and sports pro After the l commissions workers, far student and w then choos for the nation which eventu ba’s next presi In 2007-200 out was 96.8 government high turnouts of support for Dissidents say fear that not d get them in tro Polling pla into social g neighbors. Yo escort the el disabled to vo are reminded sion, unions groups that c is a patriotic d The entir devoid of p ads or logo one party is l the Comm and its job society and rather than didates, Rub secretary of Electoral Co “Voting i obligatory an said. “Our sy transparent a it like this. W is very demo

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4A Opinion

Opinion 4

Monday, October 22, 2012

viewpoint

Editor-in-Chief Susan

Medical school counts on community

UT-Austin would like a medical school. Texas A&M has one, Baylor has one, the University of North Texas has one and Texas Tech has two — one in Lubbock and one in El Paso. The UT System already has several, one each in Houston, Dallas, Galveston and San Antonio. But not Austin. UT is looking to change that. Plans are in the works for a new medical school in Austin, with associated clinics, medical research facilities and a teaching hospital serving Travis County. But to make all that happen, the University needs a steady, reliable source of funding, which has yet to materialize. By UT’s estimates, construction and operation of the medical school for 12 years would cost about $4.1 billion. The Board of Regents has committed at least $25 million per year from the Available University Fund and an additional $5 million per year for the first eight years to help with equipment and other startup expenses. But that covers less than 10 percent of the expected total cost. To make up the difference, UT has cobbled together funding from a number of sources, including a possible $250 million for the proposed teaching hospital from the Seton Healthcare Family, which has partnered with UT in the past. But UT still needs about $35 million per year, and for that the University is turning to Travis County taxpayers. On Nov. 6, Austinites will vote on Proposition 1, which, if approved, would institute a 63 percent increase on their property taxes for health care. This would raise the average Travis County resident’s property taxes by $107.40 in 2014. According to the University and Central Health, Travis County’s hospital district, this extra tax revenue will cover the remaining cost of the medical school. The proposal also aims to secure additional funding

from the federal government through a Medicaid waiver program created last year that provides $1.46 for every $1 invested in health care improvements for a community’s poor. According to Central Health, the $54 million from the tax increase would draw another $76 million from the feds. The University justifies the tax increase by arguing that the Travis County voters footing the bill would see a significant return on their investment. “It’s important to remember that the tax revenue would be used to pay for health care — not research and not buildings,” said UT spokeswoman Tara Doolittle. Opponents of the tax increase believe that if UT wants to build a medical school, it should cover the cost itself. But the University’s problem is that its two main sources of revenue — endowments and appropriations from the Legislature — are not reliable enough to fund such a largescale initiative. Endowments are inherently unpredictable, as they are largely based on economic climate. The Legislature could provide steady funding if it wanted to, but it doesn’t always want to. “It is impossible to predict the will of the Legislature or the economic factors that influence both it and donors,” Doolittle said. “In order for this venture to be successful, the predictability of recurring funding is needed for this last piece, and we will not be able to move forward unless such funding is secured.” That’s why the University is looking to the tax increase to provide a steady revenue stream. A new UT-Austin medical school would be highly beneficial to the city, the state and Texas’ flagship university. It’s unfortunate that the Legislature can no longer be relied on to fund such an advantageous initiative, and in light of that, a tax increase like Proposition 1 is probably the only

In order for this venture to be s the predictability of recurring needed for this last piece, a not be able to move forward u funding is secured.

— Tara Doolittle, UT Director of M

viable option if UT-Austin is to come up wi it needs. Feeling hard-pressed to make sure that m alizes, UT’s Executive Vice President and P Leslie put in his rather lengthy two cents, c passage of Proposition 1 in an Oct. 10 email staff. The email was then published in the A ican-Statesman. “For us, this is a yes or no Leslie wrote. “Without a complete and relia new funding, we will not be able to start a m … A medical school would immediately com engineering, natural sciences, nursing, pha work, and other programs, strengthening th ally as well as the University’s overall reputat Leslie could not be reached for comment, China at the time of this writing. It remain whether Travis County voters will agree to ra and give UT the medical school it is asking faculty and staff will respond positively or University’s Executive VP telling them how t When they go to the polls, voters should count the lack of viable options for funding th faces. We can’t count on our endowment or o ture, but we should be able to count on our c

gallery

What to Watch October 22-26

Every Monday, we provide a list of the top opinion-worthy events to expect during th coming week.

1

President Barack Obama and former Massa Mitt Romney will face off tonight at 8 p.m presidential debate of the election season. Th focus on foreign policy and will be aired on a networks, on PBS and online.

2

Members of College Republicans and Univ crats will argue in a mock debate on Wednes in GEA 105. The debate is sponsored by Hook UT Votes.

3

Former Speaker of the U.S. House of Re Newt Gingrich will give a lecture this Thur about leadership challenges after the electio speaking at the LBJ Library Atrium at 6 p.m. free and open to the public.

anik Bhattacharya | Daily Texan Cartoonist

Why the debates stink By Jeremi Suri Guest Columnist

I love rigorous toe-to-toe debates, but I hate what I have seen from our presidential candidates in their recent performances. Debates are supposed to force a detailed and focused interrogation of issues, but the past two encounters have only encouraged attacks and personal viciousness accompanied by saccharine smiles. Debates are designed to show candidates’ clarity on positions and contrast their styles. The past two debates have included so many slippery shifts in position that it is less clear today what the candidates believe than it was before the debates. Most of all, debates are intended to showcase leadership demeanor and command capabilities. Tuesday’s “town hall” brawl undermined any opportunity to assess these qualities. The two candidates spent their time interrupting one another, arguing with the moderator and flaunting their postures as aggressive warriors. At moments, it looked like they were keen to clobber one another. These displays of belligerence are harmful on the high school playground, and they are deadly in the White House. Shame on President Obama and Gov. Romney. They are much better than what they have become in this campaign. I am not nostalgic for the mythical time of “clean” and “substantive” politics in America. I know very well that such a moment never occurred. Despite their powdered wigs and dignified public demeanor, even our nation’s founders engaged in vicious attacks against opponents. Two of the greatest early American politicians, Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr, literally came to blows, with Hamilton dying from a bullet fired by Burr’s dueling gun. American politics have always involved brawling. Negative advertising is only a modern form of the traditional campaign. What is new, however, is the use of information overload to obscure positions. Both President Obama and Gov.

Romney are throwing more “facts” at listeners than ever before, but they are refusing to offer coherently argued positions. They each claim to support lower taxes, increased government revenue, lower deficits and more spending. They each pledge to assert more American strength abroad while bringing the troops home. Most confusingly, President Obama and Gov. Romney agree that job creation is a priority, while they simultaneously oppose jobs plans or even targeted investments in job creation and training at home. Watching them throw around the data from all directions, one gets more information but less clarity about how purpose and policy will fit together. It is like listening to kids argue about who started a fight. As they debate the facts, it becomes easier to continue the fight than create a useful path forward. We need debates in our campaigns, but not these debates. The problem is more than format. It is about what we as citizens have come to expect in an age of talk radio and blogs in which those who shout loudest and longest, not those who make the most persuasive arguments, are rewarded with fame and money. We are a public culture of argument without real debate, and that needs to change if we ever want a true marketplace of ideas. At present, we have an overload of facts and positions without the interrogation and testing necessary for finding the truth. So here is what I propose: Let’s scrap the open “foreign policy” brawl that is planned for the next debate. Instead, the public should demand that the two candidates sit down together at a table (please no more shoulder-to-shoulder jousting!) with an agreed focus on one discrete topic — for example, tax policy or job creation or the Iranian nuclear project. A real debate would require each candidate to explain what he will do in the next four years to address that specific challenge. After that, each candidate should be allowed to cross-examine the other with short questions, not statements.

LEGALESE

Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

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We are a public culture of without real debate, and th to change if we ever wan marketplace of ideas.

Under this scheme, President Obama can budget he hopes to pass. Gov. Romney can details regarding deficits and pork in Obam budget. Gov. Romney can outline his own pro and then President Obama can question him inequality and cuts to essential services under is the form of dignified interrogation that wo rate boardrooms, in academic seminars and i ing bodies like the National Security Council. generals assess competing war plans. Why sho less of our presidential candidates? Proposing a detailed plan and defending i stantive questions about its content and conse most effective test of leadership. That is also wh debates should be about. We have had enlight of this kind in the past with diverse candida George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Ross Per well as Ronald Reagan and Jimmy Carter in 1 has come for a return to policy focus withou personal attacks. The future of the United Sta determined by who is best at tearing down The progress of our society will hinge on imple cies that prove, under scrutiny, most helpful to Dr. Jeremi Suri is a professor in the UT Depa tory and the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Publ essay originally appeared on his blog on Global B national affairs magazine.

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE

E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be m and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissio clarity and liability.

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NEWS 5

News

Monday, October 22, 2012

STATE

5 CITY

State Fair icon burns down Students discuss

nnah Jacob

current racial bias

By Danny Robbins Associated Press

By David Maly

DALLAS — The man who successful, provides the voice for Big Tex, gthe funding is at the State giant cowboy Fair of Texas, and we will was greeting people with his usual “Howdy, unless folks!” insuch a slow drawl Friday when someone rushed into

his trailer to tell him the towMedia Outreach

ering fair icon was on fire. ith“It themoved money quickly,” Bill Bragg said of the fire that engulfed materithe 52-foot-tall strucmoney ture, leaving not much more Provost Steven than itsfor charred calling the metal frame behind. “Itand was a quick end.” to faculty This Ameryear’s fair was supAustin posed to be a celebration proposition,” for Big Tex, able source of marking his 60th birthday. medical school Instead, the beloved cowboy mplement our was hauled from the grounds on a flatarmacy, social bed individutruck two days before hem the end of the fair in a protion.” resembling a funeral. ,cession as he was in “It’s sad to see this happen, ns to be seen but their it’s lucky aise taxesno one was injured or killed, for and if UT” Mike Blucher of Dallas,towho object the was at the fair with his wife, Linda, said. to vote. Theinto fire acbrought a temd take porary end to a piece of hat UT-Austin Texas culture. on our LegislaThe cowboy with the community. 75-gallon hat and 50-pound belt buckle always was easy to spot and served as a popular meeting place for people coming to the fair

h VOTE

continues from page 1 communications director,

psaid three the convenience of on-campus voting works he

better with students’ busy schedules. If students wait until Election Day, they achusetts will only Gov. be able to vote at m. in the final he debate will all major news

John McKibben | Associated Press Fire engulfs the Big Tex cowboy statue displayed at the State Fair of Texas in Dallas on Friday. Big Tex made his debut at the Texas State fair in 1952.

or attending the annual Texas-Oklahoma football game at the nearby Cotton Bowl. But all that remained by noon Friday were hands and shirt sleeves on a burned skeleton. Dallas Fire-Rescue spokesman Joel Lavender said Friday afternoon that the cause of the blaze had not been determined. Some dispatchers took a playful approach to reporting the blaze. “Got a rather tall cowboy with all his clothes burned off,” one said. “Howdy, folks, it’s hot,” another said.

Fair officials and city leaders quickly called for the return of Big Tex, vowing to rebuild the structure. Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings tweeted that the cowboy would become “bigger and better for the 21st century.” Big Tex’s hands, boots and face were made of Fiberglas, Gooding said. The clothing that burned had been provided last year by a Fort Worth company, she said. Gooding speculated that the fire could have started in mechanical workings at

the base of the structure and that the metal skeleton “served as a chimney.” The skeleton will be evaluated, and a new one will be built if necessary, she said. Big Tex was actually built in 1949 as a giant Santa Claus for a Christmas celebration in Kerens, 60 miles south of Dallas. Intrigued by the idea of a towering cowboy, the State Fair paid $750 for the structure, which debuted as Big Tex in 1952. —Additional reporting by Schuyler Dixon

the precinct listed on their registration card. “It’s better to just vote within the next week or so, just to take care of business,” Zeng said. “Students benefit from early voting by not having to worry about it on the day of election and avoid standing in long lines. We are college students, so time is precious.” Winn said all voters should

take time to see what is on the ballot beforehand to quicken the voting process. Andre Treiber, sociology junior and University Democrats communications director, said preparation is important for student voters who will be heading to the voting booth in between classes. “There are a lot of candidates and propositions on

that ballot,” Treiber said. “Luckily, the Internet and Travis County have fantastic resources to help you there.” Voters with questions can call 512-238-VOTE to contact the Travis County Elections Division. Voting information is also available on a free app “SmartTXVoter,” provided by the Texas Secretary of State.

Have you always wanted to take

BUSINESS COURSES

versity Demosday at 8 p.m. k the Vote and

but thought they were just for students IN the business school?

epresentatives rsday, Oct. 25, on. He will be The lecture is

This summer is your CHANCE! McCombs School of Business Summer Enhancement Program

This summer, the McCombs School of Business will offer special

argument opportunities for all students to enhance their business education and at develop needsbusiness skills. Students will have direct access to register for nt a true Business Foundations courses and traditional BBA coursework.

Here is a sneak peek of what our departments will be offering this summer:

Management Accounting n describe the n then ask for- Foundations of Accounting  MAN 320F - Foundations of Management  ACC 310F ma’s proposed  MAN 336 - Organizational Behavior  ACC 311 - Financial Accounting oposed budget,  MAN 337 - Entrepreneurship  ACC 312 - Managerial Accounting about income  MAN 374 - General Management Strategy r his plan. This Business Administration orks in corpoManagement Info Systems BA 320F - Foundations of Entrepreneurship in policymak MIS 302F - Foundations of MIS  BA 324 Business Communications . It is also how  MIS 301 - Introduction to IT Management ould we expect Finance  MIS 325 - Introduction to Data Management it against sub FIN 320F - Foundations of Finance -  FIN 357 equences is the Marketing - Business Finance e presidential hat  MKT 320F - Foundations of Marketing  FIN 367 - Investment Management atening debates  MKT 337 - Principles of Marketing  FIN 376 - International Finance -ates, including  FIN 370 - Integrative Finance rot in 1996, as Statistics a1980. The time Legal Environment of Business  STA 371G - Statistics and Modeling rut flamboyant LEB not 320Fbe - Foundations of Legal Environment e will ates dhis opponent. LEB 323 - Business Law and Ethics ementing poliyo the public. Management Operations aartment His OMof335 - Operations Management elic Affairs. This dBrief, an intern Don't miss this great opportunity to participate in some of e the best business education in the country!

d -more than 100 ons e for brevity, e Visit our website for more information: d www.mccombs.utexas.edu/BBA/summer-courses ng d bins on cam-

UT students came together Saturday with students from Huston-Tillotson University and members of the general public to discuss the issue of racial bias in presentday society. The event titled “End Racism and the New Jim Crow: Families of Police Violence Victims Speak Out” was held at HustonTillotson University in East Austin. The event was co-organized by several organizations, including the UT chapter of the national organization Campaign to End the Death Penalty. The discussion focused on national and local instances of police misconduct driven by racial bias. In many of the instances, an African-American man was killed by police at the crime scene or while in custody. The family members and victims shared their stories to explain why there needs to be additional and stronger legislation to prevent such misconduct from happening in the future. Speakers included Eva Haywood, mother of James Haywood, an AfricanAmerican man that died in 2011 at the age of 33 in the custody of the Elgin Police Department in Central Texas. Airicka Taylor also spoke at the event from Chicago via Skype. She is the cousin of Emmett Till, an AfricanAmerican boy killed in 1955 at the age of 14 by Mississippi police, spurring on the then emerging national civil rights movement. Roughly a

dozen event attendees stood up and shared their experience with racially-motivated misconduct. Several of the event’s coorganizers, including government senior Michelle Uche, also spoke at the event. She broke down in tears as she spoke about the lack of public awareness of such misconduct in Austin and nationwide. Uche called the issue “systematic,” because of its frequency and the lack of oversight regarding it. “This idea that black life can be extinguished by anyone at any time is systemwide and it needs to stop, but it will not stop until we get together and we fight it,” she said. “There will be no justice for us until we get together and we demand it.” Speaker Eva Haywood said racially motivated police misconduct often occurs because police tend to treat people unfairly once they have been convicted of a crime. “Because our children break the law, it doesn’t mean they are not worth anything,” she said. “They are worth something.” Felisa Yzaguirre, event moderator and 2012 UT alumna, encouraged event attendees to join organizations that advocate for civil rights in order to fight racially motivated misconduct. Outside the event, the UT chapters of Campaign to End the Death Penalty and the International Socialist Organization set up tables to allow event attendees to join their organizations and find out about related events.


Sports

ENTER NOW ET ME INTRAMURAL SWIM COMPETITON

www.utrecsports.org

6

Monday, October 22, 2012

TEXAS

Christian Corona, Sports Editor

BAYLOR

VS.

STARTS HERE

Horns triumph in shootout

SIDELINE NFL COWBOYS

PANTHERS

By Chris Hummer The Longhorn defense wasn’t elite, good or even average, but the highly criticized group played well enough down the stretch to propel Texas to a victory. Texas’ defense was pounded, again, for 607 yards, and, at times, looked as inept as the numbers show. However, a pair of huge turnovers plus a few timely stops allowed the Longhorns to edge out Baylor and their No. 1 ranked offense. “We knew going into the game that they were going to make plays, so we looked at it as a game of stops,” defensive coordinator Manny Diaz said. “The two turnovers and holding them to three field goals were just crucial.” The biggest momentum swing of the contest for the defense came with a few seconds remaining in the third quarter. The Longhorns were up by six after a three-and-out — a tough scenario in a game that was based on score-for-score jabs — and the Bears were driving into Texas territory. But it was at that moment that a pair of sophomore’s made an upperclassmen level play. Baylor called a dive up the middle for Glasco Martin, and when he hit the hole, Steve Edmond was there to meet him. The pair clashed in the gap and Edmond knocked the ball away. “I put my head on the ball and it popped out,” Edmond said. “I didn’t even know I made him fumble. Everybody just started screaming, I was like ‘What is going on?’ until I saw the replay.” Newly-minted starter Mykkele Thompson pounced on it and Texas took over in Baylor territory. Texas later scored what turned out to be

RAVENS

TEXANS

MLB CARDINALS

GIANTS

LONGHORNS IN THE NFL Marisa Vasquez | Daily Texan Staff Sophomore running back Joe Bergeron scores a touchdown against Baylor on Saturday night. Bergeron had 117 yards and five touchdowns, a career-high and one short of Ricky Williams’ record, against the Bears. He averaged 6.2 yards per carry.

the game-winning score on a 15-yard touchdown catch by Mike Davis. The defense wasn’t done. The group held Baylor’s explosive group to seven points in the fourth quarter. The Longhorns gave up more than 600 yards but it was a bend-but-not-break performance at its finest. “We have faced some of the top offenses in the nation, so these guys are going to put up stats,” cornerback Carrington Byndom said. “The main thing for us is to limit as much as we can, but then again, at the end of the day, all it comes down to is if we win.” After Texas’ performance the previous week, the offense was brilliant. David Ash played

FOOTBALL COLUMN

turnover-free and was supported by a punishing running game — most of which came from 6-foot-1, 230-pound bruiser Joe Bergeron. He could not be slowed down near the goal line, bowling people over en route to running for five touchdowns during his 117yard outburst. “I see the crease, I see the touchdown, I see the goal line and that is really it,” Bergeron said. “It’s just a blur. If anybody else comes within that vision, you just punish them. That’s what you do on goal lines.” Bergeron provided most of the fireworks for the Texas offense, but the first play from scrimmage created the spark for Texas’ 56-point outburst. The Longhorns, for the

I see the crease, I see the touchdown, I see the goal line and that is really it. It’s just a blur. If anybody else comes within that vision, you just punish them. — Joe Bergeron, sophomore running back

first time all season, choose to receive the opening kickoff instead of sending their defense out first, and it paid dividends. Co-offensive coordinator Bryan Harsin called a play for electric freshman Daje Johnson, and he made the most of it. Johnson burst through the hole on the right side and from there his sprinter-like speed took over. Johnson ran

untouched up the sideline for the 84-yard touchdown, and even had time to turn around and take in the scenery — the pursuit was that far behind. “Once he [Johnson] gets in the open field, he is capable of doing great things for us and the play was huge,” Harsin said. “We wanted to start fast. We took the ball and wanted to get out there, and to get a score was huge.”

FOOTBALL

Texas does what it takes to win By Lauren Giudice It was not a pretty win for the Longhorns. But thanks to the well-rounded offense, Texas defeated Baylor for the first time in three years. With 10 different players catching passes and the 251 rushing yards the Longhorns accumulated, the offense made it very difficult Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff Freshman Daje Johnson rushes against Baylor on Saturday. Johnson logged 102 yards and one touchdown against the Bears.

Forget SEC-type defense, Longhorns a Big 12 team By Christian Corona Sports Editor

Forget what you heard about Texas being a defense-minded, run-first, SEC-style team. All the preseason hoopla pegged the Longhorns as a team that would lean on their defense, wait patiently for their passing game to progress as the running attack carried the offense. But they need to embrace their identity as just another Big 12 team where defense is an afterthought and 50 points occasionally won’t be enough to win. It took 56 points for Texas to improve to 5-2 this weekend as the Longhorns beat the Bears, 56-50, no thanks to a defense that gave up 607 yards and is in the midst of its worst five-game stretch in school history. Missed tackles and the lack of a decent run defense are still problems. At this

point, there’s no reason to expect they’ll be fixed this year. But the Longhorns offense made sure it didn’t matter. The only thing that may have looked better was Natalie Portman. And she looked as shocked to be on the Godzillatron as Texas’ defense did when a ballcarrier approached. “We’ve leaned on the defense for the last two years when the offense has struggled,” head coach Mack Brown said. “I thought we grew up some tonight. We did better. We didn’t panic. We didn’t get down. I thought the young linebackers did stop the run better tonight than we’d done. Still didn’t stop it great, obviously. But it was better.” But Mack Brown and his team have now realized the benefits of a fast start. After years of deferring to the second half when they win the coin toss, the Longhorns elected to receive to start the

BAYLOR continues on page 7

for the Baylor defense to keep track of players and keep up. “This is the offense we want,” head coach Mack Brown said. “It’s who we want to be — very balanced. It’s who we were the first two games.” David Ash picked apart the struggling Baylor defense and went 19-for-31 for 274 yards while Joe Bergeron had five rushing touchdowns.

quarter by quarter

by the numbers

First quarter — It was clear it was going to be a shootout very early on. Daje Johnson ran for an 84yard touchdown on the first play of the game. A botched snap by Kyle Ashby on fourth down gave Baylor the ball on the Texas 8-yard line and Nick Florence ran the ball in for an easy touchdown. Bergeron had his first touchdown of the game to give Texas back the lead. Baylor scored on 2-yard rush from Glasco Martin and then went up 21-14 when Terrance Williams scored on an 80-yard pass from Florence. Second quarter — Bergeron scored three touchdowns in the quarter. Baylor’s Lanear Sampson had a seven-yard touchdown reception and freshman Johnathan Gray finally scored his first touchdown as a Longhorn. The Bears hit a field goal at the end of the half to make the score 42-31, in favor of Texas. Third quarter — The second half was much quieter than the first. The Texas defense forced a fumble, but Baylor tight end Jordan Najvar fell on the ball in the end zone for a touchdown. Bergeron finished his high-scoring night with his fifth touchdown and the score was 49-43 heading into the fourth quarter. Fourth quarter — Mike Davis scored on a 15-yard pass from Ash. Florence kept things interesting by scoring a touchdown with 1:57 left in the game.

stock up, stock down Stock up — David Ash. He is continuing to improve and managed to spread the ball around. He went 19-for-31 for 274 yards and threw the ball downfield 67-yards to Davis. His left wrist injury did not seem to affect him at all and he took advantage of Baylor’s struggling defense.

Stock down — Rush defense. It seems repetitive to declare the rush defense as the weakest aspect of the Longhorns. But giving up 255 rushing yards to pass happy Baylor shows how much the defense is struggling. Tackling is still a problem, but is improving.

255 — Number of rushing yards given up to the Bears, a team known for its passing game. 100 — Baylor’s scoring percentage in the red zone as they went 7-for-7. 7 — the number of rushing touchdowns Texas scored, five of them came from Bergeron. 607 — Number of total offensive yards the Bears accumulated. This is the second consecutive week the Longhorns have given up more than 600-yards.

what’s next The Longhorns will have easier competition Saturday. They will be facing Kansas, the only team with a worse Big 12 record than Baylor. Though the game is in Lawrence, Kan., the Longhorns should not have a problem handling Charlie Weis’ struggling squad. Kansas is 1-6 on the season and 0-4 in Big 12 play. Kansas’ last game ended in a loss to Oklahoma State, 52-7.

Justin Tucker 2/2 FG, 1/1 XP

LONGHORNS IN THE MLB Brandon Belt 2/4 2 runs

SPORTS BRIEFLY Texas Rangers hire new hitting coach

The Texas Rangers acquired a new hitting coach this weekend, reassigning Scott Coolbaugh, hitting coach since July 2011. Dave Magadan comes to the Rangers after six seasons in Boston as the hitting coach for the Red Sox. During his tenure, the Red Sox ranked first in doubles and extra base hits and second in runs, hits and total bases. Magadan’s offense had the highest OPS in 2010 and 2011. He began coaching in San Diego in 2010 and played professional ball for 16 seasons. In college at the University of Alabama, he led the NCAA in 1983 with a hitting average of .525. —Sara Beth Purdy

ON THE WEB WEEKEND recaps Check out recaps of men’s and women’s swimming and diving, men’s and women’s tennis, men’s and women’s golf, soccer and women’s rowing. dailytexanonline.com

BCS Rankings 1. Alabama 2. Florida 3. Kansas State 4. Oregon 5. Notre Dame 8. Oklahoma 14. Texas Tech 19. West Virginia 23. Texas


sports

Monday, October 22, 2012

Texas 22-5. The pressure paid off in the 105th minute as sophomore midfielder Alexa Wilde put a header in the back of the net to give Baylor the game winning goal. With West Virginia winning the night before, the loss knocked Texas out of contention for the conference championship. The loss was compounded as Texas stayed on the road with a match against formerly conference winless TCU. TCU scored in the 18th minute to secure the 1-0 win. Texas outshot TCU 1710, but only four shots were on target. A late rally by Texas was not enough, as the Horned Frogs held on for their first conference win of the season.

Zachary Strain | Daily Texan Staff Midfielder Gabby Zarnegar protects the ball against Kansas. After starting 4-1 in Big 12 play, Texas dropped two road games.

The Longhorns won their first three conference games, but have lost three of their last four with the final game of the season Friday. West Virginia has locked up the Big 12

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After getting off to a fast start in Big 12 play, Texas dropped two straight decisions this weekend with only one game remaining in the regular season. On Friday, Texas traveled to take on Baylor. The Bears have the best offense in the Big 12, and they came through in a 2-1 overtime win. Texas held them scoreless for most of the game, but a 30-yard shot in the 80th minute broke the scoreless draw for Baylor. Texas answered in the 89th minute as Sharis Lachappelle drove in a 27yard free kick to send the match into extra time. Baylor had been putting pressure on the Texas defense all night, out-shooting

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game — and it paid off. “We decided to take the ball tonight if we won the toss, which is not something we’ve been doing,” Mack Brown said. “But West Virginia scored on the first drive. Oklahoma scored on the first drive. So we wanted to score on the first drive and, not only did we do that, we also scored on the first play.” Even the way they took a 7-0 lead was uncharacteristic. With Malcolm Brown out with an ankle injury and Joe Bergeron listed at the top of the depth chart, it was true freshman Daje Johnson that got the game’s first carry. He made the most of it, taking it 84 yards for a touchdown on the first play from scrimmage.

SOCCER recap |WES MAULSBY

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continues from page 6

N Co

BAYLOR

“That first play was awesome,” sophomore quarterback David Ash said. “Any doubt that was in our minds was gone at that moment when we showed that we could get in the end zone again. We can play football. We can win.” And win Texas did. Limited by both a broken left wrist and agonizingly conservative playcalling, Ash made the most of the situation and managed to throw for 274 yards and a fourth-quarter touchdown to Mike Davis. Most importantly, and unlike last week, he didn’t commit a turnover. This year’s Longhorn defense could go down as, statistically, the worst in the storied program’s history. It will need to improve if Texas wants to beat the Texas Tech’s and Kansas State’s of the world. But it’s Texas’ offense that will clearly do the heavy lifting this year.

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Life & Arts

Monday, October 22, 2012

8

EXHIBIT

continues from page 10

Photo courtesy of Esperos Esperos is a company that sells backpacks to help send children to school in Haiti. For every backpack sold, one child goes to school for one year.

HOPE

continues from page 10 launched Esperos.” So, for Shuttlesworth, the next logical step was clear: backpacks. “At that point, it made the most sense to me to tie it into backpacks,” Shuttlesworth said. “Backpacks and education go hand in hand.”

The backpacks are made to appeal to a wide audience, Shuttlesworth said. “I wanted it to be something that kids in middle school would feel comfortable carrying, kids in high school and college would be comfortable carrying and even something adults would want to carry,” Shuttlesworth said. Since launching in July, Shuttlesworth said the company has been successful.

They got a boost in sales earlier when the “Today” show featured Esperos as one of the best backpacks to buy going back to school this year. One of Esperos’ means of distribution is reaching out to college campuses and getting clubs on campus to help sell the bags. Cassie Recker, vice president of business operations, said Esperos is working to launch a campus club on UT’s campus. “Our campus clubs have

two angles,” Recker said. “We want them to spread the word about our company and other socially conscious businesses. We also want them to be able to educate others on the importance of access to education.” She said examples of businesses such as Esperos and Toms, a shoe company, show that this generation likes to give back. “This generation right now really wants to buy a

HOUSE

continues from page 10 Once customers make their way through the haunted house they can purchase locally-based food and drinks at “Foodtopia.” That is if they have not lost their appetite by the end of the journey. “I screamed so much,” Austin resident Courtney Kimble said. “The actors were uber, uber creepy, and I got lost multiple times.” However, not everyone was impressed by Ecopocalypse’s tactics. Austin resident John Landers thought the experience was too short, and redundant. Regardless of the praise or criticism, Kirby hopes to

SHORT

continues from page 10 screened at AFF as well, said that as an increasing number of people get their hands on today’s easily accessible film equipment, shorts are an important way for wannabe cineastes to hone their skills into something presentable. “I think it’s, like, 12,000 shorts that are made each year now,” Bourke said. “And that number’s getting bigger and bigger because more and more people want to do film, but at the same time they don’t want to spend the money that it would take to make a feature, so [shorts] are a good way for them to [practice their skills].”

product that is not just fashionable, but also provides a social good,” Recker said. Shuttlesworth said Esperos are launching a new line of tote bags Monday. As the company continues to grow and expand, Shuttlesworth said he hopes to get Esperos bags into retail stores. The canvas backpack prices are currently $70, but Shuttlesworth said he is working to lower the price.

‘‘

The actors were uber, uber creepy, and I got lost multiple times. — Courtney Kimble Austin resident

bring Ecopocalypse back another year. “We’re not trying to be preachy or tell people they need to be environmentalists,” Kirby said. “If they take something away from this experience and want to change their ways, then cool. But if not at least they experienced what Ecopocalypse has to offer.”

shootings and narco messages delivered close to the areas they live,” Delgadillo said. “It used to be a really peaceful city, so to see that years later is very shocking.” The Mexican media is dominated by graphic scenes of mutilated bodies, drug crimes and narco mensajes. Attempting to bridge the divide between the U.S. and Mexico, the artists beautifully recreate and incorporate scenes of death and destruction into their pieces. The works themselves are very quiet, but they represent a much more powerful and emotional subject. The opening of the exhibit on Friday featured a panel of experts that contextualized the violence portrayed in Chicano culture and art. “All the works in the exhibition have so many layers for interpretation, so the panelists gave really good insight into how the social issues — cartels, drugs, immigration — are involved,” Luis VargasSantiago, Ph.D. candidate in art history at UT and the panel’s moderator, said. “But they also gave insight about the materials. I think it served to put those in context.” The panel explained how the exhibit features a new genre of art referred to as border art. This genre combines elements of both U.S. and Mexican culture to portray the attitude of those caught in the crossfire. “The aesthetic of this border art is very violent,” Vargas-Santiago explained. “The pieces in the exhibition describe this violence through subtle and sometimes minimal strategies. The way they treat it is very conceptual.” The exhibit uses the conventional beauty of the art to explore the atrocities of the drug war. The work itself is simple, and often the explanation of the piece can only be found in the label. “It’s quiet. The work is interesting because it’s addressing violence, horrendous acts of violence. It’s dealing with the media portrayal of this violence in Mexico,” Maia Schall, president of the Center Space Project, explained. “So all these issues are very tough issues, but the work is extremely delicate and detailed. Its an interesting contrast — to be talking about violent issues with a quiet voice, a somber and poignant voice.” Hoping to inform fellow students and Austin community members, “A Nation of Fear” uses the powerful images of those affected by the drug war to portray the reality of the border. “I want it to be evocative instead of provocative,” Delgadillo said. “I want people to think about it, not to be shocked.”

Famous directors’ short films Martin Scorsese - “The Big Shave (Viet ‘69)” Jason Reitman - “In God We Trust” Paul Thomas Anderson - “The Dirk Diggler Story” Benh Zeitlin - “Glory at Sea” Steven Soderbergh - “Winston” The rise of the Internet as a publishing tool has been a blessing to filmmakers trying to get some viewership, however little, of their work. However, the market still favors longer films and TV seasons over short films. People are barely willing to spend $15 on a feature movie, and thus shorts often remain stuck either in festivals or in the deep crevices of YouTube and Vimeo.

“I really really wish there was a market for shorts,” Sheeran said. “I think there should be and I don’t know why there isn’t because short form is much more proper on things like Netflix. ... people go on Netflix and watch TV episodes that are 22 minutes, so why not shorts that people can just watch and then go back to work, go do something, watch another one?”

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Comics

Monday, October 22, 2012

9

DAILY TEXAN COMICS

SUDOKUFORYOU

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 500 Seventh Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Monday, October 24, 2011

Across 1 Common interjection on 27-/44-Across 5 Corn, wheat or soybeans 9 Mobile downloadables 13 Ark builder 14 Amours 16 Underground part of a plant 17 Where plankwalkers end up on 27-/44Across 20 Often-purple flowers 21 500 sheets 22 Big bird Down Under 23 “Itʼs the ___ I can do” 25 “Hold it!,” on 27/44-Across 27 With 44-Across, annual celebration on 9/19 31 That woman 32 Yours, in Tours

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33 Never, in Nuremberg 34 Gog and ___ (enemies of God, in Revelation) 36 Deep-toned woodwind 38 Bird in a “tuxedo” 40 Malevolent spirit 41 Cushion 42 Actress Swenson of “Benson” 43 Asian electronics giant 44 See 27-Across 46 Treasure on 27/44-Across 48 Sometimessprained joint 49 Pretend 50 Watch sound 52 Playmate of Tinky Winky, Dipsy and Po 57 “I donʼt believe it!,” on 27-/44Across 60 “___ la Douce”

61 Ultimate authority 62 “The Art of Fugue” composer 63 Onetime competitor of Nair 64 Glowing gas 65 Hello, on 27-/44Across

Down 1 “Iʼve fallen … ___ canʼt get up!” 2 Surf sound 3 Sitar player Shankar 4 John ___-Davies of the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy 5 Get near to 6 Harry Potterʼs best friend 7 Be a foreman of 8 Onetime money in Spain 9 Curve 10 Do some investigating 11 Sonnets and haikus 12 Peacockʼs walk TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE 15 1970s radical I M E D S T R A P org. N A B D U C T I O N S 18 Set, as mousse S W A G E N J E T T A 19 Resident of Nebraskaʼs E A S E N U D I S T largest city C K R O N D O 24 Related (to) T E D R E E N T E R 26 ___ burger S C L A W S O T O (meatless dish) F A I T S D R A W 27 Key on the far C U R S E E E R I E left of a keyboard U L E S E X C E L L 28 Not much T L A S R E I N 29 Take immediate L E P L U M T A M steps A S T E E P P R I C E 30 Destiny S T M E N T T E A M S 34 Award hung on S I D S S O L E S a chain or ribbon

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54 Jacobʼs first wife 55 California-based oil giant 56 Like a used barbecue pit

58 Winery container 59 General on a Chinese menu

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10 L&A

Monday, October 22, 2012

Life & Arts 10

Kelsey McKinney, Life & Arts Editor

HALLOWEEN

Ricky Llamas | Daily Texan Staff

Ecopocalypse is a horror attraction that envisions a future where healthy food and clean water are depleted, driving people to their primal instincts.

It’s the end of the world as we know it Haunted house aims to make visitors think about environment By Eli Watson Toothless, grimy faces peer through dark corners. They mumble under their breath and shortly after release a maniacal, Joker-like laugh that echoes throughout long and silent hallways. These people are not chainsawwielding serial killers. They are survivors of a post-apocalyptic world where only the fittest and most cutthroat will survive. Ecopocalypse haunted

house creates a dark and futuristic dystopia for its customers. In its imagined future, resources are finite and in order to survive people must dispose of their ethics, and give into their primal instincts. “What happens when civilization collapses? When healthy food runs out and we lose access to clean water?” Ecopocalypse co-creator Peter Kirby asked. “This is what Ecopocalypse is all about.” Inspired by their experiences at HAuNTcon — a haunted house trade show

in Pittsburgh — earlier this year, Kirby and Ecopocalypse co-creator Matt Sparks were determined to create something that was refreshing and thought-provoking. Ecopocalypse maintains the aesthetic of a conventional haunted house, using bloodied props and goth-like cult leaders, but loosely uses the issue of sustainability to separate itself from its contemporaries. Although not entirely based on scientific research, Kirby and Sparks hope the haunted house will make

FILM

visitors more conscious of the state of the earth. “Each haunted house we visited during HAuNTcon showed us what to do, and what not to do with Ecopocalypse,” Kirby said. “No 13-year-olds in masks or machete serial killers waiting in a corner. Just a realistic experience that hopefully gets attendees thinking.” First-time actor James Goolsby, who has helped direct films in the past, plays “The Berserker,” a man who tears people apart

Where: 504 Trinity Street How much: $20 Website: ecopocalypseaustin.com and eats them. But The Berserker is only one of many scary surprises featured in Ecopocalypse. From an unkempt survivor offering visitors kitty cobbler, to The Labyrinth — a

room littered with pictures of those dead and gone — the haunted house does an impressive job of grabbing attendees’ attention and never letting go.

HOUSE continues on page 8

Bags provide aid to Haiti

Photo Courtesy of Hungry Man This movie still is from “Asad”, one of the works screened for the Short Film portion of the Austin Film Festival.

Short films alive at Austin festival The Austin Film Festival’s marquee screenings feature highly anticipated movies such as “Silver Linings Playbook” and “Hyde Park on Hudson,” but the festival is also the proud home to an underrated facet of cinema: short films. Not often cited in the day-to-day, short films should not be put in the back burner as something less than their feature-length brothers. Shorts are just as valid a form as longer-length pieces, and often pack a great story with great production value in less than 20 minutes. Short films have been around since the dawn of filmmaking. When film technology was in the process of being wrangled and tamed at the start of the 20th century, people’s projects would typically be a lot shorter, like Georges Mélies’ “A Trip to the Moon” (1902). People were interested in seeing the wonders of cinematic technology, and thus were excited to see screenings no matter their length. That changed later, as filmmakers gained a better understanding of technology and story structure. The industry was opposed to making longer films, afraid that people would not pay attention for a whole hour or two. But directors came onto the scene with longer works, like D.W.

When: Oct. 19-31 (Opening times vary. Check website for additional details.)

FASHION

By Bobby Blanchard

By Jorge Corona

Ecopocalypse

Shorts showing this week at the Hideout 617 Congress Ave.

Monday The World Comes of Age— 5:30 p.m. Dirty Laundry— 9:45 p.m. Tuesday Documentary Shorts Competition— 3:00 p.m. The Space Between Us— 5:30 p.m. Postcards From the Battlefield— 9:30 p.m. Wednesday Crime Stories— 5:15 p.m. A Glimpse Into Another World— 7:30p.m. Thursday The View From Outside— 4 p.m. The Search for Ourselves— 6:30 p.m. General admission: $10 (free with an AFF Badge or a Film Pass) Griffith’s “Birth of a Nation” (1915) and these garnered the most merit and attendance from audiences. Shorts stayed alive through the rise of the feature film, screened alongside some features, newsreels and even becoming propaganda during wars. Today, we know short films best as music videos, film festival material, and artsy works, perpetually on Vimeo. But why watch a 20-minute story instead of a twohour epic? Is the story better developed in longer films? Not exactly. Matt Lefebvre, producer of the short film “Asad,” the winner of the Best Narrative Short award at AFF, said “[the short

film form] ... can capture and create an essence and feeling that could only be done in a short film.” A.J. Sheeran, the writer/codirector/co-producer of the AFF-selected short “The Treehouse” also defended shortform films. “To be honest, at any given time I would rather watch a feature ... [But] I think that there are things that short films can do that a film can’t. You can drive a point home clearer and more coherently with a short,” Sheeran said. UT filmmakers Kevin Harger and Chris Bourke, who had their short film “Love, Emily”

SHORT continues on page 8

Esperar means “to hope” in Spanish, an emotion Esperos is built on. Esperos, which launched officially this past July, is an organization that sells canvas backpacks to raise money to send children in Haiti to school. The organization’s name is derived from the Spanish verb “esperar.” Every bag purchased sends one child to school for a year, and hope is the organization’s motto. Oliver Shuttlesworth, the company’s CEO and founder, said he got the inspiration to build the company after returning from a trip to Central America in the fall

It was really shocking that in some instances it costs as little as $20 to send a child to school for a year.

of 2011, where he witnessed the effects of poverty. “I heard from parents; they had this desire for their children to be educated so they could make better lives for themselves and then for their children,” Shuttlesworth said. At that point, Shuttlesworth said he began to look into how much it takes to send a child to school for a year. His find-

— Oliver Shuttlesworth CEO & Founder of Esperos

ings surprised him. “It was really shocking that in some instances it costs as little as $20 to send a child to school for a year,” Shuttlesworth said. “From that point on, I started thinking of ways to reach a lot of people and do some good, and because I’ve always been thinking about education I

HOPE continues on page 8

ART

Exhibit displays violence of drug war By Olivia Arena Capturing the violence and destruction of the drug war on the US-Mexico border, “A Nation of Fear” seeks to inspire thought. Coordinated by UT student art group Center Space Project, the exhibit features the work of three Mexican-American artists Miguel Aragón, Adriana Corral and Raymundo Delgadillo. Rather than focusing on the shock value of the violence, the artists subtly convey the gravity of the violence in Mexico. With nearly 50,000 victims, the drug war along the border continues to escalate. Using the idea of human remains to represent the victims lost, the artists subtly

Photo courtesy of the Raymundo Delgadillo “A Nation of Fear” is on view at the Visual Arts Center through Nov. 10.

draw attention to the impact the drug war has on the people of both nations. Corral transferred the printed names of murdered victims from papers to the wall and burned the remaining paper. The ashes are arranged in a rectangle that represents the standard burial plot of a victim. Delgadillo created serigraphs of different drugs using animal blood to represent the blood lost in the drug war. “I started working with blood because it was very raw, but I wasn’t interested in using it for shock factor,” Delgadillo, the coordinator of the exhibit

and featured artist, said. “I wanted people to think about what blood really meant. It’s when someone is damaged, when someone is wounded.” Born in areas now plagued by crime and drug traffic, the artists explored the way the crimes of the cartels have changed their homeland. Delgadillo has seen his once peaceful childhood neighborhood in San Louis Potosi torn apart by the violence. “The city that I am from used to be very peaceful, and every time I talk to my family they tell me about more

EXHIBIT continues on page 8

The Daily Texan 2012-10-22  

The October 22, 2012 edition of The Daily Texan.

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